For suggested edits or changes to the handbook, please email popmgrad@uoguelph.ca.
Department of Population Medicine
Graduate Student Handbook
July 2019
Page 2 of 41
Table of Contents
1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 6
1.1 Before you arrive ............................................................................................................... 6
1.2 When you arrive ................................................................................................................ 7
2. Graduate Programs in Population Medicine ............................................................................... 8
2.1 Non-clinical programs ....................................................................................................... 8
2.2 Clinical programs .............................................................................................................. 9
3. Application Process .................................................................................................................. 10
3.1 MSc, PhD, and DVSc ...................................................................................................... 10
3.2 MPH & GDIP in Public Health ....................................................................................... 10
4. Program & Course Requirements ............................................................................................. 10
4.1 MSc .................................................................................................................................. 10
4.2 MPH................................................................................................................................. 12
4.3 GDip in Public Health ..................................................................................................... 12
4.4 PhD .................................................................................................................................. 12
4.5 DVSc ............................................................................................................................... 13
4.6 Additional courses ........................................................................................................... 16
5. Program/course registration & deadlines .................................................................................. 17
5.1 Registration ...................................................................................................................... 17
5.2 Adding courses ................................................................................................................ 17
5.3 Dropping courses ............................................................................................................. 18
5.4 Auditing courses .............................................................................................................. 18
5.5 Graduate Settlement ........................................................................................................ 18
5.6 Failing to Register ........................................................................................................... 18
5.7 Schedule of dates ............................................................................................................. 18
6. Advisory Committees ............................................................................................................... 19
6.1 Contributors to the graduate program .............................................................................. 19
6.2 Student: Roles & responsibilities .................................................................................... 19
6.3 Advisor: Roles & responsibilities .................................................................................... 20
6.4 Advisory Committee Members: Roles & responsibilities ............................................... 22
6.5 Advisory Committee Appointment & Graduate Degree Program Form ......................... 23
7. Tracking Student Progress ........................................................................................................ 23
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7.1 Advisory Committee Meetings ........................................................................................ 23
7.2 Graduate Student Progress Reports ................................................................................. 23
8. Transferring programs .............................................................................................................. 24
9. Qualifying Exams ..................................................................................................................... 24
9.1 PhD Qualifying Exam: Epidemiology ............................................................................. 24
9.2 PhD Qualifying Exam: Public Health ............................................................................. 25
9.3 DVSc Qualifying Exam ................................................................................................... 26
10. Thesis Writing & Formatting (thesis-based programs only) .................................................. 27
10.1 Timeline for completion of thesis .................................................................................. 27
10.2 Formatting ..................................................................................................................... 27
11. Applying to graduate............................................................................................................... 27
12. Program Completion: Thesis-based programs ........................................................................ 27
12.1 Arranging your defence (PhD & DVSc) ....................................................................... 27
12.2 Arranging your defence (MSc) ...................................................................................... 28
12.3 Final thesis submission .................................................................................................. 28
12.4 Early Completion Rebate............................................................................................... 29
13. Program Completion: Course work-based programs .............................................................. 29
13.1 MSc, MPH & GDip in Public Health ............................................................................ 29
14. Support Services ..................................................................................................................... 29
14.1 Student Health Services ................................................................................................. 29
14.2 Counselling Services ..................................................................................................... 29
14.3 Student Accessibility Services....................................................................................... 30
14.4 Stress Management & High Performance Clinic .......................................................... 30
14.5 Career Services ......................................................................................................... 30
15. Resources for Graduate Students ............................................................................................ 30
15.1 Library & Learning Commons ...................................................................................... 30
15.2 Graduate Student Learning Initiative (GSLI) ................................................................ 30
15.3 Lynda.com ..................................................................................................................... 30
15.4 Mitacs ............................................................................................................................ 30
15.5 Flexible Desk Space ...................................................................................................... 30
15.6 Wellness Lounge ........................................................................................................... 31
16. Resources for International Students ...................................................................................... 31
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16.1 International Student Advisor ........................................................................................ 31
16.2 International Student Organization ................................................................................ 31
16.3 Visas and Study permits ................................................................................................ 31
16.4 Immigration Advising.................................................................................................... 32
16.5 University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP) ..................................................................... 32
17. Financial Aide, Awards & Scholarships ................................................................................. 32
17.1 Financial Needs Assessment Form ................................................................................ 32
17.2 Graduate Entrance and In-Course Scholarships ............................................................ 32
17.3 OVC In-program Awards .............................................................................................. 33
17.4 Tips for applying for awards & scholarships................................................................. 33
18. Leaves of Absence .................................................................................................................. 33
19. Full-time vs. part-time studies ................................................................................................ 33
19.1 Choosing between part-time & full-time studies ........................................................... 33
19.2 Changing from full-time to part-time ............................................................................ 34
20. Full-time distance fee status.................................................................................................... 34
21. Appeals for Academic Consideration ..................................................................................... 34
22. Conflict Resolution ................................................................................................................. 35
23. Student Services ...................................................................................................................... 35
23.1 Payment of Fees............................................................................................................. 35
23.2 Student ID cards ............................................................................................................ 35
23.3 Student bus passes ......................................................................................................... 35
23.4 Student Health Insurance Plan ....................................................................................... 35
24. Other Useful Contacts & Services .......................................................................................... 36
24.1 Graduate Student Association (GSA) ............................................................................ 36
24.2 Student Financial Services (SFS) .................................................................................. 36
24.3 Student Housing Services .............................................................................................. 36
24.4 Gryphon Athletics.......................................................................................................... 36
24.5 Health & Performance Centre (HPC) ............................................................................ 36
24.6 Computing & Communication Services (CCS) ............................................................. 36
24.7 Environmental Health & Safety (EHS) ......................................................................... 36
24.8 OVMA Membership ...................................................................................................... 36
25. Office of Graduate& Post-doctoral Studies (OGPS) .............................................................. 37
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25.1 Graduate Calendar ......................................................................................................... 37
25.2 Forms & Documents ...................................................................................................... 37
26. Population Medicine Graduate Studies Committee ................................................................ 37
27. OVC Shared Administrative Services .................................................................................... 37
27.1 OVC Graduate Program Services .................................................................................. 37
27.2 Departmental Services/Administrative Support ............................................................ 38
27.3 Human Resource Services ............................................................................................. 38
28. Map and Key Locations .......................................................................................................... 38
29. Important Forms & Due Dates ................................................................................................ 39
Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms & Documents .................................... 41
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1. Introduction
Welcome to the Department of Population Medicine at the Ontario Veterinary College.
Beginning a graduate program is very different from undergraduate studies. You may feel
intimidated by all the new things you need to do, especially if you are new to the University of
Guelph. The purpose of this handbook is to outline your graduate student responsibilities and the
program requirements necessary to complete your graduate degree.
Note: The department will do its best to keep this document as current and consistent as possible
with other posted University of Guelph policies and procedures. However, students should be
aware that university policies and procedures may still change without notice. In the event of a
discrepancy in information between this document and the information provided in the current
Graduate Calendar or by the Office of Graduate & Post-doctoral Studies (OGPS), the Graduate
Calendar and other OGPS and departmental policies will take precedence.
1.1 Before you arrive
1.1.1 Accept your Offer of Admission
Your offer of admission has been issued electronically through WebAdvisor. You need to
submit your official response by logging in to WebAdvisor, and scrolling to the bottom
of your offer letter.
1.1.2 ***Request to have original transcripts sent directly to Office of Graduate &
Post-doctoral Studies (OGPS)***
Refer to the first page of your Offer of Admission for a list of required documents. All
documents must be received by OGPS no later than the 1
st
day of class. You will not
be able to register for F19 until all required documents listed on your Offer of Admission
have been received by OGPS.
1.1.3 Check your University of Guelph email account regularly
After you receive your University of Guelph central log-in account all future
correspondence from the university will be through your University of Guelph email
account.
1.1.4 Complete the SAS New Employee Payroll Form & Direct Deposit Forms (if
applicable)
The GPA will send you payroll and direct deposit forms. Please complete and submit to
the contacts listed. (Course-work based programs are self-funded programs.)
1.1.5 Activate your registration and register for classes
Please see section 5. Program/course registration & deadlines for more information.
1.1.6 Complete your Graduate Settlement
Please see section 5.5 Graduate Settlement for more information.
1.1.7 Read, sign & return your DVSc appointment letter (DVSc program only)
Please see section 4.5 DVSc for more information.
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1.1.8 Contact the College of Veterinarians of Ontario (DVSc program only)
Please see section 4.5 DVSc for more information.
1.1.9 Proof of rabies vaccination or rabies titre (DVSc program only)
Please see section 4.5 DVSc for more information.
1.2 When you arrive
1.2.1 Attend the department orientation
The graduate program orientation will be offered in early September for all Population
Medicine programs.
1.2.2 Submit your radiation dosimeter form to the GPA (DSVc program only)
See section 4.5.2 Clinical Program Requirements for more information and
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Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms & Documents for a copy of the
form.
1.2.3 Student ID card
For more information, please see section 23.2 Student ID cards
1.2.4 Print your Student Health Insurance Card
For more information, please see section 23.4 Student Health Insurance Plan
1.2.5 Pickup keys & desk assignment from the Assistant to the Chair & Faculty
1.2.6 Find your student mailbox
1.2.7 ***International Students***:
Bring a copy of your study permit, SIN number (with expiry date) to the OVC HR
Assistant in Biomedical Sciences Rm 2144.
Bring your visa and study permit to OGPS, University Centre Level 3.
2. Graduate Programs in Population Medicine
2.1 Non-clinical programs
2.1.1 Master of Science Thesis & Course-work based
The department offers a MSc by thesis in the fields of: 1) epidemiology; 2)
theriogenology; and 3) health management, and a MSc by course-work in the field of: 1)
epidemiology.
When reviewing transcripts, the department focuses on the applicant's performance in
undergraduate and graduate-level courses relevant to the applicant's proposed area of
specialization. Students admitted must have an honours or DVM degree (or its
equivalent). In addition, the department considers the applicant's special circumstances
and the referees' comments. Since the core of the MSc by course work program builds on
analytic skills, students entering the program should possess knowledge of basic
statistical methods and their application.
All applicants should submit a one-page statement of research interests and career goals
to assist in the identification of a faculty advisor who has the funding necessary to
support the research. Students may be admitted into the Fall, Winter or Summer
semesters.
