WORK HEALTH
AND SAFETY (WHS)
MANAGEMENT
PLAN FOR
INSERT NAME HERE
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DISCLAIMER
This information is for guidance only and is not to be taken as an expression of the law. It should be read in conjunction with the
relevant legislation. For more information contact your local workplace health and safety authority.
PUBLICATION DETAILS
Published by Comcare
© Commonwealth of Australia 2016
All material presented in this publication is provided under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/deed.en) licence.
For the avoidance of doubt, this means this licence only applies to material as set out in this document.
The details of the relevant licence conditions are available on the Creative Commons website (accessible using the links
provided) as is the full legal code for the CC BY 3.0 AU licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode).
USE OF THE COAT OF ARMS
The terms under which the Coat of Arms can be used are detailed on the It’s an Honour website
(http://www.itsanhonour.gov.au/coat-arms/index.cfm).
CONTACT US
Inquiries regarding the licence and any use of this document are welcome at:
Communications
Comcare
GPO Box 9905
Canberra ACT 2601
Ph: 1300 366 979
Email: helpdesk.communications@comcare.gov.au
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CONTENTS
PART A: WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS 5
1. Purpose 5
2. Work Health and Safety (WHS) Policy 5
3. Definitions 6
4. Responsibilities 7
5. Consultation and Communication Arrangements 10
6. Training 11
7. WHS Risk Assessment 12
8. Right of Entry 13
9. WHS Issue Resolution 13
10. Authoritative Sources 13
PART B: GENERAL WHS INFORMATION 14
1. Emergency Procedures 14
2. Hazard/Injury/Incident Reporting 14
3. Reporting of Notifiable Incidents 14
4. First Aid 15
5. WHS Training and Induction 16
6. Risk Management and the Risk Register 17
7. Workplace Hazard Inspections 21
8. Purchasing 21
9. WHS Record Keeping 21
10. Documents to be displayed 21
11. Important Contact Numbers 21
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PART C: SPECIFIC WHS REQUIREMENTS 22
1. Asbestos 22
2. Inappropriate behaviour 22
3. Contractors 22
4. Dangerous Goods and Hazardous Substances 23
5. Electrical Safety 23
6. Confined Spaces 24
7. Mustering 24
8. Falls from height 25
9. Manual Handling 25
10. Plant and Equipment 26
11. Personal Protective Equipment 27
12. Slips, trips and falls 27
13. Drugs and Alcohol 28
14. UV Radiation 28
15. Vehicles 28
16. Working alone 29
PART D: FORMS AND CHECKLISTS 30
Attachment 1—Emergency Contacts List 30
Attachment 2—Hazard/Injury/Incident Report Form 31
Attachment 3—WHS Induction Checklist for New Workers 33
Attachment 4—WHS Induction for Contractors/Visitors 34
Attachment 5—Detailed WHS Induction Checklist for Contractors 38
Attachment 6—WHS Training Register 40
Attachment 8—WHS Hazard Inspection Procedure 44
Attachment 9—WHS Hazard Inspection Quick Checklist 46
Attachment 10—Suggested Asbestos Register 50
Attachment 11—Hazardous Substances Register 51
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PART A: WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY
ARRANGEMENTS
1. PURPOSE
The purpose of this Plan is to establish and maintain an effective health and safety management system.
( )
is committed to implementing a structured approach to workplace health and safety in order to achieve a consistently high
standard of safety performance.
This Plan will assist in meeting its obligations in accordance with work health and safety
legislation.
This Plan applies to all officers and workers and to other persons at risk from
work carried out at workplaces. Failure to comply with the requirements of this Plan may lead to
disciplinary action.
2. WORK HEALTH AND SAFETY (WHS) POLICY
The Statement of Commitment and the Implementation of Policy Commitment provide the overarching direction
will follow in pursuit of workplace health and safety outcomes. These commitments are
Statement of Commitment
is committed to providing a workplace that enables all work activities to be carried out safely.
We will take all reasonably practicable measures to eliminate or minimise risks to the health, safety and welfare of workers,
contractors, visitors, and anyone else who may be affected by our operations.
We are committed to ensuring we comply with the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (the Act). We will also comply with any other
relevant legislation, applicable Codes of Practice and Australian Standards as far as possible.
This WHS Management Plan and s WHS Policies and Procedures set out
the safety arrangements and principles which are to be observed by and its workers to ensure
compliance with the WHS Act and to provide appropriate mechanisms for continuing consultation and management of WHS
matters.
Implementation of Policy Commitment
is committed to ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health and safety of its
workers (employees, contractors, labour hire workers, outworkers, apprentices, students or volunteers) while they are at work,
and that the health and safety of other persons (e.g. visitors) is not put at risk from our operations. This will be achieved by:
> providing and maintaining a healthy and safe work environment through the implementation of safe work practices, safe
systems of work and the provision of safe plant and equipment;
> ensuring that workplaces under the control of are safe, without risk to health, and have safe
means of access and egress;
> routinely consulting in order to maintain effective and co-operative relationships between
and its workers, and with other duty holders, on health and safety matters in the
workplace; and
> reviewing, through appropriate mechanisms, the effectiveness of the safety measures taken.
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commitment to providing safe and healthy working environments for its workers includes:
> providing relevant, up-to-date WHS information to all workers on matters such as workplace safety and their responsibilities;
> providing expert assistance in WHS matters where necessary;
> providing instruction and/or training in work processes where appropriate;
> developing and implementing strategies which include workplace assessment, hazard identification, and appropriate
remedial action to eliminate or control hazards; and
> implementing and maintaining appropriate information, reporting and statistical systems.
3. DEFINITIONS
Terminology Definition
Person Conducting a
Business or Undertaking
(PCBU)
A PCBU has the primary duty of care to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable:
> the health and safety of its workers while they are at work, and
> that the health and safety of other persons is not put at risk from work carried out as part of
the conduct of the PCBU.
> is a PCBU.
Officer It is an officer’s duty to exercise due diligence to ensure that the PCBU complies with its health
and safety obligations under the WHS Act.
> The Members of the Board for will usually be Officers under
the WHS Act.
> The Station Manager may be an Officer under the WHS Act
Note: A person is an Officer under the WHS Act only if they “make, or participate in making,
decisions that affect the whole, or a substantial part, of the business of the corporation; or who
has the capacity to affect significantly the corporation’s financial standing”. Whether a person is
an Officer or not under the WHS Act will depend on the facts of the particular situation.
Worker Previously known as ‘employee’.
The term worker includes employees, contractors and sub-contractors and their employees,
labour hire employees, outworkers, apprentices and trainees, work experience students and
volunteers.
Health and Safety
Representative (HSR)
A worker elected by members of their work group to represent them in health and safety matters.
Other persons Includes any visitors
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4. RESPONSIBILITIES
As the duty holder, , being the PCBU, must:
> ensure the health and safety of its workers and others in our workplace
> ensure the health and safety of other persons is not put at risk from work carried out as part of its operations
> provide and maintain a work environment that is without risks to health and safety
> provide and maintain safe plant and structures
> provide and maintain safe systems of work
> ensure the safe use, handling and storage of plant, structures and substances
> provide adequate facilities for the welfare of workers
> provide information, training, instruction and supervision
> monitor the health of workers and the conditions of our workplaces.
Specific duties as a PCBU also include:
> record and notify Comcare of any notifiable incidents arising out of the conduct of the business or undertaking
> ensure authorisations are in place for any high risk work or plant
> consult so far as reasonably practicable with other PCBUs or persons who have a duty in regard to a work health and
safety matter
> consult so far as reasonably practicable with workers, their representatives and Health and Safety Representatives on work
health and safety matters.
The Chairperson and members of the Board
The Chairperson and members of the Board, as officers, are responsible for ensuring that
complies with any duty or obligation under the WHS Act. This is achieved by these officers exercising due diligence, which means
they:
> acquire and keep an up to date knowledge of work health and safety matters
> gain an understanding of s operations and the hazards and risks involved
> ensure that appropriate resources and processes are provided to enable hazards to be identified and risks to be eliminated or
minimised
> ensure that information regarding incidents, hazards and risks is received, considered and responded to in a timely way
> ensure that has, and implements, processes for complying with its WHS duties and
obligations
> verify the provision and use of the resources and processes listed above.
