Woodland
Management Plan
Woodland or Property Name Kendal Woodlands
Case Reference
The landowner agrees this plan as a statement of intent for the woodland
Plan author name Jamie Chaplin-Brice
For FC Use only
Plan Period (ten years) Approval Date: To:
Five Year Review Date
Revision No Date status Reason for Revision
00537
26/02/2019
26/02/2029
2024
UKFS Management Planning Criteria
Approval of this plan will be considered against the following UKFS criteria, prior to submission review your plan
against the criteria using the check list below.
No UKFS Management Plan Criteria Minimum Approval Requirements Applicant
Check
1
Plan Objectives:
Forest management plans should state the objectives of
management and set out how an appropriate balance between
social, economic, and environmental objectives will be achieved.
• Management plan objectives are stated.
• Consideration is given to environmental, economic and social
objectives relevant to the vision for the woodland.
2
Forest context and important features in management strategy:
Forest management plans should address the forest context and the
forest potential and demonstrate how the relevant interests and
issues have been considered and addressed.
Management intentions communicated in Sect. 6 of the
management plan are in line with stated objective(s) Sect. 2.
Management intentions should take account of:
• Relevant features and issues identified within the woodland
survey (Sect. 4)
• Any potential threats to and opportunities for the woodland, as
identified under woodland protection (Sect. 5).
• Relevant comments received from stakeholder engagement
and documented in Sect. 7.
3
Identification of designations within and surrounding the site:
For designated areas, e.g. National Parks or SSSI, particular
account should be taken of landscape and other sensitivities in the
design of forests and forest infrastructure.
• Survey information (Sect. 4) identifies any designations that
impact on woodland management.
• Management intentions (Sect. 6) have taken account of any
designations.
4
Felling and restocking to improve forest structure and
diversity:
When planning felling and restocking, the design of existing forests
should be re-assessed and any necessary changes made so that
they meet UKFS requirements.
Forests should be designed to achieve a diverse structure of habitat,
species and ages of trees, appropriate to the scale and context.
Forests characterised by a lack of diversity, due to extensive areas
of even-aged trees, should be progressively restructured to achieve
age class range.
• Felling and restocking proposals are consistent with UKFS
design principles (for example scale and adjacency).
• Current diversity (structure, species, age structure) of the
woodland has been identified through the survey (Sect. 4).
• Management intentions aim to improve / maintain current
diversity (structure, species, and ages of trees).
5
Consultation:
Consultation on forest management plans and proposals should be
carried out according to forestry authority procedures and, where
required, the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations.
• Stakeholder engagement is in line with current FC guidance
and recorded in Sect. 7. The minimum requirement is for
statutory consultation to take place, and this will be carried out
by the Forestry Commission.
• Plan authors undertake stakeholder engagement (ref FC Ops
Note 35) relevant to the context and setting of the woodland.
6
Plan Update and Review:
Management of the forest should conform to the plan, and the plan
should be updated to ensure it is current and relevant.
• A 5 year review period is stated on the 1st page of the plan.
Sect. 8 is completed with 1 indicator of success per
management objective.
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1. Property Details
Woodland Property Name Kendal Woodlands SLDC
Name Graham Nicholson I am the: owner
email g.nicholson@southlakeland.gov.uk Contact Number 01539 793349
Agent Name (if applicable) Jamie Chaplin-Brice
email jamie@cumbriawoodlands.co.uk Contact Number 07974446106
County Cumbria Local Authority South Lakeland District
Council
Grid
Reference
SD 50959 92807 Single Business Identifier 110498607
Management Plan Area (Hectares) 143.08 ha
You have included an Inventory and Plan of Operations
with this plan?
yes
List the maps associated with this management plan Opportunities and Constraints, Felling Maps
Do you intend to use the information within the
management plan and associated plan of operations to
apply for the following
Felling Licence: no
Thinning Licence: yes
Woodland Regeneration Grant: no
You declare that there is management control of the
woodland detailed within the woodland management
plan?
yes
You agree to make the woodland management plan
publicly available?
yes
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2. Vision and Objectives
To develop your long term vision, you need to express as clearly as possible the overall direction of management
for the woodland(s) and how you envisage it will be in the future. This covers the duration of the plan and beyond.