2.1.2 Master of Public Health (MPH) & GDip in Public Health
The Master of Public Health (MPH) program is a five-semester professional degree
offering graduate students didactic and experiential training in public health practice,
including areas such as epidemiology, infectious disease, outbreak response, applied
research, and transformation of science into policy. The objective of the MPH program is
to prepare students for careers in public health. This program is of interest to individuals
holding an undergraduate degree in science or applied science seeking a career in public
health, or to public health professionals (including physicians, veterinarians, nurses, and
public health inspectors) wishing to upgrade their skills. The MPH program offers a
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practicum opportunity that is attractive for students looking for a graduate degree that
includes a professional experience; creating a personal competitive advantage in the job
market.
2.1.3 PhD
A PhD program is available in the fields of Epidemiology and Public Health. Admission
into this program is usually granted to holders of a Masters of Science (MSc) or Masters
of Public Health (MPH) degree who have demonstrated superior performance, or to MSc
students who have not completed their thesis but have performed exceptionally well in
courses, shown exceptional aptitude and skill in research, and whose thesis research is
suitable for expansion to the doctoral level. For such direct transfer, a thesis proposal and
strongly supportive letters of reference are required. Infrequently, well qualified Doctor
of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) or honours degree holders may be accepted directly into
the PhD program.
All applicants should submit a one-page statement of research interests and career goals
to assist in the identification of a faculty advisor who has the funding necessary to
support the thesis research. Students may be admitted into the fall, winter or summer
semesters.
2.1.4 Collaborative Specializations
International Development Studies
The Department of Population Medicine participates in the International Development
Studies MSc course work/MPH/PhD collaborative specialization. Those faculty members
whose research and teaching expertise includes aspects of international studies may serve
as advisors for MSc course work/PhD in International Development Studies students.
Please consult the International Development Studies listing for a detailed description of
the collaborative specialization.
Neuroscience
The Department of Population Medicine participates in the Neuroscience MSc/PhD
collaborative specialization. Those faculty members whose research and teaching
expertise includes aspects of neuroscience may serve as advisors for MSc/PhD in
Neuroscience students. Please consult the Neuroscience listing for a detailed description
of the collaborative specialization.
2.2 Clinical programs
Clinical programs at the OVC have additional requirements to those asked from students in non-
clinical programs. In addition to the graduate degree, the Doctor of Veterinary Science (DVSc)
program offers advanced clinical training in a speciality area which allows the student to qualify
and write specialty board examinations. For information about residency/speciality board
examination requirements please see section 2.2.3.
2.2.1 Doctor of Veterinary Science
The Department of Population Medicine participates in the DVSc program with
recognized fields in health management and theriogenology. The normal basis for
admission to DVSc studies as a regular or a provisional student is a DVM or equivalent
degree that would allow the applicant to be eligible for licence to practice veterinary
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medicine in Ontario. The applicant must have achieved high academic standing as set out
in the Admission Requirements in the DVSc program
3. Application Process
3.1 MSc, PhD, and DVSc
Applicants to the MSc (course-work & thesis-based), PhD and DVSc programs must find a
faculty advisor willing to take them on for a graduate program. Once you have found a faculty
advisor you can submit your application to OGPS. Full directions on how to apply can be found
here.
3.2 MPH & GDIP in Public Health
The only entry date into the MPH and Graduate Diploma in Public Health is Fall each year. The
deadline to apply for each fall is February 1. Directions on how to apply can be found here.
4. Program & Course Requirements
4.1 MSc
4.1.1 Thesis-based MSc
The prescribed studies are a minimum of four courses (at least 2.0 course credits)
appropriate to the discipline. Epidemiology I (POPM*6200) is a required course for
students in epidemiology; students in health management and theriogenology must take
either Epidemiology I (POPM*6200) or Applied Clinical Research (POPM*6230). A
minimum of 'B-' average is required in the prescribed studies. The department seminar
course, POPM*6100, is also required but does not count as one of the four courses. A
thesis must be completed and successfully defended.
4.1.2 Course-work & Major Research Project MSc (Epidemiology)
For the MSc in Epidemiology by course work, no fewer than eight courses (at least 4.0
course credits) must be taken, and a research project completed. The courses must be
approved by the departmental graduate studies committee and the Dean of Graduate
Studies. Each student in the program will take three prescribed courses (see below), and
at least four additional courses. The Department Seminar Course (POPM*6100) is also
required but does not count as one of the eight courses. Normally, the prescribed courses
for the MSc in Epidemiology by course work will include:
PRESCRIBED COURSES:
POPM*6200
POPM*6210
[0.50]
[0.50]
Epidemiology I
Epidemiology II
POPM*6250
[1.00]
Project in Epidemiology
ADDITIONAL COURSES
The four courses selected in this category will depend upon the student's background,
specialty, interest and area of research.
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Examples of courses suitable for inclusion in the student's program include:
[0.50]
Epidemiology of Zoonoses
[0.50]
Epidemiology III
[0.50]
Safety of Foods of Animal Origins
[0.50]
Studies in Population Medicine
[0.50]
Topics in Statistics
[0.50]
Environmental Risk Assessment
[0.50]
Swine Health Management *
[0.50]
Dairy Health Management *
Additional courses other than those listed above may be deemed suitable for the student's
program by the Departmental Graduate Program Coordinator after recommendations are
received from the Advisory Committee.
At least three semesters of full-time study will be required for completion of the MSc
program by course work and major research study option; two of these semesters must be
at the University of Guelph. Normally, however, students take 4-5 semesters to complete
the program.
4.2.3 Course-work & Major Research Project MSc (Public Health)
For the MSc by course work and major research paper in the field of Public Health, no
fewer than eight courses (at least 4.0 course credits) will be taken. These must be
approved by the departmental Graduate Program Committee. Each student in the program
will take three core courses (including the Project in Population Medicine course,
POPM*6250, which is equivalent to two courses), and at least four additional courses.
The department seminar course, POPM*6100, is also required but does not count as one
of the eight courses. Normally, the prescribed courses for the MSc in Population
Medicine (Public Health) by course work and major research project will include:
Core Courses
POPM*6200 [0.50] Epidemiology I
POPM*6210 [0.50] Epidemiology II
POPM*6250 [1.00] Project in Population Medicine
Additional Courses
The four courses selected in this category will depend upon the student's background,
specialty, interest and area of research.
Examples of courses suitable for inclusion in the student's program include:
PABI*6500 [0.50] Infectious Diseases and Public Health
POPM*6210 [0.50] Epidemiology II
POPM*6290 [0.50] Epidemiology III
POPM*6510 [0.50] Community Health Promotion
POPM*6540 [0.50] Concepts in Environmental Public Health
POPM*6580 [0.50] Public Health Administration
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POPM*6950 [0.50] Studies in Population Medicine
EDRD*6100 [0.50] Disaster Planning and Management
POPM*6520 [0.50] Introduction to Epidemiological and Statistical Methods
EDRD*6690 [0.50] Program Evaluation
POPM*6600 [0.50] Applied Public Health Research
Additional courses other than those listed above may be deemed suitable for the student's
program by the Departmental Graduate Program Coordinator after recommendations are
received from the Advisory Committee.
At least three semesters of full-time study will be required for completion of the MSc
program by course work and major research paper option; two of these semesters must be
at the University of Guelph. Normally, however, students take 4-5 semesters to complete
the program.
4.2 MPH
The MPH program at the Ontario Veterinary College will typically consist of five consecutive
semesters of full-time study. Full-time students will take three semester-length courses for four
semesters (total 12 courses), the Public Health Capstone course and a 12 to 16-week practicum in
a public health practice setting. Students will begin their program in September. Students can
complete the program in four semesters if they choose by adding one additional elective to their
course load during each of the Fall and Winter first-year and Fall second-year semesters (four
courses per academic semester).
Students will complete at least six (0.50 credit) courses before they begin their practicum
placement. The practicum will provide an opportunity to add function to the knowledge base
achieved during the didactic portion of the program. A poster and public presentation developed
from data gathered during the practicum will illustrate the cumulative experience during the
Public Health Capstone course. This is a residency program as core courses and many electives
are not offered through distance education. Students may enroll part-time while they continue to
work in their public health or regulatory careers. Part-time students will normally take one or two
courses per semester. Please note that since this is a non-thesis based degree, applicants are not
required to obtain an advisor prior to applying. One will be assigned once students have been
admitted into the program. Further details about the program can be found here.
4.3 GDip in Public Health
This stand-alone diploma consists of four courses, including Applied Public Health Research, at
least two other required courses and one elective course. Students may request a transfer from
the Graduate Diploma into the MPH and if accepted, will receive credit for the courses taken.
Students interested in this option must apply to the MPH prior to initiating graduation procedures
from the Graduate Diploma.
4.4 PhD
The major emphasis in the PhD program is on the preparation of an acceptable thesis. There are
no specific course requirements other than the Department Seminar Course (POPM*6100),
which must be completed twice. However, students are expected to have taken Epidemiology I
(POPM*6200) and Epidemiology II (POPM*6210), or their equivalent, in their MSc program. It
is usual for students, in consultation with their advisory committee, to select a suitable program
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of prescribed studies and additional courses. Course selection takes into account the student's
background, research area, career aspirations, and need to prepare for the qualifying
examination.
Courses should normally be completed before the qualifying exam is attempted. The written
component of the examination is followed by an oral component (two to four hours), usually one
week later. Master's holders must complete the qualifying examination by the end of the fifth
semester. Students transferring from their master's program and those who enter the program
directly after their honours or DVM degrees (or their equivalents) must complete the
examination by the end of the seventh semester. In addition, the advisory committee is required
to confirm that the student has demonstrated ability and promise in research. The PhD program is
completed by the successful defence of a thesis.
4.5 DVSc
4.5.1 Degree Program Requirements
Health Management
Candidates must have a DVM or equivalent degree, appropriate clinical experience,
cumulative average of at least a “B”, and be licensed or eligible for licensing to practice
veterinary medicine in Ontario. One position in ruminant health management and one
position in swine health management are available during most academic years, and they
normally start in May or September. It is a three-year program, which will provide
training and experience in applied health management and clinical research.
Approximately one-third of the time will involve clinical training, teaching final year
veterinary students and service duties (including on-call), one-third course work and one-
third research. Service duties in ruminant health management are with the Ruminant
Field Service clinic of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. In swine health management,
clinical experience and advanced academic activities will be appropriate for a candidate
preparing for board certification in Swine Health Management by the American Board of
Veterinary Practitioners. The candidate will be required to complete a substantive thesis
research project, related to an applied aspect of production medicine. The DVSc degree
requirements include successful completion of 2.5 credits of prescribed graduate level
courses, a qualifying examination in the student's discipline area, and a successful
defence of a thesis. A faculty member(s) in the Department of Population Medicine will
supervise each candidate for the Health Management DVSc position.