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This may include:
> having work health and safety as a standing agenda item for each Board meeting
> integrating WHS laws into everyday business through consultation with Managers and all workers
> developing a work health and safety management system framework, which will be reviewed on a regular basis by the
Chairperson and Board members
> ensuring that WHS risk management is incorporated into all business activities and that hazard identification, risk
assessment and control is an on-going process, including:
development and maintenance of a WHS risk register
development and maintenance of WHS policies and procedures
ensuring an effective injury/incident reporting procedure
ensuring appropriate processes are in place for WHS issues relating to contractor management
ensuring that the procurement of any equipment takes into account WHS matters
ensuring that regular hazard inspections of the workplaces occur
ensuring that WHS is a standing agenda item at all staff meetings
incorporating WHS updates and information into regular reporting provided to the Board by Station Managers
ensuring that WHS issues are part of all training provided for staff, including induction
ensuring that contractors and visitors to are provided with appropriate and reasonable
WHS information at site entry, and
ensuring that the work environment is a safe environment.
Station Manager
The Station Manager, (if an officer), is responsible for ensuring that WHS policies and
procedures are implemented in the workplace and/or systems of work under their control. As an integral part of their normal
duties, the Station Manager will:
> consult with their workers on measures to protect their health and safety
> actively follow agreed safety practices and model positive attitudes towards health and safety matters
> arrange for their workers to be instructed in healthy and safe systems of work and procedures and supervise the practice of
safe working procedures
> notify the Chairperson and/or other members of the Board of all incidents, hazardous situations, dangerous occurrences or
immediate risks to health and safety of any workers
> ensure that all workers are informed of this policy
> undertake consultation with all managers and workers on change that may affect their health and safety
> ensure that WHS is a standing agenda item at all staff meetings
> communicate WHS matters to the Chairperson of the Board.
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Managers and Leaders
Managers and leaders are responsible for providing a workplace that is, as far as reasonably practicable, safe and healthy
workplace for workers and visitors, in particular in the areas of their control. This includes:
> modelling health and safety leadership
> demonstrating a commitment to good health and safety performance, by:
talking about safety at regular meetings
ensuring safe work procedures are followed
reporting incidents, hazards and safety concerns promptly
assessing task risk and not allowing an activity to continue until it can be controlled adequately
> fostering a strong work health and safety culture where worker input is valued
> Promoting and implementing the Work Health and Safety Management System
> actively support the identification of hazards and risks and the management of these
> understand and monitor safety performance objectives
> proactively manage other duty holders (e.g. contractors), when required.
Workers
Workers must take reasonable care for their own health and safety while they are at work, and take reasonable care that their
acts or omissions do not adversely affect the health and safety of other persons. They must comply, so far as they are reasonably
able, with any reasonable instruction given by the Station Manager, as well as co-operating with any reasonable
policy or procedure which relates to workplace health and safety. On a day to day basis,
this includes:
> to the extent of the worker’s control or influence over working conditions and methods, take reasonable care to work safely
> making sure that the work area safe when leaving it
> make proper use of all appropriate safeguards, safety devices and personal protective equipment
> follow agreed safe working practices and rules
> report all known hazards, accidents and incidents as soon as possible.
It is acknowledged that, in accordance with the Act, a worker may cease, or refuse to carry out work if they have a reasonable
concern the work would expose the worker to a serious risk to their health or safety. The Act requires workers who cease work
to notify the relevant manager that they have ceased unsafe work as soon as practicable after doing so. It also requires workers
to remain available to carry out ‘suitable alternative work’. This would not however require workers to remain at any place that
poses a serious risk to their health or safety.
Contractors
Contractors, sub-contractors and self-employed persons are defined as “workers” under the WHS Act if they carry out work in any
capacity for . They are required to:
> comply with the requirements of the WHS legislation
> have in place any work health and safety policies and programs required under State or Territory safety legislation
> consult with about safety matters and comply with policies
> work safely and to include the safety of staff and visitors in their safety plans.
If any staff member believes that a contractor may be engaging in an unsafe work practice, they are required to report this issue
to their manager.
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Visitors
Visitors and other persons to also have responsibilities to abide by our workplace safety rules
and procedures. These responsibilities include to:
> take reasonable care for their own health and safety and for the health and safety of other persons
> comply with, so far as they are reasonably able, all reasonable safety directions provided by
staff
> report all safety related incidents to staff
> ensure the adequate supervision of any accompanying children
> not enter any restricted area without authorisation or escort
> not bring or consume alcohol or illegal drugs at workplaces
> not wilfully or recklessly interfere with property.
5. CONSULTATION AND COMMUNICATION ARRANGEMENTS
Open communication between workers and managers is important to ensuring a safe workplace. Therefore, workers are
encouraged to:
> ask questions relating to WHS
> bring up safety concerns
> make recommendations regarding WHS
> give regular feedback
> become involved in evaluation of safety issues
> participate in any WHS related problem solving process.
It is important that workers help shape decisions about WHS particularly when:
> identifying hazards and assessing risks
> making decisions about ways to eliminate or minimise those hazards or risks
> proposing business changes that may affect the health and safety of workers
> purchasing of new equipment or substances
> developing or changing job tasks or safety procedures.
All workers belong to a work group and are encouraged to raise any work health and safety concerns they may have with their
manager and/or Health and Safety Representative. If the issue identified remains unresolved, it should be raised directly with the
Station Manager.
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Health and Safety Representatives (HSR)
HSRs are elected by members of a work group in order to represent the interests of that work group in matters relating to work
health and safety. HSRs must undertake approved training to exercise their powers, and may:
> consult with workers on a regular basis
> inspect a work area as required
> participate in workplace accident and incident investigations as required
> participate in any change management discussions that may affect the health and safety of workers
> provide advice to managers on the welfare of workers in their work group.
HSRs cannot exercise their powers under the Act unless they are trained. HSRs are not liable for acts or omissions that are
undertaken in good faith. HSRs are not entitled to personal or medical information about a worker without their consent unless
that information is of a general form that does not identify workers specifically.
Health and Safety Committee
Health and Safety Committees provide the forum for the constructive discussion of measures to assure health and safety in the
workplace. At the Health and Safety Committee will meet quarterly and:
> facilitate co-operation between the PCBU and workers in the instigation, development and implementation of WHS policies
and procedures
> assist in developing standards, rules and procedures relating to health and safety
> consult with workers regarding their WHS concerns
> consult with management regarding worker WHS concerns including change that may influence WHS more broadly
> ensure the conduct of regular workplace inspections.
Minutes of the latest Health and Safety Committee meeting will be made available for all workers to review.
6. TRAINING
The Station Manager will conduct a training needs analysis and arrange for appropriate WHS training to be undertaken by
workers as required.
Where required, workers are to demonstrate their competencies to perform required tasks safely.
In tasks with a high potential for injury, a separate documented assessment of a person’s competency may be undertaken.
As a guide, competency assessments should be signed and dated by the assessor/assessee and contain the following elements:
> task or equipment description
> information on licenses held (or other relevant qualifications)
> a checklist containing the essential competencies that were demonstrated, and
> comments or confirmation that the competency was met.
is committed to developing a suite of competencies to deal with all safety sensitive work tasks.
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7. WHS RISK ASSESSMENT
The purpose of any WHS risk assessment is to ensure that, for any identified hazards, appropriate control measures are
implemented in order to protect workers, contractors and visitors from risks to their health, safety and welfare.
Control measures for WHS hazards should be implemented as required using the following hierarchy of control, in order of
preference these measures relate to:
> elimination (removal of the hazard)
> substitution (substitute the hazard for something which is less hazardous e.g. replace a hazardous chemical with one within
is not hazardous)
> isolation (isolate the hazard from people e.g. place a noisy piece of equipment in another location)
> engineering (e.g. guarding on machinery)
> administrative (e.g. provision of training, policies and procedures, signage)
> personal protective equipment (e.g. use of hearing , eye protection, high visibility vests).
Outcomes of risk assessments will be documented and the control measures reviewed at least annually or earlier should a task
or activity be the subject of a WHS incident or a change of process or requirement. Current risk assessments will ensure that
achieves the goal of eliminating or minimising the risk workers may be exposed to.
The list of policies and procedures in place to manage workplace risk include:
>
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8. RIGHT OF ENTRY
A WHS permit entry holder must also hold a current Fair Work Act 2009 entry permit. Their WHS entry permit and photographic
identification must be available at all times for inspection. Where there is a suspected workplace WHS contravention, a permit
holder is not required to give prior notice. However, as soon as reasonably practicable they must give notice of their entry and the
suspected contravention to or the person with management or control of the workplace.
