1
The
Lead Away
permit
2 3
Contents
Get set
What you have to do
Finding a permit mentor
Who else?
Recording your progress
Assessment
Guide camp permit
Going Away With licence
After you have finished
Challenge 1: Get started
Challenge 2: Get sorted
Challenge 3: Get safe
Challenge 4: Get healthy
Challenge 5: Get cooking
Challenge 6: Get activities
Challenge 7: Get away
Evaluate and complete
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
6
6
8
12
20
24
28
34
40
46
Welcome to the Lead Away
permit! Love going on camps
or holidays with your unit?
Ever wanted to go away with
your unit with you in charge?
Then this is the permit for
you!
Discover the leadership and
organisational skills needed to plan
camping and holiday trips for you and
your friends. You decide the food,
activities, location, the lot!
You can do this permit as either
a Ranger or young leader.
Get set
4 5
What you have to do
The Lead Away permit is made up
of seven different challenges,
culminating with you leading a
residential.
You can complete these in any
order you’d like. We do
recommend starting at Challenge
one though! There is some overlap
between challenges, so there’ll be
things you need to do alongside
each other.
Each challenge looks at a
different area of how to plan and
run a residential.
You must complete all seven
challenges to earn your Lead
Away permit.
Your residential needs to last for
at least two nights. This can be
anytime that works for you.
Your group needs to be made of a
minimum of four, and a maximum
of eight, including you. You can
take Rangers or young leaders.
Getting started
Let your leader know that you are
interested in doing your Lead
Away permit. They will help you to
get started by suggesting
this in Challenge 2B. They'll
contact parents/carers and
commissioners in an emergency to
let them know what’s happened.
Relevant advisers – if you do
something specialised, like a
water activity, you might need to
speak to your local adviser in that
area, like a water specialist.
My supervisor is:
My home contact is:
My other advisers are:
Recording your progress
There's a space in this booklet
for you to record what you’ve
done for your permit. You can also
put together a more detailed
record to show your mentor. You
can do this any way you’d like –
vlog, blog, scrapbook, journal etc.
Not only will this show how hard
you’ve worked but show potential
employers and on university
potential permit mentors. They
can also suggest training sessions
that may be helpful and put you
in touch with other adults in
guiding who can support you in
gaining your permit.
If you’ve already gone away on
camps and holidays as a Guide,
Ranger or young leader, you could
be ready to plan your own
residential right now!
If not, you can still get started, but
you might want to brush up on
some skills first. The Camp and
Explore skills builder stages five
and six and unit meeting
activities in the Have Adventures
theme are a great place to start in
building the skills you need.
Finding a permit mentor
If you’re feeling daunted, don’t
worry. You won’t be doing this on
your own! You’ll have a permit
mentor, who’ll support you in
completing your permit. Your
mentor will be an adult leader in
Girlguiding and an experienced
Going Away With licence holder.
Your mentor will -
P
Check in with you regularly to
see how you are getting on.
P
Help you find training
opportunities.
P
Support you on any concerns
you have.
P
Find someone to act as a
supervisor on your residential.
P
Visit your residential.
P Assess your residential and any
other evidence.
P
Sign off your modules and final
assessment record.
My permit mentor is:
Who else?
Apart from your mentor, there are
other leaders and volunteers who
can help you complete your
permit. Your mentor might act as
your supervisor or your home
contact as well, and they can put
you in touch with volunteers you
need to chat to.
Supervisor: an adult leader/
volunteer who will be within 30
minutes travelling time of your
location during the residential.
You can call them if you need
some advice or help with an
incident or other emergency.
Home contact: You’ll come onto
6 7
applications how you developed
your leadership and
organisational skills.
It’s totally up to you, in agreement
with your mentor, to decide how to
you want to record and present
what you’ve done for your permit.
Assessment
Your mentor will assess your
permit. They’ll make sure you’ve
completed everything you need to
in the run up to your residential.