2.1 Vision
Describe your long term vision for the woodland(s).
The long term vision for the Kendal woodlands is to maintain a safe, biodiverse woodland environment for the
benefit of the general public. Protection of the woodlands through management and operations combined with
monitoring will ensure a healthy woodland structure for each of the woodlands, while maintaining species diversity.
A considerate and sensitive approach will be adopted, keeping in mind the local community, neighbouring
properties, the local limestone formations and the neighbouring landscapes of the nearby Lake District National
Park.
2.2 Management Objectives
State the objectives of management demonstrating how sustainable forest management is to be achieved.
Objectives are a set of specific, quantifiable statements that represent what needs to happen to achieve the long
term vision.
No Objectives
1 Keeping all woodland areas safe, for the recreation and benefit of the public.
2 Improving the structure of woodlands, to maintain species diversity and vary the age class within the
woodlands.
3 Improving species diversity to mitigate against existing or new tree health issues.
4 Encouraging woodland regeneration.
5 Improving habitat for flora and fauna.
6 Protect and maintain historic features and other features of local interest.
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3. Plan Review - Achievements
Use this section to identify achievements made against previous plan objectives. This section should be
completed at the 5 year review and could be informed through monitoring activities undertaken.
Objectives Achievements
It is known that Serpentine Wood had a management plan
from 2004-2009, and another plan prior to that.
At Serpentine Woods, Kendal Conservation Volunteers
has helped to achieve some of the objectives within
the earlier plan, including maintaining paths, clearing
scrub and moss from historical features, maintaining
the nature and alphabet trails. Little work has been
undertaken with regard to the restructuring suggested
in the plan, however where large trees have blown,
this has had a similar outcome in a couple of areas.
It appears that Little Wood, Coffin Wood and Serpentine
Wood all had a thinning licence under EWGS (English
Woodland Grant Scheme) from 2001 - 2005.
While thinning may have taken place, there is little
evidence for this now in the woodlands and no known
records to back this up.
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4. Woodland Survey
This section is about collecting information relating to your woodland and its location, including any statutory
constraints i.e. designations.
4.1 Description
Brief description of the woodland property
The South Lakeland District Council owned woodlands within the Kendal area include Prickly Fell, Somervell
Wood, Bluebell Wood, Serpentine Wood, Coffin Wood and Little Wood.
All are in or around residential or parkland areas and offer amenity to the residents of Kendal. The woodlands vary
in composition, with some newly planted woodland creation sites as well as areas of long established woodland.
Below is a brief description of each individual woodland.
Prickly Fell - Prickly Fell is a small woodland of around 0.7 hectares. The woodland is flanked by a road to the east,
with retaining walls against the steep ground, rising to the west. Several of the trees are mature and heavily
shading the woodland and neighbouring properties. The species are diverse and the age class is varied. Ivy is
prolific throughout the woodland. Access is best from the west of the woodland.
Somervell Wood - This is a woodland creation site on Aikrigg Hill, to the south of Kendal Castle. The woodland was
created as a millennium wood around the year 2000 with support from Russel Armer LTD and the Forestry
Commission. The trees are growing well, indeed many have now had their tubes removed. Access is good by foot,
but poor by vehicle. There are overhead power lines which bisect the woodland, beneath these there is an area of
scrub planting. There are a couple of mature ash trees at the woodland edge.
Bluebell Wood - Bluebell wood is a wood of two halves. The northern area is a woodland creation site, from the
year 2000. This consists of mainly ash, cherry, oak, lime and birch. All are growing very well, with ash regeneration
naturally. An area of bramble occupies some of the open ground. The southern area of the woodland is primarily a
full canopy of mature oak, with occasional ash and elm. The shrub layer is very good, also with sycamore and
hazel present, with occasional english elm. Fenced off to the east of the woodland is the Oxenholme-Windermere
railway.
