Dveloped by; Steve Carle
Program Co-ordinator-Projects/
Coordinateur de programmes-projects
Post Secondary Education Training & Labour/
Éducation postesecondaire, Formation et Travail
Employment Division/Division de l'emploi
steven.carle@gnb.ca
Career Planning Workbook
Expansion Module 1: Identifying Interests
The Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour (Saint John), School
District 6 and the Work Room Career Resource Centres have developed a program to
assist students and their parents (or anyone acting in a career coaching capacity) to
create a dialogue about careers and provide tools to assist students in preparing their
career plan. PACE (Plan to Achieve Career Excellence) is divided into 5 sequential
modules that combine to create an effective career plan. This workbook supports the first
module-”Identifying Your Interests” by providing additional information, resources and
activities to help people to identify their interests, skills and life/career goals.
This workbook is designed as an “add-on” resource to be used as part of the main PACE
career planning system. While this is not a required delivery component, it may prove
useful to anyone who requires advanced career support tools to help them to progress to
the next stage of their career plan.
1. Interest Inventory 4
2. Categorizing Your Interests 5
3. Putting it all Together (Holland Codes) 8
4. Tools and Resources 9
5. Industry Clusters 10
6. Wrap Up 11
A support website has been developed to provide additional resources. The web pages
are colour-coded to correspond with the information contained in this workbook.
www.setyourownpace.org
The PACE workshop and resources are not intended to be used as a substitute for
professional career counseling. Instead, this workbook allows students and their
parents/career coaches to do their own research and in the event they have questions
concerning career planning, there are resources readily available to assist them.
For parents who are interested in receiving career coaching training, a 60 minute
Introductory Career Coaching Workshop is available through The Work Room Career
Resource Centres and select community partners. Expansion modules (such as this one)
are available for those who complete the introductory workshop. For more information on
PACE and related career products, workshops and resource material please visit:
www.careersthatwork.ca
Introduction
3
Interest Inventory
Name ___________________
Realistic Investigative Artistic Social Enterprising Conventional
Resourceful Inquiring Organized Authentic
1. Personality Preferences (Holland Codes)
2. Personality Preferences (Personality Dimensions) *
* optional workshop
available at some
Work Room Career
Resource Centres.
3. Rank order the following 13 industry clusters based on your interests.
Architecture & Construction Medical & Health
Arts & Culture Natural Resources & Transportation
Business & Finance Science & Engineering
Computers & Telecom Skilled Trades
Education & Social Sciences Service Industry
Fashion & Design Sports & Recreation
Law & Government
4. List your top 10 interests
4
Identifying your Interests
Categorizing Your Interests:
Fix
mechanical
things
Work on a
scientific
project
Sketch,
draw, or
paint
Work as a
volunteer for
a charity
Operate your
own
business
Operate
office
machines
Take a
woodworking
class
Study the
stars through
a telescope
Sing or play
in a band
Help others
with their
personal
problems
Prefer to lead
than to follow
Saving/
Investing
money
Repair your
bike/vehicle
Solve a
mathematical
problem
Make home
movies
Take a First
Aid course
Supervise
the work of
others
Take an
accounting
class
Work
outdoors
Watch tv
crime scene
dramas
Take
photos
Work as a
nurse
Like taking
risks
Doing your
own taxes
Operate
motorized
machines or
equipment
Read for
knowledge
rather than
entertainment
Act in a
play
Teach
children
Read
business
magazines or
articles
Work in an
office
Build things Try to figure
out how
things work
Design
fashions
Act as a
coach
Meet
important
people
Write a
business
letter
Work alone Use a
microscope
Design
interior
spaces
Lead a group
discussion
Give a talk
or speech
Use a
computer
R ______ I ______ A ______ S ______ E ______ C ______
1. In the table below, circle any activities that interest you. You don’t have to have
actual experience or skill with the activity.
2. Count the number of circled activities in each column and write the totals in the
spaces provided.
3. Add the column totals from each table (on this page and the following page) to
arrive at a grand total for each of the six categories (realistic, investigative, etc.).