Two people can be assessed for
their permits at the same venue,
and you can share activity
sessions. But you must still plan
and run separate residentials,
with each of you working with
separate groups.
How you’ll be assessed is
something you can decide on
with your mentor. They’ll want to
see that you’ve done what you
need to do, understood
Girlguiding policy and
demonstrated the skills needed
to plan and run a residential.
There’s no right way to assess the
permit; chat to your mentor
about how it will work for you.
Guide camp permit
You might have completed the
Guide camp permit when you
were in Guides. If you did, there’s
certain parts of this permit you
can get signed off by your mentor.
Have a chat with them before you
start if this is something you want
to do.
Going Away With licence
Girlguiding offers a qualification
called the Going Away With
licence for adult leaders so they
can take their units away on trips.
You can get some of this licence
signed off if you can prove you
done it already as part of your
Lead Away permit. If you think
this is something you might like to
do in the future, make sure you
think carefully about how to
record your evidence.
After you’ve finished
Once all seven challenges have
been signed off, you’ve done it
– you’ve got your Lead Away
permit!
You can take away up to eight
(including yourself) Rangers or
young leaders without a leader on
a holiday or camp (depending on
whether you did 7A or 7B)
anywhere in the UK.
Every time you plan a residential
you just need to follow
Girlguiding’s policies and
procedures – forms, risk
assessment etc. and ensure you
appoint a supervisor (an adult
member who is within 30 minutes
travel of your venue). There’s
more information on the
Girlguiding website:
Girlguiding.org.uk/
girlledresidentials
Let's
do this!
8 9
Get started!
Whilst you can do
the challenges in any
order you’d like; we’d
recommend starting here
– at the beginning.
Before you can do anything
else, you need to know the
basics. What, when, where,
and who!
Chaenge
1
1A
Plan it
1 Decide on the type of residential
you want to run. A summer camp?
A winter cabin experience? Think
about what will make people want
to come. Chat your ideas through
with your group.
2 You need to come up with some
aims for your residential. For
example, your aim could be that
everyone tries one new
adventurous activity. Start
thinking about the types of
activities you might like to do. Are
they going to be suitable for all
your participants? You’ll cover
this more in module six, but its
good to start thinking about it
now.
3 Chat through your plans with
your mentor, and other leaders or
advisers. If you’re going to need
them to help support your
residential, let them know. Your
mentor can help put you in
contact with relevant, local
Girlguiding advisers – like water,
residential, walking etc.
TOP TIP
Your local residential and outdoor activities adviser will be hugely
helpful when planning and running your residential. Make sure you
get them involved right from the start.
Ideas for my residential:
Aim(s) for my residential:
Proposed date of residential:
10 11
1C
Talk about it
1B
Book it
1 Decide where you would like to
have your residential. Make sure
that it’s a guiding-approved
venue. Are you going to go
camping or stay indoors?
When choosing your venue, think
about:
P
Transport – how will you get
there and back?
P
Facilities – what activities are
on offer? How many beds in
each room?
P
Food – how are you going to
cook? Does your venue only let
you prepare food in certain
ways?
P
Equipment – what do you need
to bring i.e. tents if you are
going to a campsite, or is
equipment provided/can it
be hired?
Once you’ve decided, complete
the Residential Event Notification
form (REN).
You can’t book the venue until
your commissioner has
approved this.
When they’ve done so, you can
book your chosen venue. See 2B
for more information on
completing the REN.
1 Talk through your plan to make
sure all your participants are all
happy with it.
2 Discuss different roles with the
participants – are you going to
give people different tasks, such
as being chef, when you’re there?
3 Make sure everyone knows if
your plans change before the
event.
4 Create a kit and equipment list
together, and make sure everyone
gets a copy, so they know what to
pack. Remember, you might not
need everyone to pack a frying
pan!
TOP TIP
If you aren’t sure what venues
you could use, have a chat
with your mentor and local
residential adviser.
