Learn
Prepare
Respond...
One Ashburton Place, Room 1305
Boston, MA 02108
(617)-727-7440 Voice & TTY
(800)-322-2020 Voice & TTY
Web: www.Mass.Gov/MOD
Blog.mass.gov/mod
@MassDisability
Charles D. Baker, Governor
Karyn E. Polito, Lt. Governor
David D'Arcangelo, Director
MOD’s Emergency Preparedness
Training Supplemental Documents
Table of Contents:
I. Massachusetts Office on Disability Pg 1 & 2
II. Disability Indicator Program & Forms Pg 3,4,5
III. Show Me for Emergencies Mobile Application Pg 6
IV. MEMA Rolls Out MASS Alerts Application Pg 7
V. The Silent Call Procedure Pg 8
VI. Emergency Kit Checklist Pg 9
VII. Customizing Your Disaster Supplies Kit
VIII. Vital Records
IX. Preparing Your Pets For Emergencies
X. MASS 211
XI. MASS Options
XII. REQUIPMENT
XIII. ER Preparedness Take-A-Ways
Pg 10
Pg 11
Pg 12 & 13
Pg 14
Pg 15
Pg 16
Pg 17
“This document was prepared under a grant from FEMA’s Grant
Program Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Points
of views or opinions expressed in this document are those of the
authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or
policies of FEMA’s Grant Program Directorate or the U.S.
Department of Homeland Security.”
MASSAC
HUSETTS OFFICE
ON DISABILITY
One As
hburton Place, Room
1305
Boston, MA 02108
(617)-727-7440 Voice & TTY
(800)-322-2020 Voice & TTY
Charles D. Baker, Governor
Karyn E. Polito, Lt. Governor
David D'Arcangelo, Director
(617)-727-7440 Voice & TTY
(800)-322-2020 Voice & TTY
Web: www.Mass.Gov/MOD
@MassDisability
Blog.mass.gov/mod
Overview
Of
Services
RESOURCES
Our of
fice an
d staff possess a
wealth of institutional information
that we make available to the public.
MOD regularly deploys materials,
staff and other assets that benefit
directly persons with disabilities.
Our efforts involve disseminating in-
formation and communicating in
an open way that utilizes a variety of
methods.
Emergency Preparedness Bags
Quarterly Newsletter
Website & Blog
Fact Sheets
Disability Laws Booklet
Social Media Communications
Disability Summit
Hosting Quarterly Regional Commis-
sion on Disability Meetings
MASSAC
HUSETTS OFFICE
ON DISABILITY
1
Ad
vocacy
Information & Referral on civil rights and resources
Technical Assistance on reasonable
accommodations, applicability of architectural access
codes, etc.
Client Assistance Program for Vocational
Rehabilitation and Independent Living Center
consumers
Assistance with disability-related discrimination and
denial of service
Architectural review/site visits
Technical Advisor to local Commissions on Disability
T
raining
Community Access
Monitor
Emergency P
reparedness
Americans with Disabilities
Act
Commissions on Disability
Customized & Special
Topics
Monitorin
g
Commonwealth Executive branch
ADA Coordinator
Architectural Access Board
Member
State 911 Commission
Disability policymaking
Re
sources
Quarterly Newsletter
Website
Fact Sheets
Disability Laws Booklet
Videos
Public Outreach
Other Publications
2
3
DISABILITY INDICATOR FORM
If the disability indicator form is not completed properly, the information will not be
entered into the 9-1-1 system.
You are requir
ed to complete this form if you want your police department, fire department, or
other emergency agenc
y to know about you when you call 9-1-1 in an emergency.
*PLEASE NOTE: IT IS IMPORTANT TO SUBMIT A NEW DISABILITY INDICATOR
FORM UPON CHANGE OF SERVICE PROVIDER, TELEPHONE NUMBER, OR
ADDRESS.*
When your 9-1-1 call is answered at your local Public Safety Answering Point, the 9-1-1 system
automatically displays your name, address and telephone number on the dispatcher’s screen.
At your request, codes will be displayed on the dispatcher’s screen that will identify the
disability indicators that have been reported for you or someone living with you at your address.
These codes will help the dispatcher at the 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Point to
communicate with the caller and provide useful information to your responding public safety
agency.
The information is confidential and will
only appear at the dispatcher’s location when a 9-1-1
call originates from your
address.
The information you provide for input to the 9-1-1 system will remain until you request a
change or make a request to have it removed. It is your responsibility to notify your 9-1-1
Municipal Coordinator when there is a change in the information described on this form.
