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Information pack
To be completed by the breeder.
1. Contact details
Title (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):
First name:
Surname:
Address:
Postcode:
Phone:
Mobile:
Email:
ABOUT THE SELLER (if different)
2. Contact details
Title (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):
First name:
Surname:
Address:
Postcode:
Phone:
Mobile:
Email:
ABOUT THE PUPPY’S MOTHER
3. Date of birth
/
/
2
0
4. What is the mother’s microchip number? (15 digits)
5. Is the mother registered with a club or society? Yes No
State type of registration: (for example,
Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)
Registration number:
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6. How many caesarean sections has the mother had, including this litter?
7. How many litters has the mother had, including this one?
8. How old was the mother when she had her first litter?
years
months
Was it on her first season?
Yes No
9. Is the mother up to date with UK vaccinations?
Yes No
If yes, is her vaccination certificate available to view?
Yes No
10. When was the mother last treated for worms and which worming product was used?
Product used:
Date used:
11. Has the mother had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy? Yes No
If yes, please give details:
ABOUT THE PUPPY’S FATHER
12. Owner’s name and address
Title (Mr, Mrs, Miss etc):
First name:
Surname:
Address:
Postcode:
Phone:
Mobile:
Email:
13. Father’s date of birth
/
/
2
0
14. What is the father’s microchip number? (15 digits)
15. Is the father registered with a club or society? Yes No
State type of registration: (for example,
Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)
Registration number:
16. Has the father had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy? Yes No
If yes, please give details:
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ABOUT THE PUPPY
17. Date of birth
/
/
2
0
18. Sex: Male Female
19. Colour and distinguishing marks
Please describe the puppy‟s
colour and distinguishing marks.
20. Is the puppy a specific breed? Yes No
If yes, state the breed.
21. Is the puppy a cross-breed? Yes No
State the breed (or breeds)
for each parent, if known.
Mother:
Father:
22. Is the puppy registered with a club or society? Yes No
State type of registration: (for example,
Kennel Club, The Greyhound Studbook)
Registration number:
Puppy‟s registered name:
23. Is the puppy subject to any Kennel Club endorsements? Yes No
If yes, please list them.
24. What is the puppy’s microchip number? (15 digits)
If the puppy can‟t be microchipped yet for veterinary reasons, a copy of the signed veterinary certificate should be attached.
25. Is the puppy covered by a breeder’s insurance policy? Yes No
If yes, give the following details:
Insurance company:
Policy number:
Policy expiry date:
26. Was the puppy born by caesarean section? Yes No
27. Will the puppy be vaccinated before he/she is sold? Yes No
If yes, attach the vaccination record and fill in the date the next vaccination is due.
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28. Give details of any worming treatments the puppy will have received.
Product used:
Date used:
29. Has the puppy’s tail been docked? Yes No
If yes, a signed docking certificate should be attached. Yes No
30. If the puppy has had a health check or been treated by a vet for any reason
please tick this box and give further details.
Date of treatment or check:
Type of treatment or check (if you need more space use the extra space given at Question 44.)
31. What is the puppy’s current weight?
kilograms
grams
Date weight recorded:
32. What types of diet is the puppy currently being fed?
Dry
Pouched or tinned
Frozen
How much is the puppy fed each day?
grams
(If more than one type state how much of each.)
State approximate times of day when the puppy is fed:
33. Will the buyer be given enough of the puppy’s current food for at least one week? Yes No
34. Will toilet training be started before the puppy is sold? Yes No
If yes, where will the puppy be trained to toilet (for example, outside on grass)?
35. Where is the puppy kept for most of the time?
In a kennel
In a quiet part of the house
In a part of the house where there is a lot of activity (for example, the kitchen)
Other (please describe):
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36. Before the sale, who will the puppy have interacted with? (Tick whichever apply)
Adult males
Adult females
Children under four years old
Children between four and 10 years old
Children over 10 years old
37. Will the puppy have interacted with any of the following? (Tick whichever apply)
Other dogs of the same breed or type
Dogs of different breeds or types
Cats
Rabbits
Other animals (state which):
38. Will the puppy have experienced any of the following? (Tick whichever apply)
Wearing a collar or harness
Being briefly separated from his or her mother and littermates in the company of people
Being in a restricted environment (for example, an indoor kennel)
Hearing household noises. For example, washing machine, vacuum cleaner (see box below).
