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Norfolk Emergency Response
Guidance 2019
Version
6.6
Author
NRF Members
Reviewed by
NRF Members
Authorised by
NRF Executive Board
Next review date
March 2020
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Foreword
The purpose of this guidance document is to outline the agreed procedures and arrangements for effective integrated multi-agency
command, control and coordination when dealing with all phases of emergencies in the County. Individual plans and procedures adopted by
each of the emergency services, local authorities and other key agencies involved in the response are understandably devoted to the role of
the service concerned.
In preparing this document the authors have recognised that each emergency is different and has its own unique features. The guidance
contained in this document is designed to offer a framework within which those responsible for the successful resolution of emergencies can
work together with maximum efficiency. It follows the principles of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 as documented within the non-statutory
guidance “Emergency Response and Recovery” and the existing well-established practice of the Norfolk Resilience Forum that states an
integrated approach to emergency management should be taken.
The Norfolk Emergency Response Guidance will form the basis of integrated emergency management training and exercises undertaken
within the County and will be reviewed annually. The principles outlined in this document should, as far as possible be adopted at any
emergency requiring an integrated multi-agency response.
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Table of contents
Foreword ............................................................................................................................................................................ 2
Purpose of this guidance .................................................................................................................................................. 11
Protocols .......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Activation .......................................................................................................................................................................... 11
Section 1 - Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................... 12
1.1 Definitions ................................................................................................................................................................................. 12
1.2 Type and Scale of incidents ...................................................................................................................................................... 15
1.3 Declaration ............................................................................................................................................................................... 15
1.4 Risk Assessment ...................................................................................................................................................................... 15
1.5 Business / Service Continuity ................................................................................................................................................... 16
Section 2 - The Combined Response ............................................................................................................................... 17
2.1 Alerting Norfolk Multi-Agency Incident Call Cascade ............................................................................................................. 17
2.3 Reporting model ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20
2.4 Resilience Direct ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20
Section 3 - Scene Management ........................................................................................................................................ 21
3.1 Forward Command Post (FCP) ................................................................................................................................................ 21
3.2 Cordons .................................................................................................................................................................................... 21
3.3 Scene access ........................................................................................................................................................................... 21
3.4 Traffic cordon ............................................................................................................................................................................ 22
3.5 Rendezvous Point (RVP) .......................................................................................................................................................... 22
3.6 Marshalling Area ....................................................................................................................................................................... 22
3.7 Flying Restrictions .................................................................................................................................................................... 22
3.8 Others ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
3.9 Responder withdrawal .............................................................................................................................................................. 23
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Section 4 - Command, Control and Coordination .............................................................................................................. 23
4.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................................... 23
4.2 Operational Level ..................................................................................................................................................................... 24
4.3 Local Coordination Groups (LCG) ............................................................................................................................................ 24
4.4 Tactical Coordination ................................................................................................................................................................ 25
4.5 Strategic Coordination .............................................................................................................................................................. 26
4.6 Government Level .................................................................................................................................................................... 28
4.7 Military Aid ................................................................................................................................................................................ 28
4.8 Finance ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 28
4.9 Debriefing and Follow Up ......................................................................................................................................................... 28
Section 5 - Meeting the Needs of Those Affected ............................................................................................................. 29
5.1 General ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
5.2 The Injured ............................................................................................................................................................................... 30
5.3 Fatalities ................................................................................................................................................................................... 30
5.4 Faith and Diversity Needs ......................................................................................................................................................... 31
5.5 Family and Friends Reception Centres ..................................................................................................................................... 31
5.6 Humanitarian Assistance Centres (HAC) .................................................................................................................................. 31
5.7 Vulnerable Persons .................................................................................................................................................................. 32
5.8 Shelter and Rest Centres ......................................................................................................................................................... 33
5.9 Evacuation ................................................................................................................................................................................ 33
Section 6 Communications ............................................................................................................................................. 34
6.1 Norfolk Resilient Telecommunications Plan .............................................................................................................................. 34
6.2 Airwave ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 34
6.3 British Telecom ......................................................................................................................................................................... 34
6.4 Mobile Telecommunications Privileged Access Scheme (MTPAS) .......................................................................................... 34
Section 7 - Working with the Media .................................................................................................................................. 35
7.1 Multi-Agency Major Incident Communications Plan .................................................................................................................. 35
7.2 Warning and Informing the Public ............................................................................................................................................. 35
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7.3 Media Briefing Point .................................................................................................................................................................. 35
7.4 Initial Holding Statement ........................................................................................................................................................... 35
7.5 Media Centre ............................................................................................................................................................................ 35
7.6 Telephone Helpline ................................................................................................................................................................... 36
7.7 Connecting in a Crisis ............................................................................................................................................................... 36
Section 8 - Investigation ................................................................................................................................................... 36
8.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
8.2 Evidence Gathering .................................................................................................................................................................. 36
8.3 Statutory Bodies ....................................................................................................................................................................... 37
Section 9 - Staff Welfare ................................................................................................................................................... 37
9.1 Overview ................................................................................................................................................................................... 37
9.2 Physical Requirements ............................................................................................................................................................. 37
9.3 Psychological Requirements .................................................................................................................................................... 38
Section 10 - Recovery ...................................................................................................................................................... 38
Transfer Lead Agency Responsibility ............................................................................................................................................. 38
Appendix A Norfolk Resilience Forum ........................................................................................................................... 39
Appendix B Agency Responsibilities .............................................................................................................................. 42
Emergency Services ....................................................................................................................................................................... 42
British Transport Police (BTP) .................................................................................................................................................................... 42
East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST) ......................................................................................................................... 43
Maritime Coastguard Agency ..................................................................................................................................................................... 43
Norfolk Constabulary.................................................................................................................................................................................. 44
Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service ............................................................................................................................................................... 44
Local Authorities ............................................................................................................................................................................. 45
County: ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 45
City/Borough/District: ................................................................................................................................................................................. 46
Health 47
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Acute Hospitals .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 47
Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG) ...................................................................................................................................................... 48
Community Healthcare Service Providers .................................................................................................................................................. 48
NHS 111 .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49
NHS England and NHS Improvement East of England .............................................................................................................................. 49
Norfolk & Suffolk Foundation Trust ............................................................................................................................................................ 49
Supporting organisations ................................................................................................................................................................ 50
Animal Health & Veterinary Laboratory Agency (AHVLA) .......................................................................................................................... 50
Broads Authority ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 50
Environment Agency .................................................................................................................................................................................. 51
Health and Safety Executive ...................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Lead Government Department ................................................................................................................................................................... 51
Meteorological Office (Met Office) .............................................................................................................................................................. 52
MHCLG Departments for Communities and Local Government Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED) .................................... 52
Transport ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 53
Highways England ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 53
Norwich Airport .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 54
Greater Anglia ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 54
Utility Companies ............................................................................................................................................................................ 55
Anglian Water ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 55
Essex & Suffolk Water ............................................................................................................................................................................... 55
British Telecom (BT) .................................................................................................................................................................................. 55
Cadent Gas ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 55
Voluntary & Faith Groups ........................................................................................................................................................................... 56
Other organisations ........................................................................................................................................................................ 56
The Insurance Industry .............................................................................................................................................................................. 56
Community ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 56
Convergent Volunteers .............................................................................................................................................................................. 57
Commercial Companies ............................................................................................................................................................................. 57
Appendix C Coordination Structure ............................................................................................................................... 59
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Appendix D Strategic Aide Memoire .............................................................................................................................. 60
Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 60
Role 60
Activation ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 60
Location .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 61
Generic strategy ............................................................................................................................................................................. 61
Membership .................................................................................................................................................................................... 61
Security Vetting .............................................................................................................................................................................. 62
SCG Meetings ................................................................................................................................................................................ 63
SCG Support Cells ......................................................................................................................................................................... 63
SCG Representative Action Card ................................................................................................................................................... 64
SCG Agenda .................................................................................................................................................................................. 65
Appendix E Tactical Aide Memoire ................................................................................................................................ 66
Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 66
Role 66
Activation ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 66
Tactical Considerations .................................................................................................................................................................. 67
Membership .................................................................................................................................................................................... 70
Security Vetting .............................................................................................................................................................................. 70
Meetings ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 71
Support cells ................................................................................................................................................................................... 71
TCG Action Card ............................................................................................................................................................................ 72
TCG Agenda ................................................................................................................................................................................... 73
Appendix F Support Cells .............................................................................................................................................. 74
Recovery ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 74
Science and Technical Advice Cell (STAC) .................................................................................................................................... 74
Multi-Agency Support Group (East) MASG (E) ............................................................................................................................ 75
Combined Tactical Air Cell (CTAC) ................................................................................................................................................ 75
Multi-Agency Information Cell (MAIC) ............................................................................................................................................ 76
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Logistics Cell .................................................................................................................................................................................. 76
Evacuation Cell ............................................................................................................................................................................... 77
Vulnerable People Cell ................................................................................................................................................................... 77
Military Aid to the Civil Authorities (MACA) Triggers and Activation ............................................................................................ 78
MACA Principles .......................................................................................................................................................................... 79
MACA Considerations ................................................................................................................................................................. 79
Cost of MACA ................................................................................................................................................................................. 80
MOD Policy ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 80
Appendix H Handover Certificate Response to Recovery ........................................................................................... 81
Appendix I Teleconference etiquette.............................................................................................................................. 82
Appendix J NRF Security Vetting Protocol ..................................................................................................................... 84
Force Vetting (FV) .......................................................................................................................................................................... 85
National Steer ................................................................................................................................................................................. 86
Information sharing ......................................................................................................................................................................... 86
Tactical Coordination Centre (TCC) ............................................................................................................................................... 86
Strategic Coordination Centre (SCC) ............................................................................................................................................. 86
Obtaining Security Vetting .............................................................................................................................................................. 87
Appendix K - Convergent Volunteers Protocol .................................................................................................................. 88
Overview & Issues ............................................................................................................................................................ 88
Activation .......................................................................................................................................................................... 88
Roles and Responsibilities ................................................................................................................................................ 89
Convergent Volunteer Co-Ordinator (CVoC): ................................................................................................................................. 89
Assessment Staff: ........................................................................................................................................................................... 90
Task Supervisor: ............................................................................................................................................................................. 90
Location (Volunteer Reception Centres VRCs) .............................................................................................................. 90
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Supporting paperwork ...................................................................................................................................................... 91
What can Convergent Volunteers do? .............................................................................................................................. 91
Convergent Volunteers must not .................................................................................................................................................... 91
Media & Communications ................................................................................................................................................. 91
Insurance & Public Liability ............................................................................................................................................... 92
National Guidance ............................................................................................................................................................ 92
The SARAH Act 2015 ..................................................................................................................................................................... 92
Costs ................................................................................................................................................................................ 93
Encouraging Volunteering ................................................................................................................................................ 93
Records of Validation and Training Schedule (Up to 5 years) ........................................................................................... 95
Distribution List ................................................................................................................................................................. 96
Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................................................... 96
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Purpose of this guidance
This plan provides guidance to Norfolk Category 1 and 2 Responders, and other supporting organisations, of how Norfolk will generically
respond to and recover from emergencies in the County.
The aims of this plan are to:
Provide a single multi-agency framework, outlining coordination arrangements for Norfolk, to which all Norfolk responding
organisations will subscribe
Summarise the roles and responsibilities of Norfolk Category 1 and 2 Responders and other supporting agencies in Norfolk
Outline how responding organisations will work collectively.
Protocols
This guidance will take effect date March 2019. It will be formally reviewed every 3 years. This process will be advanced should legislation,
best practice guidance change or if lessons are identified following activation for an emergency or exercise. The master copy of this
document and a record of the review and decision-making process will be held by the NRF Business Manager, and will be made available for
audit as necessary. Contributing organisations are asked to notify the NRF Business Manager of any changes that may impact on the
content or procedures outlined in this guidance. Prior to publication, the Norfolk Resilience Forum will consider all amendments to this
guidance.
Activation
This guidance provides the principles which should, as far as possible, be adopted at any emergency requiring an integrated multi-agency
response. As such, there is no need to ‘activate’ this plan.
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Section 1 - Introduction
The risks to our County are well documented in the Norfolk Community Risk Register (CRR). Where required, plans have been prepared in
respect of individual risks, for example Control of Major Accident Hazard (COMAH) sites and those risks rated as “High or Very High” within
the CRR. However, to augment these plans it is necessary to provide an overarching multi-agency document outlining how the emergency
services, Local Authorities and other organisations will respond to emergencies.
Emergencies have similar characteristics on which this guidance is based. This document offers a framework within which those who are
responsible for the successful resolution of an emergency are able to work together with maximum efficiency.
The guidance can equally be used for less serious emergencies which warrant a coordinated response from the agencies involved.
1.1 Definitions
In order to ensure that there is complete understanding of the phrases that are likely to be used, they are defined as follows:
a. Major Incident
An event or situation, with a range of serious consequences, which requires special arrangements to be implemented by one or more
emergency responder agencies.
It is vitally important that, when appropriate, a “major incident” is declared. This decision must be clear and communicated between all
necessary agencies.
b. Emergency
An event or situation which threatens serious damage to
human welfare in a place in the UK
An event or situation which threatens serious damage to
the environment of a place in the UK
War or terrorism, which threatens serious damage to the
security of the UK
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Additionally, to constitute an emergency, an event or situation must also pose a considerable test for an organisation’s ability to perform its
functions.
The common themes of emergencies are: the scale of the impact of the event or situation, the demands it is likely to make of local
responders; and the exceptional deployment of resources.
c. Response
Response encompasses the decisions and actions taken to deal with the immediate effects of an emergency. In most scenarios it is likely to
be relatively short and to last a matter of hours rapid implementation of arrangements for collaboration, coordination and communication, is
vital. Response encompasses the effort to deal not only with the direct effects of the emergency itself (e.g. fighting fires, rescuing individuals)
but also the indirect effects (e.g. disruption, media interest). It must be recognised that some emergencies can be protracted, lasting several
days or even months. For example widespread flooding or outbreaks of animal or human diseases.
d. Command
Command is the exercise of vested authority that is associated with a role or rank within an organisation, to give direction in order to achieve
defined objectives.
e. Control
Control is the application of authority, combined with the capability to manage resources, in order to achieve defined objectives. Some
organisations define command and control together, but the key element of control is the combination of authority with the means to ensure
command intent is communicated and results monitored. While command cannot be exercised by one organisation over another, the
authority to exercise control of an organisation’s personnel or assets, for a specified time period to attain defined objectives, can be granted
or delegated to another organisation. This granting of control does not imply that the responsibility for those resources has been transferred.
f. Coordination
Co-ordination is the integration of multi-agency efforts and available capabilities which may be interdependent, in order to achieve defined
objectives. This function is exercised through the pre-designated Strategic, Tactical and Local co-ordinating structures where agency
representatives act as a conduit to individual agency command and control functions.
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g. Subsidiarity
The Emergency Response and Recovery guidance states that the UK’s approach to emergency response and recovery is founded on a
bottom up approach, in which operations are managed and decisions made at the lowest appropriate level. In all cases, local agencies are
the building blocks of response and recovery operations. In actuality local levels deal with most emergencies with little or no input from sub
national or national levels’. Decisions should be taken at the lowest appropriate level, with coordination at the highest necessary level.
h. Direction
Clarity of purpose comes from a Strategic aim and supporting objectives that are agreed, understood and sustained by all involved. This will
enable the prioritisation and focus of the response and recovery effort.
i. Recovery
In contrast, recovery may take months or even years to complete, as it seeks to support affected communities in the reconstruction of the
physical infrastructure and restoration of emotional, social and physical well-being.