The permit holder may, in relation to the suspected contravention, inspect any work system, plant substance or structure; consult
with and its workers; be allowed to inspect and make copies of relevant documents (unless to
do so would contravene a State or Commonwealth law); and warn any person of a serious risk to health and safety if immediate
or imminent.
Otherwise a permit holder is required to give at least 24 hours notice (and no more than 14 days) to the
before entering a workplace to consult on WHS matters or provide advice on those matters to
relevant workers.
must not, without reasonable excuse, refuse or unduly delay a permit holder’s entry into a
workplace or obstruct them from exercising their rights under the WHS Act.
The permit holder must not intentionally and unreasonably delay, hinder or obstruct any person or disrupt any work at a
workplace or otherwise act in an improper manner.
9. WHS ISSUE RESOLUTION
Wherever possible, any WHS concerns will be resolved through consultation between workers, their representatives and/or their
manager. If the concern cannot be resolved, then it can be referred to the Station Manager for resolution. Ultimately any issue
remaining unresolved may be referred to the Board. Where the issue remains unresolved the default procedure for issue resolution
set out in the WHS Regulations must be followed.
If reasonable efforts have been made to resolve an issue and it remains unresolved, any party to the issue can ask Comcare to
appoint an inspector to assist in resolving the matter.
10. AUTHORITATIVE SOURCES
> Work Health and Safety Act 2011
> Work Health and Safety Regulation 2011
> Approved Work Health and Safety Codes of Practice
Additional information on these sources may be found at www.comcare.gov.au
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PART B: GENERAL WHS INFORMATION
1. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
An emergency evacuation plan has been developed and this plan, together with a list of emergency contacts, is displayed in the
following locations:
> Office/reception
> common areas
> workshops
> sheds
> male toilets
> female toilets
The Emergency Contacts List is at Attachment 1. All fire emergency equipment, such as horns, sirens and fire extinguishers, will
be tested by an approved provider every 12 months.
2. HAZARD/INJURY/INCIDENT REPORTING
How to Report a Hazard or Injury or Incident:
All managers and workers including contractors are required to complete an incident form if a hazard/injury/incident occurs, and:
> Advise the Station Manager of the incident or injury or hazard
> For recording purposes complete a Hazard/Injury/Incident Report Form
> Complete the relevant sections of the form giving details of the incident. The form should be completed even when an injury
has not occurred, that is, in the event of a near miss
> All hard copy forms should be signed by the relevant parties
> The Station Manager or their delegate must record all injuries on the injury register
> Internal reporting of any hazard/injury/incident should occur is separate from reporting of notifiable incidents to Comcare.
The Hazard/Injury/Incident Report form is at Attachment 2.
3. REPORTING OF NOTIFIABLE INCIDENTS
Any serious incidents must be notified immediately to the Station Manager. After becoming aware that any such incident has
occurred, it is the Station Manager’s responsibility to report ‘notifiable incidents’ to Comcare by the fastest possible means, either:
> by phone—ring Comcare 1300 366 979
> by fax or other electronic means—fax Comcare on 1300 305 916; email notify@comcare.gov.au .
> NOTE: Comcare requires that immediate notification is followed within 48 hours in writing by completing a Notifiable Incident
Report Form and forwarding it to Comcare, GPO Box 9905, Canberra, ACT, 2601
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Definition of “notifiable incident”: ‘Notifiable incidents’ include the following:
> the death of a person
> a serious injury or illness of a person
Serious injury or illness includes immediate treatment as an in-patient in a hospital; immediate treatment for certain
serious injuries; or medical treatment within 48 hours of exposure to a substance
> a dangerous incident
A ‘dangerous incident’ means any incident in relation to a workplace that exposes a worker or any other person to a
serious risk to a person’s health or safety caused by incidents such as uncontrolled escape, spillage or leakage of a
substance, an uncontrolled implosion, explosion, fire; or uncontrolled escape of gas or steam.
HAZARD/INCIDENT/INJURY REPORTING—SUMMARY FOR THE STATION MANAGER
> Ensure that the manager or worker has completed a hazard/incident/injury form.
> Review the incident with the manager or worker to determine if any actions need to be taken to eliminate or minimise
the risk of the incident or hazard recurring.
> Complete the injury register.
> If the incident results in a death, serious injury or illness or a dangerous incident, notify Comcare IMMEDIATELY.
Ph: 1300 366 979 Fax:1300 305 916 Email: notify@comcare.gov.au
NOTE: Comcare requires that immediate notification is followed within 48 hours in writing by completing a
Notifiable Incident Report Form and forwarding it to Comcare, GPO Box 9905, Canberra, ACT, 2601
> Maintain records of all the above.
4. FIRST AID
Definitions:
> First aid is the immediate treatment or care given to a person suffering from an injury or illness until more advanced
care is provided or the person recovers.
> First aid officer is a person who has successfully completed a nationally accredited training course or an equivalent
level of training that has given them the competencies required to administer first aid.
has in place the following first aid procedures, as required by First Aid in the Workplace Code
ofPractice
> The appointment and training of First Aid Officers (FAO)
> The provision of first aid kits within the workplace
> Clear signage with the name of the FAO and the location of the first aid kits
> The provision of a suitable first aid kit in all vehicles.
It is the FAO’s responsibility to ensure that the contents of all first aid kits are maintained
First Aid Officer Training:
> The minimum level of training for a FAO is the Senior First Aid Certificate (or equivalent)
> Refresher training should be undertaken every three years.
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First Aid Officer Responsibilities:
> The FAO is approved to render first aid assistance in the workplace.
> The FAO should ensure that they do not administer first aid services beyond their level of training.
> A record of any first aid treatment given should be kept by the FAO and reported to the Station Manager on a regular basis to
assist with reviewing first aid arrangements.
Contact details for FAOs are displayed on all noticeboards.
FIRST AID—SUMMARY FOR THE STATION MANAGER
> Ensure that a First Aid Officer (FAO) has been appointed and trained.
> Keep a copy of the FAO’s qualifications.
> Ensure that a first aid kit is provided and maintained by the FAO.
> Advise all managers and workers of the name of the FAO and the location of the kit.
> Place a sign on the wall where the kit is located.
> First Aid in the Workplace Code of Practice [link here] available on the Comcare website.
5. WHS TRAINING AND INDUCTION
Training
is committed to providing appropriate training to ensure workers have the skills and knowledge
necessary to fulfil their WHS obligations. WHS training is a fundamental requirement for to
achieve a safe workplace. The WHS training needs for will be determined in consultation with
managers and workers, as well as through review of the WHS Risk Register, however it can be generally categorised into three
kinds:
Generic WHS Training—skills and knowledge which is commonly required, e.g. induction training, WHS risk management
training, evacuation procedures.
Risk Specific WHS Training—training required for those persons conducting activities with a specific risk to health and safety or
a verification activity, e.g. first aid training, hazardous substances training, manual handling training, confined spaces training,
working from heights.
Task Specific WHS Training—skills and licensing which are required depending on the specific hazards and risk, e.g. any farm
equipment operation, high risk work licenses such as for driving forklifts, cranes.
Documentation for Training
Training records shall be maintained as evidence of training delivery and assessment of competence.
WHS Induction
All new managers and workers are required to be provided with WHS information regarding the workplace as part of their overall
induction and introduction to . A thorough WHS induction process assists new staff to feel
welcome, become integrated into the organisation and ensure that they are able to work safely.
The WHS Induction Checklist at Attachment 3 should be used in conjunction with the general induction training program for land
workers to ensure that all new workers are aware of the WHS systems, policies and procedures in place within
.
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Procedure
The Station Manager must ensure a WHS induction is provided on the new team leader or worker’s first day. If the Station
Manager is not available, he or she should organise for a replacement to conduct the induction. The Station Manager must:
> use the attached WHS Induction Checklist (Attachment 3) to ensure that all WHS issues are covered
> on completion of the induction, sign the checklist and ensure that the new worker also signs
> file a copy of the induction checklist on the worker’s file
> provide the new worker with access to this WHS Management Plan and the WHS Policies and Procedures Manual.
A new Station Manager will be inducted by the outgoing Manager or a Board Member.
WHS Induction for Contractors/Visitors
All contractors/visitors should be provided with a Safety Briefing prior to entering the premises.
All contractors/visitors must sign in and be provided with a copy of the Safety Briefing Handout
to read, and to then sign, acknowledging that they have read and understood the information. These documents are included at
Attachment 4.