Hearing real or recorded noises. For example, fireworks or traffic.
Describe these experiences (washing machine, traffic noise and so on):
39. Before the sale, will the new owner have the chance to see and interact with any of the following?
The puppy‟s mother (this is a legal requirement for licensed breeders in England)
The puppy‟s father
Other puppies in the litter
40. Is the puppy’s pedigree known? Yes No
If yes, is the puppy‟s pedigree certificate attached to this information pack? Yes No
41. What is the relationship between the puppy’s parents?
Unrelated
Distantly related (for example, second or third cousins)
Third degree relatives (first cousins)
Unknown
42. How inbred is the puppy? See guidance notes for help.
State COI or leave blank if unknown.
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INHERITED CONDITIONS AND SCREENING/DNA TESTS
43. Inherited conditions and screening/DNA tests
Fill in this section to note common or serious inherited conditions in the breed (or breeds) and to record any related
screening or DNA tests carried out on the puppy and his/her parents.
Please see the guidance notes for where to find information on canine inherited disorders.
Information should be completed:
For the mother if she is a specific breed or a cross between two specific breeds;
For the father if he is a specific breed or a cross between two specific breeds
If the puppy is a specific breed or cross between two breeds and tests are available.
Mother’s breed or breeds
Common or serious
inherited conditions
in breed
Screening or
DNA test
available
Test carried out
Date of test
Results
available
Results
certificate
given to buyer
If testing has been carried out and the
results are not available or if testing
does not apply please state why
Yes
No
Yes
No
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Yes
No
Father’s breed or breeds
Common or serious
inherited conditions
in breed
Screening or
DNA test
available
Test carried out
Date of test
Results
available
Results
certificate
given to buyer
If testing has been carried out and the
results are not available or if testing
does not apply please state why
Yes
No
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No
Puppy’s breed or breeds
Common or serious
inherited conditions
in breed
Screening or
DNA test
available
Test carried out
Date of test
Results
available
Results
certificate
given to buyer
If testing has been carried out and the
results are not available or if testing
does not apply please state why
Yes
No
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No
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EXTRA INFORMATION
44. Use this space to include any extra information about the puppy.
© AWF and RSPCA 2018. You may download, print and copy this document but you must not modify it without our prior
written permission or sell or republish it.
© AWF and RSPCA 20122018
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Guidance notes
ABOUT THE BREEDER
Q1 & Q2: About the breeder or seller
It is strongly recommended that you do not buy a puppy from anyone other than the breeder so that you can see
the puppy interacting with his/her mother and siblings in the place where he/she was born and reared.
ABOUT THE PUPPY’S MOTHER
Q4: What is the mother’s microchip number?
Microchipping is the best way for dogs and puppies to be identified and returned to their owners if they get lost
or stolen. It is a legal requirement in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland that all dogs over the age
of eight weeks are microchipped.
Q6: How many caesarean sections has the mother had, including this litter?
A caesarean section is an operation to take the puppies out of the mother when she hasn‟t been able to give birth
naturally. It is a major operation which can cause problems for the mother and puppies.
Some breeds and some individual mothers struggle to give birth naturally and may end up needing a caesarean
every time. Vets feel that these dogs should not be bred from. So you should avoid buying puppies from mothers
who have had more than one caesarean. This is especially important if the puppy is a female you want to breed
from, otherwise she may have trouble giving birth herself.
In England, licensed breeders must not breed from a dog who has already had two caesarean sections.
Q7: How many litters has the mother had, including this one?
Pregnancy, birth and rearing puppies all take a lot of energy and work for any mother. She may have problems
such as difficulty giving birth and poor body condition if her nutritional needs aren‟t met. Mothers should be allowed
at least one season between litters. Avoid puppies from mothers that have had many litters, as this may be a sign
that the breeder has expected too much from the mother and may also mean that the care and condition of the
puppy might not be ideal either.
Q 8: How old was the mother when she had her first litter and was it on her first season?
Responsible breeders should not breed from their bitch‟s first season and should not breed from bitches under
one year old. This makes sure the mother is fully grown, mature and is as capable as possible of coping with
pregnancy and birth. Different breeds mature at different rates, so check with a vet for the appropriate age when
breeding can start. Breeders who have ignored these laws or guidelines may not be very knowledgeable and
caring about the mother, and as a result the puppy.