Recovery is defined as the process of rebuilding, restoring and rehabilitating the community following an emergency. Although distinct from
the response phase, recovery should be addressed from the very beginning, as recovery actions taken during the response phase can
influence the longer-term outcomes for a community.
j. Category 1 Responder
These are identified as the main agencies involved in most emergencies at the local level. The designation of Category 1 status also brings
with it certain CCA obligations outside the scope of this document.
k. Category 2 Responder
These are the organisations that are likely to be involved in some types of emergencies, for example transport companies/utilities. If the
emergency involves them, they will be expected to cooperate with the Category 1 Responders at all stages.
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1.2 Type and Scale of incidents
Incidents may be international, national, regional or local level in scale and generally fall into one of two categories:
a. Sudden Impact
These occur with little or no warning and require an immediate response. Examples of this could be significant transport collisions, fires or
explosions.
b. Slow Onset
This type of event has a lead in time of days, weeks or months. It can include severe weather, flooding or pandemics.
1.3 Declaration
In most cases it is the Emergency Services who are first to respond to an emergency and declare a Major Incident. The declaration can be
made by any of Category 1 or Category 2 Responder or site operator, who considers that any of the criteria are satisfied, it is down to each
organisation to decide which role or rank can make this declaration.
It is the responsibility of the agency making the declaration to ensure all others are notified using the Alerting Norfolk Multi-Agency
Incident Call Cascade. It must be recognised that what is an emergency as defined within the CCA to one agency, may not be so to
another. However all agencies would be notified, so that where appropriate, resources can be deployed in a stand by capacity if necessary.
1.4 Risk Assessment
a. Community Risk Register
A key requirement of the Civil Contingencies Act (CCA) is that the Local Resilience Forum (LRF) should produce a CRR that provides a
collective assessment of the hazards and risks within the LRF area.
The National Risk Register Assessment forms a platform from which the CRR is produced, the purpose of the CRR being to identify and
quantify local risks.
This information is then used to inform the public, in addition to providing meaningful information to the NRF during its emergency planning,
training and exercising activities. The Norfolk CRR is a public document and is available on the NRF website at:
www.norfolkprepared.gov.uk.
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b. Integrated Emergency Plans
Wherever appropriate, specific multi-agency plans have been prepared for relevant sites or hazards within the County. These fall into various
categories:
For risks identified by the CRR process
Other site specific (e.g. Norwich International Airport)
As required by regulations i.e. CoMAH 2015, Major
Accident Control Regulations (MACR), Major Accident
Hazard Pipeline
General procedure (e.g. NRF Multi-Agency Major
Incident Communications Plan)
General occurrence (e.g. Norfolk Coastal Pollution
Response Plan).
1.5 Business / Service Continuity
The Civil Contingencies Act requires Category 1 responders (see Appendix A Norfolk Resilience Forum) to maintain business continuity
plans to ensure that they can continue to deliver their critical functions in the event of an emergency, so far as is reasonably practicable. The
duty relates to all critical functions, not just their emergency response.
Through the Business Continuity Management (BCM) process, procedures should be developed to ensure that these critical activities are
maintained within the agreed timescales. Plans should be developed and regularly reviewed.
Each agency should consider the implications of its response on other organisations, to ensure that a coordinated response is achieved; this
can be evaluated through multi-agency exercises.
1.6 Training and Exercising
The NRF training and exercise group coordinates the training & exercise activity throughout the NRF. They undertake a programme of multi-
agency exercises and training events based on risks identified in the Community Risk Register, these include:
Table top exercises
Live exercises
Multi-agency Tactical and Strategic courses
Briefing days and workshops
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Section 2 - The Combined Response
2.1 Alerting Norfolk Multi-Agency Incident Call Cascade
The Norfolk Multi-Agency Incident Call Cascade should be used to give a heads-up to organisations of a multi-agency incident; inform a
Major Incident has been declared and request attendance at a Strategic, Tactical or Local Coordination Group. It is generally accepted that if
a Major Incident is declared, some form of multi-agency coordination should be activated.
The first meeting of the TCG or SCG is likely to be a teleconference. A decision can then be made as to whether the activation of the venue
is required. If multi-agency coordination is required, and the Emergency Services have not made the request, then the requesting agency
should ensure that an Emergency Service Control Room is alerted of the coordination group activation and asked to start the call cascade
process as per the below.
Note Norfolk Constabulary has the responsibility for establishing the physical Tactical Coordination Centre at Wymondham Police HQ so
should be notified at the earliest opportunity of a TCG. The Police Control Room will make contact with the TCC Room Managers for the
physical set up. Norfolk County Council has the responsibility for establishing the Strategic Coordination Centre at Whitegates, so should be
notified at the earliest opportunity of a SCG. The Resilience Team will complete the physical set up of the venue.
This call cascade does not include the internal cascade organisations will be required to undertake. Not all organisations will need to be
notified about every incident, some professional judgement is required to identify who should be notified. Note CoMAH, Norwich Airport &
other site specific plans may have a unique call cascade which will be included in the site specific Emergency Plan.
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2.2 Initial notification
Call into Emergency Service Control Room
Police
Fire
Ambulance
Norfolk County Council Resilience Team Duty Officer (RTDO)
Coastguard
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Cascade notification
Ambulance
Emergency Service
Control Rooms (if take initial
call)
NHS England
Acute Hospital (s)
Public Health England
Police
Emergency Service
Control Rooms (if take
initial call)
British Transport Police
Norfolk County Council
RTDO
Fire
Emergency Service
Control Rooms (if take initial
call)
Norfolk County Council
RTDO
Environment Agency
NCC RTDO
Emergency Service Control
Rooms (if take initial call)
Local Authority District(s)
Clinical Commissioning
Groups
Military
Utility Companies
Highways England
Ministry of Housing,
Communities and Local
Government (MHCLG)
Met Office
Top Tier Control of Major
Accident Hazards Sites (if
incident is near their site)
Voluntary & Faith Agencies
Environment Agency
Water Company (ies)
Food Standards Agency
Health & Safety Executive
Internal Drainage Boards
HM Coastguard
Emergency Service
Control Rooms (if take initial
call)
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2.3 Reporting model
The following reporting model will be used as the basis for Shared Situational Awareness amongst responding organisations:
M
Major Incident Declared or standby?
E
E
Exact location
T
T
Type of incident
H
H
Hazards present or suspected
A
A
Access / egress routes safe to use
N
N
Number, type, severity of casualties
E
E
Emergency responders present, and organisations required?
2.4 Resilience Direct
Resilience Direct is used to share information during the planning and response phases of an emergency. The secure system is web based,
and will be the single platform used to share information in Norfolk during a response to a multi-agency incident. Organisations should
consider how they will access and update the system during an incident.
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Section 3 - Scene Management
As part of scene management, the following will need to be considered:
3.1 Forward Command Post (FCP)
This will be established by the emergency services during the initial response, in order that activities can be properly coordinated. Should
cordons be in place, it is likely that the FCP would be situated just outside the inner cordon; this is where the Operational Commanders at the
scene will liaise and agree priorities. Once the coordination structure is established, much of the operational information fed into the TCG will
come from here.
3.2 Cordons
Cordons should be established to:
Secure the scene for any potential evidential purposes
Protect the public
Control sightseers
Prevent unauthorised interference with the scene
Facilitate the work of the responding organisations
An inner cordon should be established to enclose the scene of the emergency and contain any area of hazard or contamination. Generally
the Police will have the responsibility, when appropriate, to ensure that details of persons entering or leaving the inner cordon are
documented for evidential purposes. Individual agencies remain responsible for the health and safety of personnel that they have operating
within the inner cordon; responders may be refused access into the risk area if they do not have the appropriate personal protective
equipment (PPE).
An outer cordon will be set up, probably by the Police, in order to seal off an extensive area around the inner cordon and provide a controlled
area into which only authorised personnel have access.
3.3 Scene access
Control of access arrangements via the designated scene access control points will be imposed for both the inner and outer cordon.
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3.4 Traffic cordon
This will be established to prevent congestion at the scene and allow free access and egress of emergency responders. Personnel staffing
the cordons should implement mechanisms for allowing non-emergency services personnel to gain access to the scene if appropriate.
3.5 Rendezvous Point (RVP)
Resources immediately required at the scene should be directed to the designated Rendezvous Point. The function of this location is to
facilitate:
Maintenance of the incoming / outgoing resources
Briefing and debriefing personnel.
Issue of necessary equipment
3.6 Marshalling Area
A marshalling area may be set up for resources not immediately required at the scene or which, having served their purpose, are being held
for future use. This area is usually set up between the RVP and scene, within the outer cordon.
This area can also be used to provide briefing / debriefing facilities and welfare areas for staff that have been working at the scene.
3.7 Flying Restrictions
If required, the Police (as ‘Emergency Coordinating Authority - ECA’) can request that a “Temporary Danger Area” is imposed around the
scene. This will advise all aircraft pilots to avoid flying in a defined area in order to protect the safety of those working at the scene.
However, if a Temporary Danger Area fails to meet the objective or is deemed to be inappropriate for a particular incident, Emergency
Restriction of Flying Regulations may be introduced. The Regulations will make it an offence to fly within the designated Restricted Area
(Temporary) without the permission of the appropriate ECA.
Any request for such restrictions from personnel at the scene will be made through the Police Contact and Control Room who will contact the
Distress and Diversion Cell at the London Air Traffic Control Centre. The Maritime & Coastguard Agency is also able to assume the ECA role
in certain cases.
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3.8 Others
On scene Commanders must consider the need to establish all or some of the following functions:
Traffic routes
Casualty clearing station
Ambulance loading point
Survivor assembly point
Vehicle marshalling area
Helicopter landing site
Holding audit area (body holding)
Triage
Media liaison point.
3.9 Responder withdrawal
The decision regarding when to withdraw responders from a risk area can be a difficult one. But there is clearly a need for a robust risk based
decision making process, in order to prevent individuals being exposed to an unacceptable level of risk.
In addition, the level and speed of response and withdrawal of responders, is likely to be subject to a certain degree of scrutiny - from those
affected and also the media. A systematic multi-agency risk assessment process followed during pre-event, response and recovery stages,
would provide a robust evidence base from which critical observations, should they arise, be countered.
Section 4 - Command, Control and Coordination
4.1 Introduction
This section introduces the framework for the management of the emergency response effort; this will be undertaken at one or more of three
ascending levels: Operational/Local, Tactical and Strategic. Detailed information around the Tactical and Strategic Level can be found in
Appendix D Strategic Aide Memoire and Appendix E Tactical Aide Memoire.
Command and co-ordination levels for emergencies of the ‘sudden impact’ type will start from the operational level at the scene and be
escalated as necessary. For slow onset emergencies such as a threat of flooding, co-ordination levels may be activated as required.
See Appendix C Coordination Structure which illustrates a typical command structure which could be established for an emergency.
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4.2 Operational Level
At this level, hands on work is undertaken at the site(s) of the emergency or other associated areas. Operational Commanders or Managers
will concentrate their effort and resources on the specific tasks within their areas of responsibility, liaising with on scene partners as
necessary in line with JESIP and integrated response arrangements. They will act on delegated responsibility from their organisations until
higher levels of co-ordination are established (if required).
These arrangements will usually be adequate to deal with most events or situations, but if events demand greater planning or resources,
additional tiers of co-ordination may be necessary. A key function of a lead operational responder will be to consider whether circumstances
warrant a tactical level of response.
4.3 Local Coordination Groups (LCG)
a. Purpose
LCG’s are task, or geographically focused group(s) coordinating local assets and arrangements based on the priorities and resources
allocated to them by the TCG.
These groups have no command and control function; this is retained by individual agencies. Local Coordinating Groups may not be required
for every emergency, a single TCG may be sufficient for coordination purposes. Some smaller incidents may only require this level of
management. It should be noted that tactical decisions should not be made at this level.
b. Activation
The decision to activate a Local Coordination Group is likely to be taken by the District Local Authority. District Local Authorities have the
responsibility for identifying suitable LCG venues. Should a physical LCG need to be established, then the District Local Authority, via their
Emergency Planning Duty Officer, should be notified at the earliest opportunity so this can commence.
c. Location
At least one venue per Local Authority District should have been identified, they should meet a set of criteria (similar to that of the Tactical
Coordination and Strategic Coordination Centres) such as teleconferencing facilities, wi-fi access, meeting and break-out rooms.
Virtual LCG’s may also be held via teleconference if the situation warrants it.
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d. Membership
Membership will vary depending on the type of incident. Those organisations not required to respond at the scene, or who may not have the
correct Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to respond to the scene are likely to be requested to sit at the LCG.
4.4 Tactical Coordination
If activated, the purpose of the Tactical Co-ordinating Group (TCG) is to ensure that the actions taken by the operational level are co-
ordinated, coherent and integrated, in order to achieve maximum effectiveness and efficiency. Physical TCG meetings will take place at
Norfolk Police Headquarters, Falconers Chase, Wymondham, NR18 0WW (OCC).
It will usually comprise relevant tactical representatives from Category 1 and 2 Responders and other relevant organisations. It is important
to understand that the position of the tactical representative is role specific and not rank related.
A TCG could be activated when: the incident can no longer be managed at the Operational level or a multi-agency plan states it should be
automatically activated.
Tactical reps have a role to play before, during and after an emergency:
Before an Emergency:
Attend all relevant NRF working group meetings as
appropriate
Ensure you and your support staff are trained for their role
Familiarise yourself with all relevant emergency plans
Make contact and maintain lines of communication with
other NRF partners
Attend training and exercises as appropriate
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During an Emergency:
Maintain a detailed log of significant actions and events for
use in subsequent debriefings and any official inquiries
related to the emergency. (Agencies have their own trained
emergency loggists who can provide support if necessary)
Ensure you have all items needed to fulfil your role, such as
mobile phone charger, relevant emergency plans,
emergency contact list, maps, etc.
On arrival introduce yourself to other tactical representatives
at the earliest opportunity
Throughout the emergency response, ensure effective
contact with your operational personnel in order to maintain
close links with what is happening on the ground
Update your Strategic representative of any changes to the
situation.
After an Emergency:
Attend any debriefs (internal and multi-agency) when
requested
Ensure that any training needs are addressed for yourself
and other staff
Ensure that any emergency plans are reviewed and
amended as necessary
Compile and archive all incident logs as they may be
required in a future inquiry.
See Appendix E Tactical Aide Memoire.
4.5 Strategic Coordination
The Strategic Coordination Group (SCG) establishes the strategy and framework within which the Operational and Tactical Representatives
will work in. Physical meetings will take place at Whitegates, Norwich Road, Hethersett, NR9 3DN. It will usually comprise relevant strategic
representatives from Category 1 and 2 Responder Organisations and other relevant organisations.
