This booklet is available in English and Spanish from the office of the court clerk in the superior court of
each county in California, or at www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp.htm.
FL-810
SUMMARY DISSOLUTION
INFORMATION
Este folleto puede obtenerse en inglés y en español en la Dirección de Registro Público del Condado
(Office of the Court Clerk) o en la Corte Superior (Superior Court) de cada condado en el estado de
California o en el sitio www.sucorte.ca.gov.
Form Adopted for Mandatory Use
Judicial Council of California
FL-810 [Rev. September 1, 2019]
Family Code, §§ 2400–2406
www.courts.ca.gov
CONTENTS
Page
1 WHAT IS THIS BOOKLET ABOUT?
SOME TERMS YOU NEED TO KNOW 2ll.
3WHO CAN USE THE SUMMARY DISSOLUTION PROCEDURE?
AN IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SUMMARY DISSOLUTION
4AND REGULAR DISSOLUTION
HOW DO YOU FIGURE OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR PROPERTY
5AND THE AMOUNT OF YOUR DEBTS?
WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE OF SEPARATE PROPERTY
6
WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE AND DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PROPERTY
8
10
WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING COMMUNITY OBLIGATIONS AND THEIR DIVISION
WHAT SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THE PROPERTY SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT?VII.
12
SAMPLE PROPERTY SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT 13
WHAT STEPS DO YOU HAVE TO TAKE TO GET A SUMMARY DISSOLUTION?IX.
16
18 WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT REVOCATION
19SHOULD YOU SEE A LAWYER?
SOME GENERAL INFORMATION 20
I. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
V.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VI.
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. . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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X. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .XI.
XII. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
i.
III.
IV.
VIII.
If you wish to use the summary dissolution procedure, you must, at the time you file the joint petition, sign a statement
that says you have read and understood this booklet. It is important for you to read the whole booklet very carefully.
Save this booklet for at least six months if you decide to start a summary dissolution. If you decide you want to stop the
summary dissolution process and revoke your petition, it will tell you how to do that.
have been married and/or in a domestic partnership five years or less (this means that the time between the date
you married or registered your domestic partnership and the date you separated from your spouse or partner is
five years or less);
I . WHAT IS THIS BOOKLET ABOUT?
This booklet describes a way to end a marriage, a domestic partnership, or both through a kind of divorce called
summary dissolution.
The official word for divorce in California is dissolution. There are two ways of getting a divorce, or dissolution, in
California. The usual way is called a regular dissolution.
Summary dissolution is a shorter and easier way. But not everybody can use it. Briefly, a summary dissolution is possible
for couples who
1.
6.
5.
4.
3.
2.
do not owe very much;
do not want spousal or partner support from each other; and
With this procedure, you will not have to appear in court. You may not need a lawyer, but it is in your best interest to see a
lawyer about the ending of your marriage or domestic partnership. See page 19 for more details about how a lawyer can
help you.
For a summary dissolution, you prepare and file a Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-800), together with a
property settlement agreement,* with the superior court clerk in your county. You will also prepare and turn in a Judgment
of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of Judgment (form FL-825). Your divorce, ending your marriage and/or your domestic
partnership, will be final six months after you file your Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution. During the six months while
you wait for your divorce to become final, either of you can stop the process of summary dissolution if you change your
mind. One of you can file a Notice of Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-830), and that will stop the
divorce. If either one of you still wants to get divorced, then that person will have to file for a regular dissolution with a
Petition—Marriage/Domestic Partnership (form FL-100) unless you both agree to start a new summary dissolution
process.
This booklet will tell you
1. who can use the summary dissolution procedure;
2. what steps you must take to get a summary dissolution;
3. when it would help to see a lawyer; and
4. what risks you take when you use this procedure rather than the regular dissolution procedure.
SPECIAL WARNING
If you are an undocumented person who became a lawful permanent resident on the basis of your marriage to a U.S.
citizen or to a lawful permanent resident, obtaining a dissolution within two years of your marriage may lead to your
deportation. You should consult a lawyer before obtaining a divorce.
IMPORTANT! Domestic partners who qualify for a summary dissolution can choose to use the process described in this
booklet OR a special summary dissolution for domestic partners through the California Secretary of State. You can find
the California Secretary of State forms at www.sos.ca.gov. There is no filing fee for this process. If you choose to file
to terminate your domestic partnership through the Secretary of State, do not use this guide.
* A property settlement agreement is an agreement that the two of you write or have someone write for you after you fill out the worksheets in this
booklet. The agreement spells out how you will divide what you own and what you owe.
have no disagreements about how their belongings and their debts are going to be divided up once they are no
longer married to or in a domestic partnership with each other.
do not own very much;
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have no children together;
Il. SOME TERMS YOU NEED TO KNOW
In the following pages, you will often see the terms community property, separate property, and community obligations.
Those terms are explained in this section.
As a married couple or domestic partners, the two of you are, in the eyes of the law, a single unit. There are certain things
that you own together rather than separately. And there may be certain debts that you owe together. If one of you
borrows money or buys something on credit, the other one can be made to pay.