Detailed WHS Induction for Contractors
For contractors (e.g. trade persons) the requirements for induction will depend on the work to the undertaken and the duration
of their stay at the workplace. At a minimum, contractors should be advised of emergency procedures and location of facilities.
Refer to Attachment 5.
All WHS training provided to managers, workers and contractors should be recorded in the WHS Training Register
(Attachment 6). Alternatively, this training register can be incorporated into the overall Staff Development and Training Register
which details all professional development and training undertaken by managers and workers.
6. RISK MANAGEMENT AND THE RISK REGISTER
WHS risk management is a systematic process of hazard identification, risk assessment, and risk control with the aim of
providing healthy and safe conditions for managers, workers, visitors and contractors at .
As required by the WHS Act, has adopted a risk management approach to underpin its WHS
Management System. This approach involves all managers and workers in identifying hazards, assessing and prioritising risks,
implementing control measures and reviewing how effective the control measures are.
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All workers are responsible for assisting in managing the particular risks associated with their specific work environment. Risk
management strategies used by include:
> regular hazard inspections of the environment
> a comprehensive risk register detailing all WHS risks associated with the operation and activities of the
> documented WHS policies and procedures
> risk assessments of newly purchased equipment
> risk assessments for any change to work processes
> hazard, injury, incident reporting procedures
> incident investigations (at the direction of the Station Manager)
> WHS job safety analysis for specific activities including:
– mustering
branding and tagging
fence tensioning
changing split rim tyres
windmill maintenance/working at heights
– refueling.
Definitions:
> WHS Hazard: Anything which has the potential to cause injury or illness.
> WHS Risk: A WHS risk is the chance of someone becoming injured or ill as a result of a workplace hazard. This
significance of the risk is determined by considering the likelihood of it happening and the consequences if it
does happen.
> WHS Risk Control: WHS risk control is action taken to eliminate or reduce the likelihood that exposure to a hazard will
result in injury or illness to people or damage to property and the environment.
The Risk Management Process
WHS risk management should be undertaken for all activities where there is the potential for harm including:
> before activities commence;
> before the introduction of new equipment, procedures or processes;
> when equipment, procedures or processes are modified.
Step 1: Identify the Hazard
A hazard is a source or potential source of injury, ill health or disease. Hazard identification is the process of identifying all
situations and events that could cause injury or illness by examining a work area/task for the purpose of identifying all threats
which are ‘inherent in the job’. Tasks can include, but may not be limited to using tools, hazardous chemicals, dealing with
people, lifting/moving items and mustering.
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Step 2: Assess the Risk
Assessing the risk from a hazard determines its significance. Firstly, consider the consequences should something happen; will it
cause a serious injury, illness or death or a minor injury. Secondly, consider how likely is this to occur—very likely, not likely at
all or somewhere in between? Some of the things to think about include:
> how often is the task undertaken
> how frequently are people near the hazard
> how many people are near the hazard at a particular time
> has an incident happened before
> have there been any ‘near misses’
Use the table below to determine how significant the risk is.
Where a manager, worker, contractor, or visitor to the workplace identifies a hazard, requires
that it is eliminated or reduced in consultation with the relevant stakeholders.
> Step 1: identify the Consequences—or how severely could it hurt someone
> Step 2: identify the Likelihood—or how likely is it for an injury to occur
> Step 3 & 4: identify the Risk Priority Score—to prioritise your actions
> Step 5: apply the hierarchy of hazard control
> Step 6: identify who, how and when the effectiveness of controls will be checked and reviewed
Step 1—CONSEQUENCES
How severely could it hurt someone?
or
How ill could it make someone?—
Circle it
Step 2—LIKELIHOOD
How likely is it for an injury to occur?—Circle it
Very likely, could
happen frequently
Likely, could
happen
occasionally
Unlikely, could
happen, but rare
Very unlikely,
could happen,
probably never
will
L1 L2 L3 L4
Kill or cause permanent
disability or ill health
C1
Very high risk
(1)
Very high risk
(1)
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Long term illness or serious
injury
C2
Very high risk
(1)
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk
(4)
Medical attention and several
days off work
C3
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk (4)
Acceptable Risk
(5)
First Aid needed C4
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk (4)
Acceptable Risk
(5)
Low Risk
(6)
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STEP 3: RISK PRIORITY SCORE IDENTIFIES THE NECESSARY ACTION
AND RESPONSE
Step 3—RISK PRIORITY SCORE Step 4—ACTION AND RESPONSE
1 = Very High Risk
Stop the activity—immediate action is required to ensure safety—safety measures
applied must be cleared by the Station Manager before any activity recommences
Proceed with caution—immediate reporting of emerging or ongoing risk exposure at this
level to the Station Manager for decision is mandatory
2 = High Risk
3 = Substantial Risk
Be aware—action required as soon as possible to prevent injury or illness
Report these risks to the responsible Manager during the current shift or before the next
shift
4 = Moderate Risk
5 = Acceptable Risk
Do something when possible. Manage by routine procedures.
6 = Low Risk
These risks should be recorded, monitored and controlled by the responsible Manager
STEP 4: CONTROL THE HAZARDS
Control the hazards—the aim is to implement the most reliable controls to create a safe workplace rather than simply relying on
people to behave safely, following processes or using protective equipment. In many cases, a combination of several control
strategies may be the best solution.
Hierarchy of control strategies (in order of preference):
> eliminate the hazard; remove the equipment from use, dispose of unwanted chemicals
> substitute; use a non-hazardous chemical, use a different machine that can do the same task
> isolation; contain noisy machinery within a booth
> engineering controls; design equipment differently, providing lifting devices to minimise manual handling
> administrative processes; task variation, job rotation, training
> personal protective equipment; gloves, hearing protection, eye protection
STEP 5: REVIEW THE PROCESS
Continuously review to monitor and improve control measures and find safer ways of doing things.
Documentation for Risk Assessment
The documentation required for a WHS risk assessment will depend on the operation or activity being assessed. The appropriate
WHS Risk Assessment Form must be used when undertaking a risk assessment of the various activities of the
. The WHS Risk Assessment Proforma and procedure for conducting an assessment is at
Attachment 7.
The WHS Risk Register
The risk assessment data collected from identifying, assessing and controlling risks should be documented on a centralised risk
register for . The risk register holds a list of key risks that need
to be monitored and managed. The risk register is to be managed by the Station Manager who should be notified if new hazards
are identified and controls implemented so that the risk register can be amended.
The Station Manager is responsible for overseeing the Risk Register, and for ensuring that effective control measures are
implemented and that risks are monitored and reviewed on a regular basis.
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7. WORKPLACE HAZARD INSPECTIONS
is required by WHS legislation to be proactive in identifying hazards in the workplace which
may affect the health and safety of its workers and eliminating or minimising the risks arising from those hazards.
In order to ensure a safe and healthy workplace, the Station Manager and/or nominated manager/s accompanied by Health
and Safety Representatives (HSRs) should undertake WHS hazard inspections of the workplace regularly and at any other times
as required. The hazard inspection should be undertaken by following the principles of WHS risk management and using the
attached information and checklists (Attachments 8 and 9).
If any hazards are identified through the hazard inspection process, controls must be implemented to ensure that the risk to health
and safety is eliminated or minimised.
In addition to these regular inspections, all managers should also conduct weekly hazard inspections of their work sites in
conjunction with HSRs. Any hazards noted during these inspections should immediately be reported to the Station Manager and
appropriate remedial action taken.
All hazard inspection documentation should be filed by the Station Manager.
8. PURCHASING
Prior to purchasing any goods or services for the workplace, they should be assessed to determine if there are any associated
health and safety hazards. This includes the purchase of equipment such as machinery, tools, furniture, chemicals, as well as
contracted services such as maintenance.
9. WHS RECORD KEEPING
The Station Manager should retain all WHS and workers compensation documents. These documents are required to be filed for
30 years in safe storage accessible only to authorised personnel in accordance with the Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy
Protection) Act 2012 (Cth).