The SCG should be activated when an event or situation has an especially significant impact, substantial resource implications, involves a
large number of organisations or lasts for an extended duration of time. Strategic representatives have a role before, during and after an
emergency:
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Before an Emergency:
Ensure emergency planning is embedded at all relevant
levels within your organisation
Ensure plans and procedures are up to date, fit for purpose
and those arrangements are tested rigorously through
effective simulation exercises with NRF partners
Attendance at relevant NRF meetings
Ensure you and your support staff are trained for their role
Identify specialist/senior leads to support project based work
of the NRF to ensure capabilities can be delivered
During an Emergency:
Provide support and encouragement for the efforts of
officers of all departments involved in the response to an
emergency
Maintain close links with local communities and ensure their
views are taken into consideration
Maintain a detailed log of significant actions and events for
use in subsequent debriefings and any official inquiries
related to the emergency. (Agencies have their own trained
emergency loggists who can provide support if necessary)
Ensure regular briefings from their own tactical personnel to
maintain close links with what is happening on the ground
Plan for the recovery phase
Provide guidance to partners on emerging issues
After an Emergency:
A key source of strength, inspiration and leadership for the
local community in the recovery phase
Attend any memorial / remembrance service as appropriate.
Attend any debriefs (single and multi-agency) as requested
Ensure that the lessons learnt are incorporated into updated
and reviewed emergency plans and procedures
See Appendix D Strategic Aide Memoire.
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4.6 Government Level
Where the emergency warrants it, the SCG will report to the MHCLG Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED) and Operations Centre
through the Government Liaison Officer (GLO), who in turn will report to Government via the COBR.
It is highly likely that during the event, information will be required at a national level to allow for wider communications, planning and support
activities to be undertaken. Reporting can take various forms: single agency via emergency responder Co-ordination Centres or Lead
Government Departments or multi-agency via MHCLG Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED) to COBR.
At Central Government level, the response and recovery may be overseen by the Prime Minister and/or other Ministers sitting at COBR.
Multi-LRF coordination (Response Coordination Group ResCG) through RED will be established if an incident impacts on more than one
SCG area. The request for this additional layer of coordination is through the SCG Chairs in the affected areas into the GLO.
4.7 Military Aid
Military Aid to the Civil Authorities (MACA) can be sought when there is an urgent need to help to deal with an emergency arising from a
natural disaster or major incident. The SCG will consider early in the response to every significant incident whether there is, or may later be,
a role for the armed forces. The Joint Regional Liaison Officer (JRLO) from the Army Regional Point of Command (RPOC) Brigade
Headquarters will advise on the capabilities that may be available to support the response and should be contacted in the first instance. See
Appendix G Military Aid for more detail.
4.8 Finance
It is imperative that accurate records are kept of expenditure during the “response phase”. These records would be required should
subsequent claims for reimbursement be progressed via processes such as insurance claims or the Bellwin Scheme. Costs also need to be
recorded in relation to Military Aid.
4.9 Debriefing and Follow Up
Debriefing of all personnel should be regarded as an integral element of the response to an emergency. The purpose being not to apportion
blame, but to identify the most and least effective aspects of the response and any lessons identified. Debriefings should be structured, and
make best use of open questions to encourage participation.
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A good debriefing will gather information and intelligence and identify:
What went well and why (good practice)
What did not go well and why (shortfalls, malfunctions)
Identify areas for improvement, what would be done differently
next time
Provide recognition and praise as appropriate.
It is anticipated that debriefing will occur at operational, TCG and SCG levels. The use of ‘hot’ debriefing immediately after the emergency is
an effective forum to ensure all points from responders have been gathered. It provides a useful opportunity to address urgent operational
and welfare issues. In the event of an extended incident, this process should be carried out for each ‘shift’ going ‘off duty’.
Significant findings from this process should be recorded and an action log of issues to be addressed should be formulates. Typically this
document should contain outstanding actions, individual/organisation responsible for completion of the work and agreed timescales.
For multi-agency debriefs, it is anticipated that the monitoring of the progress of the agreed action log would be undertaken by the NRF
Business Manager on behalf of the NRF Training and Exercise Group.
Section 5 - Meeting the Needs of Those Affected
5.1 General
The response to an emergency must consider the welfare, care and management of anyone who may be affected. This encompasses a
number of groups:
The injured
Uninjured survivors and those without serious injuries
Fatalities
Families and friends of survivors
Those involved in the emergency but who are not physically
injured e.g. evacuees, witnesses
Specific groups such as children, the elderly and faith
groups
Family and friends of the deceased
Rescue and response personnel
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5.2 The Injured
The Ambulance Service will ensure casualties are prioritised in terms of treatment and transport using defined parameters. This may involve
establishing a casualty clearing structure or area which will be staffed by Ambulance and medical staff.
The Ambulance Service is responsible for providing the Police with definitive casualty numbers and providing details of which casualty has
been conveyed to which hospital. Where possible family groups will be kept together but this will depend on the clinical needs of each
casualty.
Casualties with minor injuries that can be dealt with on scene will be managed by Ambulance and/or medical staff under the direction of the
senior clinician on scene (usually the Medical Advisor or Forward Medical Advisor Doctor) these casualties may be transported to the
Survivor Reception Centre for further documentation to be completed.
5.3 Fatalities
HM Coroner has the ultimate responsibility for establishing the identity of the deceased together with the cause and time of death. HM
Coroner has jurisdiction over bodies on UK soil (regardless if British or non-British nationals). Amongst other duties this involves authority for
removal of deceased persons bodies from the scene, recommendation to open an Emergency Mortuary, appointment of key roles, setting
identification criteria, chairing the Identification Commission and authorising the release of deceased persons bodies to the lawfully entitled
person.
HM Coroner must be engaged as soon as possible in an emergency that has led to fatalities.
The Police will appoint a Senior Identification Manager to lead arrangements regarding the identification of the deceased. Police DVI
(Disaster Victim Identification) Officers, Family Liaison Officers and Police Search Advisors (PolSA) may also be involved in this process.
Full details of the arrangements for dealing with fatalities are contained in the NRF Excess Death, Mass Fatalities and Temporary Mortuary
Plan.
A Casualty Bureau provides a means of searching and creating records for missing persons, casualties and evacuees and survivors and the
identification of potential matches. This is the responsibility of the Police, and may not need to be activated in all instances.
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5.4 Faith and Diversity Needs
An emergency could involve people from differing faith, cultural and religious backgrounds. All responding agencies must ensure that
consideration is given to the specific associated needs during these traumatic events.
Requirements may relate to medical treatment, gender issues, hygiene, diet, clothing, accommodation and place for prayer.
Every care should be taken to cater for those needs. It is important to engage appropriate faith, religious and ethnic community leaders at an
early stage. Contact with the Norfolk and Waveney Churches Together Ecumenical Major Incident Team should be made.
Where there are fatalities, responders should also be aware of customs in respect of dealing with the deceased. Hospital Chaplains are
conversant with these customs and could be asked to assist.
5.5 Family and Friends Reception Centres
Previous emergencies have shown that people will travel to the scene or other focal points, if they believe that their family or friends may
have been involved. The local authorities will lead in identifying and establish the Family and Friends Reception Centres at suitable locations,
in consultation with the Police and Voluntary & Faith Sector. Where necessary, faith organisations should be present.
These centres will assist in the process of reuniting family and friends with survivors and provide the capacity to register, interview and
provide shelter.
They can be near the scene, in the area of the community affected or at arrival and departure points. Accurate and timely information is vital
and a method for collection and distribution at the centres must be set up.
5.6 Humanitarian Assistance Centres (HAC)
In the aftermath of an emergency, the immediate humanitarian concerns will be dealt with by the establishment of Rest Centres, Family and
Friends Reception Centres and associated facilities.
However it is important to consider the humanitarian requirements over a longer period. If it is decided that there is a need to provide a wider
range of practical and emotional support services than Reception Centres can offer, the SCG can authorise the activation of a Humanitarian
Assistance Centre (HAC).
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The composition and location of the HAC will be emergency specific.
Key functions of the HAC can be summarised as:
A focal point for information and assistance to families and
friends of those missing, injured or killed, survivors, and to
all those directly affected by, and involved in, the emergency
Enable those affected to benefit from appropriate
information and assistance in a timely, coordinated manner
Where necessary, facilitate the gathering of forensic
samples in a timely manner, to assist the identification
process
Offer access to, and guidance on a range of agencies and
services, allowing people to make informed choices
according to their needs
Ensure a seamless multi-agency approach to humanitarian
assistance in emergencies that should minimise duplication
and avoid gaps
Full details of this process in Norfolk are contained in the NRF Humanitarian Assistance Plan.
5.7 Vulnerable Persons
During any emergency, responders must be aware that a proportion of those involved may be more vulnerable to the incident than others.
The accepted meaning for ‘vulnerable’ in this context is ‘those that are less able to help themselves in the circumstances of the emergency.’
There are easily identifiable establishments such as care and rest homes, hospitals and schools. However there are likely to be people living
in the community that are vulnerable for example the elderly, frail and people with temporary medical conditions.
It is accepted that there is not a single data source of vulnerable people; therefore a range of sources must be considered to create what is
termed a ‘list of lists’. These include:
Category 1 and 2 responders’ plans
Community NHS Trusts
Community Emergency Plans supported by local knowledge
Norfolk County Council has a mapping browser system which
could provide information relating to care homes within the
county
Norfolk County Council - Safeguarding Teams, Adult Social
Services, Children’s Services
Care Quality commission Website
District Councils will hold information through Housing,
Sheltered Housing, Local Neighbourhood Teams and
Revenues & Benefits.
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Organisations should be aware of data sharing protocols when compiling this information. If time allows and circumstances are appropriate,
a cell should be established to collate and distribute information to the appropriate responders, reporting into the evacuation cell. See
Appendix F Support Cells
.
5.8 Shelter and Rest Centres
Shelter includes buildings, humanitarian assistance and support for individuals. It may be required for a few hours, through to several weeks.
It is unlikely that the whole population will require shelter, those that are able and willing to make their own provision should be encouraged to
do so. For others accommodation in the form of Rest Centres will be provided.
The responsibility for organising, staffing and providing logistical support for these Rest Centres (and Survivor Reception Centres) rests with
the relevant Borough / City / District Council. However, they are dependant also on support from other organisations, such as the Voluntary
and Faith Sector and the NHS.
Within Norfolk a number of locations have been identified as potential Rest Centres. These satisfy the required criteria and detailed plans for
each location have been prepared. It is important therefore that the appropriate Borough / City / District Council is fully engaged in the
response at an early stage.
People that are being evacuated should be advised on timings, where to go, what transport arrangements there are and what to take with
them. Some information regarding potential emergencies and emergency kits can be found in Community Emergency Plans and leaflets
available on the Norfolk Prepared web site: www.norfolkprepared.gov.uk
The long term housing needs of those made homeless by an emergency, or those who need to be evacuated for long periods of time, is also
the responsibility of the Borough / City / District Council.
5.9 Evacuation
The purpose of evacuation is to move people and (where appropriate) other living creatures away from an actual or potential danger to a
place that is safer for them.
It is very important to recognise that an evacuation should only take place if the benefit of leaving an area significantly outweighs the risk of
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sheltering in place. Evacuation should not be assumed to be the best option for all risks and it may not be the safest.
This document does not provide specific details for all risks and eventualities; it provides guidance that is scalable in order to manage a range
of risks. Detailed information reference evacuation and shelter can be found in the NRF Evacuation and Shelter Guidance.
Section 6 Communications
6.1 Norfolk Resilient Telecommunications Plan
The above plan ensures that local responders, at all levels, are able to communicate and share information effectively in the event of an
emergency. The plan can be accessed by Category 1 and 2 Responders via the following link:
https://collaborate.resilience.gov.uk/RDService/home/57323/Resilient-Telecommunications-Incl.-Airwave-SOP
6.2 Airwave
Police, Fire and Rescue Service, Ambulance Service and LA Emergency Planning Teams in Norfolk all utilise Airwave, a digital
communications system. The NRF Airwave Interoperability Standard Operating Procedures (located in the Norfolk Resilience Forum
Telecommunications Plan) have been developed to ensure continuity of operations.
If necessary, Norfolk Constabulary can deploy a number of Airwave terminals for use by other responders.
6.3 British Telecom
British Telecom (BT) can provide a wide range of telecommunication service support during the response to an emergency.
On request a BT Local Liaison Manager (LLM) will attend at the SCG, TCG or other emergency response meeting. The initial point of contact
will be via the BT National Emergency Linkline.
6.4 Mobile Telecommunications Privileged Access Scheme (MTPAS)
In the aftermath of an emergency the mobile networks can become overwhelmed with a high concentration of calls. To ensure that
responding agencies are able to maintain access to these networks, the MTPAS has been designed.
To invoke MTPAS, and following an agreed protocol, the Police Gold Commander advises all network operators that a major emergency has
been declared. This notification will prompt the invocation of MTPAS. Handsets installed with the special SIM card will have a much higher
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likelihood of being able to connect to their network and make calls than other customers.
Police Gold Commanders must be aware that a decision to invoke MTPAS may have unforeseen consequences by inhibiting data links for
Category 1 Responders. Therefore careful consideration and consultation must be made before taking this action, and the invocation of
MTPAS is not viewed as a matter of course for all emergencies.
Section 7 - Working with the Media
7.1 Multi-Agency Major Incident Communications Plan
This plan has been produced by Communications Officers within Norfolk Category 1 and 2 Responder organisations. It provides
comprehensive guidance on how agencies will deal with all elements of the media response. Early activation of this plan is essential.
7.2 Warning and Informing the Public
One of the early considerations in any emergency is the need to identify the extent of the information that needs to be given to the public.
This may include messages to evacuate or take shelter (“Go In, Stay In, Tune In”).
The media are an ideal conduit to get these messages to a wide audience using local radio and TV stations, as well as trusted organisations
social media sites. The Media Cell, if possible, will be co-located with the TCG.
7.3 Media Briefing Point
Operational Commanders must be aware that the media will seek access at or near the scene. Therefore a suitable location (a media
briefing point) should be identified in order for them, for example, to obtain pictures without interfering with the work being carried out, at the
scene or rest centres.
7.4 Initial Holding Statement
During any emergency the media pressure for information will be immediate and sustained. It is essential that press officers from the
responding agencies liaise and consult effectively with each other, whilst dealing with the needs of their individual organisations.
There will be considerable pressure to produce a Holding Statement at an early stage; therefore the coordinating agency will produce one
that is agreed by all responders. Sample holding statements are provided within the NRF Multi-Agency Major Incident Communications Plan.
7.5 Media Centre
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If the emergency is on a large scale and is likely to attract media attention for a protracted period, consideration will be given to setting up a
Media Centre. This will provide journalists with a base from which to operate, shelter and access welfare facilities. The benefits of this are
improved communications and rapid organisation of press briefings and interviews.
7.6 Telephone Helpline
Depending on the nature of the emergency and likely public demand an early decision to set up a call centre must be made.
A set of frequently asked questions specific to the event for use by call centre operators must be drawn up, together with a briefing, the Media
Cell will be responsible for this. Protocol will need to be agreed if the Police Casualty Bureau is also activated.
7.7 Connecting in a Crisis
‘Connecting in a Crisis’ is a BBC initiative that seeks to help meet the public demand for information in the event of an emergency. It is about
warning and informing in the interests of public safety and concentrating on delivering essential information quickly.
Preparatory work undertaken ensures there are close links between responders and BBC local broadcasters on both radio and television, so
that in the event of an emergency, there is a means to provide essential information, warnings, advice and reassurance in the first few hours.