If your marriage or domestic partnership breaks up, you become two separate individuals again. Before that can happen,
you have to decide what to do with the things you own as a couple and the money you owe as a couple.
The laws that cover these questions contain the terms community property, separate property, and community
obligations. To understand what these terms mean, you should have a clear idea of the length of time you lived
together as spouses or domestic partners. This is the period between the day you married or registered your domestic
partnership and the day you separated.
It may not be easy to decide exactly when you separated. In most cases, the day of the separation is the day the couple
stopped living together. However, you may want to choose the day when you definitely decided to get a divorce and took
some action to show this (like telling your spouse or partner that you wanted a divorce).
Community Property
In most cases that includes
1. money you now have that either of you earned during the time you were living together as spouses or partners; and
Separate Property
In most cases that includes
1. anything either of you owned before you got married or registered your domestic partnership;
2. anything either of you earned or received after your separation; and
3. anything either of you received, as a gift or by inheritance, at any time.
Community Obligations
In most cases that includes anything you still owe on any debts either of you acquired during the time you were living
together as spouses or registered domestic partners. (For instance, if you bought furniture on credit while you were
married or domestic partners and living together, the unpaid balance is a part of your community obligations.) It usually
does not matter if the debt was in the name of one spouse or domestic partner only, like on a credit card.
NOTE: If you have any questions about your separation date or about your property, it would be good to see a lawyer as
these issues can be complicated. Also, if you lived together before your marriage or domestic partnership, you may wish
to see a lawyer about possible additional rights either of you may have.
Community property is everything spouses or registered domestic partners own together.
2. anything either of you bought with money earned during that period. It does not matter if only one of you earned or
spent the money.
Separate property is everything spouses or registered domestic partners own separately from each other.
Community obligations are the debts spouses or registered domestic partners owe together.
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III. WHO CAN USE THE SUMMARY DISSOLUTION PROCEDURE?
You can use the summary dissolution procedure only if all of the following statements are true about you at the time you
file the Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution (form ). Check this list very carefully. If even one of these
statements is not true for you, you cannot get a divorce in this way.
1.
9.
15.
16.
14.
13.
12.
11.
10.
8.
7.
6.
5.
4.
3.
2.
We have both read this booklet, and we both understand it.
We have been married or registered as domestic partners five years or less between the date that we got
married and/or registered our domestic partnership and the date we separated. (Note that if you are trying to
end both a marriage AND a domestic partnership at the same time through a summary dissolution, both your
marriage and domestic partnership must have lasted five years or less.)
No children were born to the two of us together before or during our marriage and/or domestic partnership.
We have no adopted children under 18 years of age.
Neither one of us is pregnant.
Neither of us owns any part of any land or buildings.
For deciding on statements 7, 8, and 9, use the guide on pages 5–11.
At least one of us has lived in California for the past six months or longer and has lived in the county
where we are filing for dissolution for the past three months or longer; or
We have prepared and signed an agreement that states how we want our possessions and debts to be
divided between us (or states that we have no community property or community obligations).
We have both signed the joint petition and all other papers needed to carry out this agreement.
We both want to end the marriage and/or domestic partnership because of serious, permanent differences.
We have both agreed to use the summary dissolution procedure rather than the regular dissolution procedure.
We are both aware of the following facts:
There is a six-month waiting period, and either of us can stop the divorce at any time during this period.
After the dissolution becomes final, neither of us has any right to expect money or support from the other
except that which is included in the property settlement agreement.
By choosing the summary dissolution procedure, we give up certain legal rights that we would have if we
had used the regular dissolution procedure. These rights are explained on page 4.
The total of our community obligations (other than cars) is $6,000 or less.**
Our community property is not worth more than $45,000. (Do not count cars in this total.)
Neither of us has separate property worth more than $45,000. (Do not count cars in this total.)
The date that appears on the Judgment of Dissolution of Marriage and Notice of Entry of Judgment
(form ) we receive from the court as the "effective date" of the dissolution is the date our divorce
will be final, unless one of us has asked to stop the divorce prior to that effective date.
a.
b.
c.
d.
Together with the joint petition, we will turn in the judgment of dissolution forms and two self-addressed
stamped envelopes to the superior court.
a.
b.
c.
We are the same sex and were married in California but are not residents of California. Neither of us
lives in a place that will allow us to divorce. We are filing this case in the county in which we married.
We are only asking to end a domestic partnership registered in California; or
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FL-825
FL-800
IV. AN IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SUMMARY DISSOLUTION
AND REGULAR DISSOLUTION
With a regular dissolution, either spouse or partner can ask for a court hearing or trial. And with a regular dissolution, if
either spouse or partner is unhappy with the judge’s final decision, it is possible to challenge that decision. This can be
done, for example, by asking for a new trial. It is also possible to appeal the decision by taking the case to a higher court.
With a summary dissolution, there is no trial or hearing. Couples who choose this method of getting a divorce do not
have the right to ask for a new trial (since there is no trial) or the right to appeal the case to a higher court.