Q9: Is the mother up to date with UK vaccinations?
It is very important that the mother‟s routine vaccinations are up to date. She needs to be vaccinated to make sure
her puppies are born with a good immunity to certain deadly diseases. This will keep the puppies healthy until they
can be vaccinated themselves. Homeopathic vaccines should not have been used. Ask your vet if you are not
sure what vaccines the mother should have had.
Q10: When was the mother last treated for worms and which product was used?
Regular worming of the mother, including during pregnancy, is important to make sure the puppies are not born
infested with worms. Ask your vet about how effective the products listed are, and whether they are up to date.
Avoid buying from breeders who do not vaccinate or worm their animals adequately.
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Q11 and Q16: Has either parent had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?
Many breeds have been bred to emphasise certain features which over time have become more and more
exaggerated. Although „normal‟ for a breed, flat faces, heavy wrinkles and very floppy ears are just a few examples
of features that may cause problems.
For example, dogs with short flat faces often have features that can cause breathing problems, such as narrow
nostrils and tiny windpipes. They can suffer severe breathing difficulties and may even have difficulty enjoying a
walk or playing. Folded or wrinkled skin may be itchy and painful, and infolding eyelids can scratch the eyeball.
Some of these problems will require lifelong medication or sometimes surgery, both of which can be costly. These
problems can cause significant health and welfare concerns for the dog and affect its quality of life, and can be
very distressing for owners.
You should also be told if either parent has had surgery to fix a problem such as eyelids which rubbed on the eye,
as this may no longer be obvious, but could still be inherited by the puppy.
It‟s important to know whether the parents are affected to give you an idea of how likely the puppy will be to get
the same problems. Speak to your vet about any problems listed.
Before you buy a puppy find out which breeds are worst affected and try to avoid them. To find out more, talk to
your vet or visit the following websites:
Canine Inherited Disorders Database: www.upei.ca/cidd
Get Puppy Smart: www.getpuppysmart.com
Dog Breed Health: www.dogbreedhealth.com/
Breeders can also ask their vet and should use the websites above when listing the exaggerated features in their breed.
ABOUT THE PUPPY’S FATHER
Q12: Contact details: owner of the puppy’s father
This information can only be included if the owner has given permission for their contact details to be shared with
a prospective owner.
Q14: What is the father’s microchip number?
See Guidance to Q4 above.
Q16: Has the father had any surgery to correct features that could be inherited by the puppy?
See the Guidance for Q11 above.
ABOUT THE PUPPY
Q17: Date of birth
The puppy should be at least 8 weeks old before they can leave their mum.
Q23: Is the puppy subject to any Kennel Club endorsements?
Before a puppy is sold the breeder can apply to the Kennel Club to place endorsements on his/her records
(including the registration certificate). For example:
R PROGENY NOT ELIGIBLE FOR REGISTRATION or
X EXPORT PEDIGREE NOT ALLOWED.
The breeder must explain what the endorsements mean before you agree to buy the puppy.
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Q24: What is the puppy’s microchip number?
Microchipping is the best way for dogs and puppies to be identified and returned to their owners if they get lost
or stolen. It is a legal requirement in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland that all puppies are
microchipped by the time they are eight weeks old and before they go to their new homes.
It is also a legal requirement for the new owner to contact the relevant database to update their records with their
contact details.
A puppy is only exempt from being microchipped for health reasons if a vet certifies it in writing. In this case you
should ask for a copy of the certificate and speak to your vet about getting your puppy microchipped.
Q25: Is the puppy covered by a breeder’s insurance policy?
Breeders often insure their litters. Some insurance policies provide free cover for new owners against a puppy‟s
illness or injury for a limited period after the puppy has been bought. Check the details.
Q26: Was this puppy born by caesarean section?
See Guidance to Q6 about caesarean sections.
Q27: Will the puppy be vaccinated before being sold?
Vaccinations are very important to prevent certain deadly diseases such as parvovirus. If the mother was
vaccinated properly the puppy should have resistance to these diseases for roughly the first 10 weeks of his/her
life. If your puppy has been vaccinated, the breeder‟s vet will have given them a vaccination certificate which
shows the vaccination date and the products used. Speak to your vet about whether the puppy needs any more
vaccinations and when his/her first booster is due.