Section 8 - Investigation
8.1 Overview
All emergencies have the potential to be a crime scene; it is likely that there will be an investigation, whether it is for an HM Coroner inquest,
criminal or civil proceedings, public inquiries or internal investigations.
The Police will normally appoint a Senior Investigating Officer (SIO) to oversee all aspects of the investigation, including liaison with other
statutory bodies as necessary.
8.2 Evidence Gathering
This will start with protection of the scene and other locations as appropriate by implementing robust cordons with clearly designated and
controlled scene access control points.
All agencies are aware of the need to preserve evidence providing this does not inhibit rescue operations.
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8.3 Statutory Bodies
In addition to the Police, a number of other agencies will have a statutory duty to investigate an emergency depending on the circumstances.
These could include:
Animal Health & Veterinary Laboratory Agency (AHVLA)
Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB)
Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB)
Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB)
Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
Fire and Rescue Service (FRS)
Environment Agency (EA)
Local Authority (LA)
Office of Rail and Road
If they require access to the scene, this must be formally facilitated through the command structure in place.
Section 9 - Staff Welfare
9.1 Overview
Emergencies will put enormous demands on all those involved in the response and recovery. Agencies must therefore ensure they look after
the physical and psychological welfare of staff. Some of the Voluntary & Faith Group Sector have the skills sets to help with the physical and
psychological welfare of staff.
9.2 Physical Requirements
To ensure responders remain effective the following are key provisions that must be in place:
Reasonable shift lengths
Shift rotas
Refreshments at all locations, to provide warmth or prevent
dehydration
Facilities for taking meals away from the scene
Washing and changing facilities
Medical and first aid facilities
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9.3 Psychological Requirements
In addition to the physical needs, meeting the psychological requirements of staff is vital. They include:
Proper briefings
Honest information about what to expect
A quiet space to unwind and think
An opportunity to discuss experiences with someone
Access to information on sources of help
Information on what constitutes a “normal reaction”
Where necessary support for responder’s families
Debriefing at the end of a day’s activity
Access to skilled professional help
Provision of Occupational Health Services
Section 10 - Recovery
Recovery is the process of rebuilding, restoring and rehabilitating the community following an emergency. The lead organisation for recovery
is likely to be different that in response, therefore a formal handover process will need to take place.
Transfer Lead Agency Responsibility
The criteria for assessing when the handover can take place from response to recovery should be agreed by the Chair of the SCG and the
Chair of the Recovery Coordination Group (RCG).
Within Norfolk, it is accepted that if only one District Council is involved in an emergency, the Chief Executive of that District will usually have
the responsibility for the response and recovery efforts. It follows therefore that a District or County Council Managing Director (or their
nominee) can activate recovery arrangements in Norfolk.
If more than one District is involved in an emergency, Norfolk County Council will assume the coordination role for recovery.
In some cases a gradual hand-over of responsibility from response to recovery may be more effective, e.g. if a number of sites are involved.
See Appendix H Handover Certificate Response to Recovery for a Handover Certificate template. Note: The NRF document “Norfolk
Recovery Guidance” provides further information regarding recovery processes and protocols.
Further detail guidance can be found in the NRF Recovery Guidance.
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Appendix A Norfolk Resilience Forum
Section 2 of the Civil Contingencies Act 2004 and Regulation 4(1) of the Regulations requires “Category 1” and “Category 2” responders in a
local resilience area to co-operate with each other in connection with the performance of duties under the legislation. The statutory Local
Resilience Forum has been established in Norfolk and is known as the “Norfolk Resilience Forum” (NRF).
The NRF is the collective name for all groups within the framework. Membership involves organisations identified as Category 1 and
Category 2 organisations within the legislation, plus many other agencies. All organisations represented within the NRF make valuable
contributions to the wider community resilience planning activity in Norfolk, before, during and after an emergency.
Category 1 Responders Civil Contingencies Act 2004
Category 2 Responders Civil Contingencies Act 2004
Borough Council of King's Lynn & West Norfolk
Anglian Water Services Ltd
Breckland Council
Associated British Ports
British Transport Police
BT Worldwide Networks
Broadland District Council
Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs
East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust
East Coast Community Health Care
Environment Agency
Essex and Suffolk Water
Great Yarmouth Borough Council
East Midlands Trains
James Paget Hospital NHS Trust
Greater Anglia
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
Great Yarmouth Port Authority
NHS England Midlands and East (EAST)
Health & Safety Executive
Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust
Highways England (Amey)
Norfolk Constabulary
King’s Lynn Conservancy Board
Norfolk County Council
National Grid Transco
Norfolk Fire & Rescue Service
Network Rail (Anglian Region)
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North Norfolk District Council
NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups
Norwich City Council
Norfolk Community Health & Care NHS Trust
NHS England
Norwich International Airport
Public Health England
UK Power Networks
Queen Elizabeth Hospital Kings Lynn NHS Trust
Wells Harbour Commissioners
South Norfolk Council
Armed forces
HQ 7
th
Infantry Brigade & HQ East
Royal Air Force
Voluntary & Faith sector
Norfolk Lowland Search & Rescue
4x4 Response (Norfolk and Suffolk)
Norfolk RAYNET
Borough Council of Kings Lynn & West Norfolk Emergency
Wardens
North Anglia RAYNET
British Red Cross
Rail Care Team
Cruse Bereavement Care
Rapid Relief Team
Hemsby Lifeboat
Samaritans Purse
Norfolk & Waveney Churches Together Ecumenical Major
Incident Team
The Salvation Army
Norfolk Civil Protection Volunteers
The Samaritans
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Specialist Organisations
Met Office
Animal Health & Veterinary Laboratory Agency
Natural England
Broads Authority
Norfolk & Suffolk Foundation Trust
Ministry for Communities, Housing & Local Government -
Resilience and Emergencies Division
Water Management Alliance of Internal Drainage Boards
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Appendix B Agency Responsibilities
The below details the responsibilities relevant organisations have during a Major Incident. All agencies have a responsibility to participate in
coordinated media engagement where appropriate.
Emergency Services
British Transport Police (BTP)
In conjunction with other agencies the saving and protection of
life
To secure, protect and preserve the scene to safeguard
evidence for subsequent enquiries or criminal proceedings
In incidents on the jurisdiction of BTP, the coordination of the
emergency services, local authorities and other organisations
acting in support at the scene of the emergency
In conjunction with other emergency services in response to
incidents on the jurisdiction of BTP, control access to the
emergency location through maintenance of cordons at
appropriate distances (where cordons are relevant to the
emergency)
Coordinate land based search activities for survivors and
casualties in the immediate vicinity of a disaster scene, where
necessary using support from other emergency services, the
armed Forces or volunteers in the response to incidents on the
jurisdiction of BTP
Process casualty information and take responsibility for
identifying the arranging the removal of fatalities on behalf of HM
Coroner
The investigation of the emergency and obtaining and securing
of evidence in conjunction with other investigative bodies where
applicable (Health & Safety Executive, Air, Rail or Marine
Accident Investigation Branches)
Provide a Police input into the recovery process
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East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust (EEAST)
To save life together with the other emergency services
To provide treatment, stabilisation and care of those injured at
the scene
To provide a trained and experienced Medical Advisor and
Forward Medical Advisor (Doctor) to advise the Ambulance
Incident Commander and Operational Commander where
required. The Medical Advisor will assist in the casualty clearing
station and liaise with specialist receiving units such as Major
Trauma Units.
To provide appropriate transport, health care professionals,
equipment and resources as appropriate
To consider mobilisation of specialist assets such as the
Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) and Mass Casualty
Vehicles(s)
To establish an effective triage sieve and triage sort system to
determine the priority evacuation needs of those injured and to
establish a safe location for casualty holding and casualty
clearing areas
To provide a command and control structure at the emergency
for all National Health Service (NHS) and other medical
resources
To provide communication facilities for NHS resources at the
scene, with direct radio links to hospitals via EEAST Hospital
Liaison Officers.
To nominate and alert the receiving hospitals from the official list
of hospitals to receive those injured and inform the other
agencies as appropriate
To arrange the most appropriate means of transport for those
injured to the receiving and specialist hospitals, utilising air
assets where appropriate
To maintain emergency cover throughout the East of England
area and return to a state of normality at the earliest time
To act as a portal into the wider health services including the
Public Health England Emergency Planning Advisors, and in the
event of a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear
emergency liaise with Public Health England on the convening
of the Science and Technical Advice Cell (STAC)
Maritime Coastguard Agency
Initiate and coordinate civilian maritime search and rescue
Mobilising, organising and dispatching resources to assist
persons in distress at sea, in danger on the cliffs or shoreline, or
in danger in inland areas due to flooding
Dealing with pollution at sea and in conjunction with local
authorities for the shoreline clean up
Coordination of search and rescue for emergencies on the
Broads
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Norfolk Constabulary
In conjunction with other agencies the saving and protection of
life
To secure, protect and preserve the scene to safeguard
evidence for subsequent enquiries or criminal proceedings
In most instances, the coordination of the emergency services,
local authorities and other organisations acting in support at the
scene of the emergency
In conjunction with other emergency services, control access to
the emergency location through maintenance of cordons at
appropriate distances (where cordons are relevant to the
emergency)
Coordinate land based search activities for survivors and
casualties in the immediate vicinity of a disaster scene, where
necessary using support from other emergency services, the
armed Forces or volunteers
Process casualty information and take responsibility for
identifying the arranging the removal of fatalities on behalf of HM
Coroner
The investigation of the emergency and obtaining and securing
of evidence in conjunction with other investigative bodies where
applicable (Health & Safety Executive, Air, Rail or Marine
Accident Investigation Branches)
Prevention of crime
Assume overall control of terrorist related emergencies at the
scene, including additional measures to restrict access or
evacuate people
Provide a Police input into the recovery process
Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service
In conjunction with other agencies saving , protecting life and
rendering humanitarian services
In conjunction with other agencies provide decontamination for
Mass casualties
Provision of firefighting, fire prevention advice and engagement,
salvage and fire investigation
Providing advice for safety management within the vicinity of a
disaster and manage events such as, chemical, radiological and
Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosive
(CBRNE) threats
Responding to collapsed structures to render humanitarian
services
Provision of water search, rescue and recovery
Detection identification, monitoring and management of
hazardous materials
Protection of the environment
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Local Authorities
Shared responsibilities:
Provide support to the emergency services both during and in
the immediate aftermath of an emergency
Continue to provide support for the local and wider community
through any disruptions
Elected Member liaison
Coastal pollution clean-up for a Tier 2 (District) and Tier 2 (NCC
coordination) using contractor
County:
Coordinate a cross local authority border response
Coordinate Recovery phase of emergency of multi-districts
involved
Participate in the management of disaster funds
Trading Standards (animal disease control, food safety)
Provide support to District/City/Borough councils
Coordinate the establishment of an Emergency Mortuary, if
required
Co-ordination of the provision of transport
Public Health advice in conjunction with other agencies
Highways assist other responders with traffic management
a. Norfolk County Council Adult Social Care
Will take the lead in managing the provision of social care for
vulnerable adults who have been affected by the incident and
are in need of such services
Will take the lead in managing the situation if vulnerable adults
cannot be cared for by their usual individual or organisational
carer as a result of the incident
Will work with partners in Health to provide Mental Health Social
Care Services to those vulnerable adults who are in need of
such services.
b. Norfolk County Council Children’s Services
Will take the lead if Norfolk County Council becomes a
Corporate Parent to children, because local authorities are
responsible for looking after children who cannot be cared for by
their parents (e.g. if orphaned).
Will provide recovery assistance to schools if necessary,
specifically recovery of sufficient pupil places in schools
following a major incident and the associated recovery in pupil
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learning.
The Critical Incident Team provides support in schools and
settings for children suffering psychological trauma as the result
of a major incident.
In the medium to long term following a major incident Children's
Services works with partners in Health to provide Child &
Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to those children
and young people who have been affected.
City/Borough/District:
If required identify and manage Humanitarian Assistance
Centres, Survivor Reception Centres, Rest Centres, Family and
Friends Reception Centres and Family Assistance Centres
Liaise with Parish, Town Councils, Housing, Health, businesses
and the local community with regard to preparing for and
mitigating the effect of an emergency
As the emphasis moves from response to recovery, assume the
coordinating role to facilitate the rehabilitation of the community
and restoration of the environment. This aspect must
commence as soon as the emergency occurs
Use local authority resources to assist with the mitigation of the
effects on people, property and infrastructure
Arrange temporary accommodation for persons made homeless
as a result of the emergency or major emergency
Act or advise on any environmental matter resulting from the
emergency (in conjunction with the Environment Agency)
Provide advice on dangerous structures.
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Health
Acute Hospitals
Maximise bed availability and rapidly free up capacity in
conjunction with community and primary care partners. Target
10% of bed base available within 6 hours and a further 10%
within 12hrs
Make provision to double normal level 3 ventilated bed capacity
Within the first 24hrs following the incident be prepared to
participate in a teleconference to ascertain the likely impact
across all services
Make provision for self-presenters who may arrive prior to any
ambulance conveyed patients, including those who may need
decontaminating
Consideration of the potential to provide trained clinical support
to the scene (specific tasking only)
Consider acceptance of ITU transfers if not the receiving
hospital
Consider activation of lockdown arrangements to support site
security and the need to protect access to healthcare facilities
for those in need of treatment
In the event of being in a scene cordon, act as a temporary rest
centre or reception centre
Identify ways to increase P1, P2 or P3 capacity after
consultation with Ambulance Service to identify the primary
need.
Where appropriate, cease all elective activity.
Consider reducing or cancelling outpatient activity and use
outpatient areas for P3 casualties
Identify patients suitable for rapid discharge - utilise Integrated
Discharge Planning Team.
Supplement available equipment and consider the alternative
use of specialist/day care beds.
Manage excess deaths in a hospital setting
Ensure critical services continue whilst accommodating
increased numbers of casualties.
Assist the recovery of NHS assets and services and aid the
return to normality.
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Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCG)
Ensure contracts with all commissioned provider organisations
(including independent and third sector) contain relevant EPRR
elements, including business continuity
Monitor compliance by each commissioned provider
organisation with their contractual obligations in respect of
EPRR and with applicable Core Standards
Ensure robust escalation procedures are in place so that if a
commissioned provider has an incident the provider can inform
the CCG 24/7
Provide a route of escalation for the LHRP in respect of
commissioned provider EPRR preparedness
Support NHS England in discharging its EPRR functions and
duties locally, including supporting health economy tactical
coordination during incidents (alert level 2-4)
Fulfil the duties of a Category 2 responder under the CCA 2004
and the requirements in respect of emergencies within the NHS
Act 2006 (as amended).
Provide a Director On-Call 24/7 to be available as the first point
of contact for the Norfolk and Waveney CCGs.
Provide a C3 function for the Norfolk Health system in response
to an incident, emergency and recovery.
