FEBRUARY 2019
COMMUNITY
PROFILE
Resolution No. 2019-3585 Exhibit "A"
32
Introduction
The City of Newberg created this document to offer a snapshot of the community as a whole. It was written
with information from the most recent data and relevant plans available. Portland State University, College of
Urban & Public Affairs’ Population Research Center; the U.S. Census Bureau; the Ford Family Foundation;
the State of Oregon Employment Department are just some of the data sources.
Tucked into 5.93 square miles
1
of Yamhill County’s northeastern corner, Newberg is the county’s second larg-
est city. Over the past 50 years, its population has greatly grown because of a high standard of living; a clean,
green environment; and a strong economy. Large agricultural and manufacturing sectors; education, health
care and social services; and tourism lead to a household median income of over $53,000. To prepare for the
growth expected to continue, the City has created plans to meet the housing and business needs. This will
help Newberg keep the small-town feel that makes it such a great place to call home while keeping a strong,
local economy.
Arts, Culture, and Heritage
With farmers markets, First Friday Art walks, and festivals, Newberg is an active community.
Newberg Public Library
The Newberg Public Library loaned over 300,000 books in 2017 alone. But the 500-1,000 daily visitors
(170,000+ yearly) know that books are far from the only things offered. The Library is a hub of activity. Twen-
ty thousand people attended its 400+ events, such as Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
(STEM) programs; book releases; and Hispanic Heritage Month. It delivers books to those unable to leave
their homes regularly and organizes a summer food program to make sure that everyone can participate. Most
of the employees are Newberg residents and it has a strong group of volunteers and community partners like
the Rotary Club and Newberg Public Schools. This helps keep the Library current and helpful to local resi-
dents.
2
Chehalem Cultural Center
The Chehalem Cultural Center was created to “inspire and enrich lives” through the celebration of the arts,
community, education and heritage.
3
The building used to be a school. It is now home to an art gallery and
exhibition hall, 3 art classrooms, a clay studio, a music recording studio, and a 5,200 square foot ballroom. The
Center also plans to build a 250-seat theater, a conference center and a movement studio.
Newberg Cultural District
The Newberg Cultural District sits between the Cultural Center and the Newberg Public Library. It was creat-
ed with the help of the City of Newberg, Chehalem Park and Recreation District, the Cultural Center and the
Library, providing a space for relaxing activities. It is also great for events like Tunes on Tuesdays.
1 City of Newberg. As of 11/07/2018
2 NewbergPublicLibrary,KnowYourLocalGovernment.LeahGrith.10/04/2018
3 Chehalem Cultural Center,ChehalemPark&RecreaonDistrict.Accessed10/02/2018
3
Hoover-Minthorn House Museum
The Hoover-Minthorn House Museum shows the role Newberg played in the nation. After his parents died, a
young Herbert Hoover moved to Newberg to live with his uncle and aunt, Dr. Henry John and Laura Minthorn.
Of course, this is before he became the 31
st
president of the United States! The Minthorns came earlier so
Henry John could work as the rst superintendent of Friends Pacic Academy, which is now George Fox
University, a nationally-known Christian university. So the Minthorns left a legacy in Newberg and the nation
as well.
4
Museum curators have put items in the house that used to belong to the Minthorn family as well as
Hoover’s actual bedroom furniture set, pieces from George Fox University and local residents.
Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce
The Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce supports almost 400 area businesses from Newberg, Dundee,
St. Paul and Dayton. It assists local businesses, helps those who want to start a business through the Che-
halem Valley Innovation Accelerator and does business recruitment. As an active community partner, it spon-
sors the Newberg Fresh Trufe Marketplace, the Newberg Camellia Festival & Run/Walk, Taste Dundee and
other local events.
5
The Chamber also founded the Newberg Downtown Coalition, which continues to make
life great for area residents.
Newberg Downtown Coalition
The Newberg Downtown Coalition is a volunteer organization that uses the Main Street Approach to foster
community-based revitalization through physical upgrades, events and promotions.
6
It manages the Newberg
Farmers Market and supports the Holiday Tree Lighting, Art Walk and many other events. The Coalition also
does business recruitment, specically in the downtown core.
7
Social Service Organizations
Love INC
Like the town’s founders, many of Newberg’s residents participate in religious services. The city is home to
over 40 churches, such as Presbyterian, Seventh-day Adventist, Latter-day Saints, Catholic, and independent
congregations. Twenty-four churches located in Newberg and neighboring communities work with Love in the
Name of Christ (Love INC). Founded in 2004, it organizes church volunteers to use their resources and skills to
uplift the community and has assisted over 3,500 families. It connects local residents to specic congregations
that offer the specic services they need and helps the churches meet these needs, such as home heating,
food, and medication. Love INC also offers classes for nancial management, nutrition, job skills and more.
Lastly, it runs the Newberg Community Shelter to offer women a safe home and help to get back on their feet.
8
Newberg Area Habitat for Humanity
Newberg Area Habitat for Humanity is the local chapter of the global Habitat for Humanity that “brings people
4 Hoover-Minthorn House Museum.Accessed10/09/2018
5 Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce.Accessed10/10/2018
6 AbouttheNewbergDowntownCoalion,NewbergDowntownCoalion.Accessed10/10/2018
7 Accomplishments. hp://www.newbergdowntown.org/accomplishments/.Accessed10/10/2018
8 Loving Our Neighbors,LOVE,INC.Accessed10/02/2018
54
together to build homes, communities and hope.” In addition to xing and building homes, it supports fair hous-
ing policies and teaches home maintenance skills. To qualify for the home ownership program, you must have
a need for a better house, be a low-income resident with the ability to pay a mortgage, and have the desire to
partner with Habitat. The nonprot also runs the Restore, which keeps good building and housing materials
out of landlls by reselling them to the community at a low cost.
Yamhill Community Action Partnership
The Yamhill Community Action Partnership is a nonprot that meets housing, energy, food and youth service
needs in the county. Every year, it gives around 1,500 residents funds to pay for utilities during emergencies
and makes 30 homes more energy efcient. It collects and gives away 1.5 million pounds of food to over 35
sites, including elementary schools and public housing complexes. It also helps youth between 11 and 21
years old by offering job training and placement, leadership and life skills coaching, and even housing.
Recreation
Chehalem Park and Recreation District
Phase I of the Chehalem Aquatic and Fitness Center redevelopment – which includes a new aquatic wing
with dressing rooms, showers, a kiddie area, saunas, and lap lanes – shows how the Chehalem Park and
Recreation District (CPRD) has grown during its 50-year history. In 1967, the District owned 14 acres of cit-
izen-donated land and operated the City of Newberg’s outdoor pool and parks. Since then, it has grown to
over 200 acres, with recreational sites in Newberg, Dundee and Yamhill County. It maintains an 18-hole golf
course, walking and equestrian trails, a BMX park, a dog park and so much more. It also offers park shelters,
halls, meeting rooms and event spaces for rent. The District organizes educational activities for all ages, such
as summer camps and classes at the Senior Center.
9
The District continues to expand the recreational options for residents. The Chehalem Heritage Trail Plan
guides the creation of a 70-mile network to connect parks, regional trails, and historical and cultural sites.
Phase II of the Aquatic Center’s redevelopment includes renovating the original building to create a gymna-
sium and elevated track. In September 2018, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department chose to give
CPRD $287,000 to build Friends Park, a 9-acre neighborhood park in south Newberg. A private contractor will
donate nearly $300,000 in labor, which shows the community support for the CPRD.
10
Champoeg State Heritage Area
Champoeg State Heritage Area shows Newberg’s role in Oregon history, as it is the site of the state’s rst
provisional government. Located on the Willamette River ve miles outside of Newberg, the 622-acre area
includes the Historic Butteville Store, perhaps the oldest continuously operating store in Oregon. Also, visitors
can use its campground with full-hookup sites, tent sites, yurts and cabins. Each site type has at least one site
accessible to those with disabilities. The grounds also include ush toilets, hot showers and a meeting hall.
11
9 ChehalemPark&RecreaonDistrict.Accessed10/09/2018
10 TheStoryofFriendsPark,ChehalemParkandRecreaonDistrict.Accessed10/11/2018
11 Champoeg State Heritage Area,OregonStateParks.Accessed10/09/2018
5
Education Attainment
Newberg residents go to college at a slightly lower rate than state residents overall. However, the median
household income is higher than that of the state as a whole. More of Newberg’s residents participate in all
levels of education than the county overall (see Chart 1). The Latin-American community, the city’s largest
community of color, obtains at least a high school diploma and at least a bachelor’s degree at much lower
rates than the White, non-Latin American community (rates of 43.3% and 24.4% less respectively). Chart 2
shows that women get at least a high school diploma or a bachelor’s degree more often than men.
Chart 1: Educational Attainment by Region (for residents 25 years of age or older)
Source: Educational Attainment, U.S. Census Bureau,
2013-2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
Chart 2: Newberg’s Educational Attainment by Sex
76
Source: Educational Attainment, U.S. Census Bureau,
2013-2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
Education Opportunities
From elementary school to advanced degree programs, Newberg has many educational opportunities.
Newberg Public Schools (SD 29J)
Newberg Public Schools (NPS) runs ten schools that serve a total of 5,000 students from Yamhill, Washington,
and Clackamas Counties.
12
Chehalem Online Learning Alliance, a Grade K-8 school, gives online as well as
in-person classes and offers each student a tailored learning plan.
13
While 20% of all students are Hispanic/
Latino, 91% of staff are White.
14
Ever English Learners and students with special needs each make up 14% of
the student population
15
and 46% are economically disadvantaged.
16
Beginning with its migrant preschool program, NPS strives to meet all of its students’ academic needs. It offers
interventions, tutoring programs and English Language Development support starting in elementary school.
17
Middle and high schools host Advancement via Individual Determination (AVID), an academic success pro-
gram, and offer online and mobile student classes. This has led to students achieving Standardized Achieve-
ment Test (SAT) scores higher than both state and national averages.
18
In addition to support services, NPS
provides various enrichment programs such as a dual language immersion program at the elementary level
12 Quick Facts about Newberg Public Schools,NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed11/08/2018
13 Chehalem Online Learning Alliance,NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed10/3/2018
14 OregonAt-A-GlanceDistrictProle:NewbergSD29J,2017-2018,OregonDept.ofEd.
15 Ibid.
16 Quick Facts about Newberg Public Schools,NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed11/08/2018
17 Migrant Program,NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed11/08/2018.
18 Quick Facts about Newberg Public Schools,NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed11/08/2018
7
and a middle school (STEM) program. The high school offers an alternative learning program called Catalyst,
study abroad opportunities, and classes at Portland Community College. From music to sports to academic
competitions, NPS has many activities in and outside of the classroom.
19
Performance Standards
English Language Arts (2017-18)
• Elementary schools scored the same as last year but middle and high schools scored below last year
• Middle schools did not meet the scores for achievement or academic growth goals last year or for their
3-year average
• High school students met the score for their 3-year average
Mathematics (2017-18)
• Only elementary schools met the math standard either last year or for their 3-year average
• Non-Asian students of Color scored at least 25 points less than Asian and White students in elementary
and middle school and 15 points less in high school
• Middle schools did not meet the scores for achievement or academic growth goals last year or for their
3-year average
Veritas School
Newberg offers its families private school options as well. Veritas School, a Christian grade PK-8 school, uses
the Harkness Method for its 230-member student body in every class. This conversation-based teaching style
focuses on creating skills in deep thinking and communication. Ranked #6 on Oregon Live’s 2018 list of the
state’s best private schools,
20
the student-teacher ratio is 13-1 and commonly all of the graduates go to col-
lege.
21
C.S. Lewis Academy
C. S. Lewis Academy is another private, Christian school in Newberg. It has an enrollment of 101 students and
student-teacher ratios that range from 9:1 in elementary school to 7:1 in high school. Most students play on a
sports team and participate in clubs and service projects such as food, toy and clothing drives, yard work for
elderly residents, and community performances.
22
It ranked 16
th
on Oregon Live’s list of the state’s best private
schools.
23
Portland Community College, Newberg Center
19 2017-18ESSADistrictAccountabilityDetailsReport,Oct.24,2018,NewbergSD29J.OregonDept.ofEd.
20 The20bestprivateschoolsinOregonandhowmuchitcoststoaendthem,OregonLive.Accessed
09/24/2018
21 Veritas School,Niche.Accessed10/02/2018
22 C.S.LewisAcademy2018-2019Prole.
23 The20bestprivateschoolsinOregonandhowmuchitcoststoaendthem,OregonLive.Accessed
09/24/2018
98
Portland Community College, Newberg Center, offers lower-level college courses. Students may enroll in the
Oregon Transfer Module, which lets them transfer to a State of Oregon community college or university. The
center is located on a 16-acre site, which has an 11,000 square foot Learning Garden. It is in a LEED Platinum
certied building, which is the rst college building in the state that produces just as much energy as it uses
because of its utilization of solar panels and energy-saving systems.
24
The Center provides advising, counsel-
ing, disability services and a discount of up to 100% for elderly students.
George Fox University
George Fox University is a private, Christian institution offering undergraduate, accelerated undergraduate
and post-graduate degree programs.
25
The most popular of the more than 40 study areas are business, en-
gineering and nursing. GFU also has nearly 50 minors, 11 masters and 5 doctoral degrees. Most of its 4,140
students attend the 106-acre campus in Newberg. The Portland Center and Salem Site focus on program-
ming for working adults. Students get the benet of a small university with a student-teacher ratio of 14:1.
The Bruins take sports seriously, as the women’s track & eld team won the 2018 National Championships.
Last year, GFU ranked 1
st
in Oregon in Money magazine’s list of “Best College’s for Your Money,” and 5
th
best
overall in the nation for Christian colleges.
26
The student body is committed to community involvement, volun-
teering 250,000 hours yearly around the region, state and world.
27
Population
With a population of 23,795,
28
the City of Newberg has grown by 7% since 2010. Newberg is growing faster
than the county, the Portland Metro Area and the state. It is estimated to grow to 36,709 by 2040.
29
Partially
because of the university, the median age is 32.7. This is six years younger than Oregon’s median age.
Nearly 80% of the total population identify as “White alone, not Hispanic or Latino,” which is 3% more than the
state as a whole. Latin-Americans make up the next largest ethnic group at 14.5%. Almost all (90%) of these
residents are of Mexican ancestry. People of “2 or More Races” make up 3.6%, while Asians make up 1.9%
and Native Americans make up 1.2%. Blacks and Pacic Islanders each add under 0.2%.
30
Over 12% of res-
idents older than 5 years old speak a language other than English, which is 3% higher than the state overall.
There are also fewer residents born outside of the U.S. by percentage than statewide. The Latin-American
population will probably increase in the next few years based on the fact that 20% of students in Newberg
Public Schools identied as “Hispanic” for the last ve years.