There are, however, some cases in which a divorce agreement under a summary dissolution can be challenged. You will
have to see a lawyer about this. The court may have the power to set aside the divorce if you can show that one of the
following things happened:
1.
You were treated unfairly in the property settlement agreement.
This is possible if you find out that the things you agreed to give your spouse or partner were much more valuable than
you thought at the time of the dissolution.
2.
You went through the dissolution procedure against your will.
This is possible if you can show that your spouse or partner used threats or other kinds of unfair pressure to get you to
go along with the divorce.
3.
There are serious mistakes in the original agreement.
Some kinds of mistakes can make the dissolution invalid, but you will have to go to court to prove the mistakes. It may
be that one or both of you had a lot of property that you had forgotten about when you drew up the property settlement
agreement. Or maybe a bank account mentioned in the agreement had much more money or much less money in it
than your agreement states.
Correcting mistakes and unfairness in a summary dissolution proceeding can be expensive, time-consuming, and
difficult. It is very important for both of you to be honest, cooperative, and careful when you or your lawyers do the
paperwork for the dissolution.
4.
Neither of you complied with preliminary disclosure requirements.
California law requires that you fully share all information about your property and debts as well as your income. You
have to share this information before you sign your property settlement agreement.
In summary dissolution cases, this means that you and your spouse or domestic partner must each complete and
exchange: (1) an Income and Expense Declaration (form FL-150), (2) all tax returns you filed in the last two years, and
(3) the property worksheets on pages 7, 9, and 11 (or a Declaration of Disclosure (form FL-140 and either a Schedule
of Assets and Debts (form FL-142) or a Property Declaration (form FL-160)).
In addition, each spouse or domestic partner must complete and give to the other spouse or partner a written
statement about any investment opportunity, business opportunity, or other income-producing opportunity that
developed since the date you separated which was based on any investment made, significant business done, or
other income-producing opportunity that was presented to you between the date you married or became domestic
partners and the date you separated.
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V. HOW DO YOU FIGURE OUT THE VALUE OF YOUR PROPERTY AND THE
AMOUNT OF YOUR DEBTS?
Section III, page 3, lists statements that must be true if you want to use the summary dissolution procedure.
Statement 7 reads: “Our community property is not worth more than $45,000.”
Your community property is the money and things you own jointly as spouses or domestic partners. This was explained
on page 2. The value of your community property is determined by adding together (1) the amount of money you have as
community property and (2) the “fair market value” of the possessions you have as community property.
The fair market value is an estimate of the amount of money you could get if you sold these items to a stranger—for
example, through a classified ad in the newspaper. It does not mean what you paid for it originally, and it does not mean
how much it would cost you to replace it if you lost it.
One way of estimating the fair market value of your goods is to use prices for equivalent items in other people's classified
ads for secondhand goods.
Three kinds of items go into figuring out your community property:
When you include things you still owe money on, subtract the amount of money you still owe on them from the fair market
value.
You should not include the value of a car in this list.
Statement 8 reads: “Neither of us has separate property worth more than $45,000.”
Separate property is property that each spouse or partner owns separately. The term is explained on page 2. Separate
property includes the same kinds of things used in determining community property. And again, you should not include
cars in this list.
Statement 9 reads: “The total of our community obligations (other than cars) is $6,000 or less.”
Your community obligations are the debts that you and your spouse or partner owe jointly. The term is explained on page
2. List all the debts you have that you took on while you were living together as spouses or domestic partners. If you
borrowed money before you got married or registered your domestic partnership, you do not have to include that in your
community obligations. If you bought furniture on credit after you got married or registered your domestic partnership but
before you separated, you have to include the amount of money you still owe on the furniture. If you bought a stereo after
you separated, you do not have to include that.
Do not include car loans in this list.
NOTICE: The law for summary dissolution allows you to leave out cars when you figure out whether you are eligible for
this kind of divorce. But if you do have cars as part of your community property, you still have to decide who is going to
own them (and who is going to pay for them) after your divorce. You must include them in your property settlement
agreement.
Worksheets to help you figure out these amounts are found on pages 6–11. You may use the following forms in this
booklet to figure out the total of your community and separate property assets and obligations: (1) the worksheet on
pages 7 (Value of Separate Property), (2) the worksheet on page 9 (Value and Division of Community Property), and (3)
the worksheet on page 11 (Community Obligations and Their Division). Sample forms showing how to fill out those
worksheets are on pages 6, 8, and 10.
1. Money (as in bank accounts and credit union accounts);
2. Things you own outright (furniture that is already paid for, for example); and
3. Things you are buying on credit.
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CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 1: Pat
PETITIONER 2: Chris
VI. SAMPLE WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE OF
SEPARATE PROPERTY
This worksheet will help you determine whether you are eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The total fair
market value of the separate property of one spouse/partner cannot be more than $45,000. The total fair market value of
the separate property of the other spouse/partner cannot be more than $45,000. Separate property is anything that
either of you owned or earned before you got married or registered your domestic partnership, anything you earned or
bought after your separation, and anything that was given to just one of you as a gift during your marriage or domestic
partnership. Do not include cars.