Venue ideas
Kit & equipment list
Challenge 1 – Sign off
m
Plan it
m
Book it
m
Talk about it
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Venue Website How to get
there
Notes Cost
!
12 13
2A
Budget
Get sorted!
When planning an exciting
residential for you and your
mates, budgets and forms
can seem a daunting part of
the process. But without
money and paperwork, you
can’t do much! Dot the Is
and cross the Ts now so you
can have more fun later on.
Chaenge
2
Creating and keeping to a budget
is a key skill and one you’ll need
later in life.
1 Estimate the overall costs for
the whole group to go. This should
include:
P
Transport – including fuel if you
are driving.
P
Accommodation – including
site fees.
P
Food – including cooking and
cleaning equipment.
P
Activities – some might cost
money.
P
Contingency – in case of
emergency or unexpected
costs, it’s always good to keep
some spare cash. Make sure you
divide this and give it back to
participants if you don’t need it.
Use the table on page 14 to
calculate your budget.
2 Tell participants the final cost and
give them a deadline to pay by.
How can they pay – cash, cheque
or transfer the money online?
TOP TIP
If you’re still waiting for
some people to confirm if
they can come, do your
estimation by the
minimum number you
know can come. That
way, you get the highest possible
cost per person, and as more confirm
you can alter the cost accordingly.
Budget notes
Total cost of trip:
Total cost per participant:
Payment deadline:
14 15
2A 2A
3 Collect the money in from
participants, give out receipts
and record below.
P
Keep all receipts from things
you’ve bought and paid for to
prove what you’ve spent the
money on. You could create a
receipt log.
P
Keep all the money safely and
securely, in a special purse or
box.
4 Once the event is over, show
your mentor your final income/
expenditure table and give back
any money you didn’t spend. Or if
everyone agrees, you can donate
this to your unit funds instead.
5 Use the table above
to record all income and
expenditure.
Participant Amount Receipt
given?
Date Description Money
IN
Money
OUT
Overall
balance
Money in, money out
Transport
Accomodation
Food
Activities
Contingency
Other
Total
Cost Actual amountEstimated amount
Budget sheet
18 July Tent pegs (x16) £20 £8.50 £11.50
16 17
2B
Forms
Forms are another area of
residential planning that can
seem complicated but don’t
worry! Just take it one step at a
time and keep track of who’s
completed what.
1 REN form part 1
If you haven’t done so already in
1B, complete the Residential Event
Notification (REN) form Part 1
and send this to your
commissioner at least 12 weeks in
advance. You’ll need to include
any adventurous activities you’re
planning to do on this as well
– see 6B for more information.
P
Once you’ve got it back from
your commissioner, you can go
ahead with booking your venue
and activities and you can start
filling in Part 2.
2 REN form part 2
Complete the Residential Event
Notification (REN) form Part 2
and send the whole form back to
your commissioner at least four
weeks before your residential.
Once you’ve received Part 2 back,
you’re all set to go!
Girlguiding.org.uk/residentials
3 Consent for Event/Activity form
Give all your participants the
Information and Consent for
Event/Activity form for their
parents/carers to complete. If any
of your participants are 18, they
don’t have to complete this, but
it’s good practise to get them to
so you have their emergency
contact details and health needs.
Girlguiding.org.uk/residentials
TOP TIP
If you’re planning to do
adventurous activities,
you’ll need to get
parental permission for
those specific
activities on this form.
Check out 6A for more information.
4 Health Information form
Ask all participants to complete
the Health Information form and
collect these just before the event
or on arrival. No health form, no
residential! If any of your
participants are 16 or over, they
can complete this themselves.
P
If you are taking any
medication that can be used by
the group (such as plasters, sun
protection or paracetamol),
make sure you include it on the
form. Otherwise your
2B
participants (under 16) won’t be
able to use it, as permission
won’t have been given.