10. DOCUMENTS TO BE DISPLAYED
> Emergency contacts page (Attachment 1)
> Emergency Evacuation Plan
> Return to Work Policy
> Work Health and Safety Policy
> Accident/Incident Notification details
> Compensation and Return to Work information
11. IMPORTANT CONTACT NUMBERS
> Comcare
> Telephone: 1300 366 979
> Facsimile: 1300 305 916
> Email: notify@comcare.gov.au
> Postal Address: GPO Box 9905, Canberra, ACT 2601
> After Hours Emergencies: In the event of a major incident an on call inspector can be contacted on:
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PART C: SPECIFIC WHS REQUIREMENTS
1. ASBESTOS
It is highly likely that the premises to be occupied by were built before 31 December 2003
and therefore, there is a requirement for to comply with these measures outlined including
an asbestos management plan and asbestos register. Do not repair or conduct work on any building without first checking the
asbestos register. A sample register is included at Attachment 10.
2. INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIOUR
Bullying, harassment, discrimination and violence of any form will not be tolerated at .
undertakes to investigate all complaints formally made. will
take action to resolve the complaint. If the complaint is found to be valid, action may include any combination of the following:
> Asking for an apology
> Creating an agreement with the offender that will stop the behaviour of concern
> Conciliation/mediation conducted by an independent/impartial third party to seek a mutually acceptable solution
> Disciplinary action in the form of verbal, written or final warning or dismissal
> All violence will be reported to the police.
In determining the action to be taken, the following factors will be considered:
> Severity and frequency of the behaviour
> Whether there have been previous incidents or prior warnings.
3. CONTRACTORS
is committed to ensuring that all workers under its control, including contractors and sub-
contractors have a safe and healthy environment in which to perform their duties.
Contractors are likely to be workers employed by to undertake a specific task; the
delivery/pickup of goods, tradespeople undertaking repair or maintenance work within the
workplace. In order to achieve this objective, it is recognised that contractors need to be:
> suitably experienced to perform the tasks
> in possession of all necessary licenses, permits, registrations and insurance required to perform the works safely and in
compliance with appropriate regulations
> notified of any potential hazards associated with the location or use of the area where the works are to be carried out
> made aware of Emergency Procedures
> if reasonable, and if the work will involve high risk tasks, have completed the Detailed WHS Induction Checklist for
Contractors (Attachment 5).
All contractors must abide by WHS requirements which will be advised to them before
engagement.
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4. DANGEROUS GOODS AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
Hazardous substances are chemicals, organic matter and other substances which pose a health risk when people are exposed
to them. These may include glues, paints, solvents, corrosives, adhesives, thinners, cleaning solutions, chemicals, flammable
and Dangerous Goods. Dangerous goods are hazardous substances that are also explosive or flammable in nature with storage
required that is fit for purpose.
All chemicals will be included in the hazardous substances register and have their current Safety Data Sheet (SDS) present for
each chemical on the register. All workers shall have access to information about the chemicals in the event of a spillage or
exposure, even where workers would not normally use the chemicals directly. Quantities of
hazardous substances stored for use shall be kept to a minimum.
A hazardous substances register will be developed to record any substances purchased or used by the
(see Attachment 11). This will be reviewed on a regular basis.
5. ELECTRICAL SAFETY
Failure to maintain electrical equipment in a safe condition, or to use equipment in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions
may result in injury or death to workers or other parties.
All electrical equipment must be protected from damage, used safely and checked regularly. In addition, there are other
requirements that must also be implemented for ‘specified electrical equipment’. These requirements include combinations of
testing and recording and connection to safety switches.
Regular inspection and testing of in-service electrical equipment by a competent person is a way to ensure this safety duty is met.
The WHS legislation requires that electrical equipment is inspected and tested in accordance with Australian Standard 3760: 2010
In-service safety inspection and testing of electrical equipment. Only authorised electrical personnel are to perform installation,
inspection, testing and labelling activities.
1. Testing Frequency:
The frequency of inspections that are outlined in Section 2 of the Standard, AS/NZS 3760:2010 are recommended but can be
varied subject to a risk assessment. The Australian standard includes a table that sets out testing and inspection intervals for
various types of equipment from 3 months (for equipment that is high use, high risk, or hire equipment) to up to 5 years (for
equipment that is not open to abuse, flexing of cords, etc). In addition to the regular testing and inspection, the standard specifies
that electrical equipment is to be inspected and tested:
> before return to service after a repair or servicing, which could have affected the electrical safety of the equipment, and
> before return to service from a second-hand sale, to ensure equipment is safe.
Generally the following should be followed:
> tools and leads: every 12 months (low use)
> Safety Switches: monthly
> Offices: every 3 to 5 years
2. Residual Current Devices:
The fitting of Residual Current Devices (RCD) on certain equipment can considerably reduce the risk of electrocution. An RCD
(also known as a safety switch) works by detecting a current leakage. When RCD detects this current leakage, it turns the
power off almost immediately. Whilst an electric shock may still be received, the duration will be shortened reducing the risk of
serious injury.
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3. Unsafe Equipment:
Equipment that may be unsafe should be withdrawn immediately from service and have a label attached warning against further
use. Arrangements should be made, as soon as possible, for such equipment to be disposed, destroyed, or repaired by an
authorised repair agent or competent person.
The Electrical Safety Policy provides further information in relation to this workplace hazard and
its management. This Policy is included in the WHS Policies and Procedures Manual.
6. CONFINED SPACES
All confined spaces are placarded with access strictly controlled. Entry requires the issue of a confined spaces permit on
each occasion. No employee or contractor will be issued a permit to work in any confined space on the property unless they
are trained and supervised. When working in a confined space a trained bystander must be present at all times. A register of
identified confined spaces and entry permits is maintained at the office.
7. MUSTERING
Agitated livestock are a risk. Observe the following considerations when mustering:
> Mustering is best done early in the morning or towards nightfall, when temperatures are cooler and livestock have had a long
grazing period.
> Prepare the route in advance. Open the gates and be on guard at the places where livestock are most likely to break away.
> All people involved in the muster should be familiar with the property layout.
> Try to maintain visual, radio or routine contact with others involved in musters.
> Have safe working procedures in place for mustering, including an emergency response procedure.
> Stay at the fringe of their flight distance so they don’t scatter.
> When closing a yard gate behind a mob or flock, stand to the side where possible.
> If it is necessary to be behind the gate, hang on with both hands and use your boots to provide further support in case the
gate is flung backwards.
Considerations specific for moving cattle:
> Give the cows time to pick up their calves before moving.
> Never trust cows at calving time.
> Cows and calves should be moved slowly. Beware of aggressive cows and avoid mustering beef cows with very
young calves.
> If you have to catch a calf, keep it between you and the cow.
Considerations specific for moving bulls:
> Move confidently to demonstrate dominance.
> Don’t try to move a dangerous bull on foot or alone; use a vehicle.
> Always carry a long strong cane or stick.
> Keep bulls moving at a trot until they’re well into the paddock and clear of the gate—keep them a good distance apart.
> Troublesome bulls can be moved by being included with a mob.
Considerations specific for moving sheep:
> Assume every ram will act aggressively
> Use sheep dogs to control the mob
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8. FALLS FROM HEIGHT
There is a risk of serious injury from falling when working above ground height. No worker will work at height without ensuring
that ladders, steps and handrails are secure or fall prevention/arrest harnesses are in place. These structures include, but are not
limited to:
> Overhead fuel, water tanks and windmills
> Buildings and roofs
> High machinery; cherry pickers, trucks and trailers.
will ensure that:
> Workers working at height are made aware of the hazards and risk management procedures
> Fall arrest or fall prevention harnesses are provided and used
> Workers are instructed in the correct use of fall prevention or fall arrest harnesses.
Contractors will ensure that they:
> Observe and apply risk management procedures when working at heights
> Use the required personal protective equipment (PPE) where indicated.
9. MANUAL HANDLING
Manual handling is any task that requires you to push, pull, lift, carry, move, hold or lower any object, person or animal. Manual
tasks include tasks that have repetitive actions, sustained postures and may involve exposure to vibration. The types of injuries
related to manual handling include repetitive strain injuries, muscle injuries, tendon and ligament injuries, bone injuries and
injuries from falling objects.
Manual handling hazards are managed at by a risk management process in order to prevent or
minimise the risk of injuries caused by manual tasks.
The process involves conducting a risk assessment on manual tasks carried out in the workplace, working out how to address
any problems, choosing and implementing appropriate solutions, and following up to check that the solutions work.
Examples of manual handling tasks in the environment include:
> lifting and moving equipment
> mustering
> fencing
> general repairs
Preventing Manual Handling injuries
> decide what changes can be made to reduce the risks of injury. If possible, select permanent changes (such as workplace
layout, tools and equipment)
> avoid double handling of items
> provide mechanical aids (hoists)
> redesign the task (such as rotating workers)
> identify changes that are possible immediately, and those that may take time to implement
> document your risk control decisions for each task assessed, and set timelines for changes
> trial the changes in consultation with workers before making them permanent
> provide training if new equipment is introduced.