Serpentine Wood - Serpentine wood feels most like a park out of all the woodlands. It is entirely wooded with
occasional open spaces such as "the gymnasium", a circular area built in Edwardian times. It is home to a nature
trail and an alphabet trail, several benches, buildings and numerous paths. The ground is very steep in places, with
slippery paths due to dense layers of beech leaves on limestone. The tree species are varied, including beech,
ash, horse chestnut and sycamore. Occasional oak and cherry are also present. The structure is diverse by both
age and species, with some of the trees expected to be over 100 years old. The woodland is exposed to wind in
places, indeed recent storms have brought a few trees and branches down. An area of serpentine wood called Dog
Kennel Wood is leased to Kendal Conservation Volunteers (KCV). The lower area of Serpentine Wood is known for
its ferns, with KCV recently restoring the George Whitwell fern garden.
Coffin Wood - This woodland is now a rarity in the English landscape - around one third of the mature trees are
elm, mostly looking fit and well. While not great in size, these trees form a major component in the canopy, along
with ash and sycamore, with beech at the woodland edges. Interestingly, elm was traditionally used to make
coffins, amongst other things - is there a connection here? The woodland is fairly even aged and was apparently
last thinned between 2001 and 2006.
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Little Wood - This is predominantly a mature beech and sycamore woodland, with occasional ash and elm. Holly,
hawthorn, elm and goat willow are present in the understorey, although all are fairly scarce throughout the
woodland as a whole. The woodland has been home to a reservoir/pipeline at some stage, although this is now
redundant. Fencing/walling is in poor condition. Access is good thanks to a nearby public footpath and track from
the golf course, by which the woodland is surrounded. A handful of sheds/buildings butt onto the boundaries,
presumably in use by the golf course. The woodland would benefit from a thin, to enable the understory to develop.
Along with Coffin Wood, thinning operations apparently last took place between 2001 and 2006.
4.2 Information
Use this section to identify features that are both present in your woodland(s) and where required, on land
adjacent to your woodland. It may be useful to identify known features on an accompanying map. Woodland
information for your property can be found on the Magic website or the Forestry Commission Land Information
Search.
Biodiversity - Designations
Feature within Cpts adjcnt Map No Notes
Site of Special
Scientific Interest
no no
Special Area of
Conservation
no no
Tree Protection
Order
no no
Special
Protection Area
no no
Ramsar Site no no
National Nature
Reserve
no no
Local Nature
Reserve
no no
other: no no
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Biodiversity - European Protected Species
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Bat no
Dormouse no
Great Crested
Newt
no
Otter no
Sand Lizard no
Smooth Snake no
Natterjack Toad no
Biodiversity - Priority Species
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Schedule 1 birds no 13 3 While no schedule 1 birds are known to be present,
much of the area in particular near Coffin Wood and
Little Wood is a CS targeting area for Snipe,
Lapwing Curlew and the Tree Sparrow.
Mammals (Red
Squirrel, Water
Vole, Pine
Marten, etc.)
no
Reptiles (grass
snake, adder,
common lizard
etc)
no
Plants no
Fungi/Lichens no
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Invertebrates
(butterflies,
moths, beetles
etc)
no
Amphibians
(pool frog,
common toad)
no
other:
Badger
yes 13 3 A badger set is noted as being present within Coffin
Wood, Longitude 54.329641 Lattitude -2.764196
Historic Environment
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Scheduled
Monuments
no
Unscheduled
Monuments
no
Scheduled
Landscapes
no
Registered
Parks and
Gardens
no
Boundaries and
Veteran Trees
yes 8,9,10,11,12,13 1,2,3 There are various boundary and veteran trees
throughout the more mature woodlands. In the
woodland creation sites, these are rare.
other: no
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Landscapes
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
National
Character Area
no
National Park no Kendal is near to the Lake District National Park
Area of
Outstanding
Natural Beauty
no
other:
Town/Village
Green
yes 11,12,13 3 Serpentine Wood, Little Wood and Coffin Wood are
understood to be part of a registered town green.
People
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
CROW access no
Public Rights of
Way (any)
yes 13 There is a public footpath adjacent to Coffin Wood,
Little Wood and Serpentine Wood - town green
status - effectively the right of way to wander as they
please
Other Access
Provision
yes All woodland areas have an element of public
access; while often informal, it appears they are
used by dog-walkers, runners, interest and
volunteer groups along with various other users.