Theriogenology
The Department of Population Medicine offers the Doctor of Veterinary Science (DVSc)
degree in the field of Theriogenology. Prerequisites include a DVM or equivalent degree,
one or two years of practice experience/internship, cumulative average of at least a “B”,
and eligibility for licensure to practice veterinary medicine in Ontario. The DVSc
program provides rigorous advanced academic preparation in the discipline of
Theriogenology with a view to preparation for Board Certification by the American
College of Theriogenologists. The Theriogenology field at the Ontario Veterinary
College is multi-species, with emphasis placed on a candidate’s specific areas of interest.
The DVSc differs from PhD training by emphasizing the development of both research
and applied clinical skills. It is a three-year program, with approximately one-third of the
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time involving clinical duties within the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, including
assisting in teaching of final year veterinary students. The remainder of effort is directed
towards a substantive thesis research project in Theriogenology and coursework. The
DVSc degree requirements include successful completion of 2.5 credits of prescribed
graduate level courses, a qualifying examination and successful defense of a thesis. A
faculty member(s) in the Department of Population Medicine will supervise each
candidate for the Theriogenology DVSc position.
4.5.2 Clinical Program Requirements
DVSc Appointment Letter (DVSc only)
DVSc candidates accepted into the program will receive a supplemental DVSc
appointment letter outlining additional details concerning the DVSc program that are not
covered by the University of Guelph Offer of Admission letter. When you receive your
DVSc appointment letter, please read it, sign it and return it within three weeks to the
Graduate Program Assistant. Please keep a copy for your own records.
CVO Licensing
The College of Veterinarians of Ontario is the official licensing body for veterinarians.
You must be licensed under a Postgraduate/Resident License or General Licence. Please
contact Lindsay Sproule at the College of Veterinarians of Ontario directly if you have
any questions, telephone 1-800-424-2856 Ext. 2228 or e-mail LSproule@cvo.org. The
Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre (OVC-HSC) will pay your annual
licence. Your appointment is such that there is an expectation that clinical work will
commence immediately. In order for your appointment to be effective on the start date
indicated in this letter, please ensure that you have completed the application process and
submitted the required documentation to the CVO well in advance of your start date
otherwise, your start date will be delayed.
The CVO licensing fees and associated administrative fees must be paid directly to the
CVO. The OVC HSC will reimburse the cost of your licensure, excluding the associated
administrative fees, upon submission of the original receipt to the OVC HSC. All
veterinarians must renew their licenses directly with the CVO. You may ask for
assistance with completing the payment portion of the CVO’s online renewal form by
contacting OVC HSC Administration. Note that in the final 7 months of your program
(January July) the CVO pro-rates the fee for PGR licenses.
If you hold a General license in the final months of your program, OVC HSC will
reimburse the portion of your license fee applicable to the time period of your program,
upon submission of the official CVO receipt. Prior to commencing clinical work you
will be required to participate in a compulsory orientation and safety training program
provided by the OVC HSC. Details will be provided to you upon commencement of
employment.
Health Sciences Centre (HSC) Confidentiality Agreement & SOPs
The advanced clinical portion of the DVSc involves working in the OVC Health Sciences
Centre receiving clinical referral cases in your designated specialty service under the
guidance and direction of a senior faculty clinician. The OVC-HSC aims to provide
unsurpassed patient care, state of the art medical and surgical innovation as well as
superior client communication and service. To this end, the hospital has clearly
Page 15 of 41
documented Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to facilitate consistency that all
require adherence to by all clinicians while on clinical duty. These SOP’s will be
provided to you during your orientation training.
Radiation dosimeter
A dosimeter request form (see
Page 16 of 41
Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms & Documents) must be
completed and returned with your signed appointment letter before the start of your
program. Please send completed forms to the Graduate Program Assistant.
Proof of rabies vaccination or rabies titre
You must be immunized against rabies before commencing clinical work. Please provide
proof of a protective titre (obtained within the last two years) to the Department of
Clinical Studies & Student Health Services 8 weeks prior to your start date. You may
also be required to have your titre checked by Student Health Services when you arrive.
Please contact your doctor or local health department and provide documentation to us as
soon as possible.
4.5.3 Speciality requirements for board examinations
Each residency/speciality college has its own specific eligibility requirements and
deadlines. It is important that you review and discuss the requirements for your speciality
with your program advisor at the beginning of your residency.
Health Management
American Board of Veterinary Practitioners
http://abvp.com/
Theriogenology
American College of Theriogenologists
http://www.theriogenology.org/
4.6 Additional courses
4.6.1 UNIV*7100 Academic Integrity
Academic integrity is a code of ethics for teachers, students, researchers, and writers. It is
fundamental to the University of Guelph’s educational mission and to ensuring the value
of the scholarly work conducted here. This course provides definitions, examples, and
exercises to help graduate students understand the importance of academic integrity and
learn how to avoid academic misconduct in their own work. This course required of all
graduate students has to be completed within 20 days of commencing their graduate
program. You do not need to register for this course. OGPS will add this to your
registration for you.
4.6.2 WHMIS Training
Under the Occupational Health and Safety Act WHMIS training is mandatory for any
person working with or in proximity of hazardous materials. As a service to the
University community, EHS offers for new employees and graduate students, Safety
Orientation and WHMIS training. This course provides basic essentials in health and
safety at U of G; and generic information about WHMIS.
Students may register online through the Department of Environmental Health & Safety.
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4.6.3 Laboratory Safety Training
Within laboratory environments across the University community, extensive research is
conducted and valuable diagnostic and analytical services are provided. All individuals
who work in a laboratory setting need to be familiar with the types of hazards associated
with this environment and must receive appropriate training so they can work safely and
within the confines of all associated legislation.
Students may register online through the Environmental Health & Safety.
4.6.4 Animal Care Short Course
All students who will utilize vertebrate animals in their research and/or will be working
as teaching assistants in a course involving vertebrate animals must complete the Animal
Care Short Course. The program includes online modules and hands-on workshops.
5. Program/course registration & deadlines
5.1 Registration
The registration process is done electronically using WebAdvisor. For detailed instructions on
how to use WebAdvisor please consult the WebAdvisor Tutorial. The WebAdvisor Tutorial
includes instructions that will take you through the two-part process of registering for course
sections. The first part explains how to add course sections to your "Preferred Sections" list. The
second part will explain how to then register for course sections you have added to your
"Preferred Sections" list.
Once you have made your choices, you should get a fairly immediate response to indicate that
your choices have been registered. If you don't, please take careful note of the message(s) that
you do get. If successful, it is recommended that you log out and then log back in and check My
Class Schedule, to be sure that everything is there. Then check Account Summary or
Registration Billing to see your account for the current term when it is available.
Please note that you cannot select courses for audit using WebAdvisor. Please see section 5.4 for
directions on how register to audit a course.
5.2 Adding courses
For each semester that you will be registered, you must choose one of the following:
UNIV*7510*01 (02, 03 or 04) Active Full-time Registration if you were admitted to a
full-time program
or UNIV*7520*01 Active Part-time Registration if you were admitted to a part-time
program
Registering for one of these courses serves only to activate your registration. In addition to this
basic selection you must be registered in at least one other course:
UNIV*7500*01 Research/Writing (for thesis-based programs)
or any real course for which an active section exists
Failure to do this will result in the term simply not appearing on any official transcript of record.
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Check for course availability on WebAdvisor. Follow the links for WebAdvisor for Students and
Search for Classes. Please note that even if you have not had the opportunity to consult with
your department on specific course recommendations, you should still register by selecting
the appropriate UNIV*7510 or *7520 course, in order to activate your registration for the
term.
5.3 Dropping courses
You may drop courses via your Web Advisor account up until the designated drop deadline. The
drop deadline for one semester courses is the 40
th
class day each semester. Please see the
Graduate Calendar for the schedule of dates each semester.
5.4 Auditing courses
With the consent of the student’s Advisory Committee, the course instructor, and the chair of the
department concerned, a student may register for and audit all or part of a course. It is
understood that the student will attend the scheduled lectures but will not participate in any
evaluative activities, write any examination, or receive any grades. Courses audited by the
student shall be noted in the student’s program as “additional courses”, and identified on the
transcript as AUD.
You cannot select courses for audit using Web Advisor. To audit a course you must complete
a manual Course Add/Drop Form. Please write AUDIT next to the course name. Then
obtain the instructor’s signature in the “Instructor’s Consent” box and send your form to the
GPA. The GPA will obtain the GC’s signature and submit your course add to Enrolment
Services for processing.
5.5 Graduate Settlement
Registration for each semester consists of payment in full or completion of the 'Graduate
Settlement' in WebAdvisor and academic registration by the deadline date. A late fee will apply
after the deadline.
The Graduate Settlement can be used only if you are settling your account with one of the
following options:
payroll deduction, with departmental approval
departmental trust funds, with departmental approval
awards (scholarships),
sponsorship (third party invoicing)
For more information about how to complete your Graduate Settlement please contact Student
Financial Services.
5.6 Failing to Register
Graduate students are required to be registered every semester. Failing to register may mean that
you will be withdrawn from the university. In the event of a withdrawal an application for re-
admission would be required.
5.7 Schedule of dates
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For a summary of important semester dates please refer to the Graduate Calendar’s Schedule of
Dates.
6. Advisory Committees
6.1 Contributors to the graduate program
6.1.1 Office of Graduate & Post-doctoral Studies (OGPS)
The Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (OGPS) is dedicated to service
excellence in all of its activities, partnering with departments to: maintain academic
standards and the integrity of graduate programs; attract and admit high quality students
and assist graduate students with the successful completion of their academic studies.
6.1.2 Graduate Coordinator (GC)
The Graduate Coordinator (GC) offers advice and information regarding Population
Medicine graduate programs and OGPS regulations. The GC should be viewed as an
advocate for the student and should be the first person that the student consults should
problems arise that cannot be resolved directly with the advisor and/or advisory
committee.
6.1.3 Graduate Program Assistant (GPA)
The Graduate Program Assistant (GPA) acts as the graduate resource person, providing
advice and guidance on procedures related to Population Medicine graduate programs
and OGPS requirements. The GPA handles program admissions, helps set qualifying
exams and defences, and reviews and submits all paperwork destined to OGPS.