3132
Households and families
24 Newberg Center,PortlandCommunityCollege.Accessed09/24/2018
25 AcademicsatGeorgeFox,GeorgeFoxUniversity.Accessed09/24/2018
26 “GeorgeFoxUniversityrankedrstinOregonin‘Money’magazine’s‘BestCollegesforYourMoney’list, George
FoxUniversityNewsReleases,July17
th
2017.Accessed10/03/2018
27 CommunityContribuons,GeorgeFoxUniversity.Accessed10/10/2018
28 Cered2017PopulaonEsmates,PortlandStateUniversity,CollegeofUrban&PublicAairs:Populaon
Research Center
29 YamhillCountyFinalForecastTables,2018,PortlandStateUniversity,CollegeofUrban&PublicAairs:
PopulaonResearchCenter
30 DemographicandHousingEsmates,U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey5-Year
Esmates
31 OregonDept.ofEd.OregonReportCard:NewbergSD29J,2013-14–2016
32 OregonAt-A-GlanceDistrictProle:NewbergSD29J,2017-2018,OregonDept.ofEd.
9
There are 8,126 households in Newberg. Most people (67.1%) who live with someone else live with family
members, including children or spouses. The rest either live alone or with non-family members. Over 13% of
heads of family households are single women, 5% more than in 2010, while only 3.7% are single men. Nearly
a third (32.1%) of “householders” currently raise their own children. The average household size for home
owners is 2.59, which is basically the same as in 2010. The average size for renters is 2.66.
33
The overall
average size is 2.62.
34
Income and Poverty
Newberg’s median household income, $56,119, is over $3,000 more than last year but $791 less than the
state’s. Last year it was only $195 less than the state’s. It is $2,273 less than the county’s, and grew less over
the past year.
35
However, while the average annual wage (2017) in Newberg, at $42,000 is approximately
$1,000 higher than the in Yamhill County, it is over $8,000 less than in the state and $27,000 less than in
neighboring Washington County.
36
The median housing cost is $251,800, which is almost 10% more than in
2010.
37
Men who work full-time make $47,161 yearly while women earn $42,796. While the difference in pay is nearly
$1,000 less than it was last year, it is still quite large at $4,365. This difference in pay is less than that of the
state ($9,819) and county ($7,257). The jobs men and women have may be part of the reason. Men ll over
81% of computer, engineering and science occupations, while women work in over 70% of education, legal,
community service, arts and media jobs.
38
However, in Polk and Yamhill Counties, when men and women do
the same types of jobs, men still earn more – as high as 29% in managerial positions.
39
In Newberg, 17% of residents live in poverty, over 3% higher than the county rate. The percentage of single
mothers with 1-2 children who live in poverty has dropped 10% since 2016. Still they are at a major risk, es-
pecially when compared with single mothers in the county and state.
40
Yamhill County has a child poverty rate
of 22.5%, 17
th
highest in the state.
33 SelectedHousingCharacteriscs,U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey5-YearEsmates
34 QuickFacts:Newbergcity,Oregon,USCensusBureau.Accessed12/07/2018
35 DataUSA:Newberg,OR.Accessed09/21/2018
36 NewbergOverview,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
37 SelectedHousingCharacteriscs,U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey5-YearEsmates
38 OccupaonbySexfortheCivilianEmployedPopulaon16YearsandOver,U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017
AmericanCommunitySurvey5-YearEsmates
39 DataUSA:Newberg,OR.Accessed09/25/2018
40 Poverty Status in the Last 12 Months of Families, U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey
5-YearEsmates
1110
Table 1: Poverty Rates
Over all Single Mothers*
Newberg 17.0 60.6
County 13.7 47.0
State 14.9 36.1
Source: Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months, U.S. Census Bureau,
2013-2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
* Families with female householder, no husband present, with 1-2 children under 18 years of age
Those who identify as Some Other Race and Black are at the highest risk of poverty by far (see Chart 3). Be-
cause Spanish is the second-most widely spoken language, the Latin American population probably makes up
most of this group. While the percentage of Whites (not Hispanic) living in poverty is less than other groups.
However, because they make up most of the population, they account for most of the residents living in pover-
ty (63.7%), followed by Latin Americans of any race (32%). Also women are 60% more likely to live in poverty
than men.
41
41 Ibid.
11
Chart 3: Rates of Racial Groups below Poverty Level*
Source: Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months, U.S. Census Bureau,
2013-2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
*NOTE: Black, Native American, Pacic Islander data is subject to potential error due to small population
sizes
The chance of child abuse and neglect may increase with higher rates of poverty. However, this is not the
case in Yamhill County, which is the 6
th
safest county for children under 18 (7.5 survivors/victims per 1,000
residents). Also, while the poverty rate is higher than the state’s,
42
the violent crime rate of Newberg-Dundee
is half the state’s (1.26 incidents per 1,000 residents in Newberg
43
to 2.64 in Oregon
44
). This makes the 2-city
area the 8
th
safest in the state.
45
Similarly, it is the 7
th
most food secure, with 87.5% of residents not having to
worry about where their next meal will come from.
46
To help with those residents who do worry about food, the
Newberg Farmers Market accepts SNAP benets.
47
42 Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months, U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey5-Year
Esmates
43 OensesKnowntoLawEnforcementbyCity,2016:Oregon.UniformCrimeReporng,FederalBureauof
Invesgaon
44 CrimeintheUnitedStatesbyState,2016.UniformCrimeReporng,FederalBureauofInvesgaon
45 Oregon’s20SafestCiesof2018.Safewise.Kemsley,Tamarra.Accessed11/29/2018.
46 Oregon by the Numbers,2018Ed.,pages109-111.TheFordFamilyFoundaon.
47 Newberg Farmers Market.Accessed11/14/18
1312
Industries
Manufacturing contributes nearly a fourth of all private employment in Newberg, which is 10% more than the
state’s manufacturing base.
48
This is due in large part to A-dec, the largest single employer in the county and
the largest dental equipment and furniture manufacturer in the world.
49
However, metals and machining also
play a role in the local manufacturing base. This diversity causes the sector to grow more slowly but also in
a more stable manner, leading to lower market highs but also higher market lows.
50
George Fox University’s
presence boosts education and health services to comprising another fourth of Newberg’s total jobs, which is
also 10% more than in the state. Leisure and hospitality, the third largest contributor, has grown signicantly
because of the county’s wine industry. With an annual wage of $20,500, these positions, while many, pay the
less than half of Newberg’s overall private sector wage average.
51
Between 2006 and 2017, Newberg added 1,400 jobs, an 18% increase, outpacing the state and county by
8%.
52
In 2019, Newberg’s economy will keep growing but at a slower speed. By 2027, the Mid-Willamette
Valley region, is expected to see an increase in job growth of 12%, which will mean 10,400 new jobs in New-
berg.
5354
Manufacturing will account for 2,100 of them. It will grow throughout the region as well, which is both
good and bad for Newberg. On one hand, there will be more jobs offered in Newberg. On the other, because
Newberg’s job growth is happening at the same time as it is in other places, the city will have to compete to
hire and keep the same pool of workers.
55
Health care, which grew 32% from 2006 to 2017, will grow another
20% from 2017-2027. Leisure and hospitality, which grew 71% (550 jobs) over the last decade, will grow an-
other 13% (1,520 jobs) during the next decade.
56
48 NewbergOverview,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
49 Interview:BretBaker,12/21/2018
50 EmploymentinYamhillCounty:ASummaryThroughAugust2018.OConnor,Pat.StateofOregonEmployment
Dept.
51 NewbergOverview,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
52 NewbergEmployment,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
53 EmploymentinYamhillCounty:ASummaryThroughAugust2018.OConnor,Pat.StateofOregonEmployment
Dept.
54 NewbergEmployment,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
55 EmploymentinYamhillCounty:ASummaryThroughAugust2018.OConnor,Pat.StateofOregonEmployment
Dept.
56 NewbergEmployment,AbishaStone.01/28/2019
13
Table 2: Top 10 Employers in Newberg*
Employer Employees Product Description
A-dec & A-dec Global Inc 1,240 Dental equipment and furniture manufacturer
Newberg Public Schools 577 Local Public Education institution
George Fox University 569 Higher Education institution
Fred Meyer #220 280 Retail goods store
The Allison Inn & Spa 200 Luxury inn
City of Newberg 145 Local government
Friendsview Manor Inc 115 Retirement community
DCI International 111 Dental equipment and furniture manufacturer
Climax Portable Machine Tools Inc 100 Machining manufacturer
Providence Newberg Medical Center 99 Medical center
Source: Business License Information, City of Newberg
*Business License Information not up to date for Newberg businesses.
While Newberg’s annual retail trade per capita – how much money is spent per person – was just above the
state’s, it did worse than most cities with a population around the same size as Newberg (see Chart 4). The
three cities with the highest retail trade values more than doubled Newberg’s. Two of those places (Klamath
Falls and Roseburg) are at least 70 miles from the nearest large city. The other (Wilsonville) is closer to a big
city than Newberg is. Newberg probably does better than Forest Grove and Ashland because it is farther than
both of these small cities from large regional areas. When looking at income, it is clear that proximity to large
cities, not income, is the deciding factor. Because Newberg is close to the largest metro area in the state, if it
wants to keep more of its money in the local economy, it might think about investment in the local retail sector.
However, because it is so close to Portland, it would be difcult to compete with the high number of options
nearby. Newberg should also think about how the Internet is changing how people shop.
1514
Chart 4: Per Capita Retail Sales for Cities within 2000 residents of Newberg’s Population^
Source: Economy-Wide Key Statistics: 2012, 2012 Economic Census of the United States
* All information is retrieved from 2012
^ Retail sales include sales shipments, receipts revenue, or business done
Occupations and Employment
Both Yamhill County and Oregon reached their lowest unemployment rates ever in August 2018 – 3.5% for the
county and 3.8% for the state. Both are better than the nation’s rate of 3.9%. Statewide employment has been
growing faster than the county since the recession. But over the last year, the county, at 3.1%, has grown more
quickly than both the state (2.2%) and the nation (1.6%).
57
With a larger private sector than the state overall,
Newberg has nearly 5% fewer public employees than the state as a whole.
57 EmploymentinYamhillCounty:ASummaryThroughAugust2018.OConnor,Pat.StateofOregonEmployment
Dept.,page2
15
As more people and businesses come to the region, the number of Newberg residents who work in the com-
munity has also increased.
58
However, the percentage of this group has decreased overall during the last 10
years (see Chart 5). The Portland Metro Area attracts 51% of Newberg workers, a 3% increase from a decade
ago. Additionally, other counties have also drawn more workers, causing the percentage of Newberg residents
that work in Yamhill County to drop nearly 5% (see Chart 6).
59
Chart 5: Where Newberg Residents Go for Work
Source: OnTheMap, US Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies, 2015. Accessed 10/30/2018
58 OnTheMap,USCensusBureau,CenterforEconomicStudies,2015.Accessed10/30/2018
59 EmploymentinYamhillCounty:ASummaryThroughAugust2018.OConnor,Pat.StateofOregonEmployment
Depart.10/11/2018
1716
Chart 6: Where Newberg Residents Work by County
Source: Employment in Yamhill County: A Summary Through August 2018. O’Connor, Pat.
State of Oregon Employment Department. 10/11/2018
Right now, Portland (8.3%), Tualatin (6%), Tigard (6%) and Beaverton (5.7%) have the largest draw on New-
berg’s workforce.
60
While Portland always attracts the most, the order of the rest of the cities changes often,
possibly meaning there is increased economic competition throughout the metro area. This might be because
of an increase in higher paying positions. Residents who leave Newberg for work typically get paid more than
those who work in Newberg (see Chart 7). The fact that they commute to other communities might suggest
that Newberg’s high-paying employers are being outperformed by their counterparts in neighboring cities. As
it is the second largest city in the county, its ability to attract workers has a large impact on the county’s ability
overall. While Newberg’s ability to keep its residents has decreased over time, it still has much more success
than its neighbors, except for McMinnville, which employs (38%) of its residents. This may be because it is
larger and 15 miles farther from Portland and only 4 miles closer to Salem than Newberg.
60 OnTheMap,2015,USCensusBureau,CenterforEconomicStudies.Accessed10/30/2018
17
Chart 7: Newberg Monthly Income
Source: OnTheMap, US Census Bureau, Center for Economic Studies, 2015. Accessed 10/30/2018
It should not be surprising that residents who leave Newberg for work tend to make more money because of
our close proximity to Portland. To continue to compete with neighboring cities for our local workforce, New-
berg must continue to become a place where businesses can grow. This also means that we must better train
our youth for the in-demand positions local businesses look to ll. We are starting to do this in manufacturing
through Newberg High School’s School to Work Program. In the program, the district will partner with local
businesses to improve the career technical education curriculum.
61
This will help local students and local busi-
nesses connect to each other.
Business Development
From a home-based soap company to an international dental tool manufacturer, Newberg is home to over
1,712 businesses – the second most in Yamhill County.
62
Public, private and non-prot organizations work
hard to make sure this number only goes in one direction: up.
Newberg Economic Development Strategy (2016)
In 2015, the Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce entered Newberg into America’s Best Communities, a
national community grant competition, earning $50,000 as a quarternalist. Newberg used these and other
funds to create an economic development plan. The Plan outlines ways to use the city’s location and assets to
61 Petersonwillleadschool-to-workprogram,”NewbergPublicSchools.Accessed09/26/18
62 StascsforAllU.S.FirmsbyIndustry,Gender,Ethnicity,andRacefortheU.S.,States,MetroAreas,Counes,
andPlaces:2012SurveyofBusinessOwners
1918
create more local opportunities in the manufacturing, healthcare, wine, hospitality and high tech industries.
63
This, in turn, led to the Newberg Economic Development Strategy.
64
The Strategy has four sections – industry;
commerce; business development and workforce; tourism and hospitality. The Task Force chose local orga-
nizations to lead teams to complete each of the pillars’ goals. Some of the goals have already been met, as
you can see in the Economic Development Annual Reports for 2017 and 2018. For example, the Chamber
of Commerce led a team that created the Chehalem Valley Innovation Accelerator to help businesses get on
their feet.
65
Chehalem Valley Innovation Accelerator
Established in 2016, The Chehalem Valley Innovation Accelerator, connects people who want to start a busi-
ness to organizations that can help them, like local governments, regional economic development organiza-
tions, universities, and other businesses. Chehalem VIA provides, start-up money, networking, workspace,
mentoring and business development. It focuses on manufacturing, high-value agriculture and medical-dental
but also connects people with organizations in other elds. In exchange for using local resources, businesses
that nish the program commit to working in the Chehalem Valley for at least 2 years.
66
Housing
Newberg has a total of 8,580 housing units, and only 5.3% of them are vacant. Single-unit detached homes
make up the majority of housing at 63.7%, followed by buildings with 20 or more units (6.6%) single-unit at-
tached (e.g. triplex, rowhouse) at (6.5%). The percentage of 1-unit detached homes increased slightly over
the last year while the other two housing types decreased. Forty percent of the housing stock was built after
1990, 5% more than the stock of the state, which shows that Newberg is growing faster than the state as a
whole. Newberg’s median house value of $251,800 is nearly $15,000 less than Oregon’s. However, it grew
nearly $23,800 since last year, which is $5,000 more than the state increase. It is closing the gap with Yamhill
County, whose median property value is $254,000.