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When loading/unloading vehicles
> use lift equipment wherever practicable, otherwise
> prepare by stretching and warming up, especially after prolonged sitting in the vehicle
> slide the item as close as possible to you before lifting
> keep you back straight and bend your knees when lifting
> put loads down in the same manner in which they were picked up
> where possible store frequently used items at a suitable height; between waist and shoulder height, which reduces the need
for forward bending when lifting, and
> whenever possible use trolleys for moving larger and heavy items
10. PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
The definition of plant encompasses hand tools either powered or non-powered (electric drills, hammers) and extends to farm
machinery, office furniture and any other equipment used for work purposes.
Risk Management
A risk management process is a systematic method for making plant as safe as possible and can also be incorporated into other
workplace risk management systems. This risk management approach should be undertaken before purchasing of, or alterations
to plant, changing the way it is used, relocating it, or if additional health and safety information becomes available.
Maintenance and repair
Plant must be maintained and cleaned following the procedures recommended by the designer or manufacturer or by a
competent person. Only a competent person may inspect and repair damaged plant.
Unsafe and/or malfunctioning plant and equipment can be identified by any manager, worker or contractor by a number of
methods such as:
> equipment inspections;
> verbal reporting of equipment malfunction to the appropriate manager
> hazard and incident reporting.
Once identified, the unsafe or malfunctioning plant/equipment should be reported to the appropriate manager in order for repair
to be organised. Plant/equipment which has been identified as unsafe should be disconnected from the power supply and clearly
labelled as unsafe and not be used. If possible the plant/equipment should be moved to a location where it is not accessible.
Record Keeping
Records of inspection, testing and monitoring are required to be maintained by . As a minimum,
records should include details of inspections, maintenance, repair, calibration and alteration of plant.
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11. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may be required to protect managers and workers during general, specific and hazardous
tasks. PPE is the least effective way to control risk and is always the last resort to protect workers. The types of PPE used at
might include:
> respirators and masks
> foot protection (safety shoes and boots)
> body protection (high visibility clothing, long sleeves, wide brimmed hats, gloves)
> helmets
> any substance used to protect health, for example, sunscreen.
If required, workers are obliged to use PPE when required and when reasonably practicable. Other requirements include:
> workers should be fully trained in the safe use, storage and maintenance of PPE
> PPE must be checked before use for the correct type, fit and undamaged
> do not reuse disposable, contaminated or damaged PPE
> store PPE correctly.
12. SLIPS, TRIPS AND FALLS
Slips, trips and falls are one of the major types of accidents in workplaces and may be due to poor housekeeping practices such
as water or oil spilt. Material placed untidily or using walkways for storage can also be a cause of these types of incidents. When
assessing the potential for slips, trips and falls, make sure you look at out of sight areas such as storage rooms, stairways and
workshops.
Prevention
Reduce the risk of injury by following these guidelines:
> avoid walking on slippery floors
> keep floors free of water and grease
> clean floors regularly
> post warning signs around spills or wet floors
> install non-slip tiling or other non-slip floor products
> use rubber mats in areas where the floors are constantly wet
> use non-slip footwear
> clean up spills immediately
> install adhesive strips and slip resistant paint to improve slip resistance. The best method will depend on the existing floor
surface.
> use floor cleaning products to remove oil and grease.
> agree on written standards with contract cleaners to ensure that any cleaning agents leave the floor in a non-slip condition.
> use storage areas for equipment and be alert to the dangers of leaving boxes, rubbish, bags and furniture in walkways,
entrances and exits.
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13. DRUGS AND ALCOHOL
maintains the right to refuse work to any worker or contractor who, in the opinion of
management, is in an unfit state to perform their work in a safe manner.
To assist in these requirements, workers, contractors and visitors shall observe that:
> No alcohol may be consumed or permitted on property at any time unless expressly authorised by management and only
when work is completed for the day
> No illegal drugs shall be consumed or permitted on property at any time or under any circumstance
> If, in the opinion of management, a worker is unfit to work safely, they will be sent/taken home
> Workers who are taking prescription medication that may affect their safety at work (that cause drowsiness), are to inform
management of the circumstances so that appropriate duties may be assigned.
encourages all employees not to smoke. Please do not smoke in any vehicle, tractor
or building.
14. UV RADIATION
Ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure can cause sunburn, skin and eye damage and skin cancer. UV protective clothing, hats,
sunglasses and SPF 30 sunblock will be provided as PPE and are required to be worn for outdoor tasks.
15. VEHICLES
Alcohol and Drugs
managers and workers must not drive a personal or vehicle
on work related business in circumstances where that member would breach applicable road transport law by driving under the
influence of alcohol or drugs.
Licences
managers and workers who are required to drive a vehicle on work related business must hold
a current valid driver’s licence of the appropriate class and notify the Station Manager if the licence is suspended or revoked. A
copy of the current driver’s licence must be provided to the Station Manager or their delegate to be retained on file.
Mobile Phones
The use of a hand-held mobile telephone while driving is a safety risk and is against the law.
managers and workers are not to use a hand-held mobile telephone while driving a motor vehicle or other motorised equipment
at an workplace.
Seat Belts
It is a legal and requirement that seat belts are worn at all times in a moving vehicle. The driver
is responsible for ensuring that all passengers wear a seat belt when the vehicle is in motion on a public road or at an
workplace.
Smoking
Smoking in any vehicle by either drivers or passengers is prohibited.
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Load Restraint in Vehicles
> All equipment in vehicles must be restrained firmly in order to avoid the risk of the items becoming airborne and causing
missile injuries in the case of a vehicle collision
> The tension in the load restraining straps should be checked regularly during the journey
> Distribute the load evenly within the vehicle
> Ensure no loose items are within the passenger area as they may become projectiles in the event of an accident.
Do not exceed load/weight capacity of the vehicle.
16. WORKING ALONE
The risk of injury or harm for people who work alone may be increased because of difficulty contacting emergency services when
they are required. Emergency situations may arise because of the sudden onset of a medical condition, accidental work-related
injury or disease, attack by an animal, exposure to the elements, or by becoming stranded without food or water.
The consequences of an incident arising when working alone may be very serious so managers
and workers shall implement the following for each alone work task:
> a telephone call to home base on arrival and departure at a remote work site
> development and approval of trip itineraries for extended trips and adherence to the itinerary
> pre-trip agreement on departure and arrival times and accommodation arrangements
> for travel in remote areas an emergency location beacon should be carried in the vehicle
> pre-arranged mobile/satellite phone calls at scheduled times
> appropriate first aid kit
> sufficient water for emergency purposes.
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PART D: FORMS AND CHECKLISTS
ATTACHMENT 1—EMERGENCY CONTACTS LIST
(To be displayed in appropriate location/s)
CONTACTS PHONE
POLICE (local station)
EMERGENCY SERVICES (police, fire and RFDS)
000 Using Land Line
112 Using Mobile
UHF Band
Comcare
UTILITIES—Electrical
UTILITIES—Gas
UTILITIES—Sewerage and Stormwater
Doctor’s Surgery Address:
Physical Site Address:
Adjacent Occupants
Contacts:
First Aid Officer/s: (TBA)
WHS 123a | 31
ATTACHMENT 2—HAZARD/INJURY/INCIDENT REPORT FORM
Notifiable incidents must be reported to Comcare.
PART A: HAZARD/INJURY/INCIDENT REPORT (to be completed by the involved worker or manager)
Is this a Hazard report Injury report Incident (i.e. near miss) report?
Is this a Notifiable Incident? No Yes Date Reported to Comcare:
Workplace Location:
Date of Incident: Date Reported:
Time of Incident:
Name of person reporting the incident/hazard/near miss (print name):
Name of person injured (if applicable):
Nature of injury (if applicable):
Part of body injured (if applicable):
Treatment Outcome (If applicable):
Nil Required First Aid Medical treatment from GP Hospital
Location of the hazard/injury/incident:
Description of hazard/injury/incident:
How did the hazard/injury/incident occur (contributing factors)?
am
WHS 123a | 32
PART B: CORRECTIVE ACTIONS (to be completed by the Station Manager)
What needs to happen?
(to ensure that similar incidents do not occur in the future or to
minimise the risk from the hazard)
By when?