Girlguiding.org.uk/residentials
5 Home Contact Agreement form
Talk to your mentor about setting
up a home contact for your
residential. This is someone who
you can contact if your plans
change whilst you’re there, or if
there’s an emergency.
Once you’ve got a home
contact set up, complete the
Home Contact Agreement form
and send this in with your REN
form part 2.
Girlguiding.org.uk/homecontact
6 Supervision
With your mentor or unit leader,
arrange for a supervisor to be
available during your event (see
page 5 for more info about
supervisors).
TOP TIP
Keep any forms with
personal details stored
safely and securely. I.e.
don't leave them lying
around!
TOP TIP
Thank your home contact and
supervisor after the
residential - even if you
don't end up needing
them!
7 Straight after the residential:
P
If no medical treatment was
given (written on the Health
Information Form) or no
incidents or accidents
happened, destroy the Health
Information and Information
and Consent forms securely.
P
If someone had an accident,
keep the forms to send
to
insurancesupport@
girlguiding.org.uk
at
Girlguiding HQ. It’s always a
good idea to take a copy before
sending it in just in case it isn't
received.
P
If there was an accident, your
supervisor will need to complete
the Notification of Accident or
Incident form and send this in with
the Health Information form.
Girlguiding.org.uk/events-travel-
forms
18 19
2B
Form
REN part 1
REN part 2
Information
and Consent
form
Health
Information
form
Completed (tick box)
m Date:
m Date:
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
m
Name
Name
Form tracker
2B
Challenge 2 – Sign off
m
Budget
Date completed Mentor signature
m
Forms
Date completed Mentor signature
Form
Form notes
Home
Contact
Agreement
form
Completed (tick box)
Form tracker (continued)
m Date:
21
3A
Be prepared
Get safe
You might have heard:
'where’s the fun without
a little risk?', but the key
word here is ‘little’!
Discover how to manage risk
and keep everyone safe.
Challenge
3
20
You can’t be safe without learning
what safe looks like! Time to find
out …
1 Complete A Safe Space levels
one and two training, if you
havent already done so.
P
A Safe Space level one and two
can be completed by attending
a face-to-face training or
online.
P
Find out more about A Safe
Space training here:
Girlguiding.org.uk/asafespace
2 Meet with parents/carers if your
participants are under 18 so you
can tell them the final plan of your
residential and explain the
emergency home contact system.
3 Complete a risk assessment.
This is where you think about all
the things that could happen to
endanger you and your
participants on your residential,
and then decide what you can do
to lower the risk.
P
This will include risks
associated with your venue,
activities, travel, weather and
participants.
P
There is an example on the
Girlguiding website to help you
start your own.
Girlguiding.org.uk/event-
activity-risk-assessment/
4 Find out the location of the
nearest accessible landline in case
you need to make an emergency
call or ensure that there is signal
for your mobile phone network
(and don’t forget your charger!)
A Safe Space level one completed:
A Safe Space level two completed:
Met with parents/guardians:
m Date:
m Date:
TOP TIP
Keep updating your risk
assessment as you keep
planning. You might only
find out some
information just before
your residential, or if
things change when you are there.
m Date:
22 23
3B 3B
Ground rules
1 Ensure everyone knows about
the emergency and safety
procedures and site rules.
P
Site rules are generally
displayed in the entrance to
buildings, in dorm rooms, and
near the car park or drop off
point on campsites. You might
be able to find them in advance
on the site website.
P
You can agree your own rules
with your participants, to make
sure everyone knows what’s
expected of them on your
residential. They can be serious,
(e.g. don’t be unkind to each
other) or silly (e.g. everyone
must sing instead of talking
between 5-6pm).
2 Carry out a fire drill once you’ve
settled in (within a couple of hours
after you arrive is best). Have a
chat to your mentor about how to
do this.