Housing costs largely mirror the trends of the state (see Table 3). However, the income share used for rent-
ed and mortgaged housing exceeds that of the state overall, although Newberg’s median household income
is more than the state’s.
67
As 28% of Newberg’s renters face a severe rent burden (pay at least half of their
income on housing), the city has major housing challenges.
68
This has caused a great demand for housing-re-
lated services. Direct housing assistance (28.4%) and utilities (28.2%) are the most widely used services.
69
The City expects to complete a housing needs assessment by fall 2019, which will give direction for future
development. Currently, there seems to be a great need for multi-family housing.
63 Newberg:oneofAmerica’sBestCommunies,ChehalemValleyChamberofCommerce.Accessed10/01/2018
64 NewbergEconomicDevelopmentStrategy,2016,page4
65 Ibid,.page37
66 ChehalemValleyInnovaonAccelerator.Accessed10/10/2018
67 SelectedHousingCharacteriscs,U.S.CensusBureau,2013-2017AmericanCommunitySurvey5-YearEsmates
68
UnderstandingHB4006(2018)NewStatutoryRequirements,DLCDandOHCSWebinarforLargerCies,Sept.21,2018,OregonHousingandCom-
munity Services
69 211Info Client Contacts by Category,CommuniesReporter,OregonCommunityFoundaonandtheOSURural
StudiesProgram.Accessed10/05/18
19
Table 3: Housing Costs of City and State
Housing Type Newberg Oregon
30%+* Median cost 30%+* Median cost
Rental 56.3 1027 52.9 988
Owned, mortgage 37.5 1657 32.3 1594
Owned, no mortgage 16.2 522 15.4 497
Source: Selected Housing Characteristics, U.S. Census Bureau,
2013-2017 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates
* 30%+ means cost is at least 30% of income
Land Need and Supply
In 2004, the Newberg Planning Division did a Buildable Land Inventory of both vacant and redevelopable
land within the urban growth boundary (UGB) (see Table 6). The city had a total of 778 acres of buildable land
with clear designations for how the land could be used. Its urban reserve area has 467 more acres without
any designations. Based on how the population was expected to grow, the city needed 13,124 housing units
between 2005 and 2040. To meet this need, Newberg decreased residential lot sizes and created programs
to encourage building projects that have smaller housing units.
70
As the population grows, more land will be
needed for other purposes, like schools, religious practices and recreation.
The need for land for businesses is rising as well. To keep its small-town feel, Newberg will have smaller
neighborhood and community shopping centers instead of larger ones. This means that it can use the small-
er plots already in the UGB. Still this will not be enough to meet its needs. Newberg will also have to make
and attract more family-wage jobs in areas like manufacturing.
Table 4: Summary of Buildable Lands Needed, 2004
Future Buildable Acres Needed
2005 – 2025 2026 – 2040
Residential 360 1009
Commercial 6 109
Industrial 40 157
Parking 85 115
Institutions 164 233
TOTAL 655 1,623
Buildable reserve X 467
GRANT TOTAL 655 1,156
Source: City of Newberg Comprehensive Plan, 2018, page 65
70 City of Newberg Comprehensive Plan, 2018, pages 60-61
2120
Development Plans
Here are some plans that have been created to meet some of our land needs:
Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan (2016)
Phase I of the Newberg Dundee Bypass in 2018 greatly reduced trafc downtown. This means that the area
can now be a better place for walking and biking, which will which will attract new businesses and help existing
ones to thrive. The Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan was made to improve the good things the area al-
ready has and create a place in which people can live, shop, work and play, all mixed into the same spot. The
plan was also made so that downtown would be easier to get to from the areas around it.
71
Springbrook Master Plan (2008)
Springbrook Master Plan outlines a plan to make a District based on the historic Springbrook community.
72
The
District covers 450 acres of mostly agricultural land in the northern portion of the city limits. The Plan includes
1,200 housing units, from condos to houses. Walkways and trails will go through the entire area and lead to
a village center that will have shops, restaurants and a gathering space. The site already includes the Allison
Inn and Spa, a luxury hotel with a spa, conference rooms and a farm-to-table restaurant. Land is also set aside
for a mix of housing, retail and other businesses. There is also a place for a proposed church close to where
a church used to be. Fifty acres of park and open space will be spread throughout the area. Lastly, the Plan is
designed for more eco-friendly living.
73
Riverfront Master Plan (in development process)
The Willamette River has held importance to local residents since before the city was founded.
74
The com-
munity is in the process of creating the Newberg Riverfront Master Plan to enhance the 450-acre area.
Right now there is housing, open spaces and neighborhood parks as well as the WestRock Mill site (paper
mill) and the Rogers Landing boat ramp and park. The Plan will recommend the right mix of business and
housing with outlines for walking and biking paths that connect to other parts of the community.
75
The city
expects to reveal the Plan in the summer of 2019.
Newberg 2030 (in development process)
The City is trying to expand its urban growth boundary to meet housing and business needs. Finished in 2017,
Phase I included a community survey, a draft buildable lands inventory, a draft list of expansion study areas,
and an action plan. During Phase II, the City will nish the inventory and choose study areas.
71 CityofNewbergDowntownImprovementPlan,2016,pages1-2
72 Springbrook Master Plan, 2008
73 Ibid.
74 Backinme:YamhillValley–1859,NewsRegister.Accessed09/26/2018
75 City of Newberg Riverfront Master Plan, 2018, City of Newberg. Accessed 10/04/2018
21
Crestview Crossing Planned Unit Development
The property owner turned in plans to build 299 housing units and one commercial lot on a 33-acre area in
northeast Newberg. The project will take place over the next 10 to 15 years. There will be 18 single-family
homes on large lots, 230 cottage homes and 51 multi-family homes. Twelve single-family detached houses will
be sold below market rate to families earning below Newberg’s median income in order to add more affordable
housing to the area. Nearly 4.5 acres is designated for business use. Pathways will connect open spaces,
recreation areas and wetlands.
76
Infrastructure
The City of Newberg has adopted and is implementing the following infrastructure plans:
• ADA/Pedestrian/Bike Route Improvement Plan (2007)
• Stormwater Master Plan (2014)
• Sanitary Sewer Inltration & Inow Study (2015)
• Transportation System Plan (2016)
• Water Master Plan (2017)
• Wastewater Master Plan (2018)
• Comprehensive Plan (2018)
76 CrestviewCrossingPUD,receivedAugust23,2018,page3,3JConsulng,Inc.
AUGUST 2019
COMMUNITY VISION
Photo: Linda Shapiro
Resolution No. 2019-3585
Exhibit "B"
Letter from the mayor
Municipal government is chartered to further the desires of the
residents of a town or city. In our fair city, elected officials and
City staff seek to balance and prioritize conflicting demands for
limited funds and often-competing desires. Given this challenging
equation, how do elected officials and staff know what the desires
of their residents truly are? How can these desires be prioritized and
balanced? aNewBERG Community Vision tells us where Newberg
residents hope to see our community in the next 20 years. If you
think of this Community Visioning project as a road map for the
future, the goals and desires are the destination residents seek to
reach.
In these pages you will see that Newberg residents want the
community to preserve livability while retaining and expanding
community engagement, community leadership, cultural assets and
economic development. With these clear and established goals,
choices will be made to achieve the community’s desires. For this
reason, the work done by volunteers and City Staff is essential to the
future of our community.
Without the map provided by this document, we would truly be
sailing without a map, compass or sextant. Heartfelt thanks to all
who participated in this project. Thank you to the small army of
volunteers who made the project possible. Thank you all for sharing
your thoughts, concerns and desires. Together we will reach the
goals that you set forth. Newberg will continue to be a great and
livable place to grow.
Thank you for caring about our home.
Sincerely,
Rick Rogers
Mayor
Letter from the advisory Committee
This document is a culmination of the common values we as the
community of Newberg hold close. We want to thank each of you who
participated in the surveys, workshops, and forums leading to our
shared vision. Your voices helped shape this document.
We want to thank the City Council, both past and present, along with
Mayor Rogers and Mayor Andrews for entrusting the members of the
Advisory Committee with overseeing the creation of Newberg’s vision.
We are grateful to have had this opportunity, and we all learned so
much about our beloved town in the process. It was so awesome to
see the commonalities in values that Newberg residents share, and at
the same time so fascinating to learn the wide array of perspectives.
We did our best to mold this vision in a way that would accommodate
many of the unique values, while placing emphasis on those we all
share.
While the vision has been created, it’s only the beginning of the task
at hand. We encourage you to remain engaged as Newberg works to
make the vision a reality. This is a living document that will inevitably
face edits, revisions, and changes over time. You are essential in
ensuring that we hold true to Newberg’s values.
We again thank you for entrusting us with overseeing the creation of
this vision. We are so proud of our past, and we look forward to our
flourishing future.
Cheers,
The Community Visioning Advisory Committee
IN 2040, NEWBERG IS A GEM OF THE
WILLAMETTE VALLEY – MIRRORING THE
SURROUNDING BUCOLIC LANDSCAPES,
ITS CULTIVATED RELATIONSHIPS,
FLOURISHING CULTURE, THOUGHTFULLY
ENHANCED SENSE OF PLACE, STRONG
LOCAL ECONOMY, AND COLLABORATIVE
LEADERSHIP NOURISH OUR THRIVING
COMMUNITY.
98
8 - Project Introduction
10 - Vision for aNewBERG
11 - Community Engagement
14 - Community Leadership
16 - Cultural Assets
20 - Economic Development
24 - Livability & Development
30 - Implementation Strategy
32 - Project Background
34 - Outreach Efforts
38 - Acknowledgments
ProjeCt introduCtion
aNewBERG the community’s plan for
the next 20 years. The City of Portland
is in the midst of significant and rapid
growth that reverberates throughout
its metro area. Because of Newberg’s
close proximity to Portland, it is also
experiencing changes. This plan is
designed to ensure that, in the midst
of these changes, we keep the aspects
that make Newberg such a unique
and special place, while directing our
transformation to become what we en-
vision for ourselves.
The City of Newberg brought
together residents, business owners,
students, employees and retirees to
visualize our collective future. We
participated at community forums, we
collaborated at workshops and we
shared our thoughts on surveys and
during interviews. Then we combed
through diverse opinions, consolidated
information and brainstormed
potential strategies. In doing so, we’ve
focused on 5 different topic areas
that combine to create our vision for
aNewBERG!
Contents
vision for anewBerG
In 2040, Newberg is a gem of the
Willamette Valley – mirroring the
surrounding bucolic landscapes, its
cultivated relationships, flourishing
culture, thoughtfully enhanced sense
of place, strong local economy, and
collaborative leadership nourish our
thriving community.
Cultural Assets
Economic Development
Community Engagement
Livability & Development
Community Leadership
Parts of the toPiC areas
Topic Vision - what we want the topic area to
look like in our community 20 years from now
Goal - what we will focus on to reach the vision
Strategy - specific objective we will complete to
achieve the goal
Lead Organization - community organization
that will guide the strategy
toPiC areas
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1-5 years 6-10 years 11-20 years
1110
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Create 3 block clubs* in each City
Council District
City Council
2
Create community skills/resource
“e-shed" guides that map skills and/or
tools and materials residents are willing
to share in at least 2 block clubs
City of Newberg
3
Create a community tool library that
includes tools, books, and other
materials
TBD
4
Promote ways to access local social
service resources such as 211, ADRC,
YCCO, Love, INC, etc.
TBD
5
Create an youth relationship building
initiative for disengaged youth
City of Newberg
6 Establish youth mentorship program TBD
GoaL 1: BuiLd suPPort networks Between neiGhBors and within
neiGhBorhoods
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
In Newberg, engagement is a part
of who we are. We give our time,
talents and treasures to strengthen
the community. We blend service into
our jobs and institutions, help each
other, and pride ourselves in donating
and shopping locally. Our authentic
relationships serve as a strong
foundation for a supportive community.
*A neighborhood group that gathers to build relationships and achieve shared goals such
as social gatherings, neighborhood clean-ups etc.)
1312
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Create a service learning program in
educational institutions
Educational
Institutions
2
Create a community-wide garden
program
TBD
GoaL 3: deveLoP a sPirit of serviCe throuGhout the Community
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
Poysdorf,
Austria
One of Newberg’s
Two Sister Cities
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Coordinate quarterly service provider
tabling events
TBD
2
Create a brick and mortar social service
resource/outreach clearinghouse
Providence Newberg
Medical Center
3
Weekly highlight of social service
activities, statistics, and events
(calendar)
TBD
4
Hold quarterly leadership block club
meetings
Block Clubs
GoaL 2: Promote stronG reLationshiPs and networks Between and
amonG individuaLs and soCiaL serviCe orGanizations in the wider
Community
1514
COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP
GoaL 2: deveLoP new Leaders
COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP
Our leaders come from diverse
groups, backgrounds, and sectors
throughout the community and
surrounding region. They foster
creative, two-way communications
and collaborate to ensure
Newberg’s long-term success.
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Identify existing and needed leadership
networks and assets
TBD
2
Increase communication and add
additional assets among local
leadership organizations
City of Newberg
3
Improve the community’s access to
public leaders
City of Newberg
GoaL 1: imProve LeadershiP CoLLaBoration
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Create leadership mentorship
programs that encompass all ages
Young Professionals
of the Yamhill Valley
1716
CULTURAL ASSETS
Newberg residents take pride in all
that our community offers. As a cul-
tural hub, there is a range of acces-
sible artistic events and recreational
activities as well as many local shops
and restaurants you can wander into
with friends.