6.2 Student: Roles & responsibilities
From the choice of Advisor, choice of research project and through to degree completion,
graduate students must recognize that they carry the primary responsibility for their success. The
responsibilities assigned to Advisors, Advisory Committees and Departments provide the
framework within which students can achieve success. Students should take full advantage of the
knowledge and advice that the Advisor and Advisory Committee have to offer and make the
effort to keep the lines of communication open. Specifically, each graduate student has a
responsibility to:
Make a commitment to grow intellectually, in part by fulfilling course requirements as
outlined by the Advisory Committee, and to contribute to a field of knowledge by
developing and carrying out a program of research.
Learn about all appropriate deadline dates and regulations associated with registration,
award applications and graduation requirements, as specified in the Graduate Calendar
and/or the Office of Graduate Studies and/or the Department or School.
Recognize that thesis and research project topics must be within the scope of the
appraised and approved graduate program as set out in the program descriptions in the
Graduate Calendar.
Choose, with the approval of the Advisor and Advisory Committee, a topic of research
for which adequate resources are available, including financial and physical resources
and faculty expertise.
Conform to University, Faculty and Program requirements, academic standards, and
guidelines including those related to deadlines, thesis or research project style, course
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requirements, intellectual property, academic misconduct and any relevant safety and/or
workplace regulations.
Produce a thesis or research project which is the student's own work and which meets
the University and Department standards for style and quality, reflecting a capacity for
independent scholarship in the discipline.
Recognize that the Advisor and members of the Advisory Committee have other
educational, research and service obligations which may preclude prompt responses to
the graduate student. It is expected, however, that the approximate time for submitted
written material to be returned with comments is usually two weeks.
Consider and respond to advice and criticisms provided by the Advisor or members of
the Advisory Committee.
Meet or communicate regularly with the Advisor (or designate). The frequency and
timing of meetings will depend on the nature of the research being undertaken and the
stage in the student's program. However, meetings should be of sufficient frequency
that the Advisor can make an adequate assessment of the student's progress each
semester and the student receives timely feedback on what is being done well and
where improvement is needed. The student should also interact with individual
Advisory Committee members and other faculty as appropriate and meet with the
Advisory Committee, normally no less than once per semester, to review progress.
On a regular basis, make available to the Advisor all original research materials,
retaining a copy where appropriate.
Be prepared to approach first the Advisor and then the Graduate Program Coordinator
or Chair with any perceived problems or changes in circumstances that could affect
performance. (If circumstances warrant, students may wish to consider a leave of
absence on compassionate grounds. Information about this may be obtained from the
Office of Graduate Studies or from the departmental Graduate Program Coordinator.)
Submit, with specific reasons, any request for the replacement of an Advisor or member
of the Advisory or Examining Committee to the Departmental Graduate Program
Coordinator should a personal or professional conflict arise. Students should take
immediate steps to change their Advisor or a member of their Advisory Committee in
cases where an appropriate academic relationship cannot be maintained. In most
circumstances, the first step would be to meet with the Graduate Program Coordinator.
Recognize that changing Advisors after program entry may have consequences in terms
of the nature and focus of an appropriate research topic, and may alter funding planned
prior to the change from the initial Advisor as outlined in the Department's letter of
funding.
Recognize that the student may be obliged to satisfy specific performance requirements
that were agreed to at the time of acceptance to the graduate program. These
performance requirements may relate to internal or external funding support that the
student receives.
Recognize that progress will be evaluated every semester by the Advisor and Advisory
Committee, and reported to the Program and in the case of "some concerns" or
"unsatisfactory" performance, to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.
6.3 Advisor: Roles & responsibilities
An Advisor's primary task is to guide and inspire his or her students to reach their scholarly
potential. The Advisor should promote conditions conducive to a student's research and
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intellectual growth, providing appropriate guidance on the progress of the research and the
standards expected. As part of good supervisory practice, an Advisor is expected to:
Facilitate the student's intellectual growth and contribution to a field of knowledge.
Guide the student, with the assistance of the Advisory Committee, in the development of
a program of study.
Assist in the development and execution of a research program or project.
Be reasonably accessible to the student via telephone, electronic communication or in
person for consultation and discussion of the student's academic progress and research
problems. What constitutes "reasonable accessibility" may vary according to discipline,
stage of research, etc. However, an Advisor must be in contact with the student
frequently enough to be able to make an informed judgement on the student's progress
every semester.
Thoroughly examine written material submitted by the student, make constructive
suggestions for improvement, and inform the student of the approximate time it will take
for submitted written material to be returned with comments. Normally, comments
should be returned to the student within two weeks, although circumstances such as
absences from campus or unusually heavy workload may require the Advisor to take
longer than two weeks to review the student's work. Timing of submission and review
should be negotiated between student and Advisor.
Advise the student as to the acceptability of the draft thesis or research project prior to
submission to the Advisory Committee. If the Advisor believes the thesis or research
project is not ready for submission or will not be ready within a particular time, the
Advisor should so indicate with written reasons to the student. In cooperation with the
Chair/Director or GPC, the Advisor may help organize qualifying and final examinations.
Assist the student in learning about all appropriate deadline dates and regulations
associated with thesis review, examination and submission, as specified in the Graduate
Calendar and/or by the OGPS and/or the Department or School.
Give ample notice of extended absences from campus such as research leaves, and make
satisfactory arrangements for student advising when the Advisor is on leave or on
extended absence from campus. Where a faculty member knows prior to the start of the
program that he/she will be on leave for part of a student's program, the student should be
informed at the outset. Depending on the length of absence and the stage of the student's
program, it may be necessary to make arrangements for an interim Advisor.
Make available the research resources necessary for execution of the student's thesis or
major paper research, within the norms appropriate to the discipline and the limits of the
material and human resources of the University.
Advise the student of regulations designed to provide him/her with a safe environment.
These include relevant safety and/or workplace regulations as well as policies designed to
protect individual rights and freedoms.
Alert the student to any personal risks that may be encountered in the course of the
research and provide training, guidance and adequate equipment appropriate for those
risks.
Comply with any commitment of financial support made to the student as part of the
offer of admission. In the event that expected financial support becomes unavailable, the
Advisor will work with the Department and OGPS to ensure support for the student.
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Acknowledge, in accordance with University policies, the contributions of the student in
presentations and in published material, for instance through joint authorship.
Immediately disclose to the Chair/Director any conflict of interest that arises with the
student. Conflicts of interest will arise when there are sexual, romantic, or familial ties
between the Advisor and student or when there are irreconcilable interpersonal conflicts.
In such cases it is expected that the faculty member will withdraw as the student’s
Advisor. Conflicts of interest may also arise when the Advisor or student have a financial
interest in the outcome of a research project. In these cases, the decision as to whether
withdrawal is appropriate should be made in consultation with the Chair/Director.
Chair the Advisory Committee. Responsibilities are to: (1) hold regular Advisory
Committee meetings with the student, normally no less than once per semester; (2)
submit a semester progress report, developed with the Advisory Committee, and signed
by all members of the Advisory Committee and the student, to the Departmental
Graduate Program Committee and to OGPS every semester; (3) formulate a plan of
action with the student and the Advisory Committee to address any problems that have
been identified when the student receives an evaluation of “Some Concerns” or
“Unsatisfactory”.
6.4 Advisory Committee Members: Roles & responsibilities
Members of an Advisory Committee can do much to enhance the academic experience of a
student, allowing the student to take advantage of a range of expertise in the discipline. The
specific responsibilities of an effective Advisory Committee are to:
Encourage the student's intellectual growth to become a competent contributor to a field
of knowledge. In this context, the Advisory Committee must provide constructive
criticism and provocative discussion of the student's ideas as the program develops. The
Committee should ensure that the student is exposed to a wider range of expertise and
ideas than can be provided by the Advisor alone, including directing the student as
appropriate to consult with experts outside the Committee.
Be reasonably accessible to the student for consultation and discussion of the student's
academic progress and research problems.
Attend regular meetings of the Advisory Committee with the student, normally no less
than once per semester.
Develop, with the student's involvement, and formally approve a list of courses that will
constitute the program of study, no later than the middle of the second semester. The
program of study is not considered final until it is also approved by the departmental
Graduate Program Committee and the OGPS. Such approval will not normally be
withheld if the proposed program meets the published program requirements.
In consultation with the Advisor, confirm and approve semester progress reports.
Formulate a plan of action with the student to address any problems that have been
identified when a student receives an evaluation of "Some Concerns" or "Unsatisfactory".
Inform the student of the approximate time it will take for submitted written material to
be returned with comments. If the expected time exceeds the normal two-week period,
for instance because of absence from campus or an unusually heavy workload, the
student and the Advisor should be provided with an estimate of the time required.
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Thoroughly review and comment on drafts of written material, and inform the student
whether or not a research project is complete, or a thesis is ready for submission for the
final examination committee. If additional work is required, feedback to guide the student
in satisfactory completion of the work should be provided.
Immediately disclose to the Advisor and the Chair/Director any conflict of interest that
arises with the student. Conflicts of interest will arise when there are sexual, romantic, or
familial ties between the Advisory Committee member and the student or when there are
irreconcilable interpersonal conflicts. In such cases it is expected that the faculty member
will withdraw from the Advisory Committee. Conflicts of interest may also arise when
the Advisory Committee member or student have a financial interest in the outcome of
the research project. In these cases, the decision as to whether withdrawal is appropriate
should be made in consultation with the Chair/Director and the Advisor.
6.5 Advisory Committee Appointment & Graduate Degree Program Form
6.5.1 Declaration of advisory committee & courses
Students must submit a completed Advisory Committee Appointment & Graduate Degree
Program From by the 20
th
class day of their second semester to the GPA. Failure to
submit this form will result in OGPS blocking their registration for the following
semester. Students may revise their advisory committee or course selection at anytime
during their studies by submitting a revised form to the GPA.
6.5.2 Faculty nominations for external committee members
An advisory committee member may be selected from individuals external to the
University of Guelph. To sit on an advisory committee each member must have faculty
status at the University of Guelph. External individuals may be nominated for Special
Graduate Faculty Status or Associated Graduate Faculty Status as appropriate. Guidelines
for Graduate Faculty Status appointments can be found here.
7. Tracking Student Progress
7.1 Advisory Committee Meetings
Advisory committee meetings are normally held no less than once per semester and are meant to
be an opportunity for graduate students consult to with their committee and to discuss the
student's academic progress and research problems. This is also an ideal time to complete your
Graduate Student Progress Report each semester.