Person
Responsible
PART C: SIGN OFF
Person Reporting (print name): Station Manager (print name):
Signature: Signature:
Date: Date:
Contact Phone Number: Contact Phone Number:
WHS 123a | 33
ATTACHMENT 3—WHS INDUCTION CHECKLIST FOR NEW WORKERS
Worker’s Name Position/Job Title
Start Date Supervisor Name
Introduction Date completed
Introduce other staff and the supervisor
Introduce the first aid officer and show location of first aid supplies
Explain and demonstrate emergency procedures
Show location of exits and equipment
Show the work area, toilet, drinking water and eating facilities
Show how to safely use, store and maintain equipment (tools etc) and hazardous substances
(if applicable)
Work Health and Safety
WHS Induction Training Program for Land Workers (complete copy)
On completion of Safety Induction Training Program confirm the following:
Roles and responsibilities of people in the workplace regarding WHS
Hazards in the workplace and how they are controlled
How to report hazards
How to report an injury and the importance of immediate reporting of serious injuries.
Consultation about WHS—how they will be kept informed about health and safety issues
Injury and Return to Work Procedures
WHS Induction conducted by:
Person providing the induction (print name):
Signature:
Date:
Worker’s Signature:
Date:
WHS 123a | 34
ATTACHMENT 4—WHS INDUCTION FOR CONTRACTORS/VISITORS
WELCOME TO
SAFETY BRIEFING
FOR CONTRACTORS AND VISITORS
( )
is committed to ensuring the health and safety of our managers, workers, contractors and all other visitors.
For your safety and the safety of others, it is a condition of entry to this Worksite that you take a few minutes to read this
briefing.
General Safety Information
> All visitors are required to report to the main office on arrival.
> Observe any posted speed and parking restrictions.
> Obey all safety signs and barricades.
> Violent, threatening or other unacceptable behaviour is not tolerated.
> Smoking, alcohol and illegal drugs are not permitted on premises.
> Weapons, including knives, are not permitted on premises.
> Visitors and contractors intending to bring dangerous goods and/or hazardous substances onto the worksite must declare
these at the main office prior to entering the site.
> All hazards, incidents and injuries must be reported to the main office. Injuries will be recorded in the Register of Injuries.
First Aid treatment is available on site.
Emergency Procedures
In a life threatening emergency DIAL 000 For Fire, Police and Ambulance. In all cases advise an
staff member.
Follow directions of staff in the event of an evacuation
Evacuation Alarms
Evacuation Procedures
When the evacuation alarm sounds:
> Evacuate the building and proceed to the assembly area identified on the site map.
> Remain in the assembly area until advised otherwise.
Contractors
All contractors are to report to the main office to:
> indicate the location and duration of the job
> sign in/ out of Visitor Register
> advise of the status of the job before leaving the site
> remove all job and personal rubbish
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Describe warning signal here
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
WHS 123a | 35
Additionally, the contractor may be required to:
> produce a copy of their Safety Management Plan, including use of personal protective equipment and controls for site specific
hazards, including signage and removal of job and personal rubbish
> produce Public Liability Insurance documentation before work is commenced
> complete a Prohibited Employment Declaration concerning tasks requiring specific training or licenses
INSERT WORKSITE PLAN SHOWING EMERGENCY EVACUATION ROUTES AND ASSEMBLY POINTS
WHS 123a | 36
—CONTRACTORS/VISITORS/SIGN IN SHEET
IN CONTRACTOR/VISITOR DETAILS OUT
DATE TIME NAME
ADDRESS/
ORGANISATION
PERSON VISITED
(or purpose of
visit if Supplier or
Contractor)
Safety Briefing
Information
provided
Signature of
Contractor/Visitor/
acknowledging
Safety Briefing
representative
signature
TIME
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG
NAME HERE
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
am
WHS 123a | 37
CONTRACTORS/VISITORS SIGN IN INSTRUCTIONS
All contractors and visitors must be provided with a Safety Briefing prior to coming onto the worksite.
Upon arrival to the front office, ensure that:
> a laminated copy of the
Safety Briefing is given to any contractors or visitors who will be coming onto the site
> verbal advice is given regarding evacuation procedures
> an extra map of the worksite is provided to the contractor/visitor, showing the facilities (eg toilets), evacuation routes and
assembly points
> the contractor/visitor is advised to report any hazards, incidents or injuries to the front office immediately
> the contractor/visitor is advised where they can seek first aid treatment, if required
The contractor/visitor is required to sign the Sign In sheet acknowledging that they have read and understood the
Safety Briefing.
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
WHS 123a | 38
ATTACHMENT 5—DETAILED WHS INDUCTION CHECKLIST FOR
CONTRACTORS
1. Contract Details
Contract Name: Contract Duration Dates: to
Contractor Name: Contact:
Contractor Representative: Work area to be Inducted:
2. Information Checklist
Contractor qualification/license:
Contractor qualification/license and public liability/workers compensation cover provided
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS):
Safe Work Method Statement (SWMS) document/s with risk assessment and detailed controls
(may be detailed in an attachment) sighted and discussed with the Station Manager
(work will not commence
until sighted)
Site Induction:
Provided with contact numbers: Emergencies ph XXXXXX;
General Enquiries ph XXXXXX
First aid requirements discussed
Accident/incident & hazard reporting procedures for discussed
Emergency procedures at discussed
Discuss building access requirements/hours of work
Identification of restricted access areas
Discuss vehicle access to work site
Advised of Alcohol/Drugs and Smoking policies
Consultation—discussion and agreement reached with contractor regarding:
Asbestos management plan viewed
Location of any barricades to be erected
Access to electricity/use of extension leads
Contractors tools tested & tagged
Delivery/Storage/Removal of building waste
Storage of building material
Excavation sites
Lock out procedures for plant and equipment
Disconnection of utilities
Impact on fire alarm/smoke detection systems
Noise control measures
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
WHS 123a | 39
Chemicals (If applicable):
Will chemicals be used on job?
Safety Data Sheets for the chemicals being used are provided?
Hot Work (If applicable): A Hot Works permit for welding, soldering, acetylene torch, or other related heat or spark producing
operations must be obtained from the Station Manager prior to starting any Hot Works. Hot
Work signage must be displayed on the site.
Fire alarm system needs to be isolated or turned off?
Hot Work Permit is required and supplied to worksite?
Date supplied / /
Will appropriate additional firefighting equipment be located next to work site?
Working at heights (if applicable):
Has Contractor completed working at height safety training?
Are procedures detailed in the Safe Work Method Statement?
Working in a confined space (if applicable):
Has Contractor completed Confined Space safety training?
Are procedures detailed in the Safe Work Method Statement?
4. Sign-Off
By signing this form I, the undersigned, agree that:
> I have participated in and understood the WHS Induction.
> I agree to abide by the safety policies and procedures identified above whilst working for
Responsible
staff member
Date
Contractor Representative Date
Copy to Contractor, Copy to
Yes
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT ORGANISATION NAME HERE
WHS 123a | 40
ATTACHMENT 6—WHS TRAINING REGISTER
Publication: February 2014
Revision: February 2015
This training register records the work health and safety (WHS) training undertaken by
managers and workers, as required by the WHS Act 2011. Training can take place by a supervisor on-the-job, or by an instructor
outside of the workplace. WHS training will provide workers with the information and skills they
need to perform their duties without risk to their health and safety.
recognises that WHS training may be required when:
> a new person starts work—induction, on the job training
> new machinery/equipment or hazardous chemicals, products or other things are introduced to the workplace
> a worker’s job change
> there are new work health and safety regulations that affect our industry
> there has been an incident /near miss or injury at work.
To ensure the training was successful, will annually review WHS training to ensure that our
managers and workers:
> understand what is required of them
> have the knowledge and skills needed to work safely and without risk to their health and safety
> are actually working as they have been trained.
Additionally, will use this register as part of regular overall reviews of the WHS management
system with the goal of determining if:
> there has been any improvement in health and safety performance
> the feedback from people who have been trained
> further information and/or training needed
> whether the most suitable training method was used
> improvements that can be made.
Training records will be monitored so that refresher training can be given when needed.
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
WHS 123a | 41
WHS TRAINING REGISTER
Who was trained/
job title
Reason for training Duration of training
Who provided
training
Method of training
eg on the job,
theory, practical
Location of training Scheduled date Date completed
WHS 123a | 42
ATTACHMENT 7—WHS RISK ASSESSMENT PROFORMA
Workplace location:
Name and position of person/s conducting assessment:
Date:
Serial Hazard Identification Risk Assessment Risk Control Review
What is the
Hazard?