Public
Involvement
yes 13 3 Kendal Conservation Volunteers host meetings at
Dog Kennel Wood, which adjoins Serpentine Wood
Visitor
Information
yes 9,13 2,3 Visitor information is available in some woodlands.
Public
Recreation
Facilities
no
Provision of
Learning
Opportunities
no
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Anti-social
Behaviour
no
other: yes
Water
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Watercourses no
Lakes no
Ponds no
other: no
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4.3 Habitat Types
This section is to consider the habitat types within your woodland(s) that might impact/inform your management
decisions. Larger non-wooded areas within your woodland should be classified according to broad habitat type
where relevant this information should also help inform your management decisions. Woodlands should be
designed to achieve a diverse structure of habitat, species and ages of trees, appropriate to the scale and context
of the woodland.
Woodland Habitat Types
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Ancient Semi-
Natural
Woodland
no
Planted Ancient
Woodland Site
(PAWS)
no
Semi-natural
features in
PAWS
no
Lowland beech
and yew
woodland
no
Lowland mixed
deciduous
woodland
yes All of the woodland areas are priority habitat
deciduous woodland, with the exception of the
woodland creation sites at Bluebell Wood and
Somervell Wood.
Upland mixed
ash woods
no
Upland
Oakwood
no
Wet woodland no
Wood-pasture
and parkland
no
other no
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Non Woodland Habitat Types
Feature within Cpts Map No Notes
Blanket bog no
Fenland no
Lowland
calcareous
grassland
no
Lowland dry acid
grassland
no
Lowland heath
land
no
Lowland
meadows
no
Lowland raised
bog
no
Rush pasture no
Reed bed no
Wood pasture no
Upland hay
meadows
no
Upland heath
land
no
Unimproved
grassland
no
Peat lands no
Wetland habitats no
other no
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4.4 Structure
This section should provide a snapshot of the current structure of your woodland as a whole. A full inventory for
your woodland(s) can be included in the separate Plan of Operations spreadsheet. Ensuring woodland has a
varied structure in terms of age, species, origin and open space will provide a range of benefits for the biodiversity
of the woodland and its resilience. The diagrams below show an example of both uneven and even aged
woodland.
Woodland Type % of
Mgt
Plan
Area
Age Structure
(even/uneven)
Notes
Native Broadleaves 85 Even Aged Most of the woodland areas are fairly
even aged, be it new planting such as
Bluebell Wood or mature woodland
such as Little Wood. There are
occasionally old trees nearby or at the
woodland edges.
Native Broadleaves 10 Uneven Aged The main exception to even aged
woodland is within Serpentine wood
which has a slightly greater difference
in structure. This is part thanks to
clearings where trees have blown over
and historically thinning has taken
place. Such clearings now have an
understory of natural regeneration.
Native Broadleaves 5 Uneven Aged Prickly Fell is also uneven aged, but
has a full canopy for the majority of the
woodland, except for a clearing in the
middle.
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5. Woodland Protection
Woodlands in England face a range of threats; this section allows you to consider the potential threats that could
be facing your woodland(s). Using the simple Risk Assessment process below woodland owners and managers
can consider any potential threats to their woodland(s) and whether there is a need to take action to protect their
woodlands.
5.2 Risk Matrix
The matrix below provides a system for scoring risk. The matrix also indicates the advised level of action to take
to help manage the threat.
5.2 Plant Health
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Ash dieback
(Chalara Fraxinea)
high high action Ash is present within all the woodlands, often
as a major component. Ash dieback has
been noted in some of the woodlands, but it
is almost certain to be present in all.
Monitoring ash throughout the woodlands is
essential. Restructuring and thinning work
may be necessary for both safety reasons
and to improve structure to let other trees
establish. Keeping some ash is desirable, in
particular mature trees where the chance of
recovery is greater than with young trees.
Healthy ash should be retained.
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5.3 Deer
Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
low low monitor Deer presence has not been noted within any of the woodlands.
Should natural regeneration be desired or required, then action may
be needed to protect young trees.
5.4 Grey Squirrels
Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
medium low monitor Grey squirrels are known to be present in the woodland, but not
affecting the trees in any great way at present.
