THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK
Understand
your role
What you need to know
The CARE CERTIFICATE
Standard
1
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
1
Your role - Tasks,
Behaviours and
Standards of
work
Your role will have a job
description. This tells you
what your main duties and
responsibilities are and who you
report to. Ask your employer for
a copy if you do not have it.
You should know what is
expected of you but also what is
not included in your role.
It will be almost impossible for a job description to list every task you will do but it should
give a good overall picture of your role.
The kinds of duties that might be in your job description are:
providing care and support, working in a person-centred way, communicating well,
building relationships and promoting equality and diversity
working as part of a team, being a supportive team member and developing your
skills to improve your work
contributing to activities in a safe way, keeping and filing clear records, keeping to
regulations, following the agreed way of working
respecting confidentiality by not discussing any personal information on
individuals or staff with unauthorised people, and storing records securely.
Regulations
are rules that come from legislation or laws. The legislation establishes the general
‘laws of the land’. Regulations provide the specific ways in which those laws are
interpreted and applied.
The skills and knowledge you need to carry out your role competently and the ways in
which you should work are set out nationally. You can find these in:
the Care Certificate that is the shared health and social care training covered
by this workbook. It is expected that new healthcare support workers and adult
social care workers will complete the 15 Care Certificate standards (shown in this
workbook) before they work without supervision in any workplace.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
2
the Code of Conduct for Healthcare Support Workers and Adult Social Care
Workers in England. This has the moral and ethical standards expected of all
health and social care workers. The Code can be found at either:
www.skillsforcare.org.uk/code-of-conduct or
www.skillsforhealth.org.uk/code-of-conduct
As you develop in your role you will continue to build on your knowledge and skills. You
may be asked to take a qualification during or after completing induction. Employers
should invest in their workers’ learning and development beyond induction.
Experiences, attitudes and beliefs
Your experiences, attitudes and beliefs are part of what makes you who you are. They
affect how you think, what you do and how you do it. Your background, upbringing,
education, experiences and relationships will all have played a part in the way you see
things. These attitudes and beliefs may have led you to choose to work in health or social
care but sometimes they could lead you to assume things about people that are not right. It
is important that you develop self-awareness so that you can learn to check that this does
not happen. You should take time to learn about and understand the different attitudes
and beliefs of others so that you can work with individuals in a way that takes these into
account.
Beliefs
can be described as things in life that
you feel strongly about, that guide you in
your daily life and are linked very closely
to your morals and values.
Attitudes
are the approaches, opinions and
mindset that you have developed
through your upbringing and life and
learning experiences.
Competence
Having the ability and expertise to understand an
individual’s needs in order to deliver effective care.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
3
Values, aims and objectives
It’s important to understand what your employer wants to achieve as it will help you to
understand your own role. Your organisation will have values, aims and objectives.
If you find that your employer does not have these written down ask your manager to tell
you what they are.
Rights and responsibilities at work
There are many pieces of legislation that exist to protect us from harm as workers and
to make sure that everyone is treated fairly.
Health & Safety
The Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974
sets out your rights and responsibilities in
the workplace. You have the right:
to work in an environment that is safe
to be provided, free of charge, with
the equipment that you need to keep
you safe at work.
With those rights come responsibilities.
Your employer will set down policies and
procedures or tell you about the agreed
ways to work in ways that are safe for you,
those you work with and the people you
support.
You must work in the ways that you
are told by your employer.
If you have concerns about safety in
your workplace you must talk to your
manager.
You can find more information about the
Health & Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 here:
www.hse.gov.uk/legislation/hswa.htm
Confidentiality
The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) 2016 replaces the Data Protection Act
1998. This covers any information related to a natural person or ‘data subject’ that can be
used to directly or indirectly identify the person. It can be anything from a name, a photo,
an email address, bank details, posts on social networking websites, medical information,
or a computer IP address. It will also introduce ‘digital rights’ for individual citizens.
The GDPR restricts how personal and sensitive information can be used, stored and
passed on. Personal details must not be passed on unless the person gives their
permission. These laws give you rights as an employee and also require you to treat
individuals’ information responsibly.
You should only pass information on in line with your employer’s procedures and for the
purpose of providing the best care. You can find more information about the General Data
Protection Regulation 2016 here: https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-
data-protection-regulation-gdpr/
Values are the beliefs or ideals that should be evident in all aspects of the service you provide.
Objectives are specific things that must be in place in order to achieve the aims.
Aims are the general goals that an organisation hopes to achieve through their activity.
