Emergency Response
Assistance phone numbers
Date of plan:
Author
Postcode:
Eastings and Northings:
Telephone Number:
Revision number and date:
To be kept at:
Copy also located at:
Page 2 of 38
Emergency Response
Introduction
Escalation procedure
Internal contacts
External contacts
Risk assessment for salvage operations
Entry control log
Click here for example Floor Hazard Plans and Artefacts Grab
Sheets
Guidance on:
Fire
Flood
Security including site-specific information
Spillage
Documentation and Security of Salvaged Objects
Dealing with the Media
Inventory of Priority Objects
Priority Object Salvage Sheets including key information
Protect Click here for salvage advice
Air drying
Books
Ceramics
Freezing
Furniture
Leather
Metal
Natural history
Paintings
Paper
Photographs
Plastics
Stone
Textiles
Disaster store contents
Page 3 of 38
Introduction
Aim
The overall aim of this plan is to enable premises/building/company name.to respond in an
appropriate manner to any major emergency.
Structure
The plan has been designed for use during an emergency and consists of enter the type
of folder Emergency Response’.
It contains the arrangements for ______________________________________ response,
including the escalation process, the co-ordination and control of the emergency, and
recovery after an incident. Salvage information and the procedures for the removal,
treatment, and storage of valuable objects are also included.
The contents are confidential and must be kept secure.
Further guidance on pre-planning and preventing emergencies can be found on the English
Heritage PRIME website alongside EH Management Standards for Integrated Emergency
Planning.
Maintenance and Distribution
This plan has been produced in hard copy for the locations shown on the front cover of
the manual. Some parts of the plan will also be stored on (other data sources if required)
The premises/building/company name. .is responsible for the
development of plans. The individual site is responsible for ensuring their plans are up-to-
date by amending documents.
Page 4 of 38
Emergency Evacuation Procedures
IN CASE OF FIRE OR OTHER EMERGENCY:
1. Raise the alarm by breaking the nearest fire alarm break-
glass call point
2. Evacuate the premises by the nearest route
3. Tackle the fire, if safe to do so, without taking any risks.
4. Call the fire service by dialling 999
ON HEARING THE ALARM
a. Evacuate the premises by the nearest route
b. Ensure that disabled people are helped to safety
c. Report to the Assembly Point at
Location:
DO NOT
1. Do not stop to collect personal belongings
2. Do not re-enter the building unless authorised to do
so
3. Do not use lifts unless disabled
and lift is checked and declared safe to use.
Page 5 of 38
Click here to enter text.
Address, postcode and site telephone
number
Directions:
Fire Access:
Keys to all buildings:
Site duty/on call manager:
E
nglish Heritage Conservation Hotline: 07785 387847
K
eyholders:
Work Emergency
Site Manager
Site Supervisor 1
Site Supervisor 2
O
ther emergency contacts:
Curator
Conservator
Area Manager
T
he above emergency response team will then decide on any further
escalation and resources required.
S
ee Internal & External Contacts Lists for further numbers.
ESCALATION PROCEDURE
Dial 999
Local police: 101
Local fire: CDDFRS 0845 305 8383
EMERGENCY
OCCURS
No
Call together
sufficient staff to deal
with emergency and if
collection is at risk
call the Conservation
Incident Hotline
07785 387847
Does emergency
require the
immediate help of
off-site staff or other
agencies?
No
Yes
Does the emergency
require immediate
action by the
emergency services
or utilities?
Yes
Page 6 of 38
Site specific contacts
Company Contact Details
Security
Night Guard 24 hour
Maintenance
Contractor
Others
Alarm Details
Monitoring Station
Other Information
Fire Alarm
Security
Alarm
Panic Alarm
Internal contacts
Page 7 of 38
INITIAL CONTACTS MOBILE OFFICE HOME
Distance from home
to site (if
appropriate)
Duty Manager Pager
ContactName
Facilities
Manager
Contact Name
Site Manager
Contact Name
Site Supervisor
Contact Name
Site Team
Member
Contact Name
Curator
Contact Name
Conservator
Conservation
Incident Hotline
Collections
Care 24 hrs
EH Press Office 0207 973 3250
SITE STAFF/ STAFF BASED AT SITE
MOBILE OFFICE HOME
Distance from
home to site (if
appropriate)
Name
Position
Contact Name
Facilities Team
Member
Contact Name
Housekeeper
Page 8 of 38
Emergency Services Emergency Number Non-Emergency
Ambulance 999
Coastguard 999
Police 999
Fire Services 999
Local Hospital Example A&E
Local Police Station
Local Fire Station
Police Community Support Officer
Counter Terrorism Hotline
Local Council Emergency Planning Manager
Utilities
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Electricity suppliers name
Gas - suppliers name
Electricity/Gas - suppliers name
Water suppliers name
Telephone Faults - suppliers name Pin No. Account No.