Q28: Details of worming treatments the puppy will have received
Regular worming is important for all puppies, whether the mother was wormed or not, for the health of puppies
and humans. Ask your vet about any products listed and avoid buying from breeders who have not treated their
dogs for worms at all.
Q29: Has the puppy’s tail been docked?
The law bans tail docking in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland except under certain conditions and only when
carried out by a vet. In Scotland there is a total ban.
Tail docking involves removing a puppy‟s tail either by cutting it off or using a tight rubber band to make it die.
Many animal welfare and veterinary organisations are strongly opposed to the practice unless the tail is injured
or diseased. It causes pain and even death in some puppies and can cause long-term health problems. It can
also reduce how well dogs can communicate with each other.
A leaflet which explains the rules on tail docking in the UK can be downloaded from:
https://www.animalwelfarefoundation.org.uk/animal-welfare-advice/guidance-for-vets/#tail-docking-dogs
If the puppy has been docked legally you must be given a certificate signed by the vet who did the docking.
Q30: Has the puppy had a health check or been treated by a vet for any reason?
Many puppies don‟t need to see a vet before they leave their breeder. If your puppy has been checked or received
any treatment, the breeder should give you details of anything abnormal that the vet noted. Talk to your vet if you
are not sure about any of this information.
It‟s best to get your puppy examined by your vet as soon as you can, to make sure there are no problems and
to get advice about things such as food, vaccination, worming, fleas, insurance, microchipping, neutering
and socialisation.
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Q31: What is the puppy’s current weight?
There is no single correct weight for a puppy. However, it‟s really useful to know how much the puppy weighed
when you got him so that your vet can see if he/she gains or loses weight.
Q32: Details of the puppy’s diet
It is important that you know the type of food that the puppy is used to and how often and when he/she is used to
being fed, so that these can all be kept as similar as possible when you take the puppy home. Puppies should be
fed a weighed or measured amount of food at regular times.
Q33: Will the buyer be given enough of the puppy’s current food for at least one week?
When you change to a new food, you should do this gradually over four to five days, with increasing amounts of
the new food replacing the previous food each day. If you change the puppy's food too quickly, this can cause
stomach upset or diarrhoea.
Q34: Will toilet training be started before the puppy is sold?
Puppies start to learn a preference at an early age for the surface that they toilet on. The more they use a
particular surface, the stronger this preference becomes. You can then continue training the puppy in a similar
way, or expect to be really patient and consistent if you want to change their preference.
Ask a professional trainer to help you with any further training of your puppy (www.abtcouncil.org.uk)
Q35: Where is the puppy kept for most of the time?
A puppy‟s early social and physical environment strongly influences their behaviour as adults. A puppy that has
lived in a home environment, particularly in a part of it where people come and go, is more likely to be prepared
for life in a home. Where puppies have been kept in kennels, you need to check that they have experienced some
aspects of a normal home environment at least some of the time.
When you visit the puppy ask to see where he/she has been kept. Although you may be introduced to the puppy
in a house, he/she may not usually be kept there. Are there food bowls, bedding, pens and so on?
Q36: The puppy’s experience of contact with people
The period from 3–14 weeks of age in a puppy‟s life are critical in determining how he/she will react to people and
new situations. Lack of social contact during this period increases the risk of behaviours associated with fear and
anxiety later in life.
Puppies need to have contact with men, women and children during this period. In general, the more people that
puppies have interacted with the better.
Puppies which have had positive experience of lots of different types of people are less likely to be wary when you
handle and approach them. Ask the breeder if you can take as many members of your family as possible on your
second visit. Watch carefully how the puppy responds to adults and children who are acting normally and
reasonably. Look for signs of the puppy withdrawing, struggling to get away, cowering, putting their tail between
their legs or hiding.
Q37: The puppy’s contact with adult dogs and other animals
Puppies need to meet a variety of other dogs in order to learn social skills and how different types of dog
communicate. If the puppy is vaccinated, ask to see him/her interacting with adult dogs other than his/her mother
so you can see if he/she is confident and happy to interact and play with another dog.
If puppies have experience of other animals, they will be more likely to adapt quickly to any other animals they
have to live with in your home. If the puppy is very excited or nervous with other animals, he/she will be more likely
to be like this with other animals when you take him home.
If possible see what other animals are in the environment where the puppy lives and watch how he/she reacts to them.