Our ground rules
Notes for parents/guardians meeting
Challenge 3 – Sign off
m
Be prepared
Date completed Mentor signature
m
Ground rules
Date completed Mentor signature
24 25
4A
Facilities
Get healthy
A healthy residential is a
happy one! Its time to think
about the things that will
affect the environment, such
as rubbish disposal, clean
water and how to deal with
unwell or injured
participants.
Challenge
4
1 Know where the nearest clean
water supply is.
P
This could be in the bathroom
of where you’re staying, or a
water tap in a field.
P
If camping, think about how you
are going to transport water
from the tap to your camp and
store it safely.
2 Find out where the toilet and
washing facilities are. Make sure
you keep these clean during your
residential.
P
Some places are not connected
to mains sewerage so may not
allow anything apart from the 3
P’s (pee, poo and paper) to be
flushed down the loo!
3 Find out what the requirements
are for rubbish disposal. Do you
need to take anything away with
you, and can you recycle?
4 If you’re using chemical toilets,
find out the site procedure for
disposing of the contents and
which chemicals can be used.
Water supply
Toilets and washing
Rubbish removal
Chemical toilets?
TOP TIP
You could make collecting
water part of the rota of
chores for your group -
see Challenge 7.
TOP TIP
You might need to take lots
of equipment with you
(toilets, tents etc.)
Remember to include
any extras on your kit
list (see 1C) and make
plans to get them there and back.
26 27
4C
First aid kit
4B
First aid and emergencies
1 Complete the First Response
first aid qualification before you
go if you haven’t already done so
in the last 3 years.
P
If you have a different, current
first aid qualification then you
can check here to see if it is
equivalent to Girlguiding’s First
Response course: Girlguiding.
org.uk/acceptedfirstaid
2 Make a record of what the local
medical services are. Take a
paper map, so you know how to
get there.
3 During your residential make a
note of any extra medication
given (apart from what they’ve
already listed on the Health and
Information forms) and of any
first aid treatment given. Write
this on the back of Health and
Information forms.
TOP TIP
If another residential
participant already has a
current first aid
qualification and is
happy to act as the
first aider, they can do
so. Make sure you involve them in the
preparation for this challenge.
TOP TIP
Each participant is
responsible for
administering and
looking after their
personal medication.
TOP TIP
When you’re cooking, a first
aid kit, including blue
plasters, should be kept
within your kitchen area.
1 Create a first aid kit or borrow
an existing one to take with you.
Your unit might have one you can
take (as long as they won’t need it
at the same time). Find out what
to include by searching 'NHS -
what should I keep in my first aid
kit'.
2 Check everything listed in your
kit is in date and stocked up. Buy
First Response course
completed (date):
Local medical services:
anything that is missing and
replace anything out of date.
3 Keep your first aid kit
somewhere handy during your
residential, and make sure all
participants know where it is.
First aid item Needs
restocking?
Challenge 4 – Sign off
m
Facilities
m
First aid emergencies
m
First aid kit
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
29
5A
Menu selection
Get cooking!
Everyone needs food to
function, so knowing how to
plan and deliver a great
menu can make all the
difference to the success of
your residential.
Challenge
5
28
1 Plan the menu. It’s best to do
this with your participants to
make sure your menu is a
success. After all, you don’t want
to prepare a curry and then find
out no one likes spicy food! You’ll
need to consider:
P Dietary requirements (including
any allergies).
P The time of year you’re going.
P The cooking method you want
to use e.g. campfire.
Menu ideas and notes:
P Cooking and storage facilities
available.
P The programme of activities i.e.
will you need lunch on the go
one day?
P The budget you’ve set.
As a requirement of this permit,
you’ll need to cook at least one
hot meal on your residential so
remember to include time for this
in your programme.
30 31
5B
Cooking and storage
5A
Use the table below to plan your menu:
1 Find out what facilities you’ll
have to prepare and store food.
The best way to do this is to visit
the venue if you can. If not, get in
touch. You’ll need to know -
P
The size of any freezer/fridges.