When there is a change, complete another form and send it to your 9-1-1 Municipal
Coordinator.
Important Information and Instructions
When filling out the form, be sure to:
1 Give your telephone number, name, and address
2 Check the box or boxes
3 Sign and date the form
4 Return the form to your 9-1-1 Municipal Coordinator for processing
Any questions should be referred to your 9-1-1 Municipal Coordinator at:
Name: _
________________________________________
Telephone Number: _______________________________
9-1-1 MUNICIPAL COORDINATORS:
RETAIN ORIGINAL FOR YOUR RECORDS All forms must be signed by both
parties or it will be returned.
Fax all disability indicator forms to Verizon 9-1-1 Database Management at
1-800-839-6020
4
9-1-1 Disability Indicator Form-Individual Record
The filing of this document with your 9-1-1 Municipal Coordinator will alert public safety officials that
an individual residing at your address communicates over the phone by a TTY and/or has a disability
that may hinder evacuation or transport. This information is confidential and will ONLY appear at the
dispatcher’s location when a 9-1-1 call originates from your address.
*PLEASE NOTE: IT IS IMPORTANT TO SUBMIT A NEW DISABILITY INDICATOR FORM UPON
CHANGE OF SERVICE PROVIDER AND ADDRESS.*
Telephone Number: Area code (_____) _____________________________ Voice TTY
Telephone Service Provider_______________________________________
Name:________________________________________________________
Address:_______________________________________________________
Town & Zip code:________________________________________________
Please check approved designations for inclusion in the 9-1-1 Database to assist public safety
dispatchers in responding to an emergency at your address: Any changes should be
communicated to your 9-1-1 Municipal Coordinator promptly.
Check all that apply to indicate that someone at the address:
“LSS” Life Support System: has equipment required to sustain their life.
“MI” Mobility Impaired: is bedridden, wheelchair user or has another mobility
impairment.
“B” Blind: is legally blind.
“DHH” Deaf or Hard of Hearing: is deaf or hard of hearing.
“TTY”: communication via the phone may be by TTY.
“SI” Speech Impaired: has a speech impairment.
“CI” Cognitively Impaired: is cognitively impaired.
PLEASE REMOVE any designation presently on file.
PLEASE CHANGE existing designators to those shown above.
NOTICE:
By initiating this document I understand that I am responsible for notifying my 9-1-1
Municipal Coordinator of any changes with regard to the status of the above disability indicator(s).
I further agree, I will indemnify, defend and hold the State 911 Department, Verizon, my public
safety dispatch location and municipality harmless from and against any claims, suits and
proceedings (including attorney fees associated therewith) resulting from or arising out of the
initial provision or updating of this information.
I underst
and this information will remain as part of my 9-1-1 record until such time as I
notify my 9-1-1 Municipal Coordinator to changing or delete the same.
Signed :________________________________(Customer) DATE:________________________
Signed: ________________________________(Municipal Coordinator) DATE:______________
5
Show Me for Emergencies Mobile App
Now Av
ailable for Free Download!
The Office of Preparedness and Emergency Management (OPEM) is pleased to announce the release of the first
Massachusetts Department of Public Health mobile application, Show Me for Emergencies, an innovative,
interactive app that will enhance communication between public health and emergency management personnel and
volunteers and individuals with communication challenges across a variety of emergency settings.
The app expands upon the work that was done on the 2012 booklet, Show Me: A Communication Tool for
Emergency Shelters, to include not only emergency shelter settings, but emergency dispensing sites, shelter in
place, and evacuation scenarios as well. Within each scenario there are options to communicate information such
as an individual’s preferred language, the type of emergency that’s happening, personal and medical needs,
animated instructions for actions like boiling water or gathering items, along with a multitude of other concepts.
Show Me for Emergencies is a free, downloadable mobile app available in both the iTunes and Google Play
stores. One of the essential features of the app is that once it’s downloaded to a user’s device, the app does not
need internet connectivity in order to access its content. The intended target audience for the app is public health
personnel, first responders, and Medical Reserve Corps and other volunteers, but we encourage folks from all
disciplines to check the app out to see if you might be able to make use of it in your daily operations. To read more
about Show Me, please visit: www.mass.gov/dph/showme.
You can download the app from the iTunes store at: https://itunes.apple.com/in/app/show-me-for-
emergencies/id840012297?mt=8, and from the Google Play store at:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.ma.dph.showme.