The purpose of your job will be to contribute to achieving these.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
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Working conditions
There are many pieces of legislation that demand that terms and conditions of employment
are fair. For example, the law states that you do not usually have to work more than 48
hours per week, although you may choose to do so. Exactly when you work will depend on
your contract. You can find out more about working contracts and conditions here:
www.gov.uk/employment-contracts-and-conditions/overview
The Equality Act 2010 gives all people in the UK the right to be treated fairly and afforded
equality of opportunity. This means that people must be paid ‘equal pay for equal work’
regardless of ‘protected characteristics or differences. The amount that your employer
pays you for your work must meet the National Minimum Wage (until April 2016) or
National Living Wage (from April 2016).You can find more information about the Equality
Act 2010 here: www.gov.uk/equality-act-2010-guidance
Agreed ways of working
Your employer will tell you the safe and agreed ways in which you are expected to work.
This may be shared with you as part of a policy or provided in person by your manager
or another colleague. Agreed ways of working with each individual will be detailed in care
plans. They ensure that you are working within the law and providing care and support that
meet the needs of the individual. If you don’t follow the agreed ways of working, you could
harm yourself or others without meaning to. You are responsible for your own work and
could face disciplinary procedures if people come to harm as a result of your actions. This
could lead to dismissal or even prosecution.
You have responsibilities to the people that you provide care and support for. You must
ensure that:
their safety and welfare is protected by ensuring that their care plan is followed and
carried out in agreed, safe ways
the care that they receive meets their needs by involving them and their carer
1
or
support network in the planning, review and delivery of their care
they are treated fairly and that their rights are upheld by working in ways that
promote equality and diversity and uphold their dignity and human rights.
Protected characteristics
The Equality Act 2010 identifies nine protected characteristics or groups that are
protected under equalities law. The protected characteristics are:
age
being or becoming a transsexual person
being married or in a civil partnership
being pregnant or having a child
disability
race including colour, nationality, ethnic
or national origin
religion, belief or lack of religion/belief
sex
sexual orientation
1
‘Carer can mean different things in different places. Officially, including in this workbook, it means a family member
or friend who provides care, as distinct from a care worker or volunteer. That’s the same as the meaning in “carer’s
assessment” and the Carer’s Allowance. Unofficially though, some workplaces refer to care workers as ‘carers’. As a
care worker, you must never allow anyone to be confused about what your caring role is, so it will usually be better to
describe yourself as a ‘care worker or to use the job title given to you by your employer.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
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Reporting errors
We are all human and mistakes sometimes happen. When mistakes are made it’s
important to be honest and identify where errors have happened. This will allow:
action to be taken that may reduce the impact of the mistake
lessons to be learnt through thinking about and agreeing what went wrong.
Whistleblowing
Your employer should provide or explain their
whistleblowing policy. You have a responsibility
to report things that you feel are not right, are illegal, or if anyone at work is neglecting their
duties. This is known as ‘whistleblowing’. In most cases you should discuss your concerns
with your manager. However, if you felt that it was not appropriate to speak to your
manager for some reason, you should follow your employer’s whistleblowing procedure
and ways of working.
Working in partnership
Your role will involve you working with many people who have a variety of roles. This is
known as ‘partnership working’. Developing good relationships will help to improve the
quality of care provided.
The main working relationships in health and social care can be categorised in four ways:
individuals and their friends and family
your colleagues and managers
people from other workplaces, including advocates.
volunteers and community groups.
Advocate
Someone who provides support by speaking for an individual on their behalf.
For example, an individual’s carer may provide support by visiting or providing food to
them in their social care or health setting. You should be helpful and make sure that this
is built into the care plan and routine, and is understood by other workers. You might also
support the individual to share their wishes with the carer
Not all of the individuals you support will be confident or able to speak out. If their care is
inadequate or they are treated in ways that do not uphold their rights you must support
them to make a complaint, or raise concerns yourself.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
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Other workers might provide a service to someone you provide care and support to. For
example, a dietician might advise the individual about their weight and help them agree
a plan for their meals and snacks, taking into account any preferences or special dietary
needs. As the worker likely to see the individual most regularly, you could encourage them
to keep to the diet and support them to report back how the diet is working or if it needs to
be changed. If the individual was not eating or unwell as a result you would arrange for
the diet to be reviewed quickly. Very often health care support workers or adult social care
support workers are in a position to play an important role in making observations and
links with other workers because they are in regular contact with the individual. They are
very important partners in the overall health or social care provision to an individual.
All working relationships should involve mutual respect and should value other people’s
skills and knowledge with a focus on working together in the best interests of the individual
receiving care and support. The importance of people working together should not be
underestimated as serious case reviews, which are the reviews carried out when a
vulnerable adult dies or comes to significant harm, often identify failings in partnership
working as being a key factor in what went wrong.
Effective partnership working
Good communication between everyone is essential. Health and social care workers
must trust, value and respect one another, having belief in everyone’s ability to work
together to achieve shared goals.
For communication to be good and effective it must be open, accurate and
understandable. Ways of communicating and language must be right for the individual
so you can be sure that they understand what is being said. Workers should avoid using
jargon which can be misunderstood.