Note: The information on this form is for an imaginary couple, Pat and Chris, who are married. (When you fill out your
worksheet, use your information.)
A. Bank accounts, credit union accounts, retirement funds, cash
value of insurance policies, etc.
Item
Pat's
Property
Fair Market
Value
Chris' s
Property
Fair Market
Value
Credit union savings—Pat (before marriage) 420
Savings bonds—Chris (bought before marriage) 250
Pension plan benefits—Pat (before marriage and after separation) 1500
Pension plan benefits—Chris (before marriage and after separation) 1300
B. Items owned outright
Item
Clothes—Pat (bought before marriage) 350
Stocks—Pat (birthday present from father) 375
Furniture—Pat (owned before marriage) 460
Camera—Chris (owned before marriage) 229
Wristwatch—Chris (bought after separation) 142
Clothes—Chris (bought after separation) 250
C. Items being bought on credit
Item Fair Market Minus
Value What's Owed =
TV set—Pat (after separation) 400 350 50
Clothes—Pat (after separation) 220 170 50
GRAND TOTALS:
Pat and Chris
SEPARATE PROPERTY
3205 2171
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CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 2:
PETITIONER 1:
VI. WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE OF
SEPARATE PROPERTY
This worksheet will help you determine whether you are eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The total fair
market value of the separate property of one spouse/partner cannot be more than $45,000. The total fair market value of
the separate property of the other spouse/partner cannot be more than $45,000. Separate property is anything that
either of you owned or earned before you got married or registered your domestic partnership, anything you earned or
bought after your separation, and anything that was given to just one of you as a gift during your marriage or domestic
partnership. Do not include cars.
A. Bank accounts, credit union accounts, retirement funds, cash
value of insurance policies, etc.
Item
PETITIONER 1
Property
Fair Market
Value
PETITIONER 2
Property
Fair Market
Value
B. Items owned outright
Item
C. Items being bought on credit
Item Fair Market Minus
Value What's Owed =
GRAND TOTALS:
PETITIONER 1'S AND PETITIONER 2'S
SEPARATE PROPERTY
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CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 1: Pat
PETITIONER 2: Chris
VI. SAMPLE WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE AND
DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PROPERTY
Note: The information on this form is for an imaginary couple, Pat and Chris, who are married. (When you fill out your worksheet, use
your information.)
This side of the sheet will help you determine whether you are
eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The grand total
value of your community property cannot be more than $45,000.
This side of the sheet will help you
decide on a fair division of your property.
It will help you prepare your property
settlement agreement.
A. Bank accounts, credit union accounts, retirement funds, cash value
of insurance policies, etc.
Item Amount
Savings account
150
Life insurance (cash value)
250
Pension plan—Pat
600
Pension plan—Chris
500
Checking account
180
Subtotal A
1680
B. Items you own outright (for example, stocks and bonds,
sports gear, furniture, household items, tools, interests in
businesses, jewelry; do not include cars)
Item
Fair Market
Value
Furniture & furnishings— Pat’s apartment
775
Furniture & furnishings—Chris's apartment
300
Terriers season tickets
285
Savings bonds
200
Jewelry—Pat
200
Pet parrot and cage
40
Subtotal B
1800
C. Items you are buying on credit (for example, stereo equipment,
appliances, furniture, tools; do not include cars)
Item Fair Market Minus Net Fair
Value Amount = Market
Owed Value
Stereo set
305 150 155
Color television
400 100 300
Golf clubs
350 50 300
Subtotal C
Pat
Receives
Chris
Receives
150
250
600
500
180
1000 680
Pat
Receives
Chris
Receives
775
300
285
200
200
40
1175 625
Pat
Receives
Chris
Receives
155
300
300
0 755
755
Grand total value of
community property = A + B + C
4235
2175 2060
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-9-
CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 2:
PETITIONER 1:
VI. WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING VALUE AND
DIVISION OF COMMUNITY PROPERTY
This side of the sheet will help you determine whether you are
eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The grand total
value of your community property cannot be more than $45,000.
This side of the sheet will help you
decide on a fair division of your property.
It will help you prepare your property
settlement agreement.
A. Bank accounts, credit union accounts, retirement funds, cash value
of insurance policies, etc.
Item Amount
Subtotal A
B. Items you own outright (for example, stocks and bonds,
sports gear, furniture, household items, tools, interests in
businesses, jewelry; do not include cars)
Item
Fair Market
Value
Subtotal B
C. Items you are buying on credit (for example, stereo equipment,
appliances, furniture, tools; do not include cars)
Item Fair Market Minus Net Fair
Value Amount = Market
Owed Value
Subtotal C
PETITIONER 1
Receives
PETITIONER 2
Receives
PETITIONER 1
Receives
PETITIONER 2
Receives
PETITIONER 1
Receives
PETITIONER 2
Receives
Grand total value of
community property = A + B + C
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CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 1: Pat
PETITIONER 2: Chris
VI. SAMPLE WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING COMMUNITY OBLIGATIONS
AND THEIR DIVISION
Note: The information on this form is for an imaginary couple, Pat and Chris, who are married. (When you fill out your worksheet, use
your information and make sure you indicate if you are married, in a domestic partnership, or both.