Security
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Security Company
Intruder and Fire Alarms Company
Monitoring Company
(False Alarms)
External contacts
enter phone details if required
Page 9 of 38
Trades people
Where possible please add contract number
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Maintenance Contractor Company
Electrical
Heating and Plumbing
Cleaning Contractor
Other
Please enter any local museums/National Trust properties who
may want to enter into reciprocal arrangements for an
emergency response.
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Local Museum
Security
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Security Company
Intruder and Fire Alarms Company
Monitoring Company
Trades people
Where possible please add contract number
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Maintenance Contractor Company
Page 10 of 38
Electrical
Heating and Plumbing
Cleaning Contractor
Other
Please enter any local museums/National Trust properties who
may want to enter into reciprocal arrangements for an
emergency response.
Emergency Number
Non-Emergency
Local Museum
Page 11 of 38
EMERGENCY STRATEGY
ADDRESS OF
PREMISES
DATE:
RESPONSIBLE
PERSON
PROVISION
DESCRIPTION
IMPORTANT FACTORS
SIGNIFICANT
HISTORIC FEATURE
SIGNIFICANT
CONTENTS
FIRE RISKS
FLOOD & OTHER
RISKS
ACCESS FOR FIRE
ENGINES
WATER SUPPLIES
COMPARTMENTATION
MEANS OF ESCAPE
FIRE ALARM &
DETECTION
EMERGENCY
LIGHTING
Page 12 of 38
FIRE FIGHTING
EQUIPMENT
SIGNS & NOTICES
PROCEDURES
EVACUATION
PROCEDURE
TRAINING
RECORD OF TESTS
ETC
FIRE RISK
ASSESSMENT
Page 13 of 38
Incident Management Structure for Salvage
Recovery Team
Co-ordinator
Name:
Quartermaster
Name:
Salvage Teams
Names:
Wet Recovery Teams
Names:
Dry Recovery Teams
Names:
Communication & Welfare
Name:
Salvage Teams
Names:
Incident Coordinator
Name:
Documentation
Name:
Security
Name:
In the event of an incident that requires a salvage operation, the
Incident Coordinator should allocate roles to individuals. This
table can be used to document these decisions.
More information about roles can be found on the reverse of this
page.
Salvage Team
Co-ordinator
Name:
Page 15 of 38
Incident Coordinator
Manages the incident. Appoints individuals to team leader roles. Responsible for communication with Emergency Services. Delegates tasks and does not get involved in
specific activities. Remains in one place and is available to make decisions. Deals with all external enquiries including media contact (or appoints someone to do this.) Monitors
the bigger picture. Ensures events and key decisions are recorded.
Security
Ensures people, building/site and objects are secure. Manages entry to site and establishes cordons. Appoints individuals to travel off-site with objects if needed. Arranges for
site to be secured following salvage operation, e.g. manned guarding, security fencing, alarm resets.
Communication & Welfare
Ensures information is shared. Keeps in contact with all teams. Monitors and sends messages. Keeps Incident Co-ordinator updated. Monitors communication between
salvage and recovery teams to ensure the flow of salvaged objects is appropriate. Monitors the health and safety of individuals. Ensures people have breaks and looks for
signs of stress/fatigue. If appointed, handles press/external communications.
D
ocumentation
Implements a controlled documentation process to ensure whereabouts of objects are recorded. Ensures all items are identified and/or recorded as they are treated and
packed. Located with recovery teams. Security aspect to this role, so liaises with security contact or holds this role as well. Documentation can be a lengthy process so a team
may be required if people are available.
Q
uartermaster
Manages physical resources. Identifies materials available and allocates them to salvage and recovery teams whilst coordinating requests for resources. Obtains additional
items if needed.