6
MassachusettsAlertsApp
MassachuseƩs Alerts: A free public safety alerƟng app.
KeyFeatures
Customizethetypesofalertsyoureceive.
Yourprivacyandidentyare100%protected.Nopersonalinfor-
maonisrequired,ever.
Alertsmayincludelinkstowebsites,informaonalbullens,orvideos.
Sharealertswithothersthroughyoursocialmedianetworks.
Audioalertswithaenon-gengsounds.
MassachusettsAlerts
Receiveemergencyalertsandinformaonbasedonyourlocaon,proximitytoaneventorincident,andtheprefer-
encesyouselect.Userreceivereal-meinformaon,including:
Severeweatherabouttoaffectyourarea
Amberalertsformissingchildren
Cricalinformaonduringdisasterssuchasevacuaonorshelte
r-in-placeinformaonand
emergencyshelterlocaons
Otherinformaontokeepyousafeduringemergencies
TheMassachusesAlertsappiscurrentlyavailableforiOS(Apple)andAndroidplaorms.Downloadittodayby
searchingfor"MassachusesAlerts"ontheAppStore,AndroidMarketorusingthebelowlinks.
MassachusesAlertsFrequentlyAskedQuesons(FAQs)
7
Source:
MA State 911 Department and the Executive Office of Public Safety and
Security. www.mass.gov/e911
The Silent Call Procedure
The “Silent Call Procedure” is used when a caller is unable to verbally communicate their emergency over
the phone. If a resident of Massachusetts calls 9-1-1 and is unable to speak for ANY reason
(i.e. physical disability, domestic violence, home invasion, or medical condition) the need for help can still
be communicated to a 9-1-1 dispatcher by using the SILENT CALL PROCEDURE. With the Silent Call
Procedure, the caller indicates their need for help by pressing digits on their telephone keypad. The Silent
Call Procedure can work from ANY touch tone telephone (land line/cell phone).
FIRST DIAL 9-1-1
Once the call is answered, indicate your need my pressing the appropriate number on your telephone.
IF YOU NEED POLICE
PRESS 1
IF YOU NEED FIRE
PRESS 2
IF YOU NEED AN AMBULANCE
PRESS 3
The 9-1-1 Dispatcher may ask questions that require yes or no answers.
PRESS 4 FOR YES
PRESS 5 FOR NO
8
Emergency Kit Checklist
3 days of nonperishable / non-cook food
water (1 gal. per day per person), medication
ashlight, battery operated radio, extra batteries
rst aid kit, cash, cell phone and charger
ID cards, information: (Dr., meds, allergies), family / friends
contacts, toothbrush / toothpaste, blanket and washcloth
DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: The likelihood that you will recover from an emergency tomorrow often depends on the
planning and preparation done today. This list may help you get through the rst 3 days, after a disaster.
It is a starting point, as individual needs vary depending upon circumstances.
For additional information, visit: www.Ready.gov
clothes and baby or pet supplies if you need them
Region 1, SOS Secrets of Survivors
9
Customizing Your Disaster Supplies Kit
To Meet Your Needs
This k
it is designed to be the basis for some of the supplies that may be needed when an emergency or disaster happens. While
the materials included in this kit provide a good start, there is no standardized kit that can provide all supplies that individuals
may need for all emergencies. Your kit should be customized based on your own personal needs and the environment that you
live in. additional contents could include:
Cloth
ing and Bedding
At least one complete change of clothing and
footwear per person.
Sturdy shoes or work boots.
Rain Gear.
Blankets or sleeping bags.
Hat and gloves.
Thermal underwear.
Tools and Supplies
Flashlight and extra batteries
Mess kit, or paper cups, plates and plastic
utensils.
Cash, travelers checks, change.
Non-electric can opener, utility knife.
Tent.
Pliers.
Tape.
Matches in waterproof container.
Aluminum foil
Paper, pencil
Needles, thread
Medicine Dropper
Shut-off wrench, (to turn off household gas and
water)
Plastic Sheeting
Map of area
Battery operated radio and extra batteries
Whistle
Plastic storage container
Sanitat
ion
Toilet paper, towelettes
Soap, liquid detergent
Feminine supplies
Plastic garbage bags, ties
Plastic bucket with tight lid
Disinfectant
Household chlorine bleach
Hand sanitizer
Water
Store one gallon of water per person per day
(two quarts for drinking, two quarts for food
preparation/sanitation) Note: Hot environments
and intense physical activity can dramatically
increase the amount of water that a person
needs to drink.