This side of the worksheet will help you determine whether you
are eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The total
amount of your community obligations (debts) cannot be more than
$6,000. Do not include car loans. Be sure you include any other debts
you took on while you were living together as spouses or domestic
partners. List the amount you owe on the items from your Worksheet
for Determining Value and Division of Community Property. Then
add all other debts and bills, including loans, charge accounts, medical
bills, and taxes you owe.
Amount
Item Owed
This side of the worksheet will help
you decide on a fair way to divide up
your community obligations. You will
use this information in preparing a
property settlement agreement.
Stereo set 150
Color TV 100
Golf clubs 50
Dr. R.C. Himple 74
Sam’s Drugs 32
College loan 500
Cogwell’s charge account 275
Mister Charge account 68
Green’s Furniture 123
Dr. Irving Roberts 37
Pat's parents 150
Pat
Will Pay
Chris
Will Pay
150
100
50
74
32
500
275
68
123
37
150
585 974
TOTAL
1559
Pat's Share
of Community
Obligations
Chris's Share
of Community
Obligations
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CASE NUMBER:
PETITIONER 1:
PETITIONER 2:
VI. WORKSHEET FOR DETERMINING COMMUNITY OBLIGATIONS AND THEIR DIVISION
This side of the worksheet will help you determine whether you
are eligible to use the summary dissolution procedure. The total
amount of your community obligations (debts) cannot be more than
$6,000. Do not include car loans. Be sure you include any other debts
you took on while you were living together as spouses or domestic
partners. List the amount you owe on the items from your Worksheet
for Determining Value and Division of Community Property. Then
add all other debts and bills, including loans, charge accounts, medical
bills, and taxes you owe.
Amount
Item Owed
This side of the worksheet will help
you decide on a fair way to divide up
your community obligations. You will
use this information in preparing a
property settlement agreement.
Petitioner 1
Will Pay
Petitioner 2
Will Pay
TOTAL
Petitioner 1
Share of Community
Obligations
Petitioner 2
Share of Community
Obligations
VII. WHAT SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THE PROPERTY SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT?
A property settlement agreement should contain at least five parts:
I.
Preliminary Statement
This part identifies the spouses or domestic partners, states that the marriage and/or domestic partnership is being
ended, and states that both spouses or partners agree on the details of the agreement.
II.
Division of Community Property
This part has two sections:
1. What the one spouse or partner receives; and
2. What the other spouse or partner receives.
III.
Division of Community Obligations
This part has two sections:
1. The amount one spouse or partner must pay and whom he or she must pay it to.
2. The amount the other spouse or partner must pay and whom he or she must pay it to.
IV.
Waiver of Spousal Support
This part states that each spouse or partner gives up all rights of financial support from the other.
V.
Date and Signature
Both spouses or partners must write the date and sign the agreement.
An example of a property settlement agreement is found on pages 13–15.
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VIII. SAMPLE PROPERTY SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT
Below is a sample of an acceptable property settlement agreement. You may use it as a model for your own
agreement if you wish. You can find a fill-in-the blanks version of this agreement at www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp in the
section on summary dissolution.
The parts that are underlined will fit most cases. You can copy these parts for your own agreement. Since many of the
words have special meanings in the law, you may wish to talk to a lawyer if you want to change the words.
The parts printed in regular type (not underlined) are based on an imaginary couple. You will need to replace these
parts with items that apply to your situation.
The numbered notes in italics in the right-hand column are not part of the agreement. They are there to help you
understand it. (You will not need the small and in the sample for your agreement.)
Remember, you can divide the items any way you want. As long as you both agree, the court will accept it. If you cannot
agree about the division of your property and debts, you should file a regular dissolution.*
PROPERTY SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT
If you prefer, you can also write "hereafter
called "Wife" or "Husband" or "Partner A" or
"Partner B" whichever applies. Just make sure
it is clear to whom you are referring.
This means there are problems in your
marriage or domestic partnership that you
think can never be solved. Irreconcilable
differences is the only legal grounds for
getting a summary dissolution.
At the trial in a regular dissolution, a judge would set a value on and divide community property and debts into two approximately
equal parts as provided by California law.
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1.
The sample below is for a married couple, so it refers to marriage. If you are ending a domestic partnership, you should
say that in your agreement. If you are ending both a marriage and a domestic partnership with the same person, say
both and write in the dates of both your marriage and the registration of your domestic partnership.
We are Chris P. Smedlap, hereafter called Chris, and Pat T.
Smedlap, hereafter called Pat. We were married on October 7,
2015, and separated on December 5, 2016. Because
irreconcilable differences have caused the permanent breakdown
of our marriage, we have made this agreement together to settle
once and for all what we owe to each other and what we can
expect from each other. Each of us states here that nothing has
been held back and that we have honestly included everything we
could think of in listing the money and goods that we own; and
each of us states here that we believe the other has been open
and honest in writing this agreement. Each of us agrees to sign
and exchange any papers that might be needed to complete this
agreement.