7.2 Graduate Student Progress Reports
At the end of each semester, and no later than the 20th class day of the following semester, the
academic record and progress of each student will be reviewed by the Advisory Committee, and
a Student Progress Report shall be submitted to the Graduate Program Committee for the
program in which the student is enrolled. GryphForms is an electronic system that allows
students to complete and submit their report online.
This report shall be reviewed by the Graduate Program Committee and forwarded to the Office
of Graduate Studies. When the progress of a student is evaluated as “Some Concerns” or
“Unsatisfactory”, a plan of study, prepared by the Advisory Committee in consultation with the
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student and with the signed agreement of the student, shall be appended and submitted with the
progress report.
8. Transferring programs
Students may apply to transfer between degree programs within Population Medicine. For
example, an MSc student may apply to transfer to a DVSc, or a GDip student may apply to
transfer to a MSc program. Students may also apply for study option transfers, such as changing
from a course-work MSc to a thesis-based MSc. Transfers should be initiated no later than the
student’s fourth semester of study. Students may not transfer in their last semester of study.
Students may not transfer programs between departments, regardless of degree type. In order to
move to a program offered by another department a student must follow the regular “Application
for Admission” policies and procedures.
9. Qualifying Exams
9.1 PhD Qualifying Exam: Epidemiology
As early as possible and in no case later than the final semester of the minimum duration
requirement, the student is required to pass an examination to assess his or her knowledge of the
subject area and related fields. The examination ordinarily will be in several parts (written and/or
oral) and should be completed within a two-week period if possible.
The qualifying examination is an examination by the academic unit in which the student is
enrolled (as distinct from an examination by the advisory committee). Upon completing it
satisfactorily, the student is deemed to have met the departmental standards and becomes a
candidate for the PhD degree.
The examining committee, appointed by the chair or director of the academic unit concerned,
consists of five members:
The chair/director of the academic unit (or designate) or the chair of the Graduate
Program Committee, who acts as chair of the examination committee except when this
person is also a member of the advisory committee. In that event, the chair will
designate another member of the regular graduate faculty of the unit to chair the
examination;
Two members, normally of the regular or associated graduate faculty who are not
members of the advisory committee;
Two members of the advisory committee;
Normally, at least one of the qualifying examination committee members must be from
outside the department/discipline in which the student is registered. That person may be
a member of the advisory committee.
The exam will have a written exam component and an oral exam component. The written portion
of the exam will be comprised of four sections: General Epidemiology, Analytical
Epidemiology, Special Topics I and Special Topics II.
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1) Written Exam: Students have a total of 8 hours to write the exam (2 hours per exam
section).
2) Oral Exam: The three-hour oral exam will occur within 1 to 2 weeks of the written exam.
3) Letter from the Student’s Advisory Committee: Consideration is to be given not only to
the student's knowledge of the subject matter and ability to integrate the material derived
from his or her studies, but also to the student's ability and promise in research. The
examining committee will receive from the advisory committee a written evaluation of
the quality of the student's research performance to date and of the student's potential as a
researcher. The examining committee will determine the relative importance to be given
to these two major components of the qualifying examination.
To initiate the booking of their PhD Qualifying Exam, PhD candidates (with guidance of their
advisor) should complete the Qualifying Exam Request Form (see Appendix A) and submit it to
the Graduate Program Assistant. The Exam Request Form and a copy of the students reading list
must be received by the Graduate Program Assistant a minimum of 2.5 months before the
desired exam date. Each PhD candidate must also receive their reading list from their examiners
no less than 6 weeks before the written exam date.
9.2 PhD Qualifying Exam: Public Health
PhD students are required to pass an examination to assess his or her knowledge of the subject
area and related fields. Upon successful completion of the exam, the “PhD student” becomes a
“PhD Candidate.” The purpose of the qualifying examination is to determine the student's
competence in their proposed area of research within the field of public health and his or her
intellectual preparedness to undertake research for the PhD thesis.
The examining committee, appointed by the chair or director of the academic unit concerned,
consists of five members:
The chair/director of the academic unit (or designate) or the chair of the Graduate
Program Committee, who acts as chair of the examination committee except when this
person is also a member of the advisory committee. In that event, the chair will
designate another member of the regular graduate faculty of the unit to chair the
examination;
Two members, normally of the regular or associated graduate faculty who are not
members of the advisory committee;
Two members of the advisory committee;
Normally, at least one of the qualifying examination committee members must be from
outside the department/discipline in which the student is registered. That person may be
a member of the advisory committee.
The exam will have a written component and an oral component. The exam will be comprised
of a written literature review and a written thesis research proposal. These should be sent to the
GPA two weeks before the oral exam date for distribution to the exam committee.
1) Written Thesis Research Proposal: The student must prepare a written proposal outlining
their proposed thesis research. The proposal must be written following the guidelines for CIHR’s
Project Scheme funding or an equivalent peer-reviewed research competition (e.g. IDRC’s
Doctoral Research Awards); the instructions from the granting agency must be submitted to the
examination committee with the proposal.
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2) Oral Presentation and Defense: The two-hour oral presentation and defense will occur
approximately two weeks after the written literature review and proposal are submitted to the
examination committee. The student will present the systematic review of the literature and
proposal to the examination committee (0.5 hours), which is followed by in-depth questioning (1.5
hours). Students should be aware that all topics mentioned in the systematic review of the literature
and proposals are open to in-depth questioning.
3) Letter from the Student’s Advisory Committee: Consideration is to be given not only to the
student's knowledge of the subject matter and ability to integrate the material derived from his or
her studies, but also to the student's ability and promise in research. The examining committee will
receive from the advisory committee a written evaluation of the quality of the student's research
performance to date and of the student's potential as a researcher. The examining committee will
determine the relative importance to be given to these two major components of the qualifying
examination.
To initiate the booking of their PhD Qualifying Exam PhD candidates (with guidance of their
advisor) should complete the Qualifying Exam Request Form (see Appendix A) and submit it to
the Graduate Program Assistant.
9.3 DVSc Qualifying Exam
Prior to the end of the sixth semester, the student is required to pass a qualifying examination to
assess his or her overall ability in the selected area of specialization. The examination will be in
two parts (one written, one oral), and will normally be completed within a two-week period.
Upon completing it satisfactorily, the student is deemed to have met the departmental standards
and becomes a candidate for the DVSc degree.
The qualifying examination is an examination by the academic unit in which the student is
enrolled and the examination committee is appointed by the departmental Graduate Program
Coordinator. The examination is conducted by a committee consisting of five members, as
follows:
The departmental graduate program coordinator of the program committee, who acts as
chair of the examination committee;
Two members, normally of the regular or associated graduate faculty who are not
members of the advisory committee, at least one of whom must be a member of the
department in which the student is registered;
Two members of the advisory committee.
Additional information can be found in the Graduate Calendar under Degree Regulations- Doctor
of Veterinary Science- Qualifying Exam.
To initiate the booking of their DVSc Qualifying Exam DVSc candidates (with guidance of their
advisor) should complete the DVSc Qualifying Exam Request Form (see
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Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms & Documentsand submit it to the
Graduate Program Assistant. The Exam Request Form and a copy of the students reading list
must be received by the Graduate Program Assistant a minimum of 3 months before the desired
exam date. Each DVSc candidate must also receive their reading list from their examiners 3
months before the written exam date.
10. Thesis Writing & Formatting (thesis-based programs only)
10.1 Timeline for completion of thesis
Advisors and students should plan ahead and choose a preferred window of time to hold the
defence. From here students should work backwards to determine their timeline to completion.
The student’s thesis must be deemed ready by their Advisory Committee a minimum of four
weeks before the desired defence date. Students should have already made any suggested edits
from their advisory committee before the thesis is sent to the exam committee.
10.2 Formatting
OGPS has a complete guide to preparing your thesis that includes style, organization, formatting,
and naming conventions. It is important to read through this guide carefully and be sure that your
thesis meets all the formatting requirements. Incorrectly formatted documents submitted to the
atrium will not be accepted.
11. Applying to graduate
Every candidate for an advanced degree is responsible for reviewing the Graduation Application
Procedures and submitting an application to graduate through the “WebAdvisor Application for
Graduation”. Each semester, an email regarding the WebAdvisor Application for Graduation will
be sent to graduate students in semester 2 and above, requesting them to apply to graduate, if
appropriate.
12. Program Completion: Thesis-based programs
12.1 Arranging your defence (PhD & DVSc)
It is the responsibility of the advisor to begin making arrangements for the doctoral thesis
defence at least eight weeks prior to the anticipated date of the defence.
At least eight (8) weeks prior (earlier is better) to the anticipated date of the final
examination the Advisory Committee should:
o Identify three potential external examiners
o Contact the potential external examiners to verify their availability
Nominate to the GC, the names of the three potential external examiners by submitting an
External Examiner Nomination Form to the GPA (see
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Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms & DocumentsOnce the thesis
has been deemed ready by the Advisory Committee, the advisor should:
o Assemble the examination committee according to the Graduate Calendar
regulations
o Email the Graduate Program Assistant (GPA) the list of exam committee
members and the preferred dates for the defence
o The GPA will book rooms when the date and time are confirmed
o The GPA will find an exam chair
At least four (4) weeks before the defence date the student should:
o Bring the completed Examination Request Form to the GPA
o Send a copy of their thesis to the GPA (for distribution to the exam committee)
o Send a short biography to the GPA for the defence announcement
The only c.v. information which should be listed in the announcement will
be: place of birth, previous degrees and Universities, awards during
graduate study, and a list of publications (published or accepted for
publication). Total c.v. information should not exceed 10-12 lines in the
announcement.
12.2 Arranging your defence (MSc)
It is the responsibility of the advisor to begin making arrangements for the master's thesis
defence at least eight (8) weeks prior to the anticipated date of the defence.
At least eight (8) weeks prior to the anticipated date of the final examination:
o The advisory committee agrees on a timetable for completion of the thesis and
defence
o The advisor informs the GPA of the timetable
At least four (4) weeks prior to the anticipated date of the final examination
o Select the Examination Committee
At least two (2) weeks prior to the anticipated date of the final examination:
o Submit a completed Exam Request Form to the GPA
o Submit the thesis to the GPA for distribution to the exam committee
12.3 Final thesis submission
As of July 2011, the University of Guelph requires the electronic submission of all theses.
Electronic theses are commonly referred to as ETDs. ETD processing is easier, quicker, cheaper,
and more environmental for the student, the Office of Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies, the
University of Guelph MacLaughlin Library and for the National Library and Archives Canada.