CULTURAL ASSETS
GoaL 1: inCrease Community PartiCiPation
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Create a bilingual online master
event calendar
Brandon Porter
2
Install electronic reader board(s)
connected to online master calendar
City of Newberg
3
Improve the marketing of Newberg
City of Newberg
4
Explore becoming a Preserve America
Community
City of Newberg
5
Explore establishing a Historic District
for Downtown Newberg and the
surrounding areas
City of Newberg
GoaL 2: imProve CommuniCations of CuLturaL aCtivities and
faCiLities
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Evaluate the content and effective-
ness of Yamhill County Cultural Coa-
lition's cultural inventory
Chehalem Cultural
Center
1918
CULTURAL ASSETS
GoaL 3: exPand events and oPPortunities for aLL
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Develop an event assessment
TBD
2
Create event resource center/list
City of Newberg
3
Create a public art program
City of Newberg
4
Enhance Community Tree Lighting
event
TBD
2120
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Newberg’s economy thrives by
leveraging our geographic amenities
and the capabilities of local
businesses and organizations. We
create family wage jobs through
a strong business and workforce
development program. We retain and
attract businesses to Newberg and
have a vibrant downtown.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 1: enhanCe industriaL deveLoPment CaPaBiLities and
oPPortunities
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Assess the local economy by building
on the four (4) key existing traded sector
industries of Advanced Manufacturing,
Technology, Agriculture and Wood
Products; while targeting Traded Sector
High Tech Manufacturing, General
Manufacturing, Aviation related industry
and Food/Beverage Processing
City of Newberg
2
Retention and expansion of existing
industrial businesses
City of Newberg
3
Recruitment of traded sector
companies
City of Newberg
4
Participate and partner with regional,
state, and federal organizations
City of Newberg
5
Recruitment of traded sector
companies
City of Newberg
6
Increase the supply of industrial and
commercial/retail land
City of Newberg
7
Ensure adequate utilities (water, sewer,
storm draining, electricity, natural gas
and telecommunications) to support
industrial growth
City of Newberg
8
Improve transportation access for
industrial land
City of Newberg
2322
GoaL 3: Create a Premier Business and workforCe deveLoPment
ProGram
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Foster entrepreneurial business
formation
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
2
Maintain the Chehalem Valley
Innovation Accelerator
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
3
Enhance business mix in Downtown
Newberg
Realtors
4
Improve workforce development
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
5
Enhanced Chehalem Valley Chamber
of Commerce resources
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
6
Market employment training
opportunities to employers and
employees
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
7
Create business financing program
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
8
Leverage the region's educational
opportunities to support workforce
development
TBD
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 5: make newBerG / ChehaLem vaLLey a reGionaL, nationaL
& internationaL tourist destination
GoaL 4: ComPLete fundinG, administrative, and orGanizationaL
aCtions for newBerG downtown imProvement PLan
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Create an Urban Renewal District
City of Newberg
2
Create an Economic or Business
Improvement District
City of Newberg
3
Create development funding tools
City of Newberg
4
Complete regulatory improvements
City of Newberg
5
Develop downtown partnership
City of Newberg
6
Create the Downtown Development
Ombudsperson position
Newberg Downtown
Coalition
7
Develop parking management plan
City of Newberg
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Develop a Vision for Newberg as a
tourist destination
City of Newberg
2
Increase and maintain support for
tourism organizations in Newberg
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
3
Increase tourist/visitor counts in New-
berg
Visit Newberg
4
Continue Transient Lodging Tax
Program
Visit Newberg
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 2: enhanCe CommerCiaL deveLoPment CaPaBiLities and
oPPortunities
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Retain existing commercial/retail busi-
nesses in Newberg
Chehalem Valley
Chamber
2
Redevelop vacant and underutilized
commercial/retail sites
City of Newberg
3
Support creation of new retail/
commercial businesses
City of Newberg
2524
LIVABILITY & DEVELOPMENT
Newberg is a well-planned
community where the built
environment blends seamlessly into
surrounding, natural landscapes. Our
small-town character, accessibility
and affordability create a sense of
belonging where individuals, families,
and people of all ages love to live,
work, and play.
LIVABILITY & DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 2: imProve muLti-modaL transPortation
GoaL 1: BLend the BuiLt environment with surroundinG naturaL
LandsCaPe
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Develop a community aesthetic based
on history and natural environment
City of Newberg
2
Explore creating a scenic byway
between Sherwood and McMinnville
City of Newberg
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Complete ADA Spot Improvement
Program projects for Primary Criti-
cal Routes to improve walkability in
accordance with the Newberg Trans-
portation System Plan
City of Newberg
2
Complete bicycle lanes and lane treat-
ments along planned routes estab-
lished by the Newberg Transportation
System Plan
City of Newberg
3
Complete the Chehalem Heritage
Trails Phase 1 Master Plan
Chehalem Park &
Recreation District
4
Explore regional mass transit options
TBD
5
Institutionalize engagement in
Complete Streets practices
City of Newberg
6
Explore creating a separated
multimodal/bike path from Sherwood
to McMinnville
City of Newberg
7
Increase awareness of multi-modal
transportation options
City of Newberg
2726
LIVABILITY & DEVELOPMENT
LIVABILITY & DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 3: imProve housinG affordaBiLity
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Evaluate zoning changes, fees, and
permitting processes for housing
City of Newberg
2
Explore creating incentives to encourage
alternative housing
City of Newberg
3
Increase access to affordable
means of home preservation and
maintenance
City of Newberg
GoaL 4: ComPLete newBerG downtown imProvement PLan
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Implement gateway projects
City of Newberg
2
Implement First Street improvement
projects
City of Newberg
3
Implement Hancock Street Reinvention
Projects
City of Newberg
4
Implement East End/Gateway District
Project
City of Newberg
5
Implement West End/Mill District
Project
City of Newberg
6
Implement Second Street Mixed-use
District Projects
City of Newberg
7
Implement Civic/Cultural Corridor
Projects
City of Newberg
8
Implement Catalyst Development
Projects
City of Newberg
9
Implement North-South Connections
Projects
City of Newberg
11
Create three temporary outdoor social
interactive community spaces within
the downtown area
Newberg Downtown
Coalition
10
Enhance events areas/districts*
City of Newberg
*Strategy is not in the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
2928
LIVABILITY & DEVELOPMENT
GoaL 5: imProve infrastruCture
STRATEGY
LEAD
ORGANIZATION
TIMELINE
SHORT MID LONG
1
Increase the supply of industrial and
commercial/retail land
City of Newberg
2
Ensure adequate utilities (water, sewer,
storm draining, electricity, natural gas
and telecommunications) to support
industrial growth
City of Newberg
3
Improve transportation access for
industrial land
City of Newberg
4
Develop infrastructure communications
plan to keep community informed
about project progress
City of Newberg
3130
imPLementation strateGy
Community visioninG advisory Commission
City Council’s adoption of the Community
Visioning Program is the official beginning of
aNewBERG. The City will continue to provide
the organizational structure to assist community
partners in achieving our goals, by establishing
a permanent Community Visioning Advisory
Commission.
Suggested Commission Members
1 member from a lead organization
from each Topic Area (5 total)
High school or college student
City Council liaison
Suggested Commission Responsibilities
Meet on a quarterly or as necessary
Surveying lead organizations to review
project progress
Draft yearly progress reports
Assist lead and partner organizations
with strategy implementation
Create recommendations to integrate
the Community Visioning Program into
all community activities and develop-
ments
Host an annual aNewBERG Bash to
celebrate successes
visioninG uPdates
In years 5 and 10, the Commission will use community feedback to update
the Goals and Strategies to make sure the Vision continues to meet the needs
and desires of Newberg. In 15 or 20 years, the Commission will complete
another visioning process by engaging in another Community Visioning
Program.
M. L. O’Brien
3332
ProjeCt BaCkGround
On September 18, 2017, Newberg City Council adopted a City Council Goal 12: Complete
community visioning process and communication plan to engage Newberg residents. City
Staff designed the project using the International Association for Public Participation Level
4: Collaborate (Public Participation Goal: to partner with the public in each aspect of the
decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred
solution). The City contracted with the University of Oregon to receive applicants for the
Community Visioning Coordinator position in the Community Development Department to
manage the community visioning project for 11 months. The University’s Institute for Policy
Research and Engagement operates AmeriCorps’ Resource Assistance for Rural Environments
program (RARE), whose purpose is to provide organizations that serve rural communities with
a short-term staff member to complete specific projects. The project began on September 8,
2018 and ended on August 15, 2019. aNewBERG ended with the last community forum,
aNewBERG Bash, during which the finalized Community Vision was revealed to the community
before being sent to City Council for approval.
Results
Draft of Topic
Area Visions
Method
aNewBERG
Kickoff
Survey
Workshop
Phase 1
Understanding
Present Newberg
Results
Community
Profile
Topic Areas
Method
Stakeholder
interviews
Research
Phase 3
Planning for
Newberg’s Future
Results
Final Topic Area
Visions
Draft Topic Area
Action Plans
Method
aNewBERG Town
Hall
Survey
Workshop
Phase 4
Getting Ready for
Newberg’s Future
Results
Final Community
Vision
Final Action Plan
Method
aNewBERG
Community
Conference
Survey
Workshop
Phase 2
Envisioning
Newberg’s Future
Sept-Feb
Feb-Apr
Apr-June
June-Aug
Draw your favorite thing in Newberg
Photo: Catherine Thomas
3534
1261
Total
Survey Responses
145
Total
Event Attendance
outreaCh efforts
City staff, advisory committee
members, volunteers and
community members all played key
roles in our outreach efforts. We
put community forum and survey
flyers in coffee shops, restaurants,
grocery stores and businesses, on
readerboards around town, and
in all of the e-newsletters we could
find. We also made announcements
at civic meetings and community
events, and on social media.
Understanding that not everyone is
always able to get involved as much
as they would like to for many
different reasons, we tried to make
participation as easy as possible.
You could take the survey on paper,
on your computer or even on your
smartphone.
overview
6 Newsletters
9 Social Media and Websites
20 Civic/Business Meeting
Announcements
2 Newspapers
52 Posters and Flyers Locations
7 Tabling Events
4 Readerboards
3 Community Events
Posters & Flyers
A Family Place Relief Nursery
Antonia Crater Elementary School
Avamere Retirement Community
Azalea Gardens Mobile Manor
Chapters Books and Coffee
Chehalem Cultural Center
Chehalem Valley Middle School
Cherry Hill Apartments
City Center Food Mart
Coffee Cat
Coffee Cottage
Critter Cabana
Edwards Elementary School
El Sol Maya
First Street Pub
Fred Meyer
Friendsview Retirement Community
George Fox University Intercultural
Resource Center
Gonzalez Panadería
Grocery Outlet
Haworth Apartments
Jac’s Hometown Deli
Jem 100
Joan Austin Elementary School
Lucky Finds Thrift and Gift
Mabel Rush Elementary School
Mini Market El Tala
Mountainview Middle School
Nap’s Thriftway
Newberg ACE Hardware
Newberg Bakery
Newberg Catalyst High School
Newberg Coin Laundry
Newberg Faith in Action
Newberg FISH
Newberg High School
Newberg Love In the Name of Christ
Newberg Meals on Wheels
Newberg Public Library
Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake Pizza
Portland Community College,
Newberg Center
Pulp & Circumstance
Pregnancy and Counseling Info
Center
Safeway
Social Goods
Starbucks
Vittoria Apartments
Youth Outreach
Zion Lutheran Church
1st Street Laundromat
2nd Street Community Church
tabling events
Camellia Festival
George Fox University
Newberg High School
Chehalem Watershed Symposium
Newberg High School Post-Secondary
Career Fair
Providence Newberg Medical Center
Healthy Aging Series
Public Works Day
3736
Meetings & PrograMs
Brews and Business
Chehalem Valley Chamber of
Commerce Greeters
Deskins Commons/Vittoria
Apartments
Dundee Community Center
Community Meal
Ewing Young Elementary School
Library Program
George Fox University Third Cultural
Kids Club
Mountainview Middle School Parent-
Teachers Meeting
Newberg Area Historical Society
Newberg Christian Church
Community Meal
Newberg Citizenship Class
Newberg City Club
Newberg City Council
Newberg High School Ecology Class
Newberg High School Movimiento
Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán
Newberg High School Student Council
Newberg Kiwanis Club
Newberg Ministerial Association
Newberg Noon Rotary
Newberg Public Library Movie
Afterhours
Newberg Rotary Early Birds
Newberg School District Latino
Parents Meeting
Newberg Service Integration Team
Newberg Veterans Coffee
St Michael’s Episcopal Church
Spanish Mass
St. Peter’s Catholic Church
Community Meal
River St. Church of God Community
Meal
Young Professionals of the Yamhill
Valley
123 Andrés Concert
social Media & eMails
aNewBERG Project Email Subscribers
City of Newberg
Chehalem Property Management
Mexican Folkloric Ballet Group
Newberg Affordable Housing Com-
mission
Newberg Citizen’s Rates Review Com-
mittee
Newberg City Council
Newberg-Dundee Police Department
Newberg en Acción
Newberg Historic Preservation Com-
mission
Newberg Housing Needs Assessment
Ad Hoc Committee
Newberg Old Fashioned Festival
Newberg Parents and Friends of Les-
bians and Gays
Newberg Peace & Justice
Newberg Planning Commission
Newberg Public Library Instagram
Newberg Public Library Board
Newberg Traffic Safety Commission
Newberg 2030 Affordable Housing
Commission
NextDoor
Progressive Yamhill
The BERG
Unidos Bridging Community
YamCo Watch
Young Professionals of the Yamhill
Valley Facebook
readerboards
Chehalem Park & Recreation District
Senior Center
Chehalem Park & Recreation District
Aquatic Center
Lewis Audio Visual
Newberg ACE Hardware
Newberg Public Safety Building
newsletters
A-dec
Chehalem Property Management
Chehalem Valley Chamber of Com-
merce
Newberg Kiwanis Club
Newberg Noon Rotary
Newberg School District e-Friday
Folder
Newberg Service Integration Team
Press releases
Newberg Graphic
News Register
KLYC Radio 1260
3938
Denise Bacon, City Council Liaison
Tiona Cage
Lacey Carroll
Stephanie Findley, City Council Liaison
Sarah Hadley
Miriam Hall
Cyrus Ireland
Patrick Johnson, City Council Liaison
Julie Marshall
Julia Martinez-Plancarte
Suzanne Meenahan
Lynn Montoya-Quinn
Joe Morelock
Brandon Porter, Vice Chair
Kate Gregory-Jennings, Chair
Community visioninG advisory Committee
Anne Delano
Todd Engle
Shelley Hannan
Julie Luedtke
Ruth Stokesbary
Julie Walsh
Lindsay Estep
Loni Parrish
Brandon Porter
Patty MacIntyre
Keshia Owens, Facilitator
Karyn Wells
E.C. Bell
Ajelet Fonseca
Nathan Lawler
Mitzi Martinez
Rosa Olivares, Facilitator
CoMMunity engageMent coMMunity identity coMMunity leadershiP
Korie Buerkle
John Bridges
Joe Hannan
Kennedy Rainey
Britta Stewart, Facilitator
Margaret Talt
Riley Wood
Carr Biggerstaff
Shannon Buckmaster
Brian Casey
Caleb Lippard, Facilitator
Mike Ragsdale
Cindy Riggs
Colum Riley
Sam Rinkes
Abisha Stone
Jack Barnes
Debbra Buerkle
Louise Clements
Shannon Eoff
Philip Higgins
Rob Leslie
Marie Maxwell
Brittany Magallanes
Brett Musick, Facilitator
Gene & Rebecca Piros
Janine Saxton
Corinne Waterbury
cultural assets econoMic develoPMent livability & develoPMent
Community visioninG Community CorPs
sPeCiaL thanks
From helping get the word out, to hosting workshops and
forums, to drafting the documents, it truly takes a community
to raise a vision. Thanks to all those who devoted their time,
talents and treasures to make Newberg even better. It truly
could not have been done without you.