Community Healthcare Service Providers
Reprioritise community based services to maximise capacity and capability including:
Creation of capacity in the community to enable acute hospitals
to discharge patients to community hospitals or home
Deferring non-urgent planned community activity
Expediting discharges from community beds
Suspension of operational training and redeployment of
staff/managers
Liaising with NHSE East / CCG’s
Ensuring that a continuing health service is provided to those
unaffected by the incident including non-incident minor injury
plus other patients if held at scene for prolonged periods
If requested, support medical coverage at Survivor Reception
Centres wherever possible These services may also be
augmented by the voluntary services via Local Authority
arrangements or other commissioned clinical providers
GP’s and community pharmacy services may be asked to
support treatment of patients who are of a lower priority in care
settings, and assist in managing patients triaged away from A&E
GPs may work Emergency Departments to see/ triage existing
patients out of the department to make way for incident victims.
General Practitioners can support messages being issued to the
public to give reassurance following the incident.
Primary Care services are part of the mechanisms to ensure
those involved in the incident receive appropriate mental health
support and are able to triage those who are emotionally
traumatized in the appropriate support and response services.
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NHS 111
Provide telephone assessment service for symptomatic and worried well.
Provide consistent information via non clinical staff to callers with related non symptomatic queries Information database can be
used to provide consistent information across the National Service.
Provide access to a National Operations Centre 24hrs a day that can provide accurate data on calls received, symptoms assessed
and outcomes of calls.
NHS England and NHS Improvement East of England
Maintain the capacity and capability to direct and coordinate
the regional NHS response to an incident 24/7
Discharge the local NHS England EPRR duties as a
Category 1 responder under the CCA 2004.
Ensure integration of plans across the region to deliver a
unified NHS response to incidents, including ensuring the
provision of surge capacity
Seek assurance through the local LHRP and commissioners
that the Core Standards are met and that each local health
economy can effectively respond to and recover from
incidents
Norfolk & Suffolk Foundation Trust
Ensure adequate mental health liaison resources are made
available to responding care settings in the immediate
aftermath
Assist with the provision of estates, staffing and
transportation when requested and subject to operational
requirements
Assist the Acute Trusts to create and maintain capacity by
deferring transfer of non-urgent mental health patients
requiring not connected to the incident, where practicable
and clinically appropriate to do so in accordance with Good
Practice
Enable the discharge of mental health patients from the
Acute Trusts where practicable and clinically appropriate to
do so in accordance with Good Practice
Provision of urgent mental health treatment for those
experiencing immediate and severe symptoms including
suicidal ideation
Contribute specialist input in respect of monitoring,
counselling and outreach services to the multi-agency
psychological support effort when established
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Public Health England (PHE)
Public Health England is be responsible for providing public health Emergency Preparedness Resilience and Response leadership and scientific
and technical advice at all organisational levels, working in partnership with other organisations to protect the public:
Provide national leadership and coordination for the public
health elements of the emergency preparedness, resilience and
response system.
Provide health protection services, expertise and advice and co-
ordinate the PHE response to major incidents
Provide risk analysis and assessment of emerging diseases,
natural extreme events, chemical, radiological and Chemical
Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosive (CBRNE) threats
to inform the Department of Health and other government
departments and agencies, health and multi-agency EPRR
Ensure provision of high quality and timely public health data to
the Secretary of State, NHS England and providers, local
authorities and across Government, in preparedness and
response
Provide guidance to professionals in health and local
government and other sectors
Communicate with the public by providing information and
advice relevant to PHE’s responsibilities.
Supporting organisations
Animal Health & Veterinary Laboratory Agency (AHVLA)
In response to an outbreak of exotic notifiable disease AHVLA will implement disease control policies to support the Lead Government
Department, Defra by;
Preventing the spread and eradicating the disease, to regain
disease-free status
Taking action on the Infected Premises
Restricting animal and animal product movement controls
Restricting leisure activities to reduce the risk of spread of
disease
Investigating the origin of disease
Carrying out surveillance to investigate the spread of disease
Broads Authority
Provide a range of waterborne craft, trained staff and 4x4
vehicles
Conserve and enhance the natural beauty, wildlife and cultural
heritage of the Norfolk Broads
Protect the interests of navigation
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Environment Agency
Primary responsibilities for environmental protection of water
(including ground water, estuaries and coastal waters), land and
air
Key responsibility for maintaining and operating flood defences
on certain specified rivers and coastlines
To provide remedial action to prevent and mitigate the
environmental effects of the emergency
To provide specialist advice on waste management,
environmental pollution and hazardous sites
To provide warnings of flooding via the Floodline Warnings
Direct system to professional partners, media, business and the
community
To monitor the environmental effects of an emergency and to
investigate its cause
To collect evidence for future enforcement or cost recovery
Participate in multi-organisational management teams for major
events affecting our interest areas
Establishment of an Air Quality Cell, if requested, to coordinate
air monitoring during non CBRNE emergencies
Health and Safety Executive
Provide information to Category 1 and 2 responders
Cooperate with Category 1 and 2 responders
Investigate the cause of a Major Incident
Lead Government Department
Where the scale or complexity of an emergency is such that some degree of central government coordination or support becomes necessary,
a designated Lead Government Department (LGD) will be made responsible for the overall management of the Government response.
Amongst the responsibilities of the LGD are:-
Produce a brief, accurate situation report on the nature and
scale of the emergency and submit this promptly along with the
central briefing for media purposes to their Minister
Draw upon and apply the relevant capabilities applicable to the
emergency in hand and if required, coordinate the support
needed from other Government Departments and agencies
through the Cabinet Office Briefing Room (COBR)
Use its authority decisively to take whatever executive decisions
and actions are needed from the centre to handle the
emergency or to help local responders to deal with it
Where the LGD need scientific and technical advice they will
activate a Science Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).
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Meteorological Office (Met Office)
Provide the National Severe Weather Warning Service
(NSWWS)
Provide regional email weather briefings from the Met Office
Advisor (Civil Contingencies)
Participation in Norfolk LRF teleconferences when the weather
leads to resilience issues or the weather will have an impact
on an incident.
Provision of Chemet plume predictions when appropriate, these
explained by the Met Office Advisor for interpretation and use by
the LRF, if required.
MHCLG Departments for Communities and Local Government Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED)
Norfolk is covered by the Central Resilience and Emergencies Division (RED), which is based in Birmingham. In times of non-emergency
the RED is responsible for coordinating emergency preparedness across the central region.
In response to an emergency, the initial action of the RED is to establish communication with the SCG and to deploy a Government
Liaison Officer (GLO).
During an emergency the MHCLG Co-ordinating Group and Operations Centre will be formed in the most serious circumstances. It does
not become involved in local command and control arrangements unless empowered to by Emergency Regulations.
The precise role of the MHCLG Co-ordinating Group and Operations Centre will vary depending on the scale and nature of the emergency.
Generic aspects will involve:-
o Advising on regional priorities and guiding the
deployment of scarce resources
o Facilitating mutual aid arrangements, where
appropriate
o Providing early warning of emerging major challenges
and how they might best be addressed
o Ensuring an effective flow of communication between
local and national levels, including reports to the
national level on the response and recovery effort
o Ensuring that the national input to response and
recovery is coordinated with the local efforts
o Collate and maintain a Strategic picture of the
situation with a focus on consequence management
and recovery
o Raising to a national level any issues than cannot be
resolved at a local level
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a. MHCLG Response Co-ordination Group (ResCG)
The purpose of the ResCG is to:
Develop a shared understanding of the evolving situation
(including horizon scanning)
Assess the emergency’s actual and/or potential impact
Review the steps being taken to manage the situation
Gain information for the LGD (Lead Government Department)
and CCS (Civil Contingencies Secretariat)
Discuss mutual aid and any other assistance that may be
needed /provided
Identify any issues which cannot be resolved at a local level and
need to be raised at national level (e.g. niche capability gaps).
b. Multi-Agency Support Group (East)
To provide the framework for establishing and maintaining situational awareness among regional, sub-national and local organisations
across multiple counties in and Around the East of England
A non-statutory group comprising organisations with responsibility for delivering goods, services, transport or logistics.
Transport
Highways England
Highways England Traffic Officer Service will:
Provide ongoing support to traffic management, monitoring
CCTV and emergency roadside phones and Tactical sign/signal
setting, including public information through Variable Message
Signs both static and mobile
Provide emergency traffic management and maintain temporary
or permanent road closures
Through service providers and managing agents, repair and,
where able, improve roads and infrastructure
Clear vehicles and other debris from those roads and other
places to which the Highways England has responsibility
Keep arterial routes clear by providing high visibility patrols
Manage the day to day operation of the Strategic Road Network
(facilitated by the Eastern Region Control Centre) within the
affected area
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Highways England will:
Through service providers and managing agents provide
ongoing support to traffic management including public
information and signage
Through service providers and managing agents provide and
maintain temporary or permanent road closures
Through service providers and managing agents repair and,
where able, improve roads and infrastructure
Clear debris from those roads (A11, A12 & A47) and other
places to which Highways England has responsibility
Support the management of the day to day operation of the
motorway network (by the East Regional Control Centre and
mobile patrols within the affected area, including minor
improvements, congestion relief, encouragement of alternative
travel modes and reviewing the adequacy of the current network
and planning for the future.
Norwich Airport
To liaise with Category 1 and 2 responders in the planning,
response and recovery phases to an incident at Norwich
Airport.
To ensure Norwich Airport can fulfil the task required on
behalf of the aircraft operators to maximum effect, during a
major incident
Greater Anglia
In conjunction with other responding agencies, respond to
incidents on the railway network throughout the County to
assist in saving and protecting life, to mitigate the effects of
any incident and restore rail services.
Provide appropriately trained and equipped personnel to
respond to any incident on the County rail network.
Provide a Railcare Incident Care Team to provide
humanitarian assistance, in partnership with other agencies,
to those affected by a railway accident.
Cooperate and communicate with other responding
agencies in the event of a major incident away from the
railway network, recognising that the restoration or
continuation of rail services can play a major part in
mitigating the effects of, and recovery from, a major incident.
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Utility Companies
Anglian Water
Continue to supply our customers with drinking water to
meet our obligations under the Security and Emergency
Measures Direction.
Liaise with Cat 1 responders and other Cat 2 responders to
assist in their responsibilities to the wider community, and to
ensure our actions are consistent with their legal obligations.
Priority will be given to the domestic needs of the sick,
elderly and other vulnerable customers.
Hospitals, schools and prisons are given priority as non-
household customers.
Sewerage services are provided under the undertaker’s
regulatory duties and provision is made to guard against
discharges from sewers and treatment works.
Essex & Suffolk Water
Continue to supply our customers with drinking water to
meet our obligations under the Security and Emergency
Measures Direction.
Liaise with Cat 1 responders and other Cat 2 responders to
assist in their responsibilities to the wider community, and to
ensure our actions are consistent with their legal obligations.
British Telecom (BT)
Cooperate and share information with Category 1 and 2 Responders across the UK during the planning and response phase of
emergency situations that impact or have the potential to impact BT Group (Brand, Networks, People or Customers)
Cadent Gas
Maintaining the continued flow of gas through our networks,
so that it is available for consumers as they require it
Ensuring the system is reliable and safe
Providing emergency response and repair service for gas
leaks or other emergencies, which includes handling calls
from the public reporting gas leaks and sending engineers to
fix them
Liaise and cooperate with Cat 1 responders and other Cat 2
responders in the event of a major incident
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Voluntary & Faith Groups
The voluntary sector has an important role to play in supporting the statutory services in response to many emergencies. There are
numerous voluntary aid societies and faith groups that are able to contribute towards the successful outcome of the response. Their support
can alleviate some pressure on responders by providing a range of humanitarian and practical services.
It is important to note that some voluntary agencies such as the British Red Cross and the St John Ambulance may already be engaged in
community activity which could impact on their availability.
The NRF has produced a Voluntary and Faith Capabilities Directory, which includes roles, contact details and response capability.
A memorandum of understanding has been written to record the principles of an arrangement between the NRF and the Voluntary and Faith
Sector.
Other organisations
The Insurance Industry
Experience has identified the crucial role that the insurance industry will play. Although their role is seen as focused on the recovery element,
it will be of great benefit if they are engaged in the early response. This will allow them to provide responders with an overview of how they
will assist those affected and any preliminary activity that would be of benefit during the response and recovery.
As a result, the Association of British Insurers (ABI) and Chartered Institute of Loss Adjusters (CILA) will nominate a single point of contact to
act on behalf of the industry, to facilitate effective information exchange. The Strategic Coordinating Group (SCG) will also nominate a point
of contact.
A member of the industry should be invited to join the Recovery Coordinating Group (RCG). See Norfolk Recovery Guidance document.
Community
Communities play a vital role in the response to, and recovery from emergencies. They can provide resources, expertise and knowledge to
support the responding agencies. Members of the community may be able to help themselves and can also provide support to local
vulnerable people who may need physical assistance or reassurance. The community may be able to advise response agencies on the
different cultural or language needs of its members.
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Within Norfolk there are pre-existing local networks. They can be a valuable source of information and can be utilised for the dissemination of
information. Community groups can assist in preparedness measures, for example in disseminating how to respond appropriately in an
emergency.
These include:
Elected Members
Parish & Town Councils and Neighbourhood Management
Teams
Community Emergency Coordinators/Volunteers
Safer Neighbourhood initiatives and partnership
Community Response Plans
Voluntary & Faith Groups
Local business groups including town/city centre
partnerships
Convergent Volunteers
Experience has shown that in the aftermath of a major emergency, spontaneous volunteers, often called “convergent volunteers”, will arrive
at the scene of an emergency and want to offer their skills. These individuals will not be affiliated to any specific organisation.
A Convergent Volunteers Protocol can be found in Appendix K - Convergent Volunteers Protocol. Responders must be cognisant of
health and safety and insurance issues if it is decided to take up their offers of help.
Commercial Companies
As well as those commercial companies covered by the CCA as Category 2 responders, there are a number of other companies who are
likely to be involved with the response to major emergencies, due to either other legislation such as CoMAH, or the nature of their business.
It is important to identify and engage with any commercial companies where additional support or resources are likely to be involved or where
there is a need for direct involvement in the command and control structure as well as sharing key information.
Companies may establish their own help line for staff and their families as well as a media plan with associated communications staff.
Both areas need to consider that their own procedures may need to be incorporated in the standard response structures to ensure that key
information with regards to staff involved, such as casualties or missing persons, is not lost and in making sure there is consistency in key
media messages.
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Both areas need to consider that their own procedures may need to be incorporated in the standard response structures to ensure that key
information with regards to staff involved, such as casualties or missing persons is not lost and making sure there is consistency in key media
messages.
Transport companies have additional resources available for the response to major emergencies. Most major airlines have contracts in place
to deal with the loss of aircraft and the possible need for temporary mortuary facilities as well as staff to assist with the management of
survivors and families. Similar support for survivors and families is provided by the Rail Care Team for rail emergencies. In both cases the
teams are trained to work in support of the emergency responders at the scene and at casualty locations, such as hospitals - a system will
need to be provided to allow suitable access where possible for such teams.
Where a commercial company is involved in a coastal pollution incident, the company or its insurance representative may arrange the
required clearance operation rather than place the burden on the local authority and the necessity of a cost recovery process.
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Appendix C Coordination Structure
It should be noted that the coordination structure is flexible,
and not all levels of management will be required.
The given example is likely to be activated for a
coastal flooding / tidal surge incident.