P
If you’ll need cool boxes or gas
cylinders.
P
If indoor, what type of oven/hob
will you be using? Gas/electric/
induction?
P
If camping, what kind of stove
do you have to cook on e.g.
trangia.
P
If you’re cooking on a campfire,
is there wood available for you
to collect, or will you need to
bring it with you? How much is
there?
2 Now you know what’s already at
the venue, make a list of anything
else you’ll need and where to get
it from. It might help to make a list
of each meal and go through
them one by one to decide exactly
what you need.
P
Take time to evaluate your
planned menu – now you know
the facilities, are there any
meals on there you won’t be
able to do? If so, change your
menu accordingly.
Day
Breakfast
Lunch Dinner
Day 1
Day 2
Day 3
3 Buy (or arrange delivery) of
everything on your shopping list.
Don’t forget cleaning supplies!
4 Arrange for the preparation,
cooking and serving of food
during the event.
P
Have your menu and recipes
available so that everyone
knows what to prepare/cook
and when!
Shopping list:
32 33
5C
Food hygiene
5B
Use the table below to make a list of all the equipment you’ll need:
1 Once you are on the residential,
you’ll need to set up and maintain
hygienic storage facilities. Talk to
your mentor before you ago about
how to do this.
P
Make sure you can keep
appropriate foods stored
separately (e.g. meat and
dairy).
P
The main aim is to keep hot
food hot and cold food cold!
2 Keep food preparation areas
clear and clean.
P
Tell your participants before
cooking how to keep these
areas clean.
P
Make sure everyone can
wash their hands in the kitchen
area before handling food.
You may need to provide a
bowl, soap and a towel just
for handwashing.
3 Decide what you need to do to
ensure the safety of all
participants in the kitchen area,
especially if cooking on an open
fire.
P
Have a first aid kit accessible. It
will need to have blue plasters
in it.
P
Brief all participants on the safe
use of appliances, utensils and
fire and supervise if necessary.
Food hygiene notes:
Challenge 5 – Sign off
m
Menu selection
m
Cooking and storage
m
Food hygiene
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Meal Method of
cooking
Equipment I
need to bring
Equipment
already there
Chilli Trangia
Gas cannister,
pan, kettle, spoon
Kettle, spoons
34 35
6A
Create a programme
Get activities!
This is when you get to plan
all the fun things you want
to do during your residential.
Some things need more
preparation than others. Let
the fun commence!
Challenge
6
1 You need some fun stuff to do
during your residential. Plan what
you want to do based on your
overall aim agreed way back in
Challenge one.
P
Talk to your participants about
your plans and ask for their
ideas as well.
P
Make sure you plan things
everyone can take part in – do
you need to adapt any activities?
2 Make sure you plan enough time
for what you want to do. Create a
schedule for your whole
residential. Include time to make
meals, travel to/from activities
and time to get a good night’s
sleep. Don’t forget to have some
chill out time as well! Plan in some
alternatives too, in case you get
bad weather or things change.
TOP TIP
There are two types of activities you might like to do:
- Activities you run yourself – like a murder mystery or a wide game.
- Adventurous activities – like kayaking.
Day
Day
1
Day
2
Day
3
Morning Afternoon Evening
36 37
6B 6B
Equipment and instructors
Activities you plan to run
1 Make a list of all the equipment
you need to bring.
P
Check it before the residential
– is it safe? Is it usable?
P
Update your kit list and your
risk assessment as necessary.
Adventurous activities
1 Get parental permission from
participants under 18 for each
adventurous activity you are
planning to do on the
Information and Consent for
Event/Activity forms (see 2B).
Depending on your activity,
Girlguiding asks for certain
instructor qualifications and
safety requirements on
equipment. You can check what
these are on the Activity Finder:
Girlguiding.org.uk/activityfinder
2 Check with the activity
provider that your instructor has
the correct qualifications for the
activity as stated on the Activity
Finder.