Food
Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits and
vegetables
Canned juices, milk, soup (if powdered, store
extra water)
High energy foods peanut butter, jelly,
crackers, granola bars, trail mix
Vitamins
Comfort/stress foods Cookies, hard candy,
sweetened cereals, instant coffee, tea bags
Special Items
Medications (both prescribed and non-
pres
cription) that you take, including pain
relievers, stomach remedies, etc. (Ask you
physician or pharmacist about storing
prescription medications)
Extra eyeglasses
Important family documents (in a waterproof,
portable container)
o Will, insurance policies, contracts,
deeds, stocks and bonds
o Passports, social security cards,
immunization records
o Bank account numbers
o Credit card account numbers and
companies
o Inventory of valuable household
goods, important telephone numbers
o Family records (birth, marriage, death
certificates
Entertainment games and books
Supplies for persons with special needs, such as
infant, elderly, or persons with disabilities
Family or workplace disaster plan
Rethink your kit and individual needs at least once a year. Replace batteries, update clothes, etc
For more information about disaster Preparedness please visit the American Red Cross website
at: http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared
.
10
Vital Records
(Store copies in Ziploc bag)
Birth Certificate Family photo with Pets Marriage Certificate
Medicare Card Social Security Card Identification Card
Guardianship/Conservato
rship
Keeping New England Prepared
FEMA Region 1 National Preparedness Division
www.fema.gov/region-i-national-preparedness-0
Phone: 877-336-2734
11
Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies
Makes Sense. Get Ready Now.
1. Get a Kit of pet emergency supplies.
Just as you do with your family’s emergency supply kit, think first about the basics for survival, particularly food
and water.
Food: Keep at least three days of food in an airtight, waterproof container.
Water: Store at least three days of water specifically for your pets, in addition to water you
need for yourself and your family.
Medicines and medical records: Keep an extra supply of medicines your pet takes on a
regular basis in a waterproof container.
First aid kit: Talk to your veterinarian about what is most appropriate for your pet’s
emergency medical needs. Most kits should include cotton bandage rolls, bandage tape
and scissors; antibiotic ointment; flea and tick prevention; latex gloves, isopropyl alcohol
and saline solution. Include a pet first aid reference book.
Collar with ID tag, harness or leash: Your pet should wear a collar with its rabies tag
and identification at all times. Include a backup leash, collar and ID tag in your pet’s
emergency supply kit.
Important documents: Place copies of your pet’s registration information, adoption
papers, vaccination documents and medical records in a clean plastic bag or waterproof
container and also add them to your kit.
Crate or other pet carrier: If you need to evacuate in an emergency situation take your pets
and animals with you, provided that it is practical to do so.
Sanitation: Include pet litter and litter box if appropriate, newspapers, paper towels, plastic
trash bags and household chlorine bleach to provide for your pet’s sanitation needs. You can
use bleach as a disinfectant (dilute nine parts water to one part bleach), or in an emergency
you can also use it to purify water. Use 8 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon
of water, stir well and let it stand for 30 minutes before use. Do not use scented or color safe
bleaches or those with added cleaners.
A picture of you and your pet together: If you become separated from your pet during an
emergency, a picture of you and your pet together will help you document ownership and
allow others to assist you in identifying your pet. Include detailed information about species,
Familiar items: Put favorite toys, treats or bedding in your kit. Familiar items can help reduce
stress for your pet.
Consider two kits. In one, put everything your pets will need to stay where you are and make it on your own.
The other should be a lightweight, smaller version you can take with you if you and your pets have to get away.
2. Make a Plan for what you will do in an emergency.
Plan in advance what you will do in an emergency. Be prepared to assess the situation. Use common sense and
whatever you have on hand to take care of yourself and ensure your pet’s safety during an emergency.
For more information, visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY
12
For more information, visit ready.gov or call 1-800-BE-READY
Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies
Makes Sense. Get Ready Now.
Evacuate. Plan how you will assemble your pets and anticipate where you will go. If you must evacuate, take
your pets with you, if practical. If you go to a public shelter, keep in mind your pets may not be allowed inside.
Secure appropriate lodging in advance depending on the number and type of animals in your care. Consider
family or friends outside your immediate area who would be willing to take in you and your pets in an emergency.