COBR
MHCLG
ResCG
SAGE
Strategic Coordination Group
Support cells:
- Recovery Cell
- Scientific & Technical Advisory Cell
(STAC)
TCG
Support cells:
- Multi-Agency Information Cell
- Media
- Health Cell
- Evacuation
- Logistics
- Transport
- Fuel
- Multi-Agency Strategic Holding Area
(MASHA)
LCG
LCG
LCG
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Appendix D Strategic Aide Memoire
Purpose
The multi-agency forum which brings together Executive level representatives from relevant organisations is entitled the Strategic Co-
ordinating Group (SCG). The SCG establish the strategy and framework within which Operational and Tactical managers work, in
responding to and recovering from emergencies and take overall responsibility for the multi-agency management.
The SCG also supports the activities undertaken at Operational and Tactical levels, and in addition has the role of providing financial support
for the emergency response. Any requests to neighboring counties and Central Government for assistance in the form of mutual aid would be
made by the SCG.
Role
Determine and communicate a clear strategic aim and
objectives and review them regularly
Establish a policy framework for the overall management of the
event or situation
Prioritise the requirements of the tactical tier and allocate
personnel and resources accordingly
Formulate and implement media handling and public
communication plans by implementation of a multi -agency
Media Co-ordination Cell, in the event that this activity is
delegated to a single agency they must ensure that all
agencies are consulted to ensure that consistent messaging is
being delivered across all responding organisations
Direct planning and operations beyond the immediate
response, in order to facilitate the recovery process
Ensure that legal advice is obtained if considered necessary
Ensure that detailed policy records are maintained
Activation
Where an event or situation has an especially significant impact, substantial resource implications, involves a large number of organisations,
or lasts for an extended duration; then it may be necessary to implement multi-agency management at the Strategic level. The decision to
establish an SCG could in practice occur following dialogue between key partners concerning the prevailing and potential circumstances of
the emergency. This will result in a joint decision being made.
There may be instances where an SCG is automatically triggered such as receipt of a Severe Flood Warning; this is detailed in the specific
multi-agency plan.
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Norfolk County Council is responsible for the physical set up of the SCG and should be alerted at the earliest opportunity so this can
commence.
Location
The SCG should be based at an appropriate location away from the scene. The pre-designated Strategic Co-ordination Centre (SCC) for
Norfolk is Whitegates (old Fire Service HQ) in Hethersett.
Parking is available on site, responders should report to the security hut where they will be directed to the appropriate parking space. A pay
& display car park is also available on site, responders may be required to park here.
Generic strategy
This is an important element of the response and should be determined, recorded and distributed as soon as practicable.
Specific Strategic aims will vary according to the scenario; however they are likely to reflect the following themes:
Save human life
Community impact & protection of the environment
Welfare of responders
Early consideration of recovery issues
Security
Category one responders to maintain running of critical functions
Investigation
As far as reasonably practicable, protecting property
Transport
Timely advice to public and businesses
Membership
The role of the SCG chair is to exercise coordination, not a command function; the SCG Chair will be dependent on the nature of the incident.
The requirement for Strategic management may not apply to all responding agencies. Emergencies are invariably multi-agency however
membership may vary. It may therefore be appropriate for an agency, not involved at Strategic level, to send liaison officers to SCG
meetings.
SCG members should, wherever possible, be empowered to make executive decisions in respect of their organisation’s resources. In any
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case, representatives must be able to obtain decisions quickly.
The following organisations would normally, subject to the type of emergency, be represented at the SCG:
Police
Fire and Rescue
Ambulance
Local authority
Environment Agency
Maritime and Coastguard Agency
NHS England Midlands and East
Military
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
(MHCLG) (RED)
It must be noted that each organisation retains control of its own operations and the SCG has to rely on a process of discussion and
consensus to reach decisions.
For this to be achieved every member of the SCG must have a clear understanding of the roles / responsibilities and constraints of the other
participants. See Appendix B Agency Responsibilities.
In addition, members must be cognisant of their own resilience and ensure they have the necessary support and relief arrangements.
Security Vetting
Dialogue at the SCG level could at times involve subject matter of a sensitive or security marked content. Strategic reps are not required to
be security cleared to attend an SCG, however if sensitive discussion take place they may be asked to leave the room by the Chair, this will
be a dynamic risk assessment by the chair, completed at the time of the meeting.
The Chair of the SCG may need to ascertain whether:-
Different vetting is required in relation to the ongoing
incident eg. Terrorism.
If relevant attendees are not vetted whether they only attend
some aspects of the meeting where they are required for
their expertise.
The final decision re attendance will be at the discretion of the SCG Chair or Senior Police representative in attendance.
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SCG Meetings
The format and frequency of SCG meetings will be determined by the scale and nature of the event. In a fast developing situation the SCG
may convene frequently. However duration of meetings must be kept short, to allow attendees to attend to their other responsibilities. A
maximum duration of 30 minutes per meeting is considered best practice.
In other cases the SCG may meet daily or weekly (or via a teleconference facility) to receive updates and confirm existing strategy and policy
decisions.
Notes and actions will be recorded at meeting and distributed within 60 minutes and retained for disclosure in legal proceedings if required. It
is also recommended that agencies maintain their own policy logs.
The Norfolk SCG agenda is attached below.
SCG Support Cells
In order to function effectively the SCG may require a number of support cells depending on the circumstances of the emergency. These
could include:
Recovery
Science and Technical Advice Cell (STAC)
Finance
A brief outline of support cells can be found in Appendix F Support Cells
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SCG Representative Action Card
You are representing your agency at the Strategic Coordination group; you should therefore be
a strategic level representative OR have the authority to make strategic level decision s on
behalf of your agency.
You will be coordinating the support/response from your agency and working with other agency
representatives to coordinate the response at strategic level.
Before the meeting
1
Consider what support you may need during the meetings (support officer, loggist etc)
2
Ensure you follow your agency’s arrangements regarding deployment to the
Coordination Centre, and personal / welfare issues.
3
Ensure you:
Are familiar with the SCG agenda
Have an update for any allocated actions
Receive a briefing (“SitRep”) from your own agency including:
- A summary of the incident so far, and what the key impacts are from any
hazards or threats;
- The key elements of your agency’s response, and what the internal impacts are
e.g. business continuity;
- The Command and Control arrangements in place for your agency;
Can access Resilience Direct (Norfolk LRF Response page) or have someone who
can access the system on your behalf; all documentation will be uploaded and
shared via this system.
4
Sign into reception and receive a visitor’s lanyard.
5
Liaise with the Centre Coordinator who will direct you to the meeting room.
6
Familiarise yourself with the venue information in this guide.
7
It is your responsibility to keep a log of the discussions you are part of, and any actions
/ decisions you make. If you bring a loggist, it is your responsibility to ensure the
wording is accurate and should be signed off.
A note taker will record the discussions and actions for the whole group; these may
take 60 minutes to be completed, signed off and circulated. They will be circulated by
Resilience Direct only.
8
Ensure that you are contactable at all times or have a nominated deputy and that
contact details have been confirmed with the receptionist on arrival.
9
Agree relief and changeover times (if appropriate) with your own agency.
10
When a meeting is called only essential agency representatives are required to
attend the meeting. It may get over crowded and the Chair may ask members to leave
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SCG Agenda
Strategic Coordination Group (SCG) Agenda
1
Attendance and apologies
Confirm correct level of representation. Identification of any other agencies who need
to be represented at meetings.
Confirm teleconference etiquette phones on mute when not speaking, announcing
name when speaking.
Chair
2
Matters requiring urgent decisions / actions
All
3
Approval of previous minutes
Chair
4
Update on previous actions
Action owners
5
Situation report
Multi-Agency
Information Cell
6
Update from agencies
All
7
Review of options
Chair
8
Establishment of support cells
Chair
9
Review of strategy
Chair
10
Communications Strategy, Internal Media and Public Information
Comms rep
11
Community Impact Assessment
Chair
12
Urgent any other business
Chair
13
Summary of allocated actions
Chair and Loggist to confirm/review actions with group and complete/update the
action log.
Note taker
14
Time of next meeting
Create reporting schedule (sometimes known as ‘battle-rhythm’) between active
response structures.
Ensure clear stand-down when relevant.
Chair
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Appendix E Tactical Aide Memoire
Purpose
If activated, the purpose of the Tactical Co-ordinating Group (TCG) is to ensure that the actions taken by the operational level are co-
ordinated, coherent and integrated, in order to achieve maximum effectiveness and efficiency. It will usually comprise relevant tactical
representatives from each agency. It is important to understand that the position of the tactical representative is role specific and not rank
related.
Role
The role of the TCG is to:
Act as a single point of focus for multi-agency tactical
coordination
Obtain additional resources if required
Fulfil Strategic aims and objectives
Plan and coordinate how and when tasks will be
undertaken
Keep SCG informed
Assess significant risks and use this to inform the tasking
of Operational Commanders
Determine priorities for allocating available resources
Ensure the health and safety of the public and personnel
Activation
Where an incident is no longer manageable at the operational / local level, or if an incident crosses a boundary area (such as District) then
consideration should be given to activating a TCG.
There may be instances where a TCG is automatically activated; this is detailed in the specific multi-agency plan.
Norfolk Constabulary is responsible for the physical set up of the TCG and should be alerted at the earliest opportunity so this can
commence.
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Location
The pre-identified Tactical Coordination Centre (TCC) venue for the County is the Joint Operations and Communications Centre, Norfolk
Police HQ, NR18 0WW located in Wymondham. It may not be practical for representatives to physically attend the meeting; teleconference
facilities will be made available.
Visitors parking is available at the front of the site. As part of the activation process, every possible effort will be made to accommodate
responders in the staff car park.
Tactical Considerations
Where an SCG has been established, the TCG should devise a tactical plan outlining how the strategy will be fulfilled. If there is no
requirement for an SCG, then the Generic strategy
should be considered along with the following Tactical Considerations.
This guidance is not designed to be exhaustive, but provides an overview of key issues that the Tactical Co-ordination Group will need to
consider and delegate to the appropriate Silvers.
Safety Issues
Review and update as necessary any risk assessments in
accordance with JESIP (ongoing process);
Technical assessment of hazards
Personal protective equipment required
Other countermeasures required?
Make sure staff are fully aware of hazards
Decontamination issues
Appointment of officer to oversee all health and safety
issues
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Initial briefing
Obtain briefings from lead agency and other agencies as
appropriate using METHANE reporting method
Declare a major incident if necessary
Make sure that all appropriate initial actions have been
taken
If not already established, request activation of Multi-Agency
Information Cell (MAIC) to collate information and produce
situation reports
Working with the Media
Request (if not already established) a communications cell
and activation of NRF Multi-Agency Major Incident
Communications Plan
Request attendance of communications rep at meetings
Obtain professional guidance on what information should be
broadcast. In most cases this is likely to be “Go in, Stay in,
Tune in”.
Scene Access
Road closure / control of access points
Access routes for responders
Diversions
Rendezvous Points
Marshalling Area
Scene Security
To ensure scene security, access and control points;
Set up:
o Inner cordon
o Outer cordon
o If necessary traffic cordon
Ascertain details of non-emergency services personnel that
require access through the cordons
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Evacuation
Consider evacuation, shelter and reoccupation
Staff Welfare
Rest/refreshments available (consult with logistics)
Frequent briefings
Deployment of occupational health and welfare officer
Debriefing arrangements
Logistics
Staffing rota
Specialist / technical equipment
Specialist skills required
Communications networks
Transport
Catering
Mutual Aid
Accommodation for human assistance e.g. rest centres
Community Impact Assessment
Must be carried out and updated as necessary
Telecommunications
Which talk groups should be utilised? (see NRF Resilient
Telecomms Plan)
Potential hazards of using communications equipment at the
scene, are intrinsically safe radios required?
Specialist / additional communications required
Should the MTPAS be activated?
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Membership
Membership at the TCG will depend on the type of incident; however it is likely that all Category 1 and 2 Responders will be invited to attend.
Representatives must, wherever possible, be empowered to make decisions appropriate to that level. Unless there is an obvious and urgent
need for intervention, TCG should not become directly involved in the detailed Operational tasks being discharged by Operational
Commanders.
The following organisations would normally, subject to the type of emergency, be represented at the TCG:
Police
Fire and Rescue
Ambulance
Local authority (County and District)
Environment Agency
NHS England Midlands and East
Military
Health Sector (through Health Cell)
It may be beneficial to have specialist advisors attend the meetings. Individuals are available from Category 1 and 2 Responders as well as
industry specific to the type of incident.
It must be noted that each organisation retains control of its own operations and the TCG has to rely on a process of discussion and
consensus to reach decisions.
For this to be achieved every member of the TCG must have a clear understanding of the roles / responsibilities and constraints of the other
participants. See
In addition, members must be cognisant of their own resilience and ensure they have the necessary support and relief arrangements.
Security Vetting
Representatives physically expected to attend the TCG should be vetted to Non-Police Personnel Vetting Level 2. This level of clearance
allows representatives to receive an access card, at the time of an emergency, to access the TCG meeting rooms on the Police premises.
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Meetings
The first TCG meeting should take place via teleconference. TCG meetings should be held on a regular basis and where practicable, if
established, timed around any Strategic meeting structures. This coordination of meeting times is sometimes referred to as the “Battle
Rhythm”. The Norfolk TCG Agenda is detailed on the next page.
Support cells
In addition, a number of other cells may be required at the TCG. These can include (list is not inclusive):-
Logistics (incl. Voluntary & Faith)
Multi-Agency Information Cell
Community Impact Assessment
Evacuation
Transport
Communications
Combine Tactical Air Cell (CTAC)
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TCG Action Card
You are representing your agency at the Tactical Coordination Group, you should therefore
be a tactical level representative OR have the authority to make tactical level decisions on
behalf of your agency.
You will be coordinating the support/response from your agency and working with other
agency representatives to coordinate the response at tactical level.
1
Consider what support you may need during the meetings (support officer, loggist
etc)
2
Ensure you follow your agency’s arrangements regarding deployment to the
Coordination Centre, and personal / welfare issues.
3
Ensure you:
Are familiar with the TCG agenda
Have an update for any allocated actions
Receive a briefing (“SitRep”) from your own agency including:
- A summary of the incident so far, and what the key impacts are from any
hazards or threats;
- The key elements of your agency’s response, and what the internal impacts
are e.g. business continuity;
- The Command and Control arrangements in place for your agency;
Can access Resilience Direct (Norfolk LRF Response page) or have someone
who can access the system on your behalf: all documentation will be uploaded
onto the system.
4
Sign into reception and receive a visitor’s lanyard.
5
Liaise with the Centre Coordinator will direct you to the relevant work place and
provide you with an overview of the facilities.
6
Familiarise yourself with the TCG venue information
7
Consider what support you may need, such as a tactical advisor/support officer or
loggist.
It is your responsibility to keep a log of the discussions you are part of, and any
actions / decisions you make. If you bring a loggist, it is your responsibility to ensure
the wording is accurate and should be signed off.
A note taker will record the discussions and actions for the whole group; these may
take 60 minutes to be completed, signed off and circulated. They will be circulated
by Resilience Direct only.
8
Ensure that you are contactable at all times or have a nominated deputy and that
contact details have been confirmed with the Centre Coordinator.