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Each of us also understands that even after a Joint Petition for
Summary Dissolution is filed, this entire agreement will be canceled if
either of us revokes the dissolution proceeding.
Community property is property that you
own as a couple (see page 2).
II. Division of Community Property
We divide our community property as follows:
If you have no community property,
replace Part II with the simple statement
"We have no community property."
1. Chris transfers to Pat as Pat's sole and separate property:
A. All household furniture and furnishings located at the apartment
at 180 Needlepoint Way, San Francisco.
B. All rights to cash in savings account at Home Savings.
C. All cash value in life insurance policy insuring life of Pat
through Sun Valley Life Insurance.
D. All retirement and pension plan benefits earned by Pat during
marriage.
E. Two U.S. Savings Bonds, Series E.
F. Pat’s jewelry.
G. 2013 Chevrolet 4-door sedan.
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4
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3
If the furniture and household goods in one
apartment are to be divided, they may have
to be listed item by item.
This means that the property agreement is
a part of the dissolution proceeding. If
either of you decides to stop the
dissolution proceeding by turning in a
Notice of Revocation of Petition for
Summary Dissolution (form FL-830) (see
page 18), this entire agreement will be
canceled.
2. Pat transfers to Chris as Chris's sole and separate property:
A. All household furniture and furnishings located at the apartment
on 222 Bond Street, San Francisco.
B. All retirement and pension plan benefits earned by Chris
during marriage.
C. Season tickets to Golden State Terriers basketball games.
D. One stereo set.
E. One set of Jock Nicklaus golf clubs.
F. One RAC color television.
G. 2013 Ford station wagon.
H. One pet parrot named Arthur, plus cage and parrot food.
I. All rights to cash in checking account in Bank of America.
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III. Division of Community Property (Debts)
If you have no unpaid debts,
replace Part III with the simple
statement "We have no unpaid
community obligations."
1. Chris will pay the following debts and will not at any
time hold Pat responsible for them:
A. Mister Charge account.
B. Debt to Dr. R.C. Himple.
C. Debt to Sam’s Drugs.
A general rule for dividing debts is
to give the debt over to the person
who benefited more from the item.
In the sample agreement, because
Chris received the education, Chris
should pay off the loan.
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D. Debt to UC Berkeley for college education loan to Chris.
2. Pat will pay the following debts and will not at any time
hold Chris responsible for them:
A. Cogwell’s charge account.
B. Debt to Pat’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Smith.
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C. Debt to Green’s Furniture.
D. Debt to Dr. Irving Roberts.
IV. Waiver of Spousal/Partner Support
You each give up the right to have
your spouse or partner support you.
Each of us waives any claim for spousal/partner support now and for
all time.
Dated:V. Dated:
Chris P. Smedlap Pat T. Smedlap
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E. Debt to Golf Store for golf clubs.
F. Debt to Everything Electronics for color TV and stereo set.
G. Debt to Used Ford Store for 2003 Ford.
E. Debt to Friendly Finance Company for 2003 Chevrolet 4-door Sedan.
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IX. WHAT STEPS DO YOU HAVE TO TAKE TO GET A SUMMARY DISSOLUTION?
If after reviewing the information in this booklet, you feel your marriage or your domestic partnership will qualify for a
summary dissolution, you should carefully go through the following 15 steps. You can fill out the forms, worksheets, and
agreements in the summary dissolution section
Type or print your property settlement agreement if you have any property or debts to divide. Both of you must
date and sign it. Make two extra copies. See pages 12–15 for an example and instructions. You can also find a
version that you can fill in online at www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp in the information on summary dissolution at
http://courts.ca.gov/1241.htm.
5.
with a typewriter; or
with neat printing.
online, for free, at www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp;
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Turn to page 7 and complete the Worksheet for Determining Value of Separate Property.
See page 6 for an example. Make one extra copy of your worksheet after it has been
completed. Give one copy to your spouse or partner and keep one for your records.
Turn to page 9 and complete the Worksheet for Determining Value and Division of
Community Property. See page 8 for an example. Make one extra copy of your worksheet
after it has been completed. Give one copy to your spouse or partner and keep one for your
records.
(1)
(2)
Turn to page 11 and complete the Worksheet for Determining Community Obligations and
Their Division. See page 10 for an example. Make one extra copy of your worksheet after it
has been completed. Give one copy to your spouse or partner and keep one for your
records.
(3)
Fill out an Income and Expense Declaration (form FL-150). You each need to fill out this form and give it to your
spouse or partner before you sign your property settlement agreement or complete your divorce. Make one extra
copy of your form after it has been completed. Give one copy to your spouse or partner and keep one for your
records.
3.
Complete and give your spouse or domestic partner a list of community and separate property assets and
obligations. This information is needed to comply with the requirement to exchange a preliminary declaration of
disclosure in summary dissolution cases. Use the forms listed below in 1a or 1b for this purpose.
1.
Along with the documents listed in 1, give your spouse or domestic partner all tax returns you filed in the last two
years. Give one copy to your spouse or domestic partner and keep one copy for your records.