4. Try your best to identify at least two areas of interest.
5. Compare your code to the definitions on page 7.
5
Categorizing Your Interests:
Tend/train
animals
Research
before
making
a purchase
Read/write
fiction or
graphic
novels
Play a team
sport
Sell things Keep
accurate
records
Pitch a tent Understand
physics laws
and theories
Attend
concerts &
movies
Help others
resolve a
dispute
Promote or
spread an
idea
Have an
attention
for details
Solve
mechanical
puzzles
Solve
puzzles
Work on
crafts
Participate in
a meeting
Win a
Leadership
or sales
award
Use word
processing
software or
spreadsheets
Plant a
garden
Enjoy
learning new
things
Work
according
to your own
rules
Talk to
people
Take on
a lot of
responsibility
Work with
numbers
Read a
blueprint
Create a
computer
program
Use your
Imagination
to create
something
original
Enjoy using
social media
websites
Participate
in a political
campaign
Be very well
organized
Play a sport Seek to find
truth/answers
Have your
own
unique
style
Plan and
supervise
an activity
Convince
people to
do things
your way
Set up a
system for
doing
something
and stick to it
Realistic Investigative Artistic Social Enterprising Conventional
R ______ I ______ A ______ S ______ E ______ C ______
Add the column totals from each table (on this page and the previous page) to arrive at a
grand total for each of the six categories. Compare your code to the definitions on page 7.
Identifying your Interests
6
Identifying your Interests
Coding Definitions:
Realistic
You have mechanical and athletic abilities. You like working outdoors with tools and objects,
and you prefer dealing with things rather than people.
Auto mechanics Farming Carpentry
Building things Fixing electrical things Driving a truck
Wildlife biology Playing sports
Investigative
You have math and science abilities. You like working alone and solving complex problems.
You also like dealing with ideas rather than people or things.
Advanced math Doing puzzles Physics
Doing research Figuring out how things work Astronomy
Building rocket models Working in a science lab
Artistic
You have artistic ability and imagination. You enjoy creating original work, and you prefer to
deal with ideas rather than things.
Being in a play Going to concerts Creative writing
Creating fashion designs Learning foreign languages Drawing or painting
Reading about art or music Playing with musicians
Social
You have social skills. You’re interested in social relationships and helping others solve
problems. You like dealing with people rather than things.
Attending sports events Belonging to a club Making new friends
Playing on a sports team Doing volunteer work Teaching children
Helping people Working with elderly people
Enterprising
You have leadership and speaking abilities. You like to be influential, and you’re interested in
politics and business. You also prefer to deal with people and ideas, not things.
Being elected class president Selling a product Being with leaders
Talking to salespeople Buying materials for a store Giving speeches
Working on a sales campaign Talking with people at a party
Conventional
You have clerical and math abilities. You prefer working indoors and organizing things, and
you like dealing with words and numbers rather than people or ideas.
Filing letters and reports Using a cash register Following a budget
Using business machines Keeping detailed reports Typing reports
Working nine-to-five Computer programming
7
Putting it all Together
The previous exercise is based on a theory of careers and vocational choice formulated by
psychologist John L. Holland. Holland Codes (RIASEC) represent a set of personality types
but does not assume that a person is just one type or that there are "only six types of people
in the world." Instead, he assumed that any person could be described as having interests
associated with each of the six types in a descending order of preference. When applying
this theory is applied in interest inventories and career planning, it is usually only the two or
three most dominant codes that are used. This can be represented graphically in the form
of a hexagon.
The six personality types relate to each
other in different ways. Some compliment
each other while others frequently cause
conflict because they are so dissimilar.
The shorter the distance between their
corners on the hexagon, the more closely
they are related. For example Artistic
people are most like Social and
Investigative people and least like
Conventional people.
The diagram also demonstrates how the
different personality types prefer to work
with different stimuli: people, data, things,
and ideas.
The previous exercise was not an official assessment or quiz but an exercise modified from
the Holland Code Career Model to help you narrow down your interests into more
manageable categories. By doing so, it may direct you towards your career goals quicker
and easier.
It is important to remember that every person requires a blend of all these personality types
to be successful in their life. This exercise demonstrates what areas of your personality you
are most comfortable with and come naturally to you.
Over time you may find that your job, training and/or life experience may cause your
personality preferences to change.