Salvage Team Coordinator
Manages the removal of objects from the building/site or liaises with the emergency services salvage teams. Prioritises the order of objects to be salvaged and accounts for the
unique circumstances of the incident. Communicates with the Incident Coordinator. Controls access to the salvage site or provides clear instructions to the emergency
services. Ensures Incident coordinator and Recovery Team leaders know what to expect. Assesses the level of triage necessary at the point of recovery.
Salvage Teams
With the consent of the emergency services and under the guidance of the Salvage Team Coordinator, the Salvage Teams remove objects from rooms or area agreed with
Emergency Services. Team transports to object triage area. Ensures security of objects by handing to recovery teams. Appropriate PPE should be worn.
Recovery Team coordinator
Organises resources for the triage of objects. Establishes work stations, equipment and teams for wet recovery and dry recovery. Ensures all salvaged objects are treated,
packed and labelled. Ensures location of objects is documented or liaises with Documentation team.
Wet recovery Teams
Deals with the worst affected salvaged items (wet, contaminated or physically damaged). Makes decisions on immediate actions, i.e. further washing, freezing, drying, etc.
Provides initial object first aid. Team members record treatment and confirm documentation as items leave for storage.
Dry Recovery Teams
Deals with items that do not require immediate first aid. Carefully packing, labelling and protecting objects is a priority. Team members will record condition of all objects and
confirm documentation as items leave for storage.
Roles and Responsibilities
Page 16 of 38
Risk Assessment for Salvage Operations
What To Check For
Satisfactory Condition?
Describe Hazard
Proposed Action against
No or Don’t Know
Yes
No
Don’t
Know
Is there effective liaison and
communication with emergency
services?
Have hazardous Areas Been cordoned
off?
Has a Control Point been established?
Has a secure salvage area been
designated and secured (as well as
possible)?
Have staff been reminded to be alert to
security issues, such as theft from
salvage area or unauthorised entry into
the building?
Where applicable, have site security
guards been re-deployed?
Is there record of who is in emergency
area, where they are working? & when
they are due to return to control point
Is there an evacuation procedure in
place?
Is there a system in place to identify
hazards & warn operatives?
Is there a system in place to ensure
operative’s welfare & to guard against
fatigue?
Is there a system in place to ensure
good manual handling practices
prevail?
Is Personal Protective Equipment
available & used when required?
Page 17 of 38
Entry Control Log
NAME
TIME IN
TIME OUT
LOCATION
Page 18 of 38
Main Entrance
S
TATION
R
OAD
Letsby Station
Under Passage
Example Mill
(English Heritage
Property)
L
ETSBY
L
ANE
Service
Wing
West
Wing
East
Wing
Rear Entrance
Train line
M
AIN
S
TREET
Page 19 of 38
Working with the Fire Service at an Incident
The Senior Fire & Rescue Service Officer is in Charge!
Do not commit to any tasks until you have:
Briefed by the incident commander before completing any task.
Do not enter the building unless authorised.
Instruction on command and control from the Fire Service.
Under the supervision of the Fire Service at all times.
What your specific task is & you are capable of undertaking it.
Your personal protective equipment is suitable & sufficient.
Where the fire is located and relative risks.
Understand the evacuation signal is short sharp blows on a whistle
If you satisfied with the above:
S
ign in the entry log
St
ay with your buddy or team
Be aware of your surroundings at all times.
Breathe only fresh air not smoke
Check doors are not warm before opening them
Keep escape route within sight
Keep to job in hand, do not wander
Listen for evacuation whistle
Stay in radio contact (if available)
S
ign out of the entry log
Da
nger Signs
A
ny signs of Smoke or Fire evacuate the building immediately and
contact incident commander
R
emember
Y
our exit route & any alternative exits.
Never put yourself or a member of your team at risk.
Page 20 of 38
Entering a Flooded Building in Safety
The evacuation signal:- short blasts on a whistle
A building that has been damaged by rising floodwater is likely to be a
dangerous place.
Before entering a flooded building you must consider:
Ele
ctrical hazards
Structural hazards
Hazardous materials
Bacteria and viruses
Ventilation
1. Electrical hazards
If water has come into contact with electrical circuits, and especially if the
water rose above electrical outlets, turn off power at the main breaker o
r
f
use of the service panel. Do not turn power back on until the equipment
has been repaired or inspected by an electrician.