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Q38: The puppy’s other experiences
Early exposure to a range of experiences and noises prepares the puppy for encountering this later in life so
he/she remains calm and is less likely to be afraid when you take him home.
Watch how the puppy responds to things that are happening during your visit. Ask the breeder to show you how
the puppy reacts to household noises, wearing a collar, or being separated briefly from littermates. He/she should
stay calm.
Do not expose him/her to sudden new noises that he/she has not experienced before, or expect the breeder to
do so.
Q39: Before the sale will the new owner have the chance to interact with the puppy’s parents and other
puppies in the litter if there are any?
Licensed breeders in England must only show you a puppy with his/her biological mother. Regardless of the law
where you‟re buying your puppy, it is very important that you see the puppy‟s mother and the other puppies in the
litter. You should also try to see the father if possible, although this may be difficult in some circumstances.
Make sure you interact with the parents, handle them if safe to do so, and assess their reaction to you. Check
they appear healthy, check the environment that the mother and puppies are in and check the temperament of
the mother, father and the rest of the litter. The parents‟ characteristics can influence how the puppies develop
and behave. In particular, look for signs of fear, such as withdrawal, cowering, urination, and tail between the
legs. Also watch for signs of aggression such as growling, lunging and barking.
Unscrupulous breeders may try to show you another dog instead of the puppy‟s mother. To avoid this, make
sure you see the mother and puppies together, and check for signs that the dog you see has given birth recently,
such as enlarged nipples. They may also give excuses for why the mother isn‟t there, such as “she‟s at the vets”
or “she‟s gone for a walk”. These are not valid reasons so you should avoid these breeders/sellers.
If the breeder answers „no‟ in these sections, ask why you cannot see the father or the rest of the litter.
Q40: If the puppy’s pedigree is known and a pedigree certificate will be attached
The pedigree certificate shows the puppy‟s ancestry and may go back up to five generations, starting with the
puppy‟s parents in the left column through to the great- great-great grandparents in the right column. The top
half shows the puppy‟s ancestry through his/her father and the bottom half is the mother‟s pedigree.
Q41: What is the relationship between the puppy’s parents?
If the puppy‟s parents are related to each other, the puppy is inbred. The degree of inbreeding depends on how
closely related the parents are. If an ancestor‟s name is repeated in both the father‟s and the mother‟s halves
of the pedigree certificate, there is inbreeding.
Inbreeding is not desirable as it increases the risk of inherited disease such as cancer and blindness. Avoid
a puppy from matings between first- or second-degree relatives, for example:
first degree mother/son, father/daughter, brother/sister; or
second degree uncle niece, aunt/nephew, grandparent/grandchild.
Q42: How inbred is the puppy?
It‟s important to avoid buying puppies that are very inbred because they have a higher chance of having inherited
diseases and being unwell later in life. A simple way to describe this is the coefficient of inbreeding (COI). This is
a number where the higher the number, the more inbred the puppy.
For example, a very inbred puppy would come from a mother-to-son mating or a brother-to-sister, both having a
COI of 25. A less inbred puppy might come from a mating between a great-grandfather and great-granddaughter,
with a lower score of 6.25.
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Inbreeding can also build up through generations, so if a pedigree goes back a long way there can be very high
scores (over 25).
Avoid puppies with a COI of over 12.5 and above the average for their breed.
Puppies whose background is not known cannot have a score calculated and in these cases the box will be
left blank.
You can find the COI for puppies (and their parents) registered with the Kennel Club using their Mate
Select service:
www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect/
You can also use Mate Select to find out the average COI for particular breeds.
INHERITED CONDITIONS AND SCREENING/DNA TESTS
Q43: Inherited disorders and screening tests
Inherited disorders
Many breeds of dog are prone to a number of inherited disorders and some breeds have higher likelihoods of
developing particular disorders. Crossbred dogs can also inherit disorders from their parents‟ breeds.
Some inherited conditions are very rare or cause only minor suffering, while others are extremely painful or
life-threatening. Examples of inherited disorders are cancer, blindness, diabetes, heart disease, skin complaints,
epilepsy, hip dysplasia and deafness.
It is important to be aware of these conditions as they could have been passed on to the puppy.
Talk to your vet before you buy, and check for information on inherited disorders on the following websites.