What injury,
illness or
consequence
could occur?
List any Control
Measures
already
implemented
Risk Level
Describe what
can be done
to reduce the
harm further
Whom
Responsible
When By
Are the
Controls
Effective?
(Revised Risk
Score*)
Date Finalised
CONDUCTING A RISK ASSESSMENT
Step 1: Identify the Consequences—or how severely could it hurt someone
Step 2: Identify the Likelihood—or how likely is it for an injury to occur
Steps 3 & 4: Identify the Risk Priority Score—to prioritise your actions
Step 5: Apply the hierarchy of hazard control
Step 6: Identify who, how and when the effectiveness of controls will be checked and reviewed
WHS 123a | 43
Step 1—CONSEQUENCES
How severely could it hurt someone?
Step 2—LIKELIHOOD
Very likely, could
happen frequently
Likely, could
happen
occasionally
Unlikely, could
happen, but rare
Very unlikely,
could happen,
probably never
will
L1 L2 L3 L4
Kill or cause permanent
disability or ill health
C1
Very high risk
(1)
Very high risk
(1)
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Long term illness or serious
injury
C2
Very high risk
(1)
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk (4)
Medical attention and several
days off work
C3
High Risk
(2)
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk (4)
Acceptable Risk
(5)
First Aid needed C4
Substantial Risk
(3)
Moderate Risk (4)
Acceptable Risk
(5)
Low Risk
(6)
Step 3—RISK PRIORITY SCORE Step 4—ACTION AND RESPONSE
1 = Very High Risk
Stop the activity—immediate action is required to ensure safety—safety measures
applied must be cleared by the Station Manager before any activity recommences
Proceed with caution—immediate reporting of emerging or ongoing risk exposure at this
level to the Station Manager for decision is mandatory
2 = High Risk
3 = Substantial Risk
Be aware—action required as soon as possible to prevent injury or illness
Report these risks to the responsible Manager during the current shift or before the next
shift
4 = Moderate Risk
5 = Acceptable Risk
Do something when possible. Manage by routine procedures.
6 = Low Risk
These risks should be recorded, monitored and controlled by the responsible Manager
CONTROLLING THE RISKS—THE HIERARCHY OF CONTROL
Once the risk assessment process has been completed, those hazards identified as being a VERY HIGH RISK or HIGH RISK
should be addressed as a matter of priority. In considering options for controlling the identified risks, the hierarchy of controls
helps to ensure that the most effective controls are implemented.
Risk Control Hierarchy
Elimination: this is the best control measure. E.g. remove a trip hazard.
Substitution: e.g. substitute a hazardous chemical with a less hazardous substance.
Isolation: e.g. barricade off the area where the hazard is present.
Engineering: e.g. re-design of tools and equipment, provision of load shifting equipment (trolleys etc).
Administrative: e.g. written procedures, training, warning signs.
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): Introduce PPE only when other control measures cannot be implemented or as a
supplement.
WHS 123a | 44
ATTACHMENT 8—WHS HAZARD INSPECTION PROCEDURE
Identify hazards in workplaces by
> Conducting regular systematic inspections of the workplace
> Observe what hazards exist in the workplace and ask “what if?”
> Listen to feedback from people working with the task
> Maintain records of processes used to identify hazards
Frequency
Location Frequency By whom?
Buildings
Ongoing The relevant manager, HSR or worker
Formally—annually The relevant manager accompanied by a HSR
Workshops and Yards
Ongoing The relevant manager, HSR or worker
Formally—quarterly—location or task based The relevant manager accompanied by a HSR
Formally—annually—complete The relevant manager accompanied by a HSR
Check
> Air quality—extraction systems and ventilation
> Amenities—ventilation, slip/trip hazards, cleaning and hygiene
> Asbestos—register, management plan, condition
> Chemicals/dangerous goods—storage, labeling, spills, safety data sheets, PPE
> Electrical—leads, loading, testing and tagging
> Fire/emergency/first aid—communication, fire extinguishers, first aid kits
> Office/buildings—cleanliness, equipment serviceability, space, ergonomics
> Workshops—walkways, waste, storage, tools
> Lighting—adequacy, glare, cleanliness, repair
> Storage—adequacy, compatible materials, design, repair
> Machinery—guarding, maintenance, calibration
> Manual or mechanical handling—loads, equipment, training
> Stock work—yards, dairy, shearing, mustering, transport
> Noise—noise levels, designated zones, use of PPE
> PPE—availability, purpose, repair
> Premises security—adequacy, lighting
> Miscellaneous issues
INSERT SHORT ORG NAME HERE
WHS 123a | 45
At the end of the inspection a report should be drafted detailing all of the safety hazards identified. The report should provide
a description of the risk assessment undertaken for each of these items and the risk rating allocated to each. This is done by
considering the following:
> The frequency of persons exposed to the hazard—days per week, times per day.
> What the consequences might be—personal injury, environmental damage, associated costs or losses to replace or repair—
how severe the outcome.
> What systems are currently in place, how effective are they or what other information is required
WHS 123a | 46
ATTACHMENT 9—WHS HAZARD INSPECTION QUICK CHECKLIST
Work Health and Safety Hazard Inspection Summary
Location details: Date of Inspection:
Inspection undertaken by: Accompanying Manager:
Accompanying HSR:
Reference Number
Identified Hazard/
Issue
Location
Recommended
Control Measure
Priority
To be endorsed by Station Manager
To be actioned by: Completion Date: Review Date:
WHS 123a | 47
Quick Hazard Inspection Checklist
Area Assessed:
Date:
ITEM COMMENTS
Are the following safe and fit for purpose? Answering “No” will require corrective action stated in Comments
1. Buildings
> air-conditioning
> ventilation
> adequate lighting
> glare problems
> ergonomics
> amenities clean
> amenities serviceable
> slip/trip hazards
> electrical testing/tagging
> smoke alarms
> fire extinguishers
> safety signage/
information
2. Chemicals
> appropriately stored
> excess quantities beyond
immediate use
> decanted materials
labelled
> Safety Data Sheets
available
> spills procedure
> first aid
> PPE
3. All Electrical
> leads, plugs, switches in
good condition
> leads safely positioned;
any temp leads; tagged
> tagging current
> RCD testing
4. Fire & Emergencies
> fire extinguishers/hoses
checked and serviceable
> exit signage
> exits clear
> signage of HSRs, FAOs,
Fire Wardens
> designated assembly
areas
WHS 123a | 48
Quick Hazard Inspection Checklist
Area Assessed:
Date:
ITEM COMMENTS
Are the following safe and fit for purpose? Answering “No” will require corrective action stated in Comments
5. First Aid
> first aid kits adequately
stocked
> first aid kits clearly
located
> first aid room adequately
stocked
> FAO appointed and
trained
6. Workshops
> machine guarding in
place
> safety lockout
procedures observed
> walkways clear
> waste disposal
> housekeeping
> storage
> maintenance
> electrical
> battery recharging area
> designated noise zones
> PPE
7. Walkways, stairs and
landings
> surface in good
condition
> no clutter, trip hazards
> rails stable
8. Storage and manual
handling
> adequate for needs;
items appropriately
stored
> safe work method
statements for
hazardous tasks
> loads configured to
reduce risk
> lift equipment provided
and serviceable
> training in manual tasks
WHS 123a | 49
Quick Hazard Inspection Checklist
Area Assessed:
Date:
ITEM COMMENTS
Are the following safe and fit for purpose? Answering “No” will require corrective action stated in Comments
9. Stock work
> safe access
> protective railing
> stairs, handrails and
ramps in good condition
> mustering routes
established
> communication
> PPE
> workers trained
> workers supervised
10. Noise
> PPE available for
designated noise zones
11. Security
> visitor procedures
> signage
> lighting
12. Miscellaneous (list)
WHS 123a | 50
ATTACHMENT 10—SUGGESTED ASBESTOS REGISTER
ASBESTOS REGISTER
Work site: Name of Competent Person:
Date of Identification Type of Asbestos Condition of Asbestos Specific Location of Asbestos Is this an inaccessible area?
WHS 123a | 51
ATTACHMENT 11—HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES REGISTER
Name of substance Supplier Location of substance Hazardous Y/N
Current SDS
ie less than 5 years old
Date of issue
Risk Assessment
Yes/No
Uses
1300 366 979 | COMCARE.GOV.AU
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