2. Structural hazards
Never assume that water-damaged structures, particularly ceilings, are safe.
If in doubt DO NOT ENTER. Leave immediately if shifting or unusual noises
signal a possible collapse.
3. Hazardous materials
Damaged building materials may contain asbestos and lead-based paint.
Before disturbing suspect material, precautions should be taken to prevent
exposure. Floodwaters can contain hazardous materials such as
pesticides, fuel or spilled chemicals. Play it safe and do not enter if in
doubt.
4. Bacteria and viruses
Microscopic organisms, particularly those from sewage, can be found in
mud or sediment left by floodwater. If you accidentally swallow sediment or
flo
od water that is contaminated, you might develop gastrointestinal illne
ss.
Yo
u can reduce the risk by wearing rubber gloves, not eating or smoking
,
a
nd frequent hand washing. If you get a cut or wound that is exposed t
o
f
lood water, there is some risk of tetanus and you should be vaccinated if
you haven’t received a tetanus vaccination within the past 5 years.
5. Ventilation
Do not use petrol or generator pump within an enclosed area as there is a
danger of carbon-monoxide poisoning.
Page 21 of 38
Bomb Threats
A telephone bomb threat or suspicious package should be treated seriously and dealt
with urgently. It is important to gather as much information as possible from the threat
in order to assist in decision making.
Subsequent actions will be based on the assessment of the call/package and the
security measures in place. There are three possible responses:
The threat may demand instantaneous action and the need to evacuate the
building.
Alternatively, you may wish to carry out a bomb search and/or wait for the
police to arrive to help in the assessment.
Do nothing if the threat is assessed as non-credible, no further action is
required.
Bomb Search
A search must only take place when the Responsible Person has assessed the threat
and decided that immediate evacuation was not necessary. You may wish to wait until
the police arrive before making the decision to search, however the police themselves
will NOT normally search premises themselves.
There are three levels of search:
Level 1 all areas fully open to the public
Level 2 areas where visitors or contractors may have access
Level 3 all remaining areas
Searching must be done in pairs. If something is found:
1. Do not touch or move it
2. Move away immediately
3. If possible close the door to the room
4. Withdraw all people
5. Try to remember as much as possible about the appearance and
6. location of the device you will need to remain on hand to brief the police.
7. If you haven’t already done so, call the police.
Security
Page 22 of 38
Evacuation
The decision to evacuate will normally be the responsibility of the Responsible Person,
although the police may advise an immediate evacuation. The decision should be
based on the following:
If the threat appears real and imminent, then all staff should be evacuated.
If the warning appears real, but indicates that the threat is not immediate, staff
should first search their own work stations, then evacuate.
If the warning is less credible with no immediate threat, search teams could
carry out their sweep, only evacuating if something suspicious is found.
Care should be taken when choosing an evacuation route. People should not have to
pass through the risk area to evacuate:
If there is a device within the building, care will be needed in choosing which
stairwell/exits to use.
If the device is in an adjacent property or in a vehicle, evacuation at ground
floor should avoid the risk area.
The evacuation route does not stop outside the building. The guideline retreat
distances are:
Device inside the building - retreat 60m Device outside the building up to
suitcase size retreat 100m
vehicle borne retreat 500m
Site Security during Evacuation
At sites with important collections, security measures should be put in place to protect
valuable objects. If it is safe to do so, staff should be positioned where they can
observe building entrances at a distance. Alternatively, staff could patrol the site
perimeter to prevent unauthorised access.
The movement and storage of valuables during salvage operations also needs
consideration. Please refer to guidance note Documentation and Security of
Salvaged Objects which can be found in this manual.
Page 23 of 38
Security During Incident Operations
Topic
Recommended Action
IEP Folder Security
When using the folders, keep them secure at all times and control the
issue of grab sheets to salvage teams.
Incident Response
Plan the movement and storage of objects or items as determined by
the incident.
Cordon off area’s where possible
If the site or office is open, visitors/staff should be directed to the
muster point see inside front cover of emergency response folder
As an incident develops, it is important to consider the security of
individuals, the evacuated building and objects.