9
Agree relief and changeover times (if appropriate) with your own agency
10
When a TCG meeting is called only essential agency representatives are required
to attend the meeting. It may get over crowded and the TCG Chair may ask
members to leave
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TCG Agenda
Tactical Coordinating Group (TCG) Agenda
1
Nomination/ confirmation of Lead Agency, TCG Chair and TCG Loggist
2
Introduction of attendees, roles and responsibilities (Complete Attendance Sheet)
Identification of any other agencies who need to be represented at meetings.
Confirm teleconference etiquette phones on mute when not speaking, announcing name when speaking.
3
Declaration of items for urgent attention
4
Decisions on items for urgent attention
Breakout time to action urgent items as agreed above. Confirm how long / reconvene time
Gather information and intelligence
5
Update on situation Review Situation Report, if available
What has happened?
What is the M/ETHANE update from Local Coordination Groups (if sitting)?
Should a Major Incident be declared, based on the scale, duration and impact
of the incident?
What is happening now?
Update from TCG members on activity / assigned action
What is being done about
it?
What is the strategy from SCG (if active and different from Item 9)? Other
considerations
6
Additional information from individual TCG members
Not covered in the METHANE. Are resources under pressure? Are additional resources required?
Assess Risks and Develop a Working Strategy
7
Agree/ review tactical aim &
objectives
Suggested objectives:
Save and protect life
Relieve suffering
Contain the emergency limit escalation/
spread
Protect health & safety of personnel
Protect property
Safeguard the environment;
Maintain and restore critical services
Maintain normal services at an appropriate level
Promote and facilitate community self-help
Facilitate community recovery (physical, social,
economic & psychological)
Facilitate investigations and inquiries (preserve the
scene and manage records)
Evaluate & identify lessons
Consider Powers, Policies and Procedures
8
Emergency Plans / Supporting Information
Which Emergency Plans, procedures, risk-specific information or other supporting information are we working
to? (e.g. Multi Agency Flood Plan; COMAH Plan)
9
Media situation report
Are there any issues to escalate to SCG and inform the media strategy, if active? If asked, what should
responding staff say to the public/ media?
Identify Options and Contingencies
10
Discuss and agree tactical decisions
Note TCG decisions in appropriate log
11
Support Cells
Do any TCG support cells need to be activated? (E.g. Evacuation, Logistics, Information, Community Impact
Assessment and Voluntary & Faith Coordination) See Appendix F Support Cells
of NERG
12
Consideration to be given to mutual aid requests and/or Military support
(Any military request must be through the Military rep at SCG) Ensure prioritisation is considered for any mutual
aid.
Take Action and Review What Happened
13
Allocation of actions
Chair and Loggist to confirm/review actions with group and complete/update the action log.
14
Reporting Schedule
Create reporting schedule (sometimes known as ‘battle-rhythm’) between active response structures.
15
Any other business
16
Date, Time and Location of next meeting (Ensure clear stand down when relevant)
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Appendix F Support Cells
To assist with the management of a multi-agency incident, the SCG and TCG may agree to convene a number of support cells. A brief
outline of these follows. More detailed guidance can be found in the specific mulit-agency emergency plans.
Strategic Level:
Recovery
It is important that the SCG ensures that the process for recovery is considered from the outset; at the very least a member of the SCG
should be tasked with considering recovery issues in absence of the RCG. Where deemed appropriate, the activation of a Recovery
Coordinating Group (RCG) should be considered,
The early establishment of this group will ensure that at the appropriate time there will be a seamless transition from response to recovery
with the appropriate change in coordination agency (usually from the Police to the local authority). This process should be documented (See
Appendix H Handover Certificate Response to Recovery).
For further information regarding recovery, refer to the NRF Recovery Guidance document.
Science and Technical Advice Cell (STAC)
STAC is activated at the request of the SCG and brings together a range of staff to collectively provide such scientific and technical advice.
The role of the STAC is to ensure timely coordinated scientific, technical, environmental and public health advice to the SCG during the
response to an emergency. It will:
Provide a single point of scientific advice to the SCG on the
scientific, technical, environmental and public health
consequences of the incident via a nominated STAC
representative.
Monitor and corral the responding science and technical
community to deliver SCG high-level objectives
Agree any divergence from agreed arrangements for
providing science and technical input
Pool available information and arrive, as far as possible, at a
common view on the scientific and technical merits of
different course of action.
Provide a common brief to the technical lead from each
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agency represented in the cell on the extent of the evidence
based available, and how the situation might develop, what
this means, and the likely effects of various mitigation
strategies
Agree with the SCG on the advice to be given to the public
on the health aspects of the incident and advice on actions
to protect the public, including the consequences of any
evacuation or containment policies.
Provide clarification on advice provided to the SCG, to a
single, nominated, point of contact with a TCG.
The provision of advice may continue into the recovery
phase of an incident.
In addition, for incidents with a wider regional or national significance, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE) may be
established at Government level.
Multi-Agency Support Group (East) MASG (E)
MASG provides a sub-national management framework in and around the East of England. It enables sub-national organisations to work
together ahead of and during an emergency to meet their responsibilities under the Civil Contingencies Act 2004.
Membership is open to any organisation that has responsibility for delivering goods, services, transport or logistics on which the public rely
and which could be threatened or disrupted by a civil emergency or major incident across multiple counties.
Any member of the MASG, including the LRF, can initiate a meeting or conference call to discuss the situation.
Tactical Level:
Combined Tactical Air Cell (CTAC)
Should air support assets be required during a major incident, it is imperative that their response is coordinated. With this in mind, a structure
referred to as a Combined Tactical Air Cell will be utilised.
The main role of the CTAC will be prioritisation of air tasking in accordance with the strategic intent and tactical objectives of the incident.
The CTAC would be formed of liaison officers and supporting staff from the various air support providers.
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Multi-Agency Information Cell (MAIC)
The Multi-Agency Information Cell (MAIC) will support the TCG to work towards the agreed SCG objections.
The main objectives for the MAIC are as follows:
Act as a single point of contact for information
Collate information to support the development of a Situation
Report, acting as the information link between MHCLG and
the NRF
Obtain information from agencies, partners or affected
persons not represented on the TCG
Horizon scan and identify any issues / opportunities that
may arise, capturing these in a risk register
It will comprise:
Norfolk Constabulary
Norfolk Fire & Rescue Service
East of England Ambulance Service
Norfolk County Council (representing all Local Authorities)
NHS Norfolk & Waveney Clinical Commissioning Groups
Specialist agencies as pertinent to the incident
Logistics Cell
In certain situations, such as prolonged severe weather, it will be beneficial to establish a dedicated Logistics Cell. This cell should be led by
Norfolk Fire, suggested Group Manager level, and comprise:
Police
Fire
Ambulance
Local Authority, suggested Highways and Resilience
Voluntary & Faith representative if appropriate
Manned by a small multi-agency team the cell can help deliver TCG actions by considering issues including (but not limited to):
Transport (Including 4x4 Resources)
Voluntary & Faith Co-ordination
Humanitarian Assistance
General Resource Issues
Convergent Volunteers
Community Resilience
Site Clearance
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Depending on the incident type others could be invited to attend and the Voluntary and Faith Group Directory should be used to ensure that
all the Voluntary Agencies assets are being utilised.
The Logistics Cell will have dedicated email address (listed in the NRF Contacts Directory available to Category 1 and 2 Responders) and
phone number which will be advised by the TCG when the Logistics Cell is established.
Evacuation Cell
Where the response to an emergency requires the evacuation of an area, it may be appropriate to activate an Evacuation Cell. The cell
should be made up of representatives from all appropriate agencies. The cell will assume responsibility for the implementation of all aspects
of the evacuation process.
The cell will need to consider the following:
Timings is there enough time to evacuate before the
hazard arrives
Greatest risk are people safer to stay inside
Transport can people self-evacuate or will they require
assistance
Vulnerable people ensure a list of lists is collated,
accepting that some may not appear on these lists. Should
a vulnerable people cell be established?
Public Information Zone is there a pre-identified
evacuation zone? I.e. for CoMAH sites.
Further information, including an Evacuation Notice can be found in the NRF Evacuation and Shelter Guidance.
Vulnerable People Cell
This cell is responsible for identifying those that may need additional support using data sources described below (information availability). It
will also receive information from operational staff who identify people that require support when they visit premises as part of their response.
This cell will report into the evacuation cell if already establish, alternatively the TCG. The cell will comprise:
Local Authorities
Health providers
Emergency Services
Utility Companies
Voluntary Aid Societies (where appropriate)
Further detailed information on evacuation and vulnerable people can be found in the NRF Evacuation and Shelter Guidance.
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Appendix G Military Aid
The Armed Forces contribute to UK resilience through providing specialist capabilities (such as explosive ordnance disposal) and by assisting
civil authorities and structures when the need exceeds civil capability or capacity. The Forces do this in response to specific requests for a
planned response or to a crisis, but military aid is not guaranteed.
Nevertheless, a ‘forward-leaning’ approach is encouraged. Civil authorities’ proactive, early consideration of military capabilities should be
reflected in local planning arrangements. The central Government view is that:
The military should be closely involved in planning and training for emergencies at the local level, through existing liaison arrangements.
Military support should cost less, in agreed circumstances marginal rather than full costs.
Civil responders should consider whether there is, or may later be, a role for the armed forces early in the response to every significant
incident military advice on capabilities that may be available to support the response is quickly and easily available.
Military Aid to the Civil Authorities (MACA) Triggers and Activation
MACA can be sought to support the civil authorities when they have an urgent need for help to deal with an emergency arising from a natural
disaster or a major incident. Assistance is provided on an ‘as available’ basis and the Armed Forces cannot make a commitment that
guarantees assistance to meet specific emergencies. Category 1 and 2 responders should not base plans and organise exercises on the
assumption of military assistance. The Joint Regional Liaison Officer (JRLO) from the local Army Regional Point of Contact Brigade (RPOC)
Headquarters will be able to give advice and should be contacted in the first instance.
7
th
Infantry Brigade & HQ East, ‘The Desert Rats’, is the Army RPOC Brigade Headquarters for the East of England and East Midlands.
JRLO East is the primary focus for integrating military UK operations with civil authorities in the East of England. He routinely attends the
Executive Group of Norfolk Resilience Forum (NRF), and would represent Defence at the Strategic Co-ordination Group (SCG). He is
supported by Military Liaison Officers (MLOs) who could deploy to other SCGs, in the event of a multi-county incident, or the Tactical Co-
ordination Group (TCG) to support the co-ordination of MACA at the Tactical (Silver) level.
The RAF Regional Liaison Officer for the East of England (RAFRLO EE) is the point of contact for RAF-specific MACA, military aircraft post-
crash management and related issues. He would provide RAF-specific advice and assistance at SCG and / or TCG as required.
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Contact with either Regional Liaison Officer can range from informal requests for information or advice to formal requests for MACA; the latter
should be made as early as possible. Contact details for JRLO E, 7
th
Infantry Brigade & HQ East Duty Officer and RAFRLO EE are in NRF’s
emergency contacts list.
MACA Principles
The provision of military assistance is governed by four principles. MACA may be authorised when:
There is a definite need to act and the tasks our Armed
Forces are being asked to perform are clear;
Other options, including mutual aid and commercial
alternatives, have been discounted; and either
The civil authority lacks the necessary capability to fulfil the
task and it is unreasonable or prohibitively expensive to
expect it to develop one; or
The civil authority has all or some capability, but it may not
be available immediately, or to the required scale, and the
urgency of the task requires rapid external support from the
MOD.
MACA Considerations
The provision of MACA requires approval by a Defence Minister following a request by a government department. If MACA is urgently
needed to alleviate distress and preserve and safeguard lives and property in time of disaster, local military commanders may be contacted
directly for assistance. JRLO E should be informed of such requests as soon as possible after contact is made.
Requests for MACA should normally be generated in conjunction with the JRLO and, where necessary, the RAFRLO. The request should
describe the effect required, the general situation (especially if it is part of a criminal investigation), the capability gap (including efforts to
address the requirement through mutual aid or commercial contractors), and where and for how long MACA is required.
Defence capabilities and roles that may be of use to civil responders include general support (general duties, armed policing and CBRN),
medical support, logistic support (advice, transport, engineering, estate, fuel and telecommunications).
When considering military assistance, it is important to bear in mind the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the Armed Forces:
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Armed Forces personnel are few compared to the number of staff in the emergency services, health service and local authorities.
The skills, equipment, and capabilities of the Armed Forces are designed for military use, mainly for expeditionary operations.
The Armed Forces draw on civil capabilities wherever necessary.
The Armed Forces are not designed to provide an emergency response service, with certain exceptions.
The Armed Forces do not have a monopoly on equipment suitable for use in emergencies.
Cost of MACA
MACA activity is, with a few specific exceptions, not funded within the Defence budget and is therefore provided on a repayment basis.
Treasury rules dictate that Government Departments charge for services that are not part of their funded tasks. Defence will charge full
costs except where there is imminent danger to life when charges are waived, and in prescribed circumstances when marginal costs will be
applied.
MOD Policy
The MOD Joint Doctrine Publication 02 ‘UK Operations: the Defence Contribution to Resilience and Security’ Third Edition provides more
details:
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/591639/20170207_JDP02_Resilience_we
b.pdf
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Appendix H Handover Certificate Response to Recovery
Note: This certificate has been written assuming the Strategic Co-ordinating Group is being chaired by the Police
and the Recovery Co-ordinating Group is being chaired by the local authority.
Appropriate for use when the SCG for the response feels that the conditions are right for a
handover to the recovery phase.
Upon this Status Certificate being signed by both local authority and Police Service, the
Management for dealing with the aftermath of the emergency (location)
.…………………..………………..… is to be taken over by
……………………..…………………………… Council.
In addition to any requirements laid out in specific contingency plans relevant to this emergency:
1. There is no known further risk to life in relation to this specific emergency.
2. The circumstances dictate it more appropriate for the emergency management to rest with
……………………………………………………………….. Council in that the phase is clearly now
one of recovery.
3. There are no serious public order or crime prevention issues which impact on the overall
Strategic coordination of the recovery phase.
4. Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service together with the East of England Ambulance Service are
operating at a level which does not necessitate an SCG to coordinate and facilitate their activity.
5. There are no known scenarios that may require the reinstatement of SCG in relation to this
emergency in the foreseeable future.
6. ………………………………. Council is satisfied that it has in place the infrastructure and
processes to take over coordination from the Police.
Signed:…………………..………………… County/District/Borough/City Council
Signed………………………………………………… Norfolk Constabulary
Date and Time Signed:…………………..…………………..
The signatories below have read and acknowledged the contents of this Status Certificate
.…………………..……………………. ……………..…………………..………
Norfolk Fire & Rescue Service East of England Ambulance
Service NHS Trust
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Appendix I Teleconference etiquette
CHAIRPERSON
Note; this process is based upon use of a recognised British Telecom system!
Task
Description
1
Ensure participants are aware of the teleconference numbers (these are
available in the NRF Contacts Directory).
2
Dial in just before the allotted time and be prepared to wait a short while for
all participants to ‘log in’ and settle.
3
Once access is settled then you should announce your name and either
verbally check the names of the participants or carry out an electronic ‘role
call’ by selecting; # then 1.
Remember to record names of the participants and ask them to ensure their
phones are muted unless they are speaking. Remind participants to
announce their name before speaking so this can be recorded correctly in
the notes.
4
Consider locking the call by selecting *7 to avoid disruption to the
teleconference. This process can be reversed again by pressing *7.