newBerG City CounCiL
Bob Andrews, Mayor (former)
Denise Bacon
Mike Corey
Scott Essin (former)
Stephanie Findley
Elizabeth Curtis Gemeroy
Elise Yarnell Hollamon
Stephen McKinney (former)
Rick Rogers, Mayor
4140
Anna Alsager
Arvin Gambaer
Anthony Hunt
Steven Kristoff
Sylvia Garcia Ruiz
Karen Diaz
City of newBerG staff
DawnKaren Bevill, Administrative Assistant
Korie Buerkle, Assistant Director
Cheryl Caines, Senior Planner
Brian Casey, Police Chief
Jason Dorrell, Information Technologist
Michele Faber, Office Manager
Joseph Fabley, Information Technologist
Karan Frketich, Administrative Assistant
Joe Hannan, City Manager
Jay Harris, PE., Public Works Director
Chris Hege, Information Technologist
Dan Keuler, Senior Accountant
Amanda Lamb, Children’s Librarian
Anna Lee, SHRM-SCP – IPMA-SCP, Human
Resources Director
Keith Leonard, AICP, Associate Planner
Caleb Lippard, Assistant Finance Director
Bobbie Morgan, Planning Secretary
Brett Musick, Senior Engineer
Rosa Olivares, Community Engagement
Specialist
Keshia Owens, Assistant Planner
Ian Rodriguez, Information Technologist
Doug Rux, AICP, Community Development
Director
Sue Ryan, City Recorder
Robin Steele, Paralegal
Greg Stiffler, Information Technologist
Truman Stone, City Attorney
Russ Thomas, Public Works Maintenance
Superintendent
Bayoan Ware, Community Visioning
Coordinator
Matt Zook, Finance Director
Community orGanizations
Chehalem Cultural Center: Sean Andries,
Andrew Keyser
Chehalem Park & Recreation District: Kat
Ricker, Kayla McElligott
Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce:
Patty Musick
George Fox University: Ashley Lippard,
Jenny Elsey, Breana Trejo-Quibelan, Ross
Kohl, Barbi Doran, Grace Tissell, Bryce
Coefield
Newberg Noon Rotary: Omthippiyum
Sukheenai
Newberg Kiwanis: Jack Maxwell III
Newberg High School Movimiento
Estudiantil Chicana/o de Aztlán
Newberg High School Student Council:
Holly Miele
Newberg School District: Rena Kosters,
Peter Siderius, Quentin Comus, Mark
Brown
Newberg Rotary Earlybirds: Kari
Fahrenkopf
Newberg Veterans of Foreign Wars: Louie
Nuno
Jem 100
Young Professionals of the Yamhill Valley:
Kristen Stoller
Youth Outreach: Mark Bartlett
stakehoLder interviews
Sean Andries
Denise Bacon
Brett Baker
C.E. Bell
Lori Bergen
Carr Biggerstaff
Shannon Buckmaster
Tiona Cage
Jessica Cain
Don Clements
Brian Casey
Alvin Elbert
Todd Engle
Shannon Eoff
Ivan Estrada
Auggie Gonzalez
Kate Gregory-Jennings
Leah Griffith
Sarah Hadley
Les Hallman
Miriam Hall
Kristen Horn
Dennie Houle
Cyrus Ireland
Patrick Johnson
Dennis Lewis
Sarah Luna-Grider
Julie Marshall
Julia Martinez Plancarte
Suzanne Meenahan
Chris Murphy
Lynn Montoya Quinn
Joe Morelock
Loni Parrish
Brandon Porter
Mike Ragsdale
Om Thippayaphorn
Sukheenai
Mary Starrett
Britta Stewart
Abisha Stone
Rachel Thomas
April Wassei
Karyn Wells
Ron Wolfe
advertisement interviews
Swirling Mist (Valley) by Linda Shapiro
Newberg, Oregon (Coffee Cat) by M. L.
O’Brien
My House by Catherine Thomas
Untitled (River) by David Nelson
City of Newberg
Photo Credits
Photo: David Nelson
ACTION PLAN
AUGUST 2019
Resolution No.
2019-3585
Exhibit "C"
Action PlAn
tAble of contents
3 - Community Organization List
and Key
7 - Sample Action Plan Page
8 - Community Engagement
16 - Community Leadership
20 - Cultural Assets
26 - Economic Development
42 - Livability & Development
43
CE Community Engagement CA Cultural Assets LD Livability & Development
CL Community Leadership ED Economic Development
ORGANIZATION LIST Key CE CL CA ED LD
1 Ace Hardware, Newberg ACE
P
2 A-dec A-dec
P P
3 Aging and Disability Resource Connection ADRC
P
4 Affordable Housing Commission AHC
P
5 Allison Inn & Spa AIS
6 Anvil Academy Anvil
P
7 ARE Manufacturing ARE
P
8 Avamere Avamere
P
9 Bacon, Denise Bacon
P
10 Big Brothers Big Sisters of America BBBS
P
11 Business Oregon Biz OR
P P
12 Block Clubs Block Clubs
P
13 Black, Adam Black
P
14 Bonneville Power Administration BPA
P
15 Industrial Brokers Brokers
P
16 Newberg, City of City
P P P P P
17 City Club, Newberg City Club
P
18 Community And Shelter Assistance of Oregon CASA
P
19 Chehalem Cultural Center CCC
P P P P P
20 Community Emergency Response Team CERT
P
21 Clackamas Community College CLCC
P
22 CLIMB Center, Portland Community College CLIMB
P
23 Comcast Telecommunications Company Comcast
P
24 Congress, US Congress
P
25 Army Corps of Engineers, US Corps
P
26 (City) Council - City of Newberg Council
P
27 Chehalem Parks & Recreation District CPRD
P P P P P
28 C.S. Lewis Academy CSLA
P P
29 Chahelem Valley Chamber of Commerce CVCC
P P P P P
30 Chehalem Valley Innovation Accelerator CVIA
P P
31 Chemeketa Community College CHCC
P
32 Dayton, City of Dayton
P P
33 Dept. of Land Conservation and Development DLCD
P P
34 Dundee, City of Dundee
P P
35
Economic Development Administration
EDA
P
36
Department of Energy
Energy
P
ORGANIZATION LIST Key CE CL CA ED LD
37
Energy Trust of Oregon
Energy Trust
P
38
Express Employment Professionals
Express
P
39
Federal Highway Administration
FHWA
P
40
Ford Family Foundation
FFF
P P
41
Finance Community
Finance
P
42
FISH Emergency Service, Newberg
FISH
P
43
Frontier Communications
Frontier
P P
44
Friends of Yamhill County
FYC
P P
45
Friendsview Retirement Community
Friendsview
P P
46
George Fox University
GFU
P P P P P
47
Greater Portland Inc.
GPI
P
48
(Newberg) Graphic
Graphic
P P P
49
Habitat for Humanity, Newberg
Habitat
P P
50
Historic Preservation Committee
HPC
P
51
Housing Authority of Yamhill County
HAYC
P P
52
Incite, Inc
Incite
P
53
Innovate Oregon
Innovate OR
P
54
Innovate Yamhill County
Innovate YC
P
55
Japan American Society of Oregon
JASO
P
56
Kiwanis, Newberg
Kiwanis
P P P P
57
KLYC Radio
KLYC
P
58
Lafayette, City of
Lafayette
P P
59
Lutheran Community Services
LCS
P
60
Library, Newberg Public
Library
P P P P
61
Legislature, Oregon State
Legislature
P
62
Love in the Name of Christ, Newberg Area
Love INC
P P
63
Marshall, Julie
Marshall
P
64
Marion County
MC
P
65
McMinnville, City of
McMinnville
P
66
Meals on Wheels
Meals
P
67
McMinnville Economic Development Part.
MEDP
P
68
Newberg Ministerial Association
Ministers
P P
69
Hoover-Minthorn House Museum
Museum
P P
70 Mid-Willamette Valley Council of Governments MWVCOG
P
71 Newberg Area Historical Society NAHS
P P
72 Newberg Cultural District Board NCBD
P P P P
CE Community Engagement CA Cultural Assets LD Livability & Development
CL Community Leadership ED Economic Development
65
ORGANIZATION LIST Key CE CL CA ED LD
73 Newberg Downtown Coalition NDC
P P P P
74 Newberg School District NSD
P P P P P
75 Newberg Urban Management Area Commission NUMAC
P
76 Nuttree Ranch Mobile Estates Nuttree
P
77 Nurturing Newberg Nurture
P
78 North Valley Friends Church NVFC
P
79 Northwest Natural Gas NWN
P P
80 Oregon Business Council OBC
P
81 Oregon Department of Transportation ODOT
P P
82 Oregon Employment Department OED
P
83 Oregon Entrepreneurs Network OEN
P
84 Oregon Department of State Lands ODSL
85 Oregon Business Coucil OBC
P
86 Oregon Housing and Community Services OHCS
P
87 Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership OMEP
P
88 Oregon Main Street Program OMSP
P
89 Oregon Nanoscience & Microtechnologies Inst. ONAMI
P
90 Oregon State Chamber of Commerce OSC
P
91 Oregon Tourism Commission
OTC
P
92 Oregon Translational Research Development Inst. OTRADI
P
93 Oregon Wine Board OWB
P
94 Pollinate Flowers Pollinate
P P
95 Pacific Power Pacific
P
96 Portland Community College, Newberg Center PCC
P P P
97 Portland General Electric PGE
P P
98 Portland Incubator Experiment PIE
P
99 Pacific Northwest Defense Coalition PNDC
P
100 Providence Newberg Medical Center
PNMC
P P
101 Brandon Porter Porter
P P
102 City of Poysdorf, Austria Poysdorf
P
103 Portland & Western Railroad PWRR
P
104 News Register Register
P
105 Newberg Rotary Early Bird/Noon Rotary Rotary
P P P P
106 Regional Solutions RS
P P
107 Small Business Administration SBA
P
108 Small Business Development Center SBDC
P
ORGANIZATION LIST Key CE CL CA ED LD
109 Southeast STEM Center, Portland Com. College SE STEM
P
110 Strategic Economic Development Corporation SEDCOR
P
111 Sherwood, City of Sherwood
P
112 State Historic Preservation Office SHPO
P
113 Social service organizations Services
P P
114 Soroptimist International of Chehalem Valley Soroptimist
P
115 Technology Association of Oregon TAO
P
116 Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue TVFR
P
117 Newberg Thrift Thrift
P
118 Travel Oregon TO
P
119 Traffic Safety Commission TSC
P
120 US Commercial Service USCS
P
121 Unidos Bridging Communities, McMinnville Unidos
P
122 United Way United
P
123 Urban Renewal Area Board URAB
124 Visit McMinnville Visit Mac
P
125 Visit Newberg Visit
P P P
126 Veritas School Veritas
P
127 Washington County WC
P P
128 Wellness Collective Wellness
P
129 WestRock WestRock
P
130 USDA Food and Nutrition Service
WIC
P
131 Wilco Farm Store Wilco
P
132 Woodworking organizations Woodwork
133 Willamette Valley Wineries Association WVWA
P
134 Willamette Workforce Partnership WWP
P
135 Yamhill County YC
P P P P
136 Yamhill Community Action Partnership YCAP
P P P
137 Yamhill County Employer Council YCEC
P
138 Yamhill County Care Organization YCCO
P P
139 Yamhill County Parkway Committee YCPC
P
140 Yamhill County Transit Area YCTA
P
141 Young Professionals of the Yamhill Valley YPros
P P
142 2nd st Community Drop-In Center 2nd St
P
143 1000 Friends of Oregon 1000F
P
CE Community Engagement CA Cultural Assets LD Livability & Development
CL Community Leadership ED Economic Development
CE Community Engagement CA Cultural Assets LD Livability & Development
CL Community Leadership ED Economic Development
KEY
Topic Vision:
What the topic area will look like in 20 years (next page)
Goal: How we will reach the vision
Strategy: Objective to achieve the goal
Action : Specific step to complete the strategy
Lead*: Organization that will guides the strategy
Support*: Organization that provides assistance to the Lead
Short: Short-term goal to be completed in 1-5 years
Mid: Mid-term goal to be completed in 6-10 years
Long: Long-term goal to be completed in 11-20 years
:
Check box (multiple boxes means it is a continual program or how much time it will take to complete)
Details: Extra information or explanation of the Actions
C: Organizations to contact - Ex: Example - N: Notes
Cultural Assets
Goal 1: Increase community participation
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Create a bilingual online master event calendar
1
Identify organization that will host and
maintain calendar
Brandon
Porter
Newberg Graphic, Adam
Black
Sample Action Plan Page
*Lead and Support Organizations are suggested, meaning that they have not yet been asked to participate in any role by the
City
7
Community Engagement Vision
In Newberg, engagement is a part of who we
are. We give our time, talents and treasures to
strengthen the community. We blend service
into our jobs and institutions, help each other,
and pride ourselves in donating and shopping
locally. Our authentic relationships serve as a
strong foundation for a supportive community.
8
9
Community Engagement
Goal 1: Build support networks between neighbors and within
neighborhoods
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Create 3 block clubs* in each City Council District
1 Identify pilot neighborhood (leader(s)
who are willing to do it)
City
City Council
N: Feedback and
refinement
2 Create a “block club” meeting,
during which a “history” document is
created and updated regularly
City
N:
Build in for adjustment
and flexibility
3 Recruit other stakeholders (continual) Block
Clubs
4 Hold monthly meetings with the goal
of completing 2 projects for the year
Block
Clubs
City
Ex: Christmas light
decoration contest, ice
cream social, service day,
tactical urbanism
5 Use documentation and research
to draft a guide on creating a block
club in Newberg
Block
Clubs
6 City holds a “best new block club
competition with wins an activity
prize at next event
City
Block Clubs, relevant
community organizations
N: winning prize library
reading club, tractor at
next outdoor event
*Block Club: neighborhood group that gathers to build relationships and achieve shared goals such as social gatherings,
neighborhood clean-ups etc.
10
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.2:
Create a community skills/resource “e-shed” guide that maps skills, tools, and/or materials residents are willing to
share in at least 2 Block Clubs
1 Conduct a “neighbor needs” survey
to learn resources/skills members
would like access to
Block
Clubs
N: Tool library, donate
used tools to it
2 Conduct an “I can” survey to learn
the resources/skills available (record
contact information)
Block
Clubs
C: Wilco, ACE
3 Create a database (online and
printed) of resources available
Block
Clubs
C: Wilco, ACE
Ex: Next door app,
closed facebook group
Strategy 1.3: Create a community tool library that includes tool, books, and other materials
1 Recruit volunteers to organize the
tool library
TBD
City, Block Clubs
C: Habitat (lead) Wilco,
ACE, Kiwanis, Rotary,
GFU, NSD
2 Secure a central location
CPRD
Anvil, City, Block Clubs,
Woodwork
C: CPRD (lead), Wilco,
ACE
3 Conduct a tool, book, and other
materials donation campaign
TBD
City, Block Clubs, Anvil,
Woodwork
C: Habitat (lead), Wilco,
ACE, CPRD, Habitat,
Friendsview
4 Create a database (online and
printed) of resources available
Library
City, Block Clubs
5 Recruit volunteers to staff the library
for 2 2-hour shifts weekly
Block
Clubs
NSD
C: Love INC, Kiwanis,
Rotary, GFU, NSD,
Friendsview
Ex: Green Lents Tool
Library
11
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.4:
Promote ways to access local social service resources such as 211, ADRC, YCCO, Love, INC, etc.