Using Resources
Allocate security duties to minimise risks to salvaged collections/items.
Guarding duties may need to be different during an incident
If necessary, and if it is safe to do so, guard doors and exits
If a guarding company provides guarding services for your site,
consider asking them for additional staff for the duration of the salvage
operation. Otherwise appoint staff to these duties
Movement & Security of
Objects & Assets
Monitor the movement of objects/items. Carry out this activity at a
safe/appropriate distance determined by the emergency.
Ensure routes are understood and the receiving area has space
available. Monitor the receiving area
Appoint guards or staff to monitor loading and transport. If valuable
objects/items are to be transported by a third party, assign a staff
member to travel with the object/s to ensure safe and secure storage
at the agreed destination. It is essential to obtain guidance from the
conservation hotline contact, if collection objects are to be moved. It is
also essential to protect all important items, objects and data before,
during and after transport
Ensure the following items are not vulnerable to criminal activity: tills &
contents, safe & contents, stock, IT equipment, confidential data,
objects/items remaining in situ and any other confidential items.
Ensure buildings & building fabric are also not vulnerable to criminal
activity
If objects/items are to be stored in an unfamiliar environment, make
sure appropriate security exists. Appoint a static guard if necessary
Documentation
Accurate documentation is an essential security process. Valuable
objects and items may need to move to and from assessment and
treatment area’s and then to storage areas. You need to ensure
records are kept showing where objects/items are.
Triage & Treatment areas
You may need to appoint guards or staff to monitor triage and
treatment area’s
CCTV
Where available and practicable, use site security camera’s to:
monitor salvage operations
monitor entrance/exit points
view entrances/exits/salvage operations
monitor traffic (if relevant)
Site Relocation
If you need to relocate objects, staff, assets or records, ensure security
measures and protocols at the alternative location are appropriate and
suitable to ensure people and items are safe and protected. E.g. you
may need to consider additional security guarding.
Ensure appropriate asset control is introduced e.g. ensuring valuable
items/equipment or data are recorded.
Page 24 of 38
Spillages
It is essential that you attend to any spillage as soon as possible. The level of
response will depend on the nature of the spill and will therefore be site specific but
the following should be considered:
Immediate response:
Identify what has been spilt and assess the risk to health
Decide quickly whether expert help is required or if the situation can be dealt
with in-house using an appropriate spillage kit.
Move people (including yourself) to a safe distance away from fumes etc
Cordon off the area to prevent further exposure to people
Eliminate ignition sources
Ventilate the area by opening doors and windows
Clean Up
Decide on a plan of action
Only deal with the spillage if you can identify the substance and know how to
deal with it safely.
Refer to the Hazard Data Sheets for the substances involved.
Assemble proper materials and equipment for the clean-up
Put on suitable Personal Protective Equipment to minimise exposure e.g.
respirator, eye protection, overalls, gloves.
Contain the spill by absorbing liquids with a suitable absorbent material or
neutraliser.
Prevent further spread, particularly into drains and/or watercourses.
Correctly dispose of the spilt material and any clean up material using a
specialist disposal firm if necessary.
Page 25 of 38
Documentation and Security of
Salvaged Objects
6
. Documentation
During Salvage operations it is essential to keep track of all objects an
d to
e
nsure they remain secure. Documentation is therefore important but should
not delay removal or first aid treatment of ob
jects.
A
s soon as practical a person or persons should be appointed to undertak
e
Docu
mentation.
7
. Priority Objects
T
he emergency plan identifies the highest priority objects, room by room,
with an individual salvage sheet which must stay with the object; an
Inventory of Priority Objects is kept in the response file and can be used to
record the movement of these objects.
8
. Remaining Objects
After removal and documentation of priority objects, the blank inventory
sheet can be used to record what other objects have been removed and
whether they have been stored or sent for further treatment.
9
. Labelling Objects
I
dentification labels with the inventory number should be attached to larger
items or, in the case of items crated the number of items in the crate, the
ir
i
nventory numbers and the room they were salvaged from. These details
should be entered onto the blank inventory sheet. Labels should be attached
Documentation
And labelling
Treatment
Not
Required
Storage
Packing or
Further
Treatment
Object
receives first
aid Treatment
Treatment
Required
Object
Removal
Object
Assessment
(Triage)
Page 26 of 38
to objects by tying on with cotton tape; adhesive stickers should NEVER be
stuck directly onto an object.