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5.5 Livestock
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Rabbit low high plan for
action
No rabbits were noted at the time of survey,
however but continued monitoring/action may
be necessary to ensure that natural
regeneration is successful.
5.6 Water & Soil
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Soil Erosion low low monitor The soils are quite thin in places, particularly
in the limestone areas. As such, retention of
soils is significant given that they are
essential for woodlands to survive long term.
Low impact operations and extraction will
lessen the threat of soil erosion.
5.7 Environmental
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Invasive Species low low monitor Given the proximity of the woodlands to
domestic gardens, invasive species is
something to monitor and act upon if
necessary.
Cherry Laurel is known to be present within
Serpentine Wood, this could be cut back.
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5.8 Social
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Anti-social
Behaviour
low low monitor It has been known for mountain bikers to use
the woods at Serpentine Woods, while the
land is public access and cycling should not
be encouraged, an element of respect is
desirable from all those enjoying the
woodlands.
Anti-social
Behaviour
low low monitor Litter/tipping was noted in a couple of
woodlands. If persistent, prevention of this is
desirable.
5.9 Economic
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
operational costs high medium action Operational costs are likely to be high, in
particular for risk and tree safety work. This is
primarily due to access and the steepness of
sites. Sale of byproducts and timber may
help to subsidise operations.
5.10 Climate
threat Likelihood of
presence
impact result response
Uniform Structure medium medium plan for
action
The woodland areas are generally fairly small
and have often been planted at the same
point in time. While this isn't a problem in the
short term, having a diverse species mix with
a diverse age class offers more options,
should the need for a change in management
arise.
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Lack of tree
species Diversity
medium medium plan for
action
Given the threat of ash dieback and probable
change in woodland canopies as a
consequence, it may be worth considering
the preparation of diverse native saplings to
improve the species composition. In
particular this is noteworthy at Serpentine
wood and Bluebell Wood where ash is
currently a major component in both. New
species could include those desirable in the
understory such as dogwoods, guelder rose,
field maple, elder and holly. Cherry,
chestnuts and elm could also be encouraged.
Aside from the threat to ash, the woodlands
are fairly diverse and so while the threat to
ash is high, the overall threat to the woodland
is lower.
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6. Management Strategy
This section requires a statement of intent, setting out how you intend to achieve your management objectives
and manage important features identified within the previous sections of the plan. A detailed work programme by
sub-compartment can be added to the Plan of Operations.
Management Obj/Feature Management Intention
Keeping all woodland areas safe, for the recreation and
benefit of the public.
Monitoring older and veteran trees for safety is
important, acting where necessary to limit risk.
Improving the structure of woodlands, to maintain species
diversity and vary the age class within the woodlands.
Gently thin all woodland areas to encourage age and
species diversity, this will ensure a more resilient
woodland in the long term. While timber production is
not a priority for the owner, use of product for timber
and woodfuel should be considered where possible.
Improving species diversity to mitigate against existing or
new tree health issues.
Management such as thinning must consider tree
species. For example, when thinning ash, other
species could be favoured. Healthy ash trees should
ideally be retained.
Encouraging woodland regeneration. Ensuring correct woodland management so that young
trees can grow to form part of the woodland canopy.
Improving habitat for flora and fauna. Retaining deadwood from operations.
Protect and maintain historic features and other features
of local interest
Manage vegetation around features of interest, for
example in Serpentine Wood. This may also include
branches of trees overhanging paths, walls etc. This
may include maintenance and repairs to boundaries,
paths etc.
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7. Stakeholder Engagement
There can be a requirement on both the FC and the owner to undertake consultation/engagement. Please refer to the guidance document for further information. Use
this section to identify people or organisations with an interest in your woodland and also to record any engagement that you have undertaken, relative to activities
identified within the plan.
Work Proposal Individual/
Organisation
Date
Contacted
Date
feedback
received
Response Action
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8. Monitoring
Indicators of progress/success should be defined for each management objective and then checked at regular intervals. Other management activities could also be
considered within this monitoring section. The data collected will help to evaluate progress.