Communication
Effective communication is central to a successful workplace for both individuals
and staff alike.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
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When working with people who have communication needs, it may be necessary to
consider translators, pictures or communication boards to support them to communicate
well.
Jargon
Jargon or complex terminology must not be used by social care or health workers
with individuals, or with their friends and family. Be mindful that jargon may be
familiar to you and your colleagues but not necessarily to the individuals
you support.
Accurate records must be kept to ensure that all those involved are kept up to date on the
individual’s progress and care. If an incident occurs, information must be shared efficiently
and safely. All records must be up to date, understandable and stored securely.
Trust is important to all good working relationships and is essential if partnership working
is to be open, honest and successful. Everyone involved in partnership working, both the
person receiving care and support and the workers, must be confident that they can rely
on the people working with them.
It is important to work in ways that promote respect. You should understand and respect
the contribution that each individual plays in planning and providing care. This applies
to every person being supported, their carers and support network, as well as to other
workers.
Advice and support
There may be times when there is disagreement between workers from different agencies
or between the person receiving care and support and those who support them. Conflict
that is not resolved can affect the quality of care. You should ask for advice about
partnership working and resolving conflict whenever you face any problem. You can ask
your manager or other workers who are familiar with your workplace and have the skills
and experience to advise you.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK
Understand
your role
The CARE CERTIFICATE
Standard
1
What do you know now?
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
9
Activity 1.1a
Using your job description to
help you, fill in the box below
to describe your main duties
and responsibilities.
My main duties and responsibilities include:
Describe - to describe means to create a
picture with words but not simply writing a
list of bullet points.
Understand your role
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
10
Activity 1.1b
Look up the Care Certificate
and the Code of Conduct
for Healthcare Support
Workers and Adult Social
Care Workers in England.
Complete the diagram below
to list some examples of the
standards they include.
Care certificate
and Code
of Conduct
Standards
include...
List: this term means to identify the
main points which can be written as
bullet points.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
11
Activity 1.1d
Being self-aware is important
for care workers. Think about
your previous experiences
and the attitudes and beliefs
you have, and under the
points below explain how
they may have affected the
way you work.
Explain - to explain something you will
need to provide a clear account of your
understanding, including details like why
and how.
A positive experience
A negative experience, and the steps that were taken to ensure it didn’t affect your work
Your positive attitude
Your personal beliefs
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
12
Activity 1.2a
Familiarise yourself with
your employment rights and
responsibilities. Under each of
the headings below, describe
your rights and responsibilities
as a worker.
Health and safety
Confidentiality
Working time
Pay and wages
Describe - to describe means to
create a picture with words but not
simply writing a list of bullet points.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
13
Activity 1.2b
Speak to your employer
to find out the aims,
objectives and values of the
organisation that you work
in and use the information
to fill in the table below.
The aims of my organisation The values of my organisationThe objectives of my
organisation
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
14
Activity 1.2c
It is essential to work in
ways that are agreed with
your employer. Give an
example of an agreed
way of working in your
workplace and explain why
it is important.
Explain - to explain something you
will need to provide a clear account
of your understanding, including
details like why and how.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
15
Activity 1.2e & f
Part i)
For each of the statements
below, decide whether each
should be reported as a
concern and tick either yes
or no.
The health and safety of staff is in danger
Individuals are treated with dignity and respect
The environment is being damaged by work activity
Wrongdoing is being covered up
The individual’s care is inadequate but they cannot or will not complain
Care plans are reassessed and updated regularly
Your manager is involved in the abuse of individuals
Report?
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
16
Activity 1.2e & f
Part ii)
Thinking about the statements
in Part i) that would need to
be reported, explain how you
would raise your concerns, or
whistleblow and why.
Explain - to explain something you
will need to provide a clear account
of your understanding, including
details like why and how.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
17
Activity 1.3a
Think about your
responsibilities to the
individuals you support.
Describe four of your
responsibilities to those
individuals:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Describe - to describe means to
create a picture with words but not
simply writing a list of bullet points.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
18
Activity 1.3b
In the boxes below, explain
how a working relationship
is different to a personal
relationship. Use examples
from your service to help
you explain your points:
A working relationship is...
Examples include...
A personal relationship is...
Examples include...
Explain - to explain something you
will need to provide a clear account
of your understanding, including
details like why and how.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
19
Activity 1.3c
There are four main working
relationships in health and social
care. State the four main working
relationships and provide a
description of each, including who
they are most likely to be in your
own workplace:
1.
2.
3.
4.
THE CARE CERTIFICATE WORKBOOK STANDARD 1
20
Activity 1.4a & b
As a worker in health and
social care it is essential to
be an effective and good
team member and work in
partnership. Explain why it
is important to work:
a) In partnership with other workers:
b) In partnership with key people, advocates, and others who are significant to the individual such as
their carer, family members or friends:
Explain - to explain something you
will need to provide a clear account
of your understanding, including
details like why and how.
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