5
Ensure participants can view the agenda, if not a copy if available on
Resilience Direct. Be prepared for urgent interjections from participants.
6
Once the main part of the conference call has been completed then allow
final questions on a ‘round robin’ basis. A ‘silence’ on the call will indicate no
response.
7
Conclude the call by indicating any actions and/or include the date and/or
time of the next conference call.
Thank all participants and state that the call is now complete.
8
Should it be necessary for some participants to remain on the call for further
dialogue this WILL require the Chairpersons participation.
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PARTICIPANT
Note; this process is based upon use of a recognised British Telecom system!
Task
Description
Time
1
Ensure you are aware of the teleconference number (it can be found in the NRF
Contacts Directory) and time.
2
Ensure you are ready to dial into the teleconference at least 5 minutes advance of the
start time and state your name and organisation when requested. Put your phone onto
mute. You may be required to wait a little while before everyone is dialled in.
3
Once access is settled the Chairperson will announce their name and either verbally
check the names of the participants or carry out an electronic ‘role call’. The Chair
Person may then decide to lock the call.
4
When speaking, ensure you state your name and organisation so this can be recorded
correctly in the notes.
5
Should any late callers attempt to join, then they may find themselves ‘locked out’ to
overcome this, a message needs to be sent (via an alternative route) to the Chairperson to
enable access.
6
Should it be necessary for some participants to remain on the call for further dialogue
this WILL require the Chairpersons participation.
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Appendix J NRF Security Vetting Protocol
Introduction
A decision was made by the NRF Executive Board, on the 4
th
April 2008, that it would be desirable for Strategic Coordination Group (SCG)
members to be vetted to Security Clearance (SC) level due to potentially sensitive information that may be discussed and accessed during a
SCG meeting.
SC vetting is only required for long term, frequent and uncontrolled access to Government Assets marked SECRET or occasional, supervised
access to Government Assets marked TOP SECRET. Therefore members will not require SC vetting if they have no need for long term,
frequent and uncontrolled access to Government Assets.
Executive Summary
National Security Vetting is not required to attend either a Tactical Coordination Group (TCG) meeting or Strategic Coordination Group (SCG)
meeting.
If members require unsupervised access around Norfolk Police HQ (OCC) for example to attend the Tactical Coordination Centre (TCC), and
be given an access card so they can move around the building and access rooms with a swipe lock, then they are required to go through a
level of Force Vetting known as Non-Police Personnel Vetting (NPPV) Level 2 abbreviated.
Force Vetting is not relevant to the Strategic Coordination Centre as it is not located at a Police premise.
Access to the TCC will not be denied to anyone without NPPV Level 2 Vetting, however they will need to be escorted around the building
when a member of support staff becomes available.
Therefore, it is recommended that agencies identify members of staff who may be required to attend the TCC and ensure they undertake the
NPPV Level 2 (abbreviated) vetting.
Aim
The aim of this document is to set out the agreed approach of Vetting for Category 1 and 2 responders, as deemed by the Civil Contingencies
Act (2004) likely to respond to a major incident in the County of Norfolk.
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Vetting Procedures
There are two distinct vetting procedures:
Force Vetting (FV)
This includes Non-Police Personnel Vetting (NPPV) in a variety of levels (Level 1, 2 and 3). Force Vetting allows employees, third parties,
and contractors etc to gain access to Police information, equipment, infrastructure and assets.
NPPV relates to the vetting of persons other than Police Officers, who require access to Police premises without constant supervision, this is
not provided by NSV.
NPPV is broken down into 4 different levels:
Level 1 does not allow access to classified material
Level 2 (Abbreviated) allows access to Police protectively marked material up to OFFICIAL SENSITIVE either on police premises or
by remote access. No systems access.
Level 2 (Full) allows access to classified police material/information up to OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE with occasional access to SECRET.
Level 3 allows access to classified police material or information up to SECRET and occasional access to TOP SECRET.
National Security Vetting (NSV)
National Security Vetting includes vetting such as Security Check (SC). NSV is underpinned by the HM Baseline Personnel Security
Standard (BPSS). BPSS is the default employee screening standard used for anyone working within, or on behalf of a Government
Department. Therefore, all Category 1 and the majority of Category 2 responders will have achieved the BPSS.
The purpose of NSV is to protect sensitive government national security assets.
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Vetting Requirements
National Steer
The Government Security Classifications, version 1.0, October 2013, highlights the following relevant principles:
Everyone who works with government has a duty of confidentiality and a responsibility to safeguard any HMG information or data that
they access.
Access to sensitive information must only be granted on the basis of a genuine need to know and an appropriate personnel security
control.
Assets received from or exchanged with external partners must be protected in accordance with any relevant legislative or regulatory
requirements.
Information sharing
Under the Civil Contingencies Act (2004); agencies deemed Category 1 and 2 Responders have a duty to share information during the
planning, response and recovery phases of an emergency.
Tactical Coordination Centre (TCC)
In 2015 a decision was made by the NRF Executive Board, following the 2013 Tidal Surge Debrief, to have one Tactical Coordination Centre
based at Police HQ in Wymondham. After detailed discussions with the Joint Norfolk & Suffolk Police Vetting Team, it was highlighted that
anyone physically attending the TCC, who would require unsupervised access around the building and through swipe locked areas, would
need to go through an additional level of vetting. It was deemed that NPPV Level 2 (Abbreviated) would be sufficient see Vetting
Procedures below.
It is important to note that National Security Vetting and Force Vetting are separate procedures. Therefore anyone who has NSV (e.g.
security clearance, DV) is required to also obtain NPPV to be given unsupervised access to the Police Premise.
Strategic Coordination Centre (SCC)
National Security vetting is not required to attend an SCG as a general rule, however if sensitive topics are discussed then members without
any level of clearance may be asked to leave the room. This decision will be made by the Chair of the SCG in conjunction with all members.
The primary location for the Strategic Coordination Centre is Whitgates ,Hethersett, therefore Force Vetting is not required to access the
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SCC.
Obtaining Security Vetting
The NRF Business Manager has been identified as the Point of Contact (POC) for NRF members to obtain NPPV clearance to attend the
TCC. The process is currently completed free of charge by the Joint Norfolk & Suffolk Police Vetting Department. Members who require
vetting should contact their Emergency Planner in the first instance who will be responsible for confirming identity of the individual before their
clearance can be processed. The vetting forms are held centrally by the NRF Business Manager and can be provided to Emergency
Planners upon request.
The NRF keeps a record of members vetted to NPPV Level 2 and Level 2 (Abbreviated).
Each agency is responsible for maintaining their internal records for security clearance and ensuring that members clearance is kept up to
date.
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Appendix K - Convergent Volunteers Protocol
Overview & Issues
Experience has shown that following an emergency spontaneous volunteers often called ‘convergent volunteers (CV’s)’, will arrive at the
scene and want to offer their assistance. These individuals will not be affiliated to any specific organisation.
Convergent volunteers may be able to provide useful assistance but co-ordinating their activity and efforts can prove difficult for a number of
reasons:
It is difficult to assess individual skills and capabilities.
During the early stages of a response there may not be anything for volunteers to do and they could impede official responders.
There is a possibility that well-meaning individuals will ‘self-deploy’ potentially putting themselves and others in danger.
If convergent volunteers are not handled sensitively there is a possibility of creating ‘bad feeling’ which could have an effect on the
public perception of the work done by the official responders.
Recognising the issues above, and the fact that convergent volunteers could greatly assist official response and recovery, the NRF
Convergent Volunteer Co-Ordinator (CVoC) role has been created. Please Note: The activities of all official volunteer agencies such as
British Red Cross, 4x4 Response, Norlsar etc will be co-ordinated through existing NRF coordination arrangements (Logistics Cell, which is a
support cell of the TCG).
Activation
A request for activation of the CvoC can be made by any agency dealing with an incident where large numbers of CVs may turn up.
It is likely that larger emergencies will attract CVs (eg. Tidal Surge 2013, London Riots 2011) and by their very nature these events will
require appropriate coordination structures (SCG, TCG, Logistics Cell) to be established. If this is the case the CVoC can be requested
through the TCG Logistics Cell.
In incidents where the above structures are not in place the District Emergency Planner in the affected authority will be able to activate the
CVoC.
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Roles and Responsibilities
Norfolk Local Authority District personnel will staff the roles listed below in the first instance. British Red Cross Community Volunteers may
also be able to assist; these are individuals who will have previously registered with the scheme: https://reserves.redcross.org.uk/
The NRF has access to a wide range of Voluntary and Faith groups offering various capabilities and resources which could be useful in
helping to manage Convergent Volunteers.
This includes access to:
People with experience of working with volunteers
People with time and capacity to take on the role
Mobile Co-ordination Units (Vans)
4x4 Vehicles
Mobile Catering Units
Large tents, seating, heating and lighting
Radio communications (including links with RAYNET)
Mobile generator and pumps
General equipment such as ropes, wheelbarrows, shovels,
brooms etc
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
The activities of all official volunteer agencies, outside of performing the CVOC role, will be managed by the Logistics Cell.
Convergent Volunteer Co-Ordinator (CVoC):
To act as a Single Point of Contact for members of the
public volunteering to offer assistance following an
emergency
To liaise with official responders to ascertain whether
assistance from Convergent Volunteers can be utilised
To register CVs and assess skills and capabilities using a
pre-prepared skills questionnaire and consent form
To brief CVs on health & safety
To establish a central control point for CVs
To allocate appropriate tasks to CVs and deploy based on
their declared skills and capabilitiesTo organise equipment,
support and refreshments for CVs
To monitor the work of CVs and report back to official
responders
To stand down CVs when appropriate
To maintain a log of all officially sanctioned CV activity
To provide a hot de-brief for all CVs at the scene
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Assessment Staff:
Review initial registration and assessment of volunteer’s capabilities.
Task Supervisor:
Ensure that volunteers carry out tasks as briefed and adhere to Health & Safety guidelines.
Location (Volunteer Reception Centres VRCs)
A suitable Volunteer Reception Centre (VRC) will need to be established to provide support and co-ordination facilities for convergent
volunteers. Ideally pre-identified locations such as village or community halls should be used. District Emergency Planners will often have
key-holder details to access these.
In pre-identifying a suitable VRC, the following should be considered:
a) Located at a safe distance from any hazard and outside the
emergency area;
b) Access to parking;
c) Access to heating;
d) Access to first aid;
e) Offers sufficient rooms to offer privacy for assessment
processes, first aid, and space for welfare and briefing;
f) Kitchen space to provide refreshments;
g) Office space with landline / communications;
h) Toilets with room for hand-washing; and
i) Facilities which can be adapted for use by those with
disabilities or other needs
Where the VRC is required near to the scene of an emergency, volunteer resources (marquees, generators, lights, heaters etc.) can be
used to establish a suitable marshalling area. This should be done under the guidance of NFRS and outside of any safety cordon area
established by the police.
In some cases Fire Stations may also be used. NFRS will be able to provide information on suitability and access.
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Supporting paperwork
Once activated VRC’s will need a supply of paperwork to carry out various functions including (but not limited to):
Volunteer assessment and registration
Health and safety risk assessments of tasks
VRC signing in / out
Tasking records
Suitable templates can be found in the HM Government document ‘Guidance of Managing Spontaneous Volunteers in Emergencies’.
What can Convergent Volunteers do?
Assist emergency responders by providing local knowledge
Assist the Police with door knocking
Help to distribute emergency supplies such as bottled water
Check on friends and neighbours
Help to clear up affected areas
Provide refreshments
Provide general ‘manpower’
Convergent Volunteers must not
Do anything which puts themselves or others in danger
Work alone with vulnerable people or children
Do anything they have not been asked to do
Direct other CVs unless asked to by the CVoC (i.e. manage a
small team of road sweepers)
Interfere with the work of the emergency services
Often there may be little or no suitable activity for CVs to do and in this case the CVoCs role will be to register volunteers and ask them to
return at a later date (or listen to local news for updates)
Media & Communications
During a major incident early engagement with the public through social media will be crucial in helping to get the best out of any Convergent
Volunteer response efforts. This should be co-ordinated through the official NRF Media Cell which will be established during a Major
Incident.
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Insurance & Public Liability
Convergent Volunteers acting under the instruction of the CVoC will be covered by the public liability insurance of the relevant district local
authority so long as:
All volunteers have been properly assessed for capabilities / limitations, registered and briefed on Health & Safety.
All tasks have been properly risk assessed and documented.
All tasks are appropriately supervised
Note: It is crucial that all CVs understand and sign the skills questionnaire and consent form which they will be asked to complete by the
CVoC. Volunteers not wishing to do this will not be allowed to assist the official response.
Local authorities should check the position regarding convergent volunteers with their own insurance companies in advance of activating any
co-ordination activities.
National Guidance
This protocol is supported by the HM Government document ‘Guidance for Managing Spontaneous Volunteers in Emergencies’.
The SARAH Act 2015
With evidence suggesting that people are deterred from volunteering, helping others or intervening in an emergency due to the fear of risk
and/or liability, the SARAH Act is designed to address concerns of this nature. It is intended to provide reassurance that if something goes
wrong when people are acting for the benefit of society or intervening to help someone in an emergency, the courts will take into account the
context of their actions in the event they are sued for negligence or for breach of certain statutory duties (which operate in a similar way to the
law of negligence).
It is also intended to reassure people, including employers, that if they demonstrate a predominantly responsible approach towards the safety
of others during a particular activity, the courts will always take full account of the circumstances.
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c) the alleged negligence/breach of duty occurred when the defendant was acting heroically by intervening in an emergency to assist an
individual in danger.
Costs
REFER TO V&F MOU
Encouraging Volunteering
Many CVs will have volunteered for the first time, being motivated to act by the circumstances of a particular emergency. It is important to
make good use of this good will and boost response capacity for future events by encouraging these CVs to sign up with established
volunteer organisations.
The Act does not change the overarching legal framework, but directs the courts to consider particular factors when considering whether the
defendant took reasonable care. In any negligence/ breach of statutory claim that is brought where the court is determining the steps a
defendant should have taken to meet the applicable standard of care, it must have regard to whether:
a) the alleged negligence/breach of duty occurred when the defendant was acting for the benefit of society or any of its members;
b) in carrying out the activity in the course of which the negligence/breach of statutory duty occurred, the defendant had demonstrated a
predominantly responsible approach towards protecting the safety or other interests of others; and
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Plan Amendments
Date
Details
Amended By
September 2011 (Version 3)
Amendments to plan as per changes in organisational/national
requirements.
NRF Partners
November 2012 (Version 4)
Amendments to plan as per changes in organisational/national
requirements.
NRF Partners
January 2016 (version 5.1)
Annual review
NRF Partners
March 2016 (version 5.2)
Consultation completed
NRF Partners
April 2016 (version 6.0)
Updated following second consultation & sent for sign off.
NRF Partners & Business Manager
October 2017 (6.1)
Updated to include revised coordination group structure and
changes ref high tides debrief
Gemma Bailey
May 2018 (6.2)
Updated TCG agenda with teleconference numbers.
Gemma Bailey
March 2019 (6.3 6.4)
Rewritten and circulated for consultation
G.Bailey
NRF Business Manager
Email: nrf@norfolk.pnn.police.uk
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Records of Validation and Training Schedule (Up to 5 years)
Date
Details