Theses are deposited and accessible in the University’s institutional repository known as the
Atrium.
After you defence you may need to complete some additional edits to your thesis. Your advisor
must review you final thesis version to determine if the thesis is ready for submission to the
atrium. When the thesis is ready the advisor must email the GPA. The GPA will then
release the necessary departmental paperwork to OGPS. This must be done before the
student submits the thesis to the atrium.
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In addition to submitting their thesis to the atrium students must also submit the following forms
to OGPS:
Thesis Non-Exclusive License
Thesis Submission Control Sheet
Request to Restrict Circulation of Thesis (optional)
Directions on how to submit your thesis to the atrium and links to download the required forms
can be found here.
12.4 Early Completion Rebate
In certain circumstances, those students who complete the requirements for their degree
programs early in a given semester may apply for a partial rebate of tuition fees paid for that
semester. The rebate is pro-rated according to the date of final completion. Students must submit
an Early Completion Rebate Application Form in order to receive a rebate.
13. Program Completion: Course work-based programs
13.1 MSc, MPH & GDip in Public Health
Each semester Enrolment Services will send out a request for all students eligible to graduate to
apply to graduate via their Web Advisor account. Once you have completed all the program
requirements, you should apply to graduate for the next available convocation date.
14. Support Services
14.1 Student Health Services
Our mission is to provide comprehensive health promotion, disease prevention and primary
medical care to full-time and part-time, undergraduate and graduate students and their families,
as well as visitors to the campus. We contribute to the success of the University of Guelph's
academic mission by meeting the health education and clinical care needs of its students.
Health Services offers a number of services from Monday to Friday, including Nursing Services
and Physician Services. Current hours of operation can be found on their website. Walk-in
services are available September-April. For more information about what we offer, navigate
through this website or call the reception at 519-824-4120 x52131.
14.2 Counselling Services
Counselling Services offers individual counselling sessions to help support students as they work
through the personal challenges that impair their ability to succeed at school and in other areas of
their lives.
Additionally, counselling services offers walk-in and after hours resources. Please call Ext.
53244 to schedule an appointment with a Therapist/Counsellor or drop by the front desk on the
third floor of the University Centre.
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Appointments can also be made with the OVC Counsellor Bruno Mancini
(bmancini@uoguelph.ca).
14.3 Student Accessibility Services
Accessibility Services helps students who experience disabilities with full and equitable
participation in academic life. We strive towards creating a barrier-free environment where all
students can achieve their potential.
14.4 Stress Management & High Performance Clinic
The Stress Management & High Performance clinic run by Kathy Somers offers sessions on
stress management and more for a nominal fee for Guelph Students. More information on current
group offerings and individual sessions can be found at Kathy Somers' website.
14.5 Career Services
Career Services offers students individual sessions with one of our professional Career Advisors.
They provide students with job search skills, employment opportunities, assist students to discern
career or further education planning, and provide experiential learning such as resume building,
writing cover letters and mock interviews.
Career Advising appointments are free for registered students and are catered to the individual
student’s needs. Appointments with Career Advisors can be made in advance or by visiting the
Career Services Office ( Building #54, North of Rozanski Hall) during Drop In Hours.
15. Resources for Graduate Students
15.1 Library & Learning Commons
The Library & Learning Commons is a bustling, dynamic space. Our services, resources, and
spaces are all designed to support student learning; support faculty research and teaching; and
foster connections with the community.
15.2 Graduate Student Learning Initiative (GSLI)
The Graduate Student Learning Initiative (GSLI) offers a range of workshops specifically for
graduate students. We encourage students to review free workshops and short non-credit courses.
15.3 Lynda.com
Lynda.com offers thousands of video modules covering the most popular business and creative
applications, as well as topics including software development, website design, animation, soft-
skill training, audio and music, and photography. Access is free for all Guelph faculty, staff and
grad students. Visit the Lynda information page for more information.
15.4 Mitacs
Mitacs builds partnerships between academia, industry, and the world to create a more
innovative Canada.
15.5 Flexible Desk Space
Quiet Individual Study Space - Identified by a blue sign.
Room 2505, Stewart Building 4 spaces
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Room 102, Population Medicine, Building 174 4 spaces
Casual Individual and Group Study Space.
Wellness Lounge, Room 2514, Stewart Building 32 spaces
Computer Lab, Room 2500, Stewart Building 60 spaces (the room is available except when a
scheduled class is meeting).
Bookable space in McLaughlin Library:
Daily and semester-long bookings -
https://www.lib.uoguelph.ca/about/about-library/study-space
15.6 Wellness Lounge
The Pop Med Wellness Lounge (SB 2514) is available for use by all Pop Med students, faculty
and staff. The lounge includes kitchen facilities, seating, puzzles, books, games, and a ping pong
table for use by anyone with in the lounge. Users are asked not remove shared items from the
lounge.
16. Resources for International Students
16.1 International Student Advisor
The international student advisor, Megan Sager (msager@uoguelph.ca), is available to provide
guidance to international students. If you have any questions about University of Guelph student
resources, budgets and finances, UHIP, upcoming workshops and events, or how to connect with
other international students, Megan can help. If you need advice on transitioning to the
University of Guelph and Canada, or want to talk about any other issues or concerns you may
face, you can drop in to say hello or make an appointment with Megan. Her office is on the third
floor of the University Centre.
16.2 International Student Organization
The ISO aims to act as the crossroads for international students to learn about university life on
campus and of the various resources available to them. They strive to provide the social and
transitional support that all international students need during their time here at the University of
Guelph.
16.3 Visas and Study permits
Due to immigration law in Canada, the University of Guelph can't provide advice about visa
requirements or applications. However, helpful links to the Citizenship & Immigration Canada
website information are provided below.
Study Permit
You can find out if you need a Study Permit for Canada here.
You can find out how to apply for a Study Permit here.
Temporary Resident Visa
You can find out if you need a Temporary Resident Visa for Canada here.
You can find out how to apply for a Temporary Resident Visa here.
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16.4 Immigration Advising
The University of Guelph has contracted Canadian House Consulting Inc. to provide support on
campus two days per week. The support is limited to providing clarification on study permit and
visa regulations for University of Guelph students. Specifically:
Undergraduate and graduate students (pre-arrival and in-course students)
o Includes accompanying spousal work permit and study permits for children
attending school in Ontario for an admitted student bringing their family at the
start of their studies; or family members visiting for graduation; or Co-op work
permits for students enrolled in a Co-op academic program
o Includes advice on the immigration repercussions of moving from full-time to
part-time or taking a leave of absence because of wellness concerns (i.e., physical
injury, maternity leave, mental health)
Exchange students enrolled for one or more semesters through the Centre for
International Programs
English Language Program students through Open Learning and Educational support
16.5 University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP)
The University Health Insurance Plan (UHIP) is a mandatory insurance to pay the cost of the
hospital and medical services that international students may need during their stay in Canada
while registered at the University. The fee is both compulsory and charged as part of your tuition
and fees which can be viewed on WebAdvisor. All international students (paying international
fees) will automatically be enrolled in UHIP (single coverage). It is the student's responsibility to
complete the UHIP application and submit it to Student Financial Services (3rd floor of the UC)
when the student has dependents in Canada that should be added to their plan. An additional
premium is charged.
17. Financial Aide, Awards & Scholarships
17.1 Financial Needs Assessment Form
Students who apply and demonstrate a need for financial assistance may eligible for financial
need based bursaries and awards. To apply for financial need students must complete a Financial
Needs Assessment Form and submit it to Student Financial Services by the posted deadlines.
Canadian citizens, permanent residents, and international students may apply for
Financial Need.
It is important to ensure all sections of the form are completed. Incomplete NAF forms will not
be assessed. Students may bring their NAF from to the Administrative Manager, DVM and
Clinical Program and Operations Population Medicine, for completion of the departmental
section of the form.
17.2 Graduate Entrance and In-Course Scholarships
Most entrance awards are offered to students upon admission to one of our graduate programs
and are based on the student's admission application.
Graduate scholarships are available to students registered in full-time studies unless the terms
and condition of the scholarship specifically state part-time students are eligible.
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Students seeking admission should utilize the graduate award online search to see a listing
University of Guelph approved awards.
17.3 OVC In-program Awards
Each year all current and incoming OVC graduate students can apply for the OVC In-program
Awards. Applications are typically opened up every December and applications are due early
January. All OVC students are encouraged to apply.
17.4 Tips for applying for awards & scholarships
17.4.1 Reference letters
Many award applications require that applicants provide letters of reference. Don’t wait
till the application deadline to ask for a letter of reference from your referee. The letters
are an important part of your application package and it important to give your referee
sufficient time to write you a strong letter of reference.
17.4.2 Official transcripts
To avoid paying rush or courier fees for your transcripts request transcript copies well in
advance. Enrolment Services will issue free transcripts to Guelph students applying for
scholarships and awards provided the request is before the award transcript request
deadline. Late requests are subject to a rush/late fee.
Do not open your official transcripts unless specifically instructed. If the scholarship you
are applying to requires original official transcripts, then opened transcripts will not be
accepted. Opened transcripts are no longer considered official documents.
17.4.3 Application deadlines
Keep an eye out for the application deadlines for scholarship applications. Most deadlines
are hard deadlines and late applications will not be accepted.
18. Leaves of Absence
A “Regular” student may make arrangements in advance for a Leave of Absence from graduate
studies for no more than three consecutive semesters. Requests for parental leave will be
accommodated under the Leave of Absence regulations.
During an approved Leave of Absence, graduate students shall not engage in activities related to
their academic program.
Full regulations can be found in the General Regulations-Registration-Leave of Absence section
of the Graduate Calendar. The application form can be downloaded here.
19. Full-time vs. part-time studies
19.1 Choosing between part-time & full-time studies
When applying through OUAC, you will have the option to choose between full-time and part-
time (not all programs offer a part-time option). Students interested in part-time programs should
be aware that there can be certain implications, such as:
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Loss of interest-free status for outstanding student loans,
Reduced maximum course load per semester,
Loss of income-tax benefits (education credit), and
Funding/Scholarship/Bursary ineligibility (ie. OGS, CGS, etc)
The minimum duration period is based on the equivalency of three part-time semesters to
one full-time semester.
Note: DVSc applicants need to select full-time studies when they apply to the program.