2.
The worksheets in this booklet on pages 7, 9, and 11.
A Declaration of Disclosure (form FL-140) and a Schedule of Assets and Debts (form FL-142) (or a
Property Declaration (form FL-160)). These forms are not included in this booklet. You may find them
online at www.courts.ca.gov/forms.htm. Give one copy to your spouse or domestic partner and keep
one for your records; or
b.
a.
Fill out a Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-800). Both of you must sign and date this petition.
Make two extra copies of this form. (This is the form you need to START the process.)
6.
Note: When signing your joint petition and your property settlement agreement, you are signing these documents
under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California, which is the same as being sworn to testify in
court.
You may not sign each other's name.
Complete a written statement about business and investments opportunities and give it to your spouse or
partner before you sign a property settlement agreement or complete your divorce. Keep a copy for your
records.
4.
Note: The written statement must describe any investment opportunity, business opportunity, or other
income-producing opportunity that developed since the date you separated which was based on any
investment made, significant business done, or other income-producing opportunity that was presented to
you between the date you married or became domestic partners and the date you separated (there is no
specific form for this purpose).
Pay the superior court clerk's filing fee. If you cannot afford to pay the filing fee, you may qualify for a fee waiver
based on your income. If one of you qualifies for a fee waiver but the other one does not, the one who does not
qualify will have to pay the filing fee. To request a fee waiver, see Information Sheet on Waiver of Court Fees
and Costs (form FW-001-INFO). You will need to prepare a Request to Waive Court Fees (form FW-001) and an
Order on Court Fee Waiver (form FW-003).
On the day that appears on your Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of Judgment (form FL-825) as the
effective date of your dissolution:
Your marriage or domestic partnership (or both) is ended;
b.
The agreements you made in your property settlement agreement are binding—you will then own the
property assigned to you, and you will have to pay the bills assigned to you;
c.
Except for those agreements, you and your spouse or partner have no further obligations to each other; and
You are legally free to remarry or register a new domestic partnership.
d.
REMEMBER: Either of you can stop the process by filling out a Notice of Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution
(form FL-830) and bringing it to the superior court clerk during the six-month waiting period before the date your
dissolution is effective according to the Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of Judgment (form FL-825) that you
received from the court.
Wait for six months. If either one of you wants to stop the summary dissolution case, fill out and file a Notice of
Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-830) before the six months run out.
The clerk will file your joint petition and return the copies to you and your spouse or partner. The court may also
process the Judgment of Dissolution at that time, in the next few weeks, or after the six-month waiting period has
expired and give or mail it to you and your spouse or partner. The Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of
Judgment (form FL-825) will have a date on which the dissolution ending your marriage, domestic partnership,
or both will be final. That is the effective date of your dissolution and it will be six months from the date you file
your joint petition. The six-month waiting period is mandated by law.
11.
12.
14.
15.
Put your copies of all documents in a safe place.
13.
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Make one extra copy of a blank Notice of Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-830) so each
of you has one, and hold on to it. This is the form you would need to STOP the process. You may wish to use it
during the waiting period if you change your mind and want to stop the process. You should keep one copy. See
page 18 for more information.
9.
Take your Joint Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-800), Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of
Judgment (form FL-825), and all of your copies to the superior court clerk's office together with two self-
addressed, stamped envelopes (one addressed to each spouse or partner). The location of your superior court
clerk's office can be found in the phone book or online at www.courts.ca.gov/find-my-court.htm. The clerk will
stamp the date on all copies, will keep one copy of each document, and will return the other two to you. One
copy is for each spouse or partner.
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Make three sets of forms that include copies of your property settlement agreement and a copy of your Joint
Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-800). Staple each set together.
7.
Fill out the top portion of the Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of Judgment (form FL-825) and make
three copies of it.
8.
a.
X. WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT REVOCATION
It is important to realize that the Notice of Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-830) is not just
another form you are supposed to fill out and turn in.
Do not fill it out and do not bring it to the superior court clerk unless you want to stop the divorce!
This is the form you need if you want to stop the divorce. Revoking the agreement is canceling or stopping it.
What reasons are there for revoking?
There are three reasons you might have for wanting to stop the summary dissolution:
You may come to believe that you will get a better settlement if you go to court than with the agreement you originally
made with your spouse or partner. (Maybe, after thinking it over, you feel you are not receiving a fair share of the
community property.)
At the time you picked up the joint petition forms, you and your spouse or partner also received a blank Notice of
Revocation of Petition for Summary Dissolution (form FL-830). Fill out the form, sign it, make two copies, and bring them
to the superior court clerk’s office. You must also send a copy of form FL-830 to your spouse or domestic partner by
first-class mail, postage prepaid, to his or her last known address. You can do this alone. This form does not need your
spouse's or partner's signature.
If you do this at any time during the six-month waiting period, before the effective date of your dissolution, you will stop
this divorce proceeding.
Can the dissolution be stopped once the waiting period is over?