3 Check the safety requirements
for the equipment you'll be using
during your activity. For example,
if you’re going to a climbing wall,
you’ll need to check for
appropriate insurance and
quality endorsements. Your
external provider must be able to
guarantee the safety of the
equipment before you use it and
must accept responsibility for it.
Top tip
4 Ask the venue or your activity
provider for a copy of their risk
assessment. You’ll then need to
add this to your own risk
assessment.
5 If you’re using/doing something
some of your participants
havent done before, make plans
to train them up. Alternatively, let
the instructor know the skill level
of your group, so they can deliver
an appropriate session.
6 Update your risk assessment
with your plans.
TOP TIP
Your county outdoor
activities adviser can help
with checking
qualifications and safety
requirements or put you
in touch with an adviser
who can. You need to do this before
you send in your REN form Part 2.
Activity Equipment
needed and
sourced
Instructor
qualification
needed and
checked?
Safety
standard
needed and
checked?
38 39
6C 6C
Look after equipment
1 Return everything you borrowed
in good time. If you’re borrowing
lots of stuff, make a list to check it
against when you give it back.
2 If you damage anything you use,
especially if you’ve borrowed it,
make a note of this. Make sure
you tell the provider and arrange
to replace it or fix it.
3 If you’re using anything
hazardous, or dangerous, make
sure you read and follow all the
safety instructions. Add them to
your risk assessment and train
participants in how to use
them safely.
Equipment
borrowed
Condition? Returned?
At the start At the end Y/N and date
Programme notes
Challenge 6 – Sign off
m
Create a programme
m
Equipment and intructors
m
Food hygiene
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Date completed Mentor signature
Up for the
challenge
40 41
Get away
Whatever you’re staying in
– be it a tent or a palace –
you need to make sure you
look after the facilities
properly.
Challenge
7
This module has two parts – one
for camping and one for indoor
accommodation. You only need to
complete one part depending on
where you’re staying.
If you decide to lead another trip
using your permit with the other
type of accommodation, you’ll
need to complete the other part in
this challenge for that trip. Don’t
worry, you won’t need to re-do all
the other challenges!
During your residential, your
mentor will visit you to see how it’s
all going. There will be certain
things they’ll want to see for your
assessment (like having the first
aid kit accessible, a hygienic
camp layout if camping etc.) but
they’ll let you know beforehand
what you need to do. You can also
use this as a chance to ask for
help on anything you aren’t sure
of.
7A
Camping
1 Decide on how many tents you’ll
need. You might need extra for
food storage or toilet tents. Have
a chat with your mentor to see if
you could borrow these from your
unit or district.
P
Think about how you’re going to
transport all of the equipment.
2 Practise pitching one of your
tents before you go as a group.
Plan for pitching and striking
(taking down) the tents. Are you
going to assign participants
certain tents to strike? Or work
altogether on one tent at a time?
When it’s time, strike the tents
and put them back properly into
their bags (this can involve some
intricate folding).
3 Check your tents for damage
and make any repairs before and
after your residential. It’s a good
idea to research how to make
basic tent repairs before you go in
case you need to do any on site.
TOP TIP
You might have to pack up your tents whilst wet if you’re tight on time.
Make sure to hang them out to dry as soon as you get home and
re-pack them. If you borrowed tents from your unit, make sure to
clean and repair tents as necessary before you give them back.
42 43
7A 7A
4 Ask your participants to bring
bedding/sleeping bags, if you
need them to. And ensure they all
have suitable clothing, bedding
and eating utensils for spending a
couple of nights outdoors.
P
Think about the time of year
that you’re camping, the
activities that you’re planned,
and the menu you’ve prepared.
5 Plan your camp layout, safely
and hygienically. For example, you
don’t want the food area right
next to the toilets, or the fire next
to where you’re sleeping.
P
If you’re taking a few tents, it
might be easier to draw the
layout.