19.2 Changing from full-time to part-time
If you have received an offer of admission and are looking to transfer from Full-Time to Part-
Time, you will need to complete your registration for Full-Time studies and then submit the
Full-Time and Part-Time Transfer Application”. This form, along with appropriate supporting
documentation, must be submitted to the department for their internal review/approval, when
completed they will forward to the Office of Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies. This should be
completed prior to the 10th class day, to ensure no financial penalties. For more information on
the general regulations, minimum duration and/or the requirements to transfer, please refer to the
Graduate Calendar.
International students interested in switching from Full-Time should discuss with Citizenship
and Immigration Canada to determine if this will have an impact on their study permit
parameters.
20. Full-time distance fee status
Full-time students studying at a distance of at least 200 km from Guelph may apply for an
exemption from the ancillary student fees (except the GSA fees, the Medical Insurance premium,
the Dental Plan premium, and, in the case of international students, the UHIP fee (if applicable))
for the semester indicated. Students cannot be on the Guelph campus, other than for Advisory
Committee meetings and consulting with Advisors, during the period specified. The Full-time
Distance Fee Status Application can be downloaded here.
21. Appeals for Academic Consideration
Academic consideration may be granted on the following grounds:
medical
psychological
compassionate
misapplication of regulations or procedures
other special circumstances
Generally, work commitments will not constitute grounds for academic consideration. The
necessity for documentation will depend on the situation. Students should contact their Advisor
or Graduate Program Coordinator or Graduate Program Assistant regarding documentation
requirements. Full policies and procedures can be found in the General Regulations Grounds
for Consideration.
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22. Conflict Resolution
Regardless of the best intentions of all involved, conflict can arise in the course of graduate
studies. Generally, a student’s first point of contact in the event of a dispute is the Graduate
Program Coordinator. The Graduate Program Coordinator plays a central role in mediating
conflicts that may arise while students are completing their graduate degrees. Mediation
procedures for the resolution of disputes related to graduate students and advisors are found in
General Information (Chapter III) in the Graduate Calendar.
23. Student Services
23.1 Payment of Fees
After you have selected your courses, please ensure you follow the instructions in the
Registration Guide to pay your fees by the required deadline.
You will not receive a financial statement or payment form from Student Financial Services; you
are expected to check your student account on WebAdvisor in order to determine the amount
payable for the semester. Follow the instructions posted on WebAdvisor for making your
payments by the deadline. Registrations will continue to be accepted through WebAdvisor or on
Add/Drop forms. You will be able to view your student account on WebAdvisor once your
registration is complete, and will be responsible for printing off your account and submitting
your payment appropriately.
23.2 Student ID cards
Your University photo-I.D. card, required for Library purposes, should be available and may be
picked up in Enrolment Services when you have registered. Under separate cover, you should
have received a letter requesting that you provide a photo for your ID card. If you have provided
that photo in advance as requested, the card should be ready for you when you arrive on campus;
otherwise, the card will be ready 5 - 6 days after you have submitted the photo. If you will not be
on campus to pick up your Student ID Card, please send an e-mail to ups@uoguelph.ca. This
permanent photo-I.D. card will be the only card issued during your stay as a graduate student and
will be validated each semester. Should you lose your card, the loss must be reported at the ORS
Enrolment Services counter; there is a charge assessed for a replacement card. Further details
on ID Cards and replacement may be found on the ID Card - General Information web page.
23.3 Student bus passes
Your student ID card is also your bus pass. The bus pass is paid as part of your Graduate student
fees. The bus pass is administered for graduate students by the GSA. Check the GSA website for
bus pass distribution information.
23.4 Student Health Insurance Plan
For information on your Health and Dental Plan, visit My Student Plan. Once on the homepage
select University of Guelph CSA and GSA Main Campus.
To print your Student Health Insurance Card visit:
https://www.mystudentplan.ca/uofguelph/en/home
International students are covered by both UHIP and the Student Health Insurance Plan.
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The Student Services Coordinator, Ann Mammoliti, will be able to help you with any questions
or issues you have with our Health and Dental Plan.
Email: guelphplan@mystudentplan.ca
Call: 519 824 4120 Ext. 54798
Note: Part-time graduate students are not eligible for Health and Dental Benefits.
24. Other Useful Contacts & Services
24.1 Graduate Student Association (GSA)
The mission of the Graduate Students' Association is to advance the academic and social goals of
the graduate students of the University of Guelph through advocacy, social, and financial
resources.
24.2 Student Financial Services (SFS)
Student Financial Services is students’ first contact for tuition, fees, payments, loans, grants and
scholarship payments.
24.3 Student Housing Services
Student Housing Services offers graduate student housing as well as family housing options.
24.4 Gryphon Athletics
All registered full-time graduate students have paid their Athletics Base Membership within their
academic registration fees. Your Athletics Base Membership includes access to the facilities for:
all Drop-in Recreation and the option to register and pay the applicable fee for the Gryphon NRG
Pass, Personal Training, Group Personal Training (Cardio Shred, Fit in 30, Special Aqua
Program) and Skill Development Activities (such as Aquatics, Aquatic & Safety Certifications,
Fitness & Yoga Certifications, Dance, Martial Arts & Sports programs), Intramurals & Clubs as
well as the option to purchase any Add-on Memberships such as Locker & Towel Memberships.
For more information the official site of Guelph Gryphon Athletics.
24.5 Health & Performance Centre (HPC)
HPC has been preventing and treating sports and activity-related injuries for the University of
Guelph and the surrounding community for more than 20 years. From the recreationally active to
elite, competitive athletes, the collaborative team of skilled practitioners provides specialized
care to help clients perform at their best, and successfully achieve a healthy, active lifestyle.
24.6 Computing & Communication Services (CCS)
CCS provides core IT services to the greater campus community. These include internet
connectivity, a campus wide integrated email and calendaring system, telephony infrastructure,
software distribution, development of single sign-on technology, learning resources, and more.
24.7 Environmental Health & Safety (EHS)
The Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS) provides a broad range of occupational
safety and environmental protection services to all members of the University community
including graduate and undergraduate student populations.
24.8 OVMA Membership
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Graduate students with DVM degrees can get a free OVMA membership for the duration of their
graduate program: https://www.ovma.org/members/register/
25. Office of Graduate& Post-doctoral Studies (OGPS)
The OGPS website is an important resource for all graduate students. This includes all the
relevant, application, registration, payment, and student services information prospective and
current graduate students will need.
25.1 Graduate Calendar
The information published in this Graduate Calendar outlines the rules, regulations, curricula,
programs and fees for the current academic year.
25.2 Forms & Documents
During your course of study you will be required to submit various forms and documents. You
can download the most current versions of these forms directly from the OGPS forms &
documents page.
26. Population Medicine Graduate Studies Committee
Current Committee Members:
David Pearl, Graduate Coordinator
Todd Duffield, Department Chair
Olaf Berke, Graduate Exam Coordinator
Andrew Papadopoulos, MPH Graduate Coordinator
Bob Friendship
Amy Greer
Zvonimir Poljak
Ariah Easley, Graduate Program Assistant
27. OVC Shared Administrative Services
The Ontario Veterinary College is organized into seven service departments, all under the
direction of the Office of the Dean. These departments provide service to the entire OVC
community as well as many external clients. Administration of Graduate Programs falls under
the OVC Shared Administrative Services department that is also broken down into five service
units. The units of primary importance to graduate students are: OVC Graduate Program
Services, Departmental Services, and Human Resource Services.
27.1 OVC Graduate Program Services
We work together with all departments in the college and with the University of Guelph's Office
of Postdoctoral & Graduate Studies (OGPS) to deliver to you the information and services that
you need to ensure a rewarding student experience.
We are set up to accommodate and administer all graduate programs at OVC. Our team of
Graduate Program Assistants will provide primary support to specific units, but each will be able
to answer questions from any graduate student, faculty and staff.
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Contact: Population Medicine Graduate Program Assistant: Ariah Easley
(popmgrad@uoguelph.ca)
27.2 Departmental Services/Administrative Support
Departmental Services is the first point of contact for the many day to day needs of faculty, staff
and students within the academic departments, providing everything from administrative support
for DVM, undergraduate and graduate students (course scheduling, course evaluations, etc.) to
the coordination of office keys and key cards, ordering office supplies, departmental
communications, and more.
Contacts:
Administrative Manager, DVM and Clinical Program and Operations Population Medicine:
Jamie Campbell (ovcsas@uoguelph.ca).
Administrative Assistant to the Chair and Faculty: Linda Kraemer (lkraemer@uoguelph.ca)
27.3 Human Resource Services
Human Resource Services coordinates the human resources needs of both faculty and students in
the areas of recruitment, onboarding/orientation, performance management, payroll and more.
Contact:
Administrative Manager, OVC SAS HR Services & Operations Pathobiology: Melana Nam
A full list of OVC SAS contacts can be found here: https://ovc.uoguelph.ca/sas/contact-sas
28. Map and Key Locations
A campus map can be viewed here: https://www.uoguelph.ca/campus/map/
OVC Stewart Building (SB *second floor*) Location of the Department of Population
Medicine Main Office SB 2509
Located in Stewart Building:
Department Chair Dr. Duffield
Assistant to the Chair and Faculty, Linda Kraemer
Graduate Program Assistant Ariah Easley
Operations Manager Jamie Campbell
Computer Lab SB 2500
Wellness Lounge SB 2514
Meeting rooms: SB 2509c, 2511, and 2527
Faculty Offices
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OVC Population Medicine Building (CRB, formerly known as the OVC Clinical Research
Building, and also known as The Pig Palace)
Located in Population Medicine Building:
Meeting rooms: CRB 101 and 113
Faculty Offices
OVC Pathobiology AHL Building (PAHL)
Located in Pathobiology:
Lecture Halls: PAHL 1800, 1810 and 1812
OVC SAS HR Department
Department of Pathobiology Main Office (3
rd
Floor)
Animal Health Laboratory
Second Cup
OVC Lifetime Learning Centre (LLC)
Located in Lifetime Learning Centre:
Lecture Halls: LLC 1713, 1714 and 1715
OVC cafeteria.
OVC Main Building (OVCM) Location of the OVC Dean’s Office and former OVC library
(now workspace and lecture hall).
29. Important Forms & Due Dates
All graduate students (MPH, MSc, PhD, DVSc) must submit the following forms:
Submit New Employee Data Form to Melana Nam, ovcsas@uoguelph.ca
Submit Payroll Direct Deposit Information to Melana Nam, ovcsas@uoguelph.ca
Submit the Advisory Committee Appointment Form & Graduate Degree Program Form to
Graduate Program Services by the mid-point of your second registered semester. (Tracks
courses; may be amended if needed)
MPH typically a 2 member Advisory Committee (including advisor)
MSc typically a 3 member Advisory Committee (including advisor), but minimally
2 members
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PhD - typically a 4 member Advisory Committee (including advisor), one of whom is
from outside the department. Minimally a 3 member Advisory Committee (including
advisor and one from outside the department)
DVSc Minimum 3 member Advisory Committee (including advisor), one of whom
is from outside the department.