8
Personality Dimensions
®
is a dynamic tool that builds on the foundations of temperament
theories that spans 25 centuries. It emphasizes the self-discovery process, and uses a
highly effective “edu-tainment” model to help participants understand their personality
preferences in a fun and informative environment.
Personality Dimensions
®
is based on leading-edge research into human motivation and
behaviour and helps to explain what motivates behaviour in people with different
personalities or temperaments. This interactive human relations and communications
process enhances the basic values of self-esteem, dignity and self-worth.
The introductory workshop is 3 hours in duration and can be offered in a school setting or
to the public in a group format. Select Work Rooms can provide this service as there are
two licensed facilitators on staff who can provide the training.
Additional application workshops are also available that address topics such as team
building, communication, self esteem and career planning.
For more information on how Personality Dimensions® can compliment your PACE training
please contract your local Work Room Career Resource Centre www.careersthatwork.ca.
Successful completion of PACE (and this module) are not dependant on attending a
Personality Dimensions
®
workshop. This is just one of many additional resources that
support the PACE career planning process.
Here are some other options that can be effective.
Personal journal
Keep track of your activities for the next couple of weeks. Write down the places you went,
things you did, people you hung out with and past times (movies, tv, videogames, sports,
etc). Review your journal at the end of a couple of weeks to discover how you enjoy
spending your time. This may give you insight into your interests and give you a starting
point for your career plan.
Consult your social network
Who knows you better than the people in your social network (friends, family, teachers and
employers)? Ask them for their perceptions of the things you like to do and suggestions of
careers that may compliment their interests. You don’t have to act on their
recommendations as you are only collecting information at this point. They may have
unique insights that you may not have considered.
Vocational testing
If you are really stuck and can’t think of things that interest you, you may benefit from
consulting your high school guidance counsellor about doing more formalized vocational
testing and interest inventories to help find a good starting point for your career planning.
Tools and Resources
Personality Dimensions
®
9
Architecture &
Construction
Skilled Trades
Engineer
Labourer
Art & Culture
Actor
Archaeologist
Film Director
Graphic Designer
Sociologist
Writer
Business &
Finance
Accountant
Entrepreneur
HR Manager
Computers &
Telecom
Video game Designer
Programmer
Webmaster
Education &
Social Science
Clergy
Psychologist
Teacher
Fashion &
Design
Hairstylist
Florist
Interior Designer
Tattoo Artist
Model
Law &
Government
Police
Lawyer
Firefighter
Military
1. Review the 13 industry clusters on this page. There are a few examples of the types of
jobs that would be found in each industry cluster. Some clusters are very similar, so
you may notice overlap in the types of jobs found under each classification.
2. Rank order the industry clusters based on how well they match your interests. Place a
number in each circle starting with 1=1
st
choice to 13=last choice.
Natural Resources
& Transportation
Farmer
Pilot
Fisher
Medical &
Health
Doctor
Nurse
Dentist
Veterinarian
Science &
Engineering
Astronaut
Scientist
Biochemist
Service
Industry
Bartender
Salesperson
Custodian
Skilled Trades
Carpenter
Plumber
Electrician
Welder
Sports &
Recreation
Athlete
Coach
Disk Jockey
Industry Clusters
10
Wrap Up
Congratulations!
You have completed your first step in the PACE career planning system: “Identifying Your
Interests”.
Hopefully through the instruction provided by your PACE facilitator and working through
these exercises has provided you with a better idea of your interests and how important they
are as a first step in your career plan.
Please list 10 interests that you have identified through this module that you would like to
use a a starting point for the next step in your plan: “Researching Careers”.
Preview of the next step: Researching Careers
PACE participants will use the interests identified in Module 1 to match them with
potential occupations in the workforce.
Many resource tools will be introduced to assist people in doing effective research.
PACE participants will be provided access to the online Career Cruising program which
will provide ongoing research support 24/7.
Participants will be encouraged to narrow down their prospective career options to a
few manageable alternatives that they can put into an effective action plan.
11
Copyright © 2011
The Work Room
SBC13012011
Developed through the partnership of the
Department of Post Secondary Education
Training, and Labour (Saint John Regional
Office), School Districts 6/8 and The Work
Room Career Resource Centres.
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