Management
Objective /
Activities
Indicator of
Progress / Success
Method of
Assessment
Frequency of
Assessment
Responsibility Assessment
Results
Keeping all woodland
areas safe, for the
recreation and benefit of
the public.
The public remain safe
and enjoy the woodlands
Tree Safety Surveys Ongoing SLDC
Improving the structure of
woodlands, to maintain
species diversity and vary
the age class within the
woodlands.
Each woodland being
diverse, with young trees
establishing and older
trees being retained.
Survey At the plan review (5
years)
SLDC
Improving species
diversity to mitigate
against existing or new
tree health issues.
A diverse woodland with
numerous species.
Survey At the plan review (5
years)
SLDC
Encouraging woodland
regeneration.
Young trees becoming
established in the canopy.
Survey At the plan review (5
years)
SLDC
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Improving habitat for flora
and fauna.
Retaining some
deadwood in each
woodland
Survey At the plan review (5
years)
SLDC
Protect and maintain
historic features and other
features of local interest
Historic features remain Survey At the plan review (5
years)
SLDC
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FC Approval - FC Office use only
UKFS Management Plan Criteria Minimum Approval
Requirements
yes no notes
Plan Objectives:
Forest management plans should state the objectives
of management and set out how an appropriate
balance between social, economic, and environmental
objectives will be achieved.
• Management plan objectives are stated.
• Consideration is given to environmental,
economic and social objectives relevant to the
vision for the woodland.
Forest context and important features in
management strategy:
Forest management plans should address the forest
context and the forest potential and demonstrate how
the relevant interests and issues have been considered
and addressed.
Management intentions communicated in
Sect. 6 of the management plan are in line
with stated objective(s) Sect. 2.
Management intentions should take account
of:
• Relevant features and issues identified
within the woodland survey (Sect. 4)
• Any potential threats to and opportunities for
the woodland, as identified under woodland
protection (Sect. 5).
• Relevant comments received from
stakeholder engagement and documented in
Sect. 7.
Identification of designations within and
surrounding the site:
For designated areas, e.g. National Parks or SSSI,
particular account should be taken of landscape and
other sensitivities in the design of forests and forest
infrastructure.
• Survey information (Sect. 4) identifies any
designations that impact on woodland
management.
• Management intentions (Sect. 6) have taken
account of any designations.
Felling and restocking to improve forest structure
and diversity:
When planning felling and restocking, the design of
existing forests should be re-assessed and any
necessary changes made so that they meet UKFS
requirements.
Forests should be designed to achieve a diverse
structure of habitat, species and ages of trees,
appropriate to the scale and context.
Forests characterised by a lack of diversity, due to
extensive areas of even-aged trees, should be
progressively restructured to achieve age class range.
• Felling and restocking proposals are
consistent with UKFS design principles (for
example scale and adjacency).
• Current diversity (structure, species, age
structure) of the woodland has been identified
through the survey (Sect. 4).
• Management intentions aim to improve /
maintain current diversity (structure, species,
and ages of trees).
Consultation:
Consultation on forest management plans and
proposals should be carried out according to forestry
authority procedures and, where required, the
Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations.
• Stakeholder engagement is in line with
current FC guidance and recorded in Sect. 7.
The minimum requirement is for statutory
consultation to take place, and this will be
carried out by the Forestry Commission.
• Plan authors undertake stakeholder
engagement (ref FC Ops Note 35) relevant to
the context and setting of the woodland.
Plan Update and Review:
Management of the forest should conform to the plan,
and the plan should be updated to ensure it is current
and relevant.
• A 5 year review period is stated on the 1st
page of the plan.
Sect. 8 is completed with 1 indicator of
success per management objective.
Approved in Principle
This means the FC is happy with your plan; it meets UKFS requirements.
a) You can use it to support a CS-HT or other grant application.
b) You do not yet have a licence to undertake any tree felling in the plan.
Name (WO or FM) Date
Approved
This means FC is happy with your plan; it meets UKFS requirements, and we have also
approved a felling licence for any tree felling in the plan (where required).
Name (WO or FM) Date
Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org)
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On going whilst WO precess FLA/Plan of Ops
Andy Bennett
28/12/18
Andy Bennett
09/05/19
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