NO. After the date the court wrote on your Judgment of Dissolution and Notice of Entry of Judgment (form FL-825) as the
date your marriage or domestic partnership is ended (the date the divorce is effective), you can no longer revoke the
dissolution by filing the revocation form. You may have other legal options, but you will need to talk to a lawyer about
them.
If you change over to a regular dissolution, what happens to the part of the waiting period that has passed? You
can apply the amount of time you waited on the summary dissolution to your regular dissolution. For example, if four
months went by before you decided to revoke the summary dissolution, the waiting period for the regular dissolution will
be shortened by four months.
However, you can save this time only if you file for a regular dissolution within 90 days of revoking the summary
dissolution.
What is the notice of revocation for?
Why might you want to change over to the regular dissolution?
How do you do it?
1. You have decided to return to your spouse or partner and continue the marriage or domestic partnership;
2. You want to change over to the regular dissolution as a better way of getting your divorce; or
3. You learn that one of you is pregnant.
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You can locate organizations that can help you find a lawyer in the yellow pages of your telephone directory under
“Attorneys,” “Attorney Referral Service,” or “Lawyer Referral Service.” In many cases you will be able to find an attorney
who will charge only a small fee for your first visit. You can get information about free or low-cost legal services through
the county bar association in your county. You can find information about certified lawyer referral services at
www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp or on the State Bar website at www.calbar.ca.gov.
XI. SHOULD YOU SEE A LAWYER?
Do you have to accept your lawyer’s advice?
Second, a lawyer can read your property settlement agreement to help you figure out if you have thought of everything
you should have. (It is easy to forget things you do not see very often, such as savings bonds and safe deposit boxes.)
Third, in many situations it is not easy to figure out what should count as community property and what should count as
separate property. Suppose one of you had money before the marriage and put it into a bank account in both of your
names and then both of you used money from that account. It may not be easy to decide how the money remaining in
that account should be divided. A lawyer can advise you on how to make these decisions.
Fourth, there may be special situations in which your property settlement is not covered by the sample agreement on
pages 13–15.
A lawyer can help you put the agreement in words that are legally precise and cannot be challenged or misinterpreted
later.
Where can you find a lawyer?
Must you have a lawyer to use the summary dissolution procedure?
If you want legal advice, does that mean you have to hire a lawyer?
How can a lawyer help you with the summary dissolution procedure?
No. You can do the whole thing by yourselves. But it would be wise to see a lawyer before you decide to do it yourselves.
You should not rely on this booklet only. It is not intended to take the place of a lawyer.
No. You may hire a lawyer, of course, but you can also just visit a lawyer once or twice for advice on how to carry out the
dissolution proceeding. Do not be afraid to ask the lawyer in advance what fee will be charged. It may be surprisingly
inexpensive to have a lawyer handle your divorce.
No, you do not. And if you are not pleased with what one lawyer advises, you can feel free to go to another one.
First, a lawyer can advise you, on the basis of your personal situation, whether you ought to use the regular dissolution
procedure rather than the summary dissolution procedure.
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XII. SOME GENERAL INFORMATION
What about income taxes?
The amount of money that you will owe, or that will be taken out of your paycheck, for income taxes may be greater after
you are single again. If that is the case, you should prepare yourself for a bigger tax obligation.
It would be a good idea to consult the Internal Revenue Service or a tax expert on how the divorce is going to affect your
taxes. You should probably do this before you make your property settlement agreement.
What about bank accounts and credit cards?
If you have a joint bank account, it may be a good idea to close it when you separate and get two individual bank
accounts. That way it will be easier to keep your money separate.
If you have credit card accounts that you both have been using, you should destroy the cards and take out separate
accounts.
What about cars?
If both of your names are on a title to a car and you agree that one of you is going to own the car, you need to take action
to change the ownership. You should call or visit the Department of Motor Vehicles to find out how to do that. You should
also talk to the lender to get the debt into one person's name and change the insurance coverage after both the title and
debt are transferred.
What if your spouse or domestic partner does not pay his or her debts?
Can you take back your former name?
When your divorce is final, all your rights and duties connected with your marriage or domestic partnership have ended
and you cannot appeal. But if you decide later that you were cheated or pressured by your spouse or partner, or if you
believe that a mistake was made in the paperwork connected with the divorce, the court may be able to set aside the
divorce. A lawyer can explain your rights.
If you are receiving a tax refund, you should agree in the property settlement agreement on how it should be divided.
What if I am not happy with my final judgment?
If you have filed a joint tax return, both of you will still be responsible for paying any unpaid taxes even after your divorce.
If your spouse or domestic partner does not pay a debt that is his or her responsibility, the person who loaned the money
may be able to collect it from you. But then a court may order your spouse or partner to reimburse you. If you have any
reason to worry about this, a lawyer can explain your rights to you.
If you changed your name when you were married or registered your domestic partnership, you have the right to give up
that name and get your former name back. You can do this by requesting it in the joint petition. If you do not request this
in the joint petition, you can file a form called Ex Parte Application for Restoration of Former Name After Entry of
Judgment and Order (form FL-395). Your spouse or partner cannot make you change your name.
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