1
0. Security
D
ecide what security measures are needed at the earliest opportunity.
The immediate salvage scene is likely to be chaotic, and is th
e most
v
ulnerable to opportunist theft.
W
herever possible choose a salvage area that has the following features:
o Acce
ssible from the scene
o Naturally occurring boundaries e.g. fences or walls
o Is easily overlooked
o Is away from footpaths
o Is away from planting or other features that might allow a thief to
approach unseen
T
aping off a secure area with only one entry point, to deposit removed
objects, will help identify interlopers. Anybody not known or easily
identifiable and any suspicious activity should be challenged.
W
here possible consider floodlighting the secure salvage area at night.
T
he further movement of objects to a triage and treatment/packing area
can be more easily controlled and all persons working in these areas
should be reminded of their security responsibility by the Inciden
t
M
anager.
I
f there are sufficient people, one should be appointed to supervise th
e
s
ecure salvage area and help ensure security.
S
taff should also be alert to the possibility of people entering the building,
particularly if there are some parts unaffected by the incident but have un-
secured entrances.
Sites with static guards should re-deploy them to protect the salvage
a
rea, control access onto site and prevent unauthorised re-entry into th
e
building.
5
.1 Security when Transporting Objects
I
f objects are to be transported, they need to be logged on at the site an
d
o
ff at their destination using an off site curator or other employee.
Page 27 of 38
High value priority objects may need to be accompanied during transport
and the security of the storage facility should be assessed before
entrusting the objects to a third party.
Dealing with the media fact sheet
1. Dealing with the media phone calls
All media requests from journalists and television companies should be referred
to______________________________. Here’s some advice on what to do if you get a
call from a journalist at your site or office.
There is no such thing as a friendly journalist!
They are all, almost without exception, friendly and charming people but they are also
professional people for whom friendship might jeopardise their integrity or give the
perception of doing so!
Think before you speak
Don't say anything you don't really mean - not even as a joke.
Always be polite
Journalists have deadlines and can be under severe pressure to file a story. If you
can’t help by answering their question directly try to do so in an understanding way:
‘I can see your problem but...life must be difficult for you on this story but....’
Assume everything you say is on the record
You might need to say that you are going to tell them something for background or
operational reasons, but always consult Corporate Communications before doing so.
In practice, there’s no such thing as ‘off the record’.
Be careful about simple denials or ‘yes’ answers
Journalists might put a long and rambling question to you and then when you say
‘yes’, attribute it as a quote from you. It is unrealistic to ask for editorial control or copy
approval, but it is perfectly reasonable for you to ask for any quote they have taken
from you to be read back to you.
You don't have to answer questions in the terms they are put
A reporter will put something to you in negative terms such as ‘why is
_____________________________ making such a mess of its grants programme?’ It
is your job to answer as positively as possible. Say something like ‘we know that over
70% of our clients are satisfied with our grant giving arrangements....’
Page 28 of 38
2. Dealing with the media broadcast interviews
Prepare yourself. Rehearse and prepare a set of anticipated questions and
their answers. English Heritage is fortunate in having a large number of leading
experts. Nerves cannot usually destroy genuine knowledge, but if you don't
know your stuff, waffle will show you up. Try to think of every possible angle.
Determine the three points you want to make and get them over as soon as
you can. Whatever the interviewer's question, try and turn it on to your ground.
For example:
‘That's an interesting question, but can I first put it to a bit of context?
If you can think of a soundbite, use it!
Remember to say ____________________________________ as often as
you can rather than ‘we’.
Make sure you know the exact conditions negotiated for you by Corporate
Communications.
Is it live or pre-recorded? Can you take something again if you are not
happy? Who else is on? Can you hear what they have said? Will you get the
last word? What is the tone of the programme? Does your contribution come
after a filmed report?
Try and use plain language. Don’t use abstractions, latin or jargon. Use short
sentences and try and remember to keep things simple without being
patronising or ‘dumbing down’.
If you have said what you wanted to say, shut up.
It is not up to you to keep the conversation flowing. Don't be lured in to saying
more!
Hair and make-up are important. Try not to be too distracted if you are
unused to make-up. Let the make-up department do their job!