6 Make sure your camp has the
least possible impact on the
environment during your stay. For
example, do you need to take
rubbish bags with you or does the
campsite have waste disposal
and recycling facilities? Where
can you safely set up your
campfire?
P
Why not create a jobs rota to
keep the campsite clean and
tidy during your stay?
7 Check the weather forecast
beforehand, and make sure you
know how to look after your tent
in a variety of conditions.
Number of tents needed:
Repairs:
My camp layout:
Before:
During:
After:
Jobs to do whilst away
Name Responsibilities
TOP TIP
Check out the Camp skills
builder for lots of activities
to help you practise your
camping skills!
44 45
7B 7B
Indoor accomodation
1 Draw a room plan of your venue
showing your bedrooms, shared
areas (if other groups/the public
are staying there too) location of
kitchen, bathrooms etc. so that
participants know which rooms
you will be using, and which are
out of bounds.
2 Review the facilities at the
venue and make sure you add
additional items such as bedding,
plates and cutlery, to the kit list
for participants to bring if you
need them to.
3 Check everyone knows how to
make a bed before you go. It
might sound simple, but you don’t
want to get there and find you’ve
got to make eight beds if no one
else knows how!
4 Check the place you are staying
thoroughly for damage/marks
and report them to the venue as
soon as you can. If you don’t do
this at the start, you might get
blamed for something you didn’t
do/break and be charged to fix it.
5 Make sure that all the areas
you’re responsible for are kept
Number of beds needed:
Repairs/damage to areas you are responsible for –
e.g. bedrooms, kitchen, bathrooms, other rooms:
Jobs to do whilst away:
Packing up plan:
Before:
During:
After:
clean and tidy. Allocate jobs to
everyone to make sure they get
done!
6 Create and print off any signs/
labels you might need to help
your participants find their way
around. This is especially fun if
you’ve done a themed residential.
7 Plan for packing up. Assign
different people different rooms/
areas. Always include a final
sweep for rubbish… and stray
clothing! Make sure that the
venue is left clean and tidy and in
good condition.
Challenge 7 – Sign off
m
Camping
Date completed Mentor signature
m
Indoor accomodation
Date completed Mentor signature
Room layout
46 47
Evaluate and complete!
Step
1
Step
2
Well done! You’ve run an amazing
residential and you’ve nearly
completed your Lead Away
permit. Once it’s all signed off,
you’ll get a badge and certificate
to celebrate all your hard work.
Before you finish, its important
that you take a moment reflect on
what went well and what you
could do differently next time.
Step 1 – evaluate with your
participants
Have a chat with everyone who
came on your residential. Find out
what they thought about:
P
The preparation - did they
know what they needed to do
and bring with them?
P
The venue.
P
The food.
P
The programme of activities
– did they enjoy themselves?
Was there anything else they
would have liked to have done
instead, or as well?
P
Their roles during the
residential – if they had one,
was it clear what they needed
to do?
TOP TIP
You could get your
participants to feedback
anonymously, so they
can be completely
honest – you could use
an evaluation form.
Mentor signature
Have
a
blast!
There’s no such thing as the
perfect residential, so don’t worry
if not everyone liked everything!
It’s impossible to please everyone,
but you can use the feedback you
get to improve things next time.
Step 2 – Evaluate with your
mentor
Before your mentor signs off your
permit, take time to reflect on your
residential together.
P
Which parts did you enjoy
planning and leading the most?
P
Which challenges did you find
hardest?
P
What skills have you learnt/
improved?
P
What will you do differently next
time?
P
Once your mentor is happy
you’ve completed all the
challenges, they can sign off
your Lead Away permit as
completed.
Well done!
Sign
off
Date:
Date:
I (name of mentor)
can confirm that (name of Ranger/young leader)
has successfully completed the Lead Away permit.
m
For camping (7A)
For indoor accomodation (7B)
48
Have
a
blast!
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