1 Engage with local service
organizations and governments to
create a comprehensive directory
TBD
NSD, Wellness, City
C: Love INC (lead)
United, PCC, GFU,
YCCO-SIT, CVCC,
N: United Way is 211
organizer
Ex: 211, ADRC, YCCO
Strategy 1.5: Create a relationship building initiative for disengaged youth
1 Create a task force
City
Wellness, NSD
C: CSLA, GFU
N: Consider Catalyst
High School
2 Conduct a gap analysis to determine
reasons for disengagement
Task
Force
3 Implement activities and/or skills
workshops identified by the task
force
Task
Force
Wellness, NSD, City
C: CSLA, GFU
Ex: Ropes course,
scavenger hunts, projects
4 Incentivize participation
Task
Force
Businesses, NSD, City,
Wellness
C: Kiwanis, Rotary, CSLA,
GFU, Soroptimist, CVCC
Ex: prizes
Strategy 1.6: Establish a youth mentorship program
1 Identify mentorship programs and
interested local organizations
TBD
Council, CVIA, City,
Services, Bacon, NSD,
Businesses
C: BBBS, GFU - social
work (lead), Kiwanis,
Rotary, Love INC, CVCC,
YC, YCCO, Bacon
2 Initiate program
TBD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Evaluate and improve program
TBD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
12
Goal 2: Promote strong relationships and networks between and
among individuals and social service organizations in the wider
community
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.1: Coordinate quarterly service provider tabling events
1 Recruit service provider
organizations
TBD Library
C: HAYC (lead), NCDB,
YCCO-SIT, GFU, United
2 Create a task force to coordinate
events
Task
Force
Library
C: HAYC, NCDB, YCCO-
SIT, GFU, United, CPRD
Strategy 2.2: Create a brick and mortar social service resource/outreach clearinghouse
1 Create a task force to research
successful clearinghouses PNMC
PNMC, Services, Tiny Home
Community, YCAP
C: WIC, LCS, 2nd St,
Love INC, YCCO
2 Conduct a feasibility study
PNMC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Create a budget
PNMC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Secure funding
PNMC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
5 Secure location
PNMC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
N: Build or renovate
building
6 All organizations move to new
location/have annex space
PNMC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
Community Engagement
13
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.3: Weekly highlight of social service activities, statistics, and events (calendar)
1 Recruit a lead organization
City
NSD
C: GFU (lead)
2 Create online fill-out form: list of
upcoming events, stats, name,
contact info
TBD
City, YCAP, NSD, Library
C: GFU (lead), Ashley
Lippard, Computer
Science, NHS graphic
design team, CPRD,
YCPH, YCCO-SIT
3 Distribute form to interested parties
TBD
C: GFU (lead)
4 Send info to news outlets and
organizations that manage
electronic readerboards
TBD
C: GFU (lead), Graphic,
Register, CVCC, Meals
5 Review and improve outreach
methods
TBD
C: GFU (lead)
Ex: social media
Strategy 2.4: Hold quarterly leadership block club meetings
1 Select/nominate 1 block club to
organize meetings for the calendar
year
Block
Club(s)
City
C: Nurture
N: recruit at PTAs,
neighborhood picnics,
potlucks, wineries-
funding, party-kid friendly
2 Lead block club hosts inaugural
meeting, during which a hosting
rotation is developed
Block
Club(s)
City,
C: Nurture, FFF
N: Review Yamhill-
Carlton community
events
3 Nominate a block club to organize
meetings during the following year
Block
Club(s)
City
C: Nurture
14
Goal 3: Develop a spirit of service throughout the community
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1:
Create a service learning program in educational institutions
1 Create a Service Learning Ad Hoc
Committee
NSD
YCCO-SIT, City
C: GFU (co-lead), PCC
(co-lead), YCCO
2 Create service learning plan:
requirements, duration, time frame,
allowed projects, documentation,
reflection, evaluation
NSD
City, Love INC, FISH, Thrift,
SIT, YCCO, FYC, City, YC
C: GFU (co-lead), PCC
(co-lead), Love INC,
FISH, Thrift, YCCO-SIT,
FYC, YC, Pollinate
3 Designate service learning
coordinator(s)
NSD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Conduct a semester pilot program
NSD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
N: Consider adding
recognition and
contextualized learning
Ex: Asuza Pacific
University, Maryland
Public Schools
5 Modify service learning plan
NSD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
6 Initiate school/district-wide program
NSD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
Community Engagement
15
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.2: Create a community-wide garden program
1 Create a Community Garden
Committee
TBD
NSD, local farms
C: YCMG (lead), OSU
(lead), Love INC,
Pollinate, Ministers,
YCCO, FISH, Heart to
Heart Farms, Mustard
Seed Farms
2 Map community gardens in
designated areas throughout the city,
including sites of current gardens
and potential new sites
TBD
City, YCAP
C: YCMG (lead), GFU,
FISH, Head Start, NVFC,
Pollinate
3 Create a charter/purpose for the
program
TBD
YCAP
C: Same as previous
4 Create implementation plan:
funding structure, land acquisition
plan for new sites, timeline for build
out, programming
TBD
YCAP
C: YCMG (lead), Love
INC, Ministers, YCCO,
Kiwanis, Rotary, Wilco,
ACE, FISH
5 Complete the implementation of the
plan
TBD
YCAP
C: Same as previous
Community Leadership Vision
Our leaders come from diverse groups,
backgrounds, and sectors throughout the
community and surrounding region. They
foster creative, two-way communications
and collaborate to ensure Newberg’s
long-term success.
16
17
Community Leadership
Goal 1: Leaders collaborate regularly
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Identify existing and needed leadership networks and assets
1 Conduct a leadership mapping
exercise to identify all existing
leadership organizations’ structures,
roles, and skills
TBD
NSD, PNMC, City, Ypros
C: CVCC (lead), GFU,
Veritas, CSLA, PCC,
A-dec, NDC, ARE, YC,
CPRD, Rotary, Kiwanis,
City Club, YCCO, Love
INC, Ministers, Unidos
Strategy 1.2: Increase communication and add additional assets among local leadership organizations
1 Conduct a gap analysis using the
leadership map
City
NSD, A-dec, PNMC, YPros
C: CVCC, GFU, Veritas,
CSLA, PCC, A-dec,
NDC, ARE, YC, CPRD,
Rotary, Kiwanis, City
Club, YCCO, Love INC,
Ministers, Unidos
2 Major community organizations,
districts, government, business, and
education leaders meet at least
semi-annually to share their ongoing
efforts, identify collaboration
opportunities, and problem-solve
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Develop needed and future
leadership networks in missing or
underrepresented sectors in the
community
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
18
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.3: Improve the community’s access to public leaders
1 Conduct meet and greet events in
corresponding districts/areas
City
C: CVCC, GFU, PCC,
KLYC
2 Televise public meetings and create
a way to remotely participate in
meetings
City
NSD, Library
C: CPRD, NCDB, KLYC
N: City youtube channel,
Youtube Live; rent out
video recorder, create
naming standard,
distribute video
3 Divide meeting recordings (i.e video,
audio) into sections according to
topic
City
NSD, Library
4 Update all public agency websites to
improve user experience and access
to staff contact information and
common community inquiries
City
NSD, Library, other public
agencies
C: CPRD
5 Improve access to public meetings
by considering childcare, times of
meetings, bilingual support, ADA
accomodations, place of meeting
City
NSD, Library, other public
agencies
C: CPRD
6 Have bilingual support to increase
diversity of auidence or community
participation
City
NSD, Library, other public
agencies
C: CPRD
19
Goal 2: Develop new leaders
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.1: Create leadership mentorship programs that encompass all ages
1 Identify current leadership programs
Ypros
NSD
C: CVCC, Rotary, GFU,
Veritas, CSLA, FFF, YCAP,
Kiwanis
2 Identify gaps in leadership programs
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Establish partnerships that represent
a diversity of sectors to create a
leadership development framework
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Create program expectations
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
5 Create initial, intermediate, and final
assessment tool for mentors and
participants
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
6 Begin program
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
7 Assess and improve program
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
8 Integrate new leaders into leadership
roles AND positions Ypros
City, CPRD, TVFR, NSD,
Services, Businesses, Library,
Non-profits
C:
CPRD, Kiwanis, Rotary,
CVCC, CCC, NCDB
9 Encourage regular rotation between
leadership groups, teams, boards,
etc.
Ypros
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
Community Leadership
Cultural Assets Vision
Newberg residents take pride in all that
our community offers. As a cultural hub,
there is a range of accessible artistic
events and recreational activities as well as
many local shops and restaurants you can
wander into with friends.
20
21
Cultural Assets
Goal 1: Increase community participation
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Create a bilingual online master event calendar
1 Identify organization that will host
and maintain calendar
Porter
Black
C: YCCC, Graphic,
Layfayette, Dundee,
Dayton, Visit, Visit Mac
Ex: City, NSD, CCC, or
library calendars
2 Hold a meeting with organizations
with existing calendars
Porter
Black
C: Same as previous
3 Identify Spanish translator
Porter
Black
Ex: http://www.tvcreates.
org/
4 Create calendar protocol and
posting procedure
Porter
Black
5 Create funding mechanism
Porter
Graphic, Black
C: Graphic
N: Consider posting
cultural events only
Strategy 1.2: Install electronic readerboard(s) connected to online master calendar
1 Identify public and private locations
City
Library, NSD
C: GFU, Rotary, Kiwanis,
CVCC
2 Secure funding
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
N: CCC willing to help if
funding provided
3 Purchase and install readerboard
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Develop a process for posting
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
22
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.2: ...Continued
5 Coordinate with other organizations
that manage readerboards
City
Library, NSD, business
and institutions with
readerboards
C: Same as previous
N: CCC interested in
learning more
Strategy 1.3: Improve the marketing of Newberg
1 Contact Visit Newberg to determine
feasibility of marketing Newberg
as the Camellia City and its
arts, culture, heritage and tourist
opportunities
City
Museum
C: Visit, CVCC, NAHS,
CPRD, Rotary
2 If feasible, create a marketing plan
TBD
N: Visit (lead)
Strategy 1.4: Explore becoming a Preserve America Community
1 Approve an ad hoc committee
through City Council
City
2 Research the program
City
3 Make a recommendation to City
Council
City
Strategy 1.5: Explore establishing a Historic District for Downtown Newberg and the surrounding areas
1 Present previously accomplished
work on this to Historic Preservation
Commission and Newberg Area
Historical Society
City
C: NDC
2 Integrate Newberg Area Historical
Society historic signage program into
current efforts
City
C: NDC, NAHS
3 Make a recommendation to City
Council
City
C: NDC
23
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.1: Evaluate the content and effectiveness of Yamhill County Cultural Coalition’s cultural inventory
1 Assemble group to evaluate
inventory
CCC
City
C: YCCC, Visit
2 Meet with YCCC
CCC
C: Visit
3 Evaluate if YCCC’s inventory will be
effective for Newberg
CCC
C: YCCC
4 If effective, develop and implement
appropriate strategy
CCC
Goal 3: Expand events and opportunites for all
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1: Develop an event assessment
1 Survey groups who host events to
determine why or why not they are
successful
TBD
City, Library
C: CPRD (lead), CVCC
(lead), Ypros (lead)
2 Identify measurables (elements that
impact a person’s decision to attend
an event and what makes their time
there worthwhile
TBD
Library
C: Same as previous
Ex: pre/during/post-
event-parking, marketing,
outreach, accessbilility
3 Analyze survey data
TBD
C: Same as previous
Cultural Assets
Goal 2: Improve communications of cultural activities and
facilities
24
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1: ...Continued
4 Make recommendations
TBD
C: Same as previous
5 Share with relevant organizations
TBD
C: Same as previous
Strategy 3.2: Create event resource center/list
1 Using survey results, determine what
elements lead people to engage in
an event
City
C: CPRD (lead)
2 Compile list of resources that
will help groups implement these
elements in their events
TBD
3 Determine how to distribute this list
TBD
N: physical location
with staff member to
help, website with list of
important elements, and
additional resources
4 Distribute list/open resource center
TBD
Strategy 3.3: Create a public art program
1 Form an ad hoc committee to
develop a public art policy that
results in more public art
City
2 Develop city policy of grant writing
for public art
City
Ad hoc committee
3 Explore creating a 1% for art
program
City
4 Develop public art program
TBD
Artists
5 Explore urban renewal district for
public art
City
25
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.3: ...Continued
6 Identify locations for art and artistic
activity
TBD
Artists
N: Activities may include
visual art, performing art,
(i.e. theater or music),
and community art events
7 Identify and support artists to
produce art
TBD
Businesses, City
8 Maintain public art
City
Artists
Strategy 3.4: Enhance Community Tree Lighting event
1 Create a procedure to consistently
plan and execute event
TBD
C: NCDB (lead), GFU
2 Use Event Assessment as a guide to
create additional activities at event
TBD
Marshall
C: CPRD (lead)
Economic Development Vision
Newberg’s economy thrives by leveraging
our geographic amenities and the capa-
bilities of local businesses and organiza-
tions. We create family wage jobs through
a strong business and workforce devel-
opment program. We retain and attract
businesses to Newberg and have a vibrant
downtown
26
27
Economic Development
Goal 1: Enhance industrial development capabilities and
opportunities
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Assess the local economy by building on the four (4) key existing traded sector industries of Advanced
Manufacturing, Technology, Agriculture and Wood Products; while targeting Traded Sector High Tech Manufacturing,
General Manufacturing, Aviation related industry and Food/Beverage Processing
1
Identify needs of companies through
a gap analysis
SEDCOR
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, OED, USCS, OMEP,
OBC, PNDC, RS, PGE,
NWN, Frontier, Brokers
C: YC
2
Engage the OED in an analysis of
the traded sector industries and tar-
geted industries in Newberg City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, OED, USCS, OTRA-
DI, ONAMI, OMEP, OBC,
PNDC, RS, PGE, NWN,
Frontier, Brokers
C: YC
3
Conduct an industry cluster analysis
to identify opportunities to encour-
age vertical integration of industries
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, OED, USCS, OMEP,
OBC, PNDC, RS, PGE,
NWN, Frontier, Brokers
C: YC
5
Conduct a supply chain analysis of
the existing traded sector industries
and targeted industries
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, OED, USCS, OMEP,
OBC, PNDC, RS, PGE,
NWN, Frontier, Brokers
C: YC
6
Leverage CVIA to increase the num-
ber of new businesses or entrepre-
neurial businesses here in Newberg
CVIA
CVCC, City, SEDCOR
28
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.2: Retention and expansion of existing industrial businesses
1
Retention visits conducted by City in
coordination with Biz Or, SEDCOR,
and GPI