Dog Breed Health: www.dogbreedhealth.com
University of Cambridge Inherited Diseases in Dogs Database: www.vet.cam.ac.uk/idid
Universities Federation for Animal Welfare: https://www.ufaw.org.uk/dogs/dogs
Canine Inherited Disorders Database: www.upei.ca/cidd
Canine Health Schemes: https://www.bva.co.uk/Canine-Health-Schemes/
Some Breed Club websites also report common and important inherited conditions in the breed.
DNA and health screening tests
Several health screening tests can measure the risk that a dog will be affected by the disease, be a carrier
(and able to pass it on to their offspring) or be unaffected.
The breeder should have listed important disorders, and where the disorder can be screened for in the puppy and
his/her parents, attached copies of the results certificates for any tests carried out. If the puppy is a cross between
two known breeds, the list should include conditions found in each of those breeds. If the breeder has stated that they
have not done the tests or that the results are not available you should ask why and avoid buying a puppy from them.
Do not be satisfied with word of mouth - make sure you see the test results. If you buy from a breeder who has
tested their dogs and is breeding from those that have passed the health tests, you will be another step closer to
a happy, healthy puppy.
The Canine Health Scheme from the British Veterinary Association and the Kennel Club can provide you with
advice on how to interpret the results of any tests. https://www.bva.co.uk/Canine-Health-Schemes/
If the puppy‟s parents are Kennel Club registered you can use the registered name or number of the parents to
find the test results from a CHS or a Kennel Club DNA testing scheme at:
https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect/test/Default.aspx
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You can find a list of all DNA tests for dogs available worldwide at:
https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/worldwide-dna-tests/
Your vet can help you understand the results of DNA or health screening tests and give you advice on which tests
are important for particular breeds.
EXTRA INFORMATION
Q44: Extra information
Additional information about the puppy can be recorded in this space.
Disclaimer: The Puppy Contract and related documents are intended to provide a fair basis for the sale and purchase of a puppy with
the primary aim of promoting animal welfare.
No warranties, representations or undertakings, express or implied, are made about the documents (including without limitation any
as to quality, accuracy or fitness for any particular purpose). The AWF and RSPCA cannot accept liability for any loss, damage or
cost arising out of or in connection with the use of these documents or any decisions that you make in relation to a sale or purchase.
A suitably qualified lawyer should be consulted on any specific legal issue you have or the use of the documents in your particular
circumstances.
AWF and RSPCA own and reserve all intellectual property rights in the documents and on this website (including, but not limited to
copyright) and you agree that you will not do anything to infringe or prejudice those rights. You are not permitted to copy or use the
documents except for the purposes for which they have been provided, as stated on this website. You may not modify any of the
content of the documents or remove any of the proprietary markings on them without our prior written consent.
© BVA AWF and RSPCA 20122018.
© AWF and RSPCA 20122018
Page15 of 17
Contract for the sale and purchase of a puppy
1. PUPPY DETAILS
Breed:
Date of birth:
Sex:
Colour:
Kennel Club registered name of dog:
Kennel Club registration number:
Microchip number:
This is to confirm that the sale of the dog described above (“the Puppy”) is between:
2. DETAILS OF PARTIES
Seller’s name:
Seller’s address:
Seller’s telephone number:
and
Buyer’s name:
Buyer’s address:
Buyer’s telephone number:
DEFINITIONS
“Puppy Information Pack” means the Puppy Information Pack that sets out the Dog Health Information and
Future Health and Welfare Needs and forms part of this agreement.
“Dog Health Information” means the information about the Puppy, its parent and grandparents, and these
animals‟ health and temperament.
“Good Health” means a condition of health free of parasites and hereditary disorders and of reasonably
sound physical condition and temperament.
“Future Health and Welfare Needs” means the measure that should be taken to ensure that the Puppy is
and remains in Good Health and is properly housed, fed, watered, trained, socialised and exercised and that
it receives appropriate veterinary attention.“Seller” means the seller of the Puppy defined above, whether or
not the breeder of the Puppy.
© AWF and RSPCA 20122018
Page 16 of 17
3. THE SELLER WARRANTS:
3.1 That if the Buyer has previously selected the Puppy from a litter or in any other circumstances,
that the Puppy sold under this contract is the Puppy that the Buyer has previously selected.
3.2 That the genetic health checks and health screening set out in the Puppy Information Pack have
been carried out on the Puppy‟s parents and explanation of what this means for the Puppy is
provided in the Puppy Information Pack.