Other options may include: a hotel or motel that takes pets or some sort of boarding facility, such as a kennel or
veterinary hospital that is near an evacuation facility or your family’s meeting place. Find out before an emergency
happens if any of these facilities in your area might be viable options for you and your pets.
Develop a buddy system. Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to make sure that someone is available to
care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation
plans and show them where you keep your pet’s emergency supply kit. Also designate specific locations, one in
your immediate neighborhood and other farther away, where you will meet in an emergency.
Talk to your pet’s veterinarian about emergency planning. Discuss the types of things you should include
in your pet’s emergency first aid kit. Get the names of vets or veterinary hospitals in other cities where you might
need to seek temporary shelter. Also talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. If you and your pet are
separated, this permanent implant for your pet and corresponding enrollment in a recovery database can help a
veterinarian or shelter identify your animal. If your pet is microchipped, keeping your emergency contact informa-
tion up to date and listed with a reliable recovery database is essential to you and your pet being reunited.
Gather contact information for emergency animal treatment. Make a list of contact information and ad-
dresses of area animal control agencies including the Humane Society or ASPCA and emergency veterinary
hospitals. Keep one copy of these phone numbers with you, and one in your pet’s emergency supply kit. Obtain
“Pets Inside” stickers and place them on your doors or windows, including information on the number and types
of pets in your home to alert firefighters and rescue workers. Consider putting a phone number on the sticker
where you could be reached in an emergency. And, if time permits, remember to write the words “Evacuated
with Pets” across the stickers, should you evacuate your home with your pets.
3. Be Prepared for what might happen.
Some of the things you can do to prepare for the unexpected, such as assembling an emergency supply kit for
yourself, your family and your pets, is the same regardless of the type of emergency. However, it’s important to
say informed about what might happen and know what types of emergencies are likely to affect your region.
Be prepared to adapt this information to your personal circumstances and make every effort to follow instruc-
tions received from authorities on the scene. With these simple preparations, you can be ready for the unex-
pected. Those who take the time to prepare themselves and their pets will likely encounter less difficulty, stress
and worry. Take the time now to get yourself and your pet ready.
Developed in partnership with:
13
Mass 2-1-1
Need Help & Don't Know Where To Turn?
Every day, someone somewhere in Massachusetts needs to find essential community services,
an after school program, a food bank, or where to secure care for an aging parent. Many face
these challenges, but don't always know where to turn for help. The Solution is to Dial 2-1-1.
Mass 211 is an easy to remember telephone number that connects callers to information about
critical health and human services available in their community. It serves as a resource for
finding government benefits and services, nonprofit organizations, support groups, volunteer
opportunities, donation programs, and other local resources. Always a confidential call, Mass
211 maintains the integrity of the 9-1-1 system saving that vital community resource for life and
death emergencies.
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, Mass 211 is an easy way to find or give help in your
community.
Mass 211 responds immediately during times of crisis, to field calls regarding the crisis and to
direct callers to services most appropriate for their needs. If you are unable to reach 2-1-1 due
to your telephone or cell phone carrier, a toll-free number is available 1-877-211-MASS (6277);
Hearing impaired callers can reach us using 508-370-4890 TTY
Relationship to the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA)
Mass 211 partners with the (MEMA) and local offices of emergency management to provide
citizens with critical information and non-emergency assistance before, during and after
emergency or disaster events. The Mass 211 Emergency and Disaster Services Line relieves
pressure on 9-1-1 and emergency response teams by providing contact center services for
citizens needing critical non-emergency public information and referral.
Mass 211 also supports mass transportation services during severe weather or other events by
acting as a backup contact center to existing mass transit public information services.
The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) and the Council of Massachusetts
United Ways (COMUW) have agreed to utilize Mass 2-1-1 as the Commonwealth’s primary
telephone information call center during times of emergency. The easy to remember 2-1-1
telephone number will be utilized as a resource for human service and public safety/disaster
response and planning agencies. It was designed, in part, to reduce the number of non-
emergency calls made to 9-1-1. This new partnership will offer citizens the opportunity for ‘one-
stop-shopping’, with access to vital updated disaster information, numerous post-disaster
programs, interpreter services, and call tracking of caller locations. Mass 2-1-1 will also have the
ability to act as the registration site for spontaneous volunteers and donations from the public
during an emergency or crisis.
14
INTRODUCING...
What is MassOptions?
MassOptions is a free resource linking elders, individuals with disabilities, caregivers, and family members to
services that help you or a loved one live independently in the setting of your choice.
We help individuals avoid the frustration of calling multiple agencies and navigating various networks.