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
OMEP, CVCC, JASO, RS,
PGE, Brokers
C: PCC
Strategy 1.3: Recruitment of traded sector companies
1 City coordinates recruitment activities
with Biz Or, SEDCOR, and GPI City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, JASO, RS, PGE, Bro-
kers
2 Identify and establish sources of
funding (e.g. grants) to assist in at-
tracting family wage businesses
City
Same as previous
3 Develop a program enabling CVCC
to play role of spokesperson in in-
dustrial business recruitment
City
CVCC
4
Develop relationships and frequent
communications with industrial bro-
kerage community in the greater
Portland area
City
Brokers
5
Recruit food processing (wine) com-
panies and suppliers as part of verti-
cal integration of wine industry
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, JASO, RS, PGE, Bro-
kers, Poysdorf
Strategy 1.4: Participate and partner with regional, state and federal organizations
1
Build relationships with organiza-
tions such as OBC, ONAMI, PNDC,
OTRADI, TAO, and others
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI, RS,
USCS, EDA, MWVCOG,
OBC, ONAMI, PNDC,
OTRADI, TAO
2 Participate in roundtable forums
SEDCOR
29
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.5: Recruitment of traded sector companies
1 Define and identify target audiences
for marketing
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, Brokers
C: Graphic
2 Research and identify Newberg’s
competitive advantages
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI
3 Analyze existing data and develop
strategies for industrial recruitment
marketing material
City
Same as previous
4 Coordinate data gathering and mar-
keting material with SEDCOR, GPI,
MWVCOG, and other entities
CIty
SEDCOR, GPI, MWVCOG
5 Make specific face-to-face presenta-
tions
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, JASO, Brokers
C: Graphic
6 Promote the Newberg Enterprise
Zone program through marketing
material and face-to-face discus-
sions
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI, In-
dustrial Brokers
7 Promote existing financial incentive
programs (local and state), market-
ing material, and face-to-face dis-
cussions
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
MWVCOG
8 Distribute marketing material
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
MWVCOG
Ex: web, social media,
trade shows, and interna-
tional tours
9 Develop community profile to place
on GPI website
City
GPI
Strategy 1.6: Increase the supply of industrial and commercial/retail land
1 See Livability & Development Action
Plan Goal 5.1
30
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.7:
Ensure adequate utilities (water, sewer, storm draining, electricity, natural gas and telecommunications) to support
industrial growth
2 See Livability & Development Action
Plan Goal 5.2
Strategy 1.8: Improve transportation access for industrial land
1 See Livability & Development Action
Plan Goal 5.3
Goal 2: Enhance commercial development capabilities and
opportunities
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.1: Retain existing commercial/retail businesses in Newberg
1 CVCC and NDC survey/interview
existing businesses in downtown to
establish business needs and devel-
op appropriate programs
CVCC
NDC, City, Brokers
2 Enhance the quality of permitting
services for businesses from the City
City
NDC, CVCC
3 Interview businesses exiting Newberg
CVCC
NDC, City, Brokers
Strategy 2.2: Redevelop vacant and underutilized commercial/retail sites
1 Maintain and promote inventory of
available, underutilized, and vacant
retail, commercial and industrial
space on website
City
CVCC, NDC, Brokers, Fi-
nance
2 Work with partners to market sites
City
Same as previous
31
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.2: ...Continued
3 Meet with property owners on devel-
opment and redevelopment oppor-
tunities
City
Same as previous
4 Develop a program for possible
property assemblage
City
5 Enhance existing or create new in-
centive packages
City
CVCC, NDC, Finance
6 Update inventory of vacant and un-
derutilized sites
City
NDC, CVCC, OMSP, Bro-
kers, Finance
Strategy 2.3: Support creation of new retail/commercial businesses
1 Create business inventory identifying
what we have for businesses and
what is missing
CVCC
City, Brokers, Finance, Prop-
erty Owners, NDC
2 Leverage CVIA to increase the num-
ber of new businesses or entrepre-
neurial businesses here in Newberg
CVIA
CVCC, City, SEDCOR
3 Encourage/recruit activity-based
businesses such as youth entertain-
ment
City
Brokers, Finance, Property
Owners, NDC
Ex: arcade, laser tag
4 Establish a low interest loan pro-
gram
City
CVCC, Brokers, Finance,
Property Owners, NDC
5 Identify and establish sources of
funding (e.g. grants) to assist in at-
tracting family wage businesses
City
Biz OR, SEDCOR, GPI,
CVCC, JASO, RS, PGE, Bro-
kers
6 Maintain and publish data on vacant
office, industrial buildings, and land
City
CVCC, Brokers, Finance,
Property Owners, NDC
32
Goal 3: Create a premier business and workforce development
program
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1: Foster entrepreneurial business formation
1 Foster connections between GFU
and PCC and entrepreneurs
CVCC
City, NDC, Finance, CLIMB,
MWVCOG, SBA
C: CPRD, PCC, GFU
2 Turn CVCC into a regional Business
Resource Center
CVCC
3 Establish the Chehalem Valley Entre-
preneurs Network
CVCC
City, NDC, Finance, CLIMB,
MWVCOG, SBA
C: CPRD, PCC, GFU
4 Coordinate with Launch Mid-Valley
SEDCOR
CVCC, City
C: Launch Mid-Valley
5
Coordinate and sponsor an annu-
al regional economic development
summit with partners such as SED-
COR, MEDP, etc.
SEDCOR
MEDP, CVCC
Strategy 3.2:
Maintain the Chehalem Valley Innovation Accelerator
1 Recruit, vet, and select tenants
CVCC
TAO, PIE, technology-driven
wineries, other local and
regional businesses, City
C: GFU, PCC, CPRD
2 Achieve projects-to-products-to-mar-
ket successes
CVCC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Maintain operational funding for the
CVIA
CVCC
Economic Development
33
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.2:
...Continued
4 Promote and market the CVIA
through the Business Resource Cen-
ter, City, CVCC, NDC websites, and
GFU, PIE, and other channels
CVCC
TAO, PIE, NDC, PIE, tech-
nology-driven wineries,
other local and regional
businesses, City
C: GFU, PCC, CPRD
5 Move the accelerator to a permanent
facility
CVCC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
6 Integrate the CVIA with GFU Engi-
neering & Innovation Center and
other local makerspace(s)
CVCC
C: GFU, CPRD
Strategy 3.3: Enhance business mix in Downtown Newberg
1
Plan and implement ongoing mar-
keting and recruitment of businesses
to downtown
Realtors
NDC, CVCC, City, LLP Prop-
erties, Brokers, Finance
Strategy 3.4: Improve workforce development
1 Interview local companies’ manage-
ment teams and conduct surveys to
determine current and future work-
force needs
CVCC
NSD, Incite, OED, Innovate
OR, City, SEDCOR, YCEC,
WWP
C: GFU, PCC, SE STEM,
CLIMB
2 Facilitate region-wide collaboration
between workforce development
stakeholders to expand and extend
services
CVCC
NSD, Incite, OED, Innovate
OR, City
C: GFU, PCC, SE STEM,
CLIMB
N: Building collabora-
tive industry relation-
ships (medical, financial,
bankers, IT, Tech) through
forums
34
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.4: ...Continued
3 Identify and establish sources of
funding to assist in developing local
workforce
CVCC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
N: Extend opportunities
for local students to earn
technical degrees within
the region
4 Create skill development programs
for industries that have workforce
gaps
CVCC
NSD, Incite, OED, Innovate
OR, Innovate YC, City
C: Same as previous
5 Implement skill development pro-
gramming at different educational
levels (i.e. K-12, tech schools, com-
munity colleges, universities) and
professional levels (i.e. businesses,
business associations, other organi-
zations, and government)
CVCC
GFU, PCC, NSD, Incite,
OED, CLIMB, Innovate OR,
City
C: Same as previous
N: Adapt CVCC intern
program with partners
to address workforce
development; CVCC
coordinate with NSD to
implement employability
soft skills curriculum into
NSD; Build and leverage
best practices from orga-
nizations like American
Association of Chamber
Executives
Strategy 3.5: Enhance Chehalem Valley Chamber of Commerce resources
1 Develop mentoring programs from
existing business owners
CVCC
City, NDC, MWVCOG,
Businesses
C: PCC, GFU, CLIMB
2 Coordinate services with the City
CVCC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Apply for funding/grants to expand
operations and/or hire a full-time
employee
CVCC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
35
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.5: ...Continued
4 Integrate goals and purpose with the
CVIA, GFU, PCC, CHCC, and re-
gional and state organizations
CVCC
City, NDC, MWVCOG,
CVIA, Businesses
C: PCC, GFU, CLIMB,
CHCC
5 Expand the facility, operations, and
services as needed
CVCC
City, NDC, MWVCOG,
Businesses
C: PCC, GFU, CLIMB
Strategy 3.6: Market employment training opportunities to employers and employees
1 Track and promote workforce train-
ing programs
CVCC
Incite, OED, Express
C: GFU, PCC, CLCC
Ex: CVCC, ARE, PCC,
CLCC, GFU, A-dec, NSD,
WWP, etc.
2 Fund a full-time employee dedicated
to expansion of workforce develop-
ment programs that serve new and
existing businesses
CVCC
Same as previous
C: GFU, PCC, CLCC
Strategy 3.7: Create business financing program
1 Create and maintain a repository of
business financing alternatives and
connect businesses and entrepre-
neurs with local lending institutions
SEDCOR
City, NDC, MWVCOG, Fi-
nance, SBA, Brokers
2 Promote Yamhill County small and
large grant programs to local busi-
nesses
CVCC
City, NDC, Brokers
3 Establish a regional angel funding
program to support the CVIA as
well as other businesses, promoted
through the CVCC
CVCC
City, NDC, MWVCOG, Fi-
nance, SBA, Brokers
36
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.7: ...Continued
4 Evaluate non-traditional financ-
ing programs such as Kick Starter,
Crowd Supply, etc. Promote them
and provide advisory services as
needed through the CVIA and the
CVCC
CVCC
City, NDC, Brokers
5 Bring the Economic Development
Revolving Loan Fund loan program
currently managed by the MWVCOG
back to Newberg
City
City, MWVCOG
6 Expand Economic Development Re-
volving Loan Fund
City
Finance, Brokers
7 Modify requirements in the Economic
Development Revolving Loan Fund
program to increase accessibility to
small businesses
City
NDC, Finance, SBA, Brokers
Strategy 3.8: Leverage the region’s educational opportunities to support workforce development
1 Recruit quality Community College
resources for the community (Ex:
CHCC)
TBD
City
C: PCC (lead), CHCC
2 Take advantage of regional and
statewide resources to encourage
and enhance Science, Technology
Engineering, and Math (STEM) and
Career Technical Edcucation (CTE)
initiatives in K-12 education
NSD
Innovate OR, Innovate YC
C: GFU
N: Connect the regional
technical groups such as
Innovate YC and cre-
ate new programs as
needed; evaluate if GFU
Graduate program can
be used for a Business
Resource Center
37
Goal 4: Complete funding, administrative, and organizational
actions for Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.1: Create an Urban Renewal District
1 Conduct an Urban Renewal Feasibil-
ity study
City
NDC, CVCC
2 Create an Urban Renewal district
and board
City
3 Create an Urban Renewal Plan and
Report
URAB
NDC, CVCC
4 Form an Urban Renewal District
URAB
NDC, CVCC
Strategy 4.2: Create an Economic or Business Improvement District
1 Contact business and property own-
ers
City
NDC, CVCC, Brokers, Fi-
nance, OMSP
2 Establish an Economic or Business
Improvement District (EID/BID)
City
NDC, CVCC
Strategy 4.3: Create development funding tools
1 Create a Vertical Housing Program
City
NDC
2 Create a Multi-Unit Housing Tax Ex-
emption Program
City
NDC
3 Establish new Market Tax Credits City, De-
veloper
City, NDC
4 Participate in the EB-5 Immigrant
Investor Program
Develop-
er
Economic Development
38
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.3: ...Continued
5 Establish a Construction Excise Tax
City
Strategy 4.4: Complete regulatory improvements
1 Engage property owners
City
2 Update Comprehensive Plan and
policies
City
3 Update Zoning and Development
Code
City
4 Prepare M-5 (craft industrial) design
guidelines
City
Strategy 4.5: Develop downtown partnership
1 Identify and recruit potential Partner-
ship members
City
2 Support and guide the Downtown
Partnership
City
Strategy 4.6: Create the Downtown Development Ombudsperson position
1 Identify funding and host organiza-
tion for position
NDC
City
2 Recruit and hire for the position
NDC
City
Strategy 4.7: Develop parking management plan
1 Establish guiding principles for park-
ing
City
NDC
2 Establish a parking working group
City
NDC
3 Amend code and develop guidelines
for shared parking
City
NDC
4 Simplify on-street stay time allow-
ances
City
NDC
39
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.7: ...Continued
5 Upgrade on-street signage and
striping
City
NDC
6 Create parking brand
City
NDC
7 Upgrade public lots
City
NDC
8 Improve private surface parking
City
NDC
9 Create East/West Gateway Commu-
nication System
City
NDC
10 Add bike parking at strategic loca-
tions
City
NDC
11 Identify off-street shared-use oppor-
tunities
City
NDC
12 Collect parking data
City
13 Conduct business-to-business out-
reach and communication
NDC
City
14 Explore and develop funding options
City
NDC
15 Identify and procure long-term park-
ing assets
City
NDC
40
Goal 5: Make Newberg / Chehalem Valley a regional, national &
international tourist destination
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 5.1: Develop a Vision for Newberg as a tourist destination
1 Implement and refresh Newberg
Strategic Tourism Plan
City
CVCC, NDC
C: Visit, CCC
2 Create and expand a regional, na-
tional, and international marketing
campaign that promotes Newberg
and the valley as a tourist destina-
tion
TBD
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
C: Visit (lead)
N: Support Visit outreach
programs to tourists
Strategy 5.2: Increase and maintain support for tourism organizations in Newberg
1 Continue providing Visitor Center
functions; continue quarterly and
annual reporting per contract with
the City
CVCC
City
2 Increase advertising and public rela-
tions dollars Visit
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
3 Work with major businesses, GFU,
Sportsman Airpark, AIS, local major
wineries, and other national/inter-
national sources of potential visitors
to increase out-of-region destination
traffic
Visit
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
C: GFU, AIS
Economic Development
41
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 5.3: Increase tourist/visitor counts in Newberg
1 Recruit a mid-tier hotel to the valley
City
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
2 Establish annual reporting on tour-
ism activities
Visit
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, NDC, CVCC
3 Conduct a 3-year review and evalu-
ation of programs and progress Visit
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
Strategy 5.4: Continue Transient Lodging Tax Program
1 Develop and put on community
education programs about TLT taxes
and their use
Visit
City, OSC, TO, OWB,
WVWA, Brokers, NDC,
CVCC
N: how TLT tax works, di-
versity of local tourist op-
portunities, how tourism
affects community ameni-
ties, city's role in tourism,
including contracts
2 Coordinate with Visit Newberg on
tourism marketing and promotion
activities
City
CVCC, NDC, Visit
Livability & Development Vision
Newberg is a well-planned community
where the built environment blends
seamlessly into surrounding, natural
landscapes. Our small-town character,
accessibility and affordability create a
sense of belonging where individuals,
families, and people of all ages love to
live, work, and play.