Avoid jangly jewellery and too many layers of clothing around the
neckline. It is also best to avoid small patterns such as stripes, spots and
checks, especially herringbone as they dazzle on TV.
For male staff, a shirt and tie is normally the safest option. Some very
stylish people get away without a tie, but they have usually been ‘styled’ by a
professional or dressed very expensively.
Sit up straight in the chair. The back of a tailored jacket can ride up making
you look hunched.
Wear dress that is appropriate on site interviews
Remember to smile, but not too much or you will not be believed.
Never wear sunglasses for an outside interview.
Check there is nothing visually distracting behind you
Page 29 of 38
Inventory of Priority Objects at
Object
Type
Inventory
No
Object Description Priority Floor
Room & Position in
Room
First Aid
Required?
Location?
Storage
Destination
Inventory of Salvaged Objects
Object
Type
Inventory
No (if
known)
Object Description/s
Floor & Room
Recovered from
1st Aid
Rqrd?
Where
Returned
form 1
st
Aid?
Pack
?
Crate? Wrap?
Ref Number
Where
Stored?
EXAMP
LE
ONLY
90002454
5
8 blue vases
FR4 Dining Room
No
EXAMPLE
Yes
Crate 1
Brodsworth
Barn 1
90017777
Small painting Horse
Racing
Billiard Room
No
EXAMPLE
Yes
Crate 3
Momart
Receipt
-
Children on swing
FR4 Dining Room
Yes wet
EXAMPLE
Item ref FR4 P1
Page 30 of 38
Object
Type
Inventory
No (if
known)
Object Description/s
Floor & Room
Recovered from
1st Aid
Rqrd?
Where
Returned
form 1
st
Aid?
Pack
?
Crate? Wrap?
Ref Number
Where
Stored?
Page 31 of 38
Object
Type
Inventory
No (if
known)
Object Description/s
Floor & Room
Recovered from
1st Aid
Rqrd?
Where
Returned
form 1
st
Aid?
Pack
?
Crate? Wrap?
Ref Number
Where
Stored?
Page 32 of 38
Object
Type
Inventory
No (if
known)
Object Description/s
Floor & Room
Recovered from
1st Aid
Rqrd?
Where
Returned
form 1
st
Aid?
Pack
?
Crate? Wrap?
Ref Number
Where
Stored?
Page 33 of 38
HOUSE/PREMISIS _________________________
Main Recovery Store Area:
Small Recovery Store area:
Transport and Longer Term Storage:
Page 35 of 38
Disaster Store Contents for_________________________________________
Example House Object Recovery Locations
Object Recovery
Capability is limited.
See contact list for
Treatment,
Transport and
Storage Facilities.
Main Store
Recovery and
Storage Area:
Letsby Station under
passage
To be secured by
police if used.
Small Store
Recovery and
Storage Area:
Example Mill, Letsby
Lane
Space for large
collections limited.
Potential Overflow
Recovery and
Storage Area:
North Garden,
Example House
Security and shelter
required.
Page 37 of 38
Store Location ___________________________________________
Personal Protective Equipment
Equipment
Tools
in-Tool Box
Page 38 of 38
Consumables
Post Incident Procedure
1 Purpose
The purpose of this procedure is to detail the method of making the site ready for
occupation after a fire, alarm activation, or other emergency.
2 Competencies required
Staff must be familiar with the site or building, the normal opening up procedure, and
what devices or equipment that might need to be reset after activation of the fire alarm
system.
3 When to use this procedure
Staff must use this procedure after the site has been made safe following a fire, fire
alarm signal or other emergency. If the incident has caused anything more than minor
damage the re-opening may need to be delayed to allow for a comprehensive clean-
up or building repairs.
4 What you need to do
1. If visitors are waiting for entry keep them informed as to what is happening
2. Reset the fire alarm system
3. Check that all exit doors and routes are free from obstructions and other hazards;
clean or otherwise rectify as necessary.
4. Cordon off any areas that are hazardous and cannot be made safe.
5. Open automatic fire doors that are held open on magnets.
6. Check that all areas are adequately lit.
7. Ensure that the visitor experience will not be unduly affected
8. Restart boilers.
9. Check that room stewards are in position
10. Staff the tills
11. Allow entry
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