Submit a Graduate Student Progress Report to Graduate Program Services every semester
Progress Reports are submitted online via GryphForms
https://graduatestudies.uoguelph.ca/current/gryphforms-student-guide
Due mid-semester for the previous semester (ex. F15 report is due mid-W16)
Includes advisor and student comments and must be signed by the advisor, student,
all members of the Advisory Committee and the Graduate Coordinator
Advisory Committee meetings are recommended every semester
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Appendix A Population Medicine Departmental Forms &
Documents
This section contains Population Medicine specific forms as from fillable PDFs. For OGPS
controlled forms (advisory committee forms, faculty nomination forms, defence exam forms, and
progress reports), please download the most current version as needed here.
Forms & Documents:
Enrolment Form
HR Direct Deposit Form
SFS Direct Deposit Form
Dosimeter Request Form
Request for Qualifying Exam
Nomination of External Examiner
ENROLMENT FORM
Please complete and submit to ovcsas@uoguelph.ca. with subject line: name, department & program (if applicable).
NAME
(Last, First, Middle Initial)
DEPARTMENT BIOM CLIN PATH POPM Other:
SUPERVISOR/ADVISOR
UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH ID#
IDENTIFYING
GENDER
Male Female
DATE OF BIRTH
(mm/dd/yyyy)
MARITAL STATUS
LOCAL ADDRESS
STREET ADDRESS
CITY PROVINCE
POSTAL CODE COUNTRY
TELEPHONE
(Home)
TELEPHONE
(Mobile)
EMAIL
(U of G)
EMAIL
(Alternate)
EMERGENCY CONTACT(S)
NAME
(Last, First)
RELATIONSHIP
TELEPHONE
(Home)
TELEPHONE
(Work or Mobile)
NAME
(Last, First)
RELATIONSHIP
TELEPHONE
(Home)
TELEPHONE
(Work or Mobile)
I HAVE INCLUDED THE FOLLOWING WITH MY SUBMISSION:
PAYROLL DIRECT DEPOSIT
FORM
YES (Must be submitted with this form)
NOT REQUIRED I will not be on payroll
NOT REQUIRED I am currently receiving pay
from the U of G
NOT REQUIRED - I have been employed
with the U of G within the last 3 months,
and my banking information hasn’t
changed
SOCIAL INSURANCE
NUMBER Copy of Confirmation of SIN letter attached (If international) Yes N/A
PERMIT TYPE
(Select only one)
WORK (Copy of permit attached) STUDY (Copy of permit attached) N/A
DATE
(mm/dd/yyyy)
SIGNATURE
HUMAN RESOURCES USE ONLY
FP Ticket # International Documents
Received N/A
Banking
Received Request N/A
Distribution:
Entered Request
HRER
Entered
Appointment Letter
Sent Request N/A
Communication
Sent
Code Banking provided to HR
Sent N/A
SIN letter provided to HR
Sent N/A
Completed by: Date:
#
Payroll Direct Deposit Information
Human Resources
Please check one: New Change
Employee Name:
Employee # (or Student ID):
Dept Name:
Attach a void cheque. (If one is not available, please have your local bank branch
provide you with a copy of the necessary banking information.)
I understand that the University will deposit my pay as per the account
information I have provided. I acknowledge that it is my responsibility to advise
Human Resources of any changes to this information.
__________________________________
_____________________________
Employee Signature Date
The University of Guelph has paperless pay advices. Further information can be found at:
www.uoguelph.ca/hr/staff-faculty/pay/e-paystub
Please note that this information applies to both payroll deposits and for Travel & Business
Reimbursement Claim payments.
Please forward completed form to Human Resources, University Centre, Level 5.
For Student Account Refund Requests Only
This Direct Deposit Form is to be used for the refunding of credits on your Student
Account to Canadian Bank Accounts only.
Last Name:
First Name
Student ID#
U of G email
A bank stamped direct deposit information form (or printed from your
bank’s website) or VOID cheque MUST be attached to this form.
Save and e-mail the signed form along with the bank information to
accquest@uoguelph.ca or return to Student Financial Services, located on
the 3rd floor of the U.C., open Monday to Friday 8:30 to 4:30.
IMPORTANT
Direct Deposit account information should be in the student’s name
MUST be a Canadian Bank Account
Hand written banking information will not be accepted
A new SFS Direct Deposit Authorization Form should be submitted if
banking information has changed
Student Financial Services requires banking information even if previously
submitted to a different department; information is not shared between
departments
I certify that the given information is correct and that I have read all necessary
direct deposit authorization requirements prior to submission of this form.
S
tudent Signature
Date
SFS Direct Deposit Authorization
Dosimeter Request Form
The following information is required to order a dosimeter for you upon your
arrival to the Health Sciences Centre, University of Guelph
First Name
Middle Name
(if none leave a (-)
Last Name
Date of Birth
Day:_____ Month:____________ Year:_________
Social Insurance
Number (Canada)
Gender
Country / Province of
Birth
Previously issued a
Dosimeter
Yes:___________ No:_____________
Country/Province Worn
Where:_____________ Year Worn:____________
Department of Population Medicine
Request for PhD Qualifying Examination
Candidate Name: ID#:
Committee members:
Suggested Dates (one week required between exams; 2 weeks max):
Written:
Oral:
Suggested Examination Committee:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Note: see back for instructions from the Graduate Calendar, please provide email address for
non-department members. External examiners need to have “Special Graduate Faculty” status
Chair:
General Epidemiology Examiner:
Analytical Epidemiology Examiner:
Special Topics I examiner and Topic:
Special Topics II Examiner and Topic:
Note: This form should be completed no later than the beginning of the minimum duration
semester and forwarded to the department graduate secretary for approval of the
Examination Committee and initiation of the examination procedure.
A signed statement from the Advisory Committee concerning the candidate’s applied
skills and progress to date must be received prior to commencement of the examination.
Additional Member
Additional Member
Additional Member
Additional Member
Additional Member
Qualifying Examination (From the Graduate Calendar 2016/2017)
As early as possible and in no case later than the final semester of the minimum duration
requirement, the student is required to pass an examination to assess his or her knowledge of the
subject area and related fields. The examination ordinarily will be in several parts (written and/or
oral) and should be completed within a two-week period if possible.
The qualifying examination is an examination by the academic unit in which the student is enrolled
(as distinct from an examination by the advisory committee). Upon completing it satisfactorily, the
student is deemed to have met the departmental standards and becomes a candidate for the PhD
degree. The examining committee, appointed by the chair or director of the academic unit
concerned, consists of five members:
The chair/director of the academic unit (or designate) or the chair of the Graduate
Program Committee, who acts as chair of the examination committee except when this
person is also a member of the advisory committee. In that event, the chair will designate
another member of the regular graduate faculty of the unit to chair the examination;
Two members, normally of the regular or associated graduate faculty who are not members
of the advisory committee;
Two members of the advisory committee;
Normally, at least one of the qualifying examination committee members must be from
outside the department/discipline in which the student is registered. That person may be a
member of the advisory committee.
Note: The chair serves to administer the examination according to the approved format of the
program. The chair does not serve as an additional examiner. In unforeseen circumstances
where a committee member is unable to attend, the chair will attempt to receive questions to
ask on behalf of the absent member, to be answered by the student to the satisfaction of the
examiners.
As a qualifying examination, consideration is to be given not only (1) to the student's knowledge of
the subject matter and ability to integrate the material derived from his or her studies, but also (2) to
the student's ability and promise in research. The examining committee, therefore, will receive from
the advisory committee a written evaluation of the quality of the student's research performance to
date and of the student's potential as a researcher. The examining committee will determine the
relative importance to be given to these two major components of the qualifying examination.
The student is deemed to have passed the qualifying examination if not more than one of the
examiners votes negatively. An abstention is regarded as a negative vote. The results of the
qualifying examination will be reported to the Assistant Vice-President (Graduate Studies) through
the chair of the academic unit. The report to the Assistant VP will record the decision as
unsatisfactory or satisfactory. If unsatisfactory, the student may be given a second attempt at the
examination. A student who fails the qualifying examination and who is being given a second
opportunity to pass the examination will be required to repeat it no later than six months after the
failed attempt. Academic units may impose a shorter time limit. A second failure constitutes a
recommendation to the Board of Graduate Studies that the student be required to withdraw (see
Unsatisfactory Progress and Appeals of Decisions.
NOMINATION OF EXTERNAL EXAMINER
PhD Candidate Name: ID #:
Department/School:
Title of Thesis:
Date when Thesis will be available to be sent to Examiner:
Tentative Date(s) for Oral Examination:
1.
2.
3.
Note: The expense of bringing in an External Examiner from a distance is no longer supported by
the Office of Graduate Studies and the Department/School. The Office of Graduate
Studies still provides a $200 honorarium.
THE FOLLOWING THREE INDIVIDUALS, IN ORDER OF PREFERENCE, ARE
NOMINATED FOR EXTERNAL EXAMINER
:
1. Name:
Address:
Telephone:
Qualifications and Expertise:
2. Name:
Address:
Telephone:
Qualifications and Expertise:
3. Name:
Address:
Telephone:
Qualifications and Expertise:
Please indicate if there is any association between the advisor and/or the candidate and any of the
nominees which should be declared.
Advisor
Co-Advisor
Chair
From the current Graduate Calendar (IV Degree Regulations)
External Examiner
For each doctoral thesis an external examiner from outside the university is appointed on behalf of
the Assistant VP of Graduate Studies by the department chair, in consultation with the advisor. The
external examiner must not have served as advisor to the student’s advisor, and must not have
participated in joint projects with the advisor. In addition, the external examiner must not have been
a student or member of the graduate faculty at the University in the last five years. The nomination
will be made when the candidate's advisor declares that the thesis is about to be prepared, normally
no later than the beginning of the student's last semester. The external examiner will submit a
written appraisal of the thesis (at least seven days prior to the examination) to the chair of the
department who will then provide these comments to the candidate and the Advisory Committee.
The external examiner is expected to participate in the final oral examination and to assist in
evaluating all aspects of the candidate's performance. Any individual who serves as an External
Examiner may not serve again until a period of 3 years has passed.
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