42
43
Goal 1: Blend the built environment with surrounding natural
landscape
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.1: Develop a community aesthetic based on history and natural environment
1 Identify a task force
City
Museum, City, HPC, NDC
C: CPRD, GFU, NAHS,
Pollinate
2 Create a vision document and or-
dinances to ensure that open space
community developments blend with
natural landscape
Task
Force
Museum, City, HPC, NDC
C: Same as previous
N: Exploring becoming a
Tree City
3 Use landscape aesthetic to define
the downtown area
Task
Force
4 Explore creating an Urban Forestry
Program
City
Museum, City, HPC, NDC
C: CPRD, GFU, NAHS,
Pollinate
5 Exlore creating a Heritage Tree Pro-
gram
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
6 Explore funding options for the pres-
ervation of historic homes and archi-
tecture
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
7 Create beautification projects along
pedestrian routes connecting popu-
lar attractions
Task
Force
City, ODOT, property own-
ers
C: Same as previous
Economic Development
44
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 1.2: Explore creating a scenic byway between Sherwood and McMinnville
1
Learn steps to develop a scenic by-
way
City
NSD, Dundee, ODOT,
FHWA, OTC
C: Sherwood, Dayton,
Lafayette, McMinnville
1000F, FYC, CPRD, YC,
WC
2
Contact support partners to develop
a task force
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3
Secure project funding Task
Force
4
Create a Corridor Management Plan Task
Force
Goal 2: Improve multi-modal transportation
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.1: Complete ADA Spot Improvement Program projects for Primary Critical Routes to improve walkability in
accordance with the Newberg Transportation System Plan
1 Prioritize projects in the ADA Spot
Improvement Program
City
ODOT
2 Create implementation plan based
on funding scenario
City
ODOT
3 Secure funding for and implement
ADA Spot Improvement Program
projects
City
ODOT
4 Explore adding pedestrian walkway
at strategic locations along Highway
99W east of downtown Newberg
City
ODOT
Ex: HAWK or RRFB pe-
destrian signals, painted
crosswalks
45
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.2: ...Coontinued
5 Create a city/citizen program to fix/
develop sidewalks
City
NSD, ODOT
C: GFU, NDC, PCC
6 Explore setting appropriate speed
limits that reflect car and pedetrian
volumes
City
ODOT
Strategy 2.2: Complete bicycle lanes and lane treatments along planned routes established by the Newberg Transportation
System Plan
1 Address drainage grates and other
obstacles
City
ODOT
2 Decide on and implement bicycle
boulevard applications
City
ODOT
Ex: pavement markings,
intersection treatments,
traffic calming, traffic
diversion
3 Decide on and implement roadside
treatments
City
ODOT
Ex: Filter strips and
swales
Strategy 2.3: Complete the Chehalem Heritage Trails Phase 1 Master Plan
1 Build planned trails as funding be-
comes available
CPRD
City, property owners,
ODOT
N: Bob and Crystal Rilee
Park, Central Newberg
Trail, Dayton Avenue
Trail, Dundee to River
Trail, Willamette River-
front Trail, Chehalem
Creek Trail, Hess Creek
Corridor Trail, Ha-
worth-Springbrook Trail
Strategy 2.4: Explore regional mass transit options
1 Amend the Comprehensive Plan to
align with the YCTA Plan
City
46
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.4: ...Continued
2 Identify additional potential public
transit routes to surrounding com-
munities
TBD
City, Assisted living, busi-
nesses
C: YCTA (lead), Friends-
view, Avamere
3 Construct bus stop shelters with seat-
ing and route maps at all stops
TBD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Create an advertising program to
advertise on bus stop shelters
TBD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
5 Educate business community on
public transit and provide opportu-
nity to participate in federal public
transit incentive programs
TBD
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
Strategy 2.5: Institutionalize engagement in Complete Streets practices
1 Ensure that all new development has
sidewalks, bike lanes where appro-
priate, drainage, planting strips, and
public transportation marking where
appropriate
City
2 Inventory and confirm locations
where complete streets do not exist
City
TSC
3 Prioritize the list of streets that will
become complete streets
City
TSC
Strategy 2.6: Explore creating a separated multimodal/bike path from Sherwood to McMinnville
1 Create a task force
City
Dundee, ODOT, Property
Owners
C: Lafayette, McMinnville,
Dayton, Lafayette, YC,
WC, CPRD
2 Decide on project feasibility, includ-
ing potential routes
Task
Force
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Secure funding Task
Force
47
Goal 3: Improve housing affordability
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1: Evaluate zoning changes, fees, and permitting processes for housing
1 Evaluate establishing a mandated
maximum lot size standard
City
2 Evaluate establishing minimum den-
sity standards
City
3 Evaluate expanded cluster develop-
ment standards including cottage
housing ordinance
City
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 2.6: ...Continued
4 Construct path Task
Force
Strategy 2.7: Increase awareness of multi-modal transportation options
1 Create a Safe Routes to School pro-
gram
City
ODOT, CVCC, NSD, Nut-
tree
C: CVCC, GFU, Ava-
mere, Friendsview, CPRD
(Senior Center)
2 Create a multi-modal access guide
providing information on how to
access specific destinations with an
emphasis on bicycling, walking and
transit
City
ODOT, NSD, Nuttree
C: CVCC, GFU, Ava-
mere, Friendsview, Visit
3 Tourist safe routes guide
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
4 Explore implementing TravelSmart
programming to encourage environ-
mentally friendly ways to travel
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
48
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.1: ...Continued
4 Evaluate Reduced / Waived Building
Permit fees, Planning fees, or SDCs
City
5 Evaulate simplifying permitting pro-
cess
City
6 Encourage cottage/tiny homes
City
Strategy 3.2: Explore creating incentives to encourage alternative housing
1 Create a task force
City
AHC, OHCS, YCAP, Devel-
opers
C: Habitat, HAYC, CASA
2 Supplement master plan for resi-
dential/mixed-use residential zoning
with innovative, locally-appropriate
ideas
Task
Force
Ex: evaluate expanding
density bonuses; es-
tablish vertical housing
tax abatement district;
establish an affordable
housing tax abatement;
reduced/waived build-
ing permit fee, planning
fees, or SDCs; collabo-
ration /partnerships for
tiny houses/affordable
housing in single family
zones; Create programs
to incentivize ADU de-
velopment; Investigate
expansion of mixed-use
development around the
perimeter of downtown
3 Develop a tax structure to better sup-
port multi-family and higher density
housing development
Task
Force
49
Goal 4: Complete Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.1: Implement gateway projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Develop a Streetscape, Wayfinding,
and Gateway Plan to identify types
and locations for streetscape fea-
tures, wayfinding markers, gateways,
and other components of the pedes-
trian realm
City
NDC, GFU, ODOT, Services
C: GFU
2 Initiate West End and Northwest
Gateway pilot projects in order to
build momentum, interest, and
support for downtown improvement
activities
City
Same as above
C: GFU
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 3.3: Increase access to affordable means of home preservation and maintenance
1 Work with Energy Trust and others to
implement energy audits
and weatherization in buildings
City
HPC, Energy, Pacific Power,
NWN, Energy Trust
2 Compile a list of resources for im-
proving historic homes
including financial resources, materi-
al sources, and contractors
HPC
City
C: CVCC
3 3. Investigate creation of city incen-
tives for historically appropriate
exterior renovations in residential
buildings
TBD
City
C: SHPO (lead or sup-
port), HPC (lead or sup-
port)
50
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.2: Implement First Street improvement projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Resolve policy/analysis issues
City
ODOT
2 Create road diet/design agreement
City
ODOT
Ex: protected bike lanes,
outdoor seating for busi-
nesses, enhanced beauti-
fication
3 Pursue Oregon Freight Advisory
Commision and Oregon Transporta-
tion Commission approvals
ODOT
City, NDC
4 Create design and programming
ODOT
Same as previous
5 Determine project limits/phasing
ODOT
Same as previous
6 Complete design and construction
ODOT
Same as previous
Strategy 4.3: Implement Hancock Street Reinvention Projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Resolve policy/analysis issues
City
ODOT
2 Create road diet/design agreement
City
ODOT
Ex: protected bike lanes,
outdoor seating for busi-
nesses, enhanced beauti-
fication
3 Pursue Oregon Freight Advisory
Commision and Oregon Transporta-
tion Commission approvals
ODOT
City, NDC
4 Create design and programming
ODOT
Same as previous
5 Determine project limits/phasing
ODOT
Same as previous
6 Final design and construction
ODOT
Same as previous
51
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.4: Implement East End/Gateway District Project in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Engage property owners
City
NDC, Property Owners
2 Engage developers
City
Same as previous
3 Create district vision and strategy
City
Same as previous
4 Amend vision with action plan
City
Same as previous
Strategy 4.5: Implement West End/Mill District Project in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Engage property owners
City
NDC, Property Owners
2 Engage developers
City
Same as previous
3 Create district vision and strategy
City
Same as previous
4 Amend vision with action plan
City
Same as previous
Strategy 4.6: Implement Second Street Mixed-use District Projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement
Plan
1 Engage property owners
City
NDC, Property Owners
2 Conduct infill housing demonstration
project
City
Same as previous
3 Complete 2nd Street improvement
design & construction
City
Strategy 4.7: Implement Civic/Cultural Corridor Projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Appoint task force
City
NDC
C: NCDB, CPRD
2 Coordinate activities with other strat-
egies
Task
Force
City
3 Begin fundraising activities Task
Force
City
52
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.7: ...Continued
4 Howard Street festival design and
construction
City
NDC, Property Owners
C: NCDB, CPRD
Strategy 4.8: Implement Catalyst Development Projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Engage Downtown Catalyst Project
Program
City
NDC
2 Conduct Butler property develop-
ment
City
NDC
3 Explore post office re-use
City
NDC
4 Recruit hotel developer
City
Brokers, Property Owners
Strategy 4.9: Implement North-South Connections Projects in accordance with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 North-South refinement study
City
NDC
2 Connectivity demonstration projects
City
NDC
3 Engage in discussions with railroad
owners and railroad users
City
NDC, ODOT, others
4 Trolley feasibility study
City
Same as previous
5 Identify funding
City
Same as previous
6 Project development
City
Same as previous
Strategy 4.11: Create three temporary outdoor social interactive community spaces within the downtown area in accordance
with the Newberg Downtown Improvement Plan
1 Research other successful projects
in comparable communities around
region or state
NDC
Block clubs, City, Nuttree
C: GFU, Avamere,
Friendsview,
2 Create a task force to optimize loca-
tions
NDC
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
53
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 4.10: ...Continued
3 Hold a community ideation event to
determine how to create year-round,
usable outdoor space in downtown
NDC
City
C: CHCC, NCDB
4 Develop supportive zoning such as
rezoning to have commercial space
at street level and professional space
above
City
CVCC, NDC, Brokers, Fi-
nance
5 Recruit volunteers to construct and
deconstruct project
Task
force
Block clubs, City, NDC
C: GFU, Avamere,
Friendsview
6 Review success of project and con-
sider permanence
Task
force
Same as previous
Strategy 4.11: Enhance events areas/districts
1 Create task force to lead coordina-
tion of event areas/districts
City
NDC
C: CPRD, NCDB, CVCC,
CCC
2 Determine existing adequate elec-
trical capabilities of outdoor event
locations
Task
force
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
3 Build covered areas at outdoor event
locations
Task
force
Same as previous
4 Pursue collaborative/shared use of
existing parking
Task
force
Same as previous
5 Explore public parking options to
support local events
Task
force
Same as previous
54
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 5.1: Increase the supply of industrial and commercial/retail land
1 Apply for grant(s) to evaluate ex-
panding the Urban Growth Bound-
ary
City
DLCD, RS, Legislature
2 Update Comprehensive Plan Policies
City
DLCD, Biz OR, Brokers
C: CVCC, FYC, 1000F
3 Complete Buildable Lands Inventory
City
DLCD, Biz OR, NUMAC,
Newberg Community,
ODOT, RS, Dundee, Brokers
C: NDC, CVCC, 1000F,
FYC, YC
4 Evaluate expansion land opportuni-
ties
City
Same as previous
C: Same as previous
5 Conduct land use education cam-
paign to increase citizen support for
industrial land rezoning
City
Newberg Community, Bro-
kers
C: FYC
6 Engage the owners and neighbors of
the targeted property City
DLCD, Biz OR, NUMAC,
Newberg Community, Bro-
kers
C: CVCC
7 Identify needed infrastructure
City
DLCD, Biz OR, NUMAC,
Newberg Community,
ODOT, RS, Legislature, Bro-
kers
C: CVCC, FYC, 1000F,
YC
8 Identify financing for infrastucture
City
Same as previous
C: CVCC, FYC, 1000F
Economic Development
Goal 5: Improve infrastructure
55
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 5.1: ...Continued
9 Expand the Urban Growth Boundary
City
DLCD, Biz OR, NUMAC,
Newberg Community,
NDC, ODOT, RS, Dundee,
Legislature, Brokers
C: CVCC, FYC, YC,
1000F
10 Identify shovel ready sites
City
DLCD, Biz OR, ODOT, RS,
Brokers
C: YC
11 Tell the story of the expansion to
build community support for future
expansions
City
DLCD, Biz OR, NUMAC,
Newberg Community,
NDC, ODOT, RS, Dundee,
Legislature, Brokers
C: CVCC, YC
12 Monitor land absorption to deter-
mine next horizon for Urban Growth
Boundary expansion
City
Same as previous
C: CVCC, FYC, 1000F
Strategy 5.2:
Ensure adequate utilities (water, sewer, storm draining, electricity, natural gas and telecommunications) to support
industrial growth
1 Coordinate with PGE, NWN, Frontier
and Comcast on utility infrastructure
capacities and locations. Inventory
gaps or weaknesses in systems
City
PGE, NWN, Frontier,
Comcast, BPA, Industrial
Brokers
2 Evaluate cogeneration opportunities
with WestRock
City
WestRock, PGE, BPA
3 Update necessary master plans every
10 years
City
PGE, NWN, Frontier,
Comcast, BPA, Industrial
Brokers
Ex: transportation, wa-
ter, sanitary sewer, storm
drainage
4 Enhance accessibility to high-speed
fiber
City
Frontier, Comcast, others
56
Action Plan Lead Support
Timeline
Details
Short Mid Long
Strategy 5.3: Improve transportation access for industrial land
1 Update the Transportation System
Plan to include focus on needed im-
provements to existing/future indus-
trial area access/freight routes
City
ODOT, PWRR, CVCC,
Brokers
C: Y, MC, YCPC
2 Support Parkway Committee to com-
plete the Bypass
City
3 Evaluate rail service capabilities
(freight & commuter)
City
PWRR, ODOT
C: YC
4 Enhance transit service for industrial
businesses
City
Legislature, ODOT, CVCC
C: YC, YCTA
5 Coordinate with ODOT and MC to
transfer jurisdiction of Highway 219
from the McKay Road to Woodburn
to Marion County and ODOT to ac-
quire McKay-Ehlen Road to I-5
City
ODOT
C: MC, YCPC
6 Coordinate with Oregon Department
of Transportation and the Oregon
congressional delegation on trans-
portation funding sources
City
ODOT, Legislature,
Congress, FHWA
C: CVCC, YC, MC, YCPC
Strategy 5.4: Develop infrastructure communications plan to keep community informed about project progress
1 Update City website to make key
information more available and us-
er-friendly
City
Library, NSD
C: GFU
2 Create and display infrastructure
online
City
Library, NSD
C: GFU
N: Transportation, waste
water, ODOT, CERT,
stormwater, etc.
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