3.3 That the Puppy is not the result of a mating of two dogs related within two generations.
3.4 That the Puppy is in Good Health, other than as the Seller specifically informs the Buyer before
the date of sale.
3.5 That he/she has supplied the Puppy Information Pack prior to the Buyer viewing the Puppy or a
reasonable period in advance of the Buyer‟s decision to buy the Puppy and has communicated
to the Buyer within the Puppy Information Pack:
a) the possible consequences of buying the Puppy given the Dog Health Information, the
genetic health checks and health screening carried out under clause 3.2 and the particular
considerations that are likely to affect the Puppy given its breed;
b) the meaning of any Kennel Club endorsement;
c) the measures that should be taken, whether by neutering, contraception or otherwise,
to guard against unwanted pregnancy; and
d) the Future Health and Welfare Needs of the Puppy.
3.6 That the information contained in the Puppy Information Pack supplied to the Buyer under clause
3.5 above is accurate and materially complete (to the best of the Seller‟s knowledge and belief
where the information is supplied by a third party) and all diagnostic tests for the Puppy have been
undertaken as recorded in the Dog Health Information and that reasonable care and skill is and/or
will be used when explaining to the Buyer the Future Health and Welfare Needs of the Puppy and
any advice or recommendations provided under clause 4.5 below.
3.7 That, if he/she is a member of the Kennel Club Assured Breeder Scheme, he/she has adhered
to the Standard and all requirements and recommendations under the Scheme as set out at
https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/breeding/assured-breeder-scheme/ and/or as provided to
the Buyer.
3.8 That he/she, having made reasonable enquiries of the Buyer, in good faith believes that the Buyer
is able to meet the Puppy‟s Future Health and Welfare Needs.
3.9 That the Puppy is more than 8 weeks old at the date of sale.
3.10 That the Puppy has received adequate care and that the Seller has provided it with the opportunity
to socialise with dogs, humans and other animals it is likely to come into contact with and it has
experienced and become accustomed to the sounds and experiences of typical family life.
3.11 That any pedigree indicated for the Puppy is correct. Where appropriate, the Seller will provide the
Buyer with all relevant registration papers and pedigree certificate within one month of the date of
sale, or as soon as it is available.
© AWF and RSPCA 20122018
Page 17 of 17
4. THE BUYER WARRANTS:
4.1 That he/she has read and understands the information provided to him/her under clauses 3.2-3.5
above and contained in the Puppy Information Pack.
4.2 That he/she in good faith believes that he/she will be able, and intends, to meet the Puppy‟s Future
Health and Welfare Needs.
4.3 That neither he/she nor any member of his/her household has been cautioned for or convicted of
any breach of animal welfare law such as neglect, cruelty or abandonment.
4.4 That he/she shall not breach the terms of any Kennel Club endorsement.
4.5 That in the event that he/she is no longer able or willing to provide a home for the Puppy or
otherwise to meet the Puppy‟s Future Health and Welfare Needs he/she will contact the Seller and
have regard to any advice and recommendations that the Seller provides, including return of the
Puppy at the option of the Seller.
4.6 That he/she is purchasing the Puppy for himself/herself and not as agent for a third party.
5. BOTH BUYER AND SELLER AGREE AND UNDERSTAND:
5.1 That the Puppy is a living creature with interests independent of both Buyer and Seller.
5.2 That the Buyer may suffer distress and inconvenience as a result of the Puppy suffering pain
or discomfort and one purpose of the Seller's warranties is to reduce or avoid such distress
and inconvenience.
5.3 The Buyer shall be entitled to recover from the Seller his reasonable veterinary fees and
costs to treat a serious disorder suffered by the Puppy that relates to a breach of any of the
Seller‟s warranties.
5.4 Nothing in this contract affects the Buyer‟s statutory rights including any warranty of satisfactory
quality of the Puppy implied by sale of goods legislation or other law.
5.5 The Buyer agrees to take the Puppy to their vet, soon after purchase, for a general health check
and advice on inoculations and worming.
6. DATE, DECLARATIONS AND SIGNATURES
Date of sale and purchase:
Purchase price received by Seller:
£
Buyer: By signing this contract I agree and understand that I am entering into a legal and binding contract.
Signed:
Date:
Seller: By signing this contract I agree and understand that I am entering into a legal and binding contract.
Signed:
Date:
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