What does MassOptions do?
We provide information about and connections to community services and supports. By linking callers to such
information, we work to empower individuals to make informed choices about care they
may need or want.
Trained specialists at MassOptions give individuals fast, personalized attention.
All one needs to do is tell our trained specialists about themselves or what they might need to
live independently. A caller can even stay on the line while we connect them with an appropriate community
resource or organization.
What types of services and supports might someone be able to access through MassOptions?
MassOptions can help individuals link to information about a broad range of services including:
•Caregiver Support Services
•Mental Health Services
•Care Management Services
•Substance Abuse Services
•Coordinated Care Programs
•Transportation Services
•Employment and Training Services
•Community Life Services
•Equipment and
Supplies
•Day Services
•Financial Assistance Services
•In-Home Supports
•Food and Nutrition Services
•Personal Care Services
•Health and Therapeutic Services
•Protective Services
•Housing
H
EA
LTH &
T
HE
RAPEUTIC
E
QU
IPMENT
& S
UP
PLIES
D
AY S
ERVICES
M
EN
TAL HEALTH
S
ER
VICES
I
N-
HOME
S
UP
PORTS
P
ER
SONAL
C
AR
E SERVICES
Connections to services for elders and
individuals with disabilities - simplied.
Right here when you dont know
where to turn.
Massachusetts Executive Oce of Health and Human Services
TOLL-FREE
1-844-422-6277
OR VISIT
MassOptions.org
F
A
Qs
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
MassOptions Can Help!
HEALTH &
THERAPEUTIC
EQUIPMENT
& SUPPLIES
DAY SERVICES
MENTAL HEALTH
SERVICES
IN-HOME
SUPPORTS
PERSONAL
CARE SERVICES
15
About REquipment:
REquipment is an innovative durable medical equipment (DME) reuse program that gives a second life
to un-needed medical equipment. REquipment accepts donations of good condition DME, repairs and
cleans it, and reassigns it to people in need at no cost. REquipment provides free refurbished equipment
to adults, children and seniors without the paperwork and delay. REquipment can be used short or long
term and insurance is not needed. Pickup and delivery is available in the Greater Boston and Central MA
areas.
REquipment is currently supported by a collaboration of public and private funding from the
Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission's (MRC) MassMATCH program, the Massachusetts
Department of Developmental Disabilities (DDS), the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH)
as well as private grants. REquipment is a statewide program with partner locations in Canton,
Worcester, Amherst and Pittsfield.
In Need of DME:
Search our inventory of available items to find what you need at www.dmeREquipment.org:
Manual Wheelchairs
Shower Chairs
Strollers and Standers
Power Wheelchairs and Scooters
Sling Lifts
Rollator Walkers and More!
Donating Your DME:
REquipment accepts donations of gently used DME that is not older than 5-6 years. Learn more about
donating at dmerequipment.org or call toll-free 1-800-261-9841. Pick up is free in the Greater Boston/
Central MA areas.
REquipment is managed by the REquipment DME and AT REUSE Program, Inc. thanks to funding from
the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission's (MRC) MassMATCH Program.
Give new life to assistive technology and adaptive equipment.
GetATstuff.com is the web site of the Assistive Technology Exchange in New England and New York.
Our goal is to put AT equipment that is not currently being used into the hands of someone who can
benefit from it. The exchange is a free “classified ad” type resource designed to help people find, buy,
sell or give away used AT equipment.
Register online today for your FREE account at
www.getATstuff.com
www.dmeREquipment.org
info@dmerequipment.org
Facebook.com/dmerequipment
16
TAKEAWAYS

Have a Plan  Help Inform Others
 Sign Up For Emergency
Alerts
 Get Involved With  Check on Your Neighbors
Planning
 Connect With Your
 Build a Kit
Emergency Management
 Make Sure Your Plan
 Have Emergency
Director
is Accessible for YOU
Documents
 Know Your Area
 Practice Your Plan
 Have List of Your
 Know How to Evacuate at
 Prepare for Yourself
Medications
any place you stay
 Plan for ose With
 Have 1-2 Days of Medicine in
 Learn How to Shelter in
Disabilities
Go-Kit
Place
 Plan for Pets &
 Have Emergency Supply List
 Fi
le Of Life (Keep this
Service Animals
 Be Aware
Updated and make sure it
 Create a Personal

is visible)
Call 911 (If Emergency)
Support Network
TakeResponsibilityByPlanning
Now
17
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