Prose
Poetry
Congress
New Coach Manual
CX
LD
Informative
Persuasive
2019-2020
2
NoticeofNon-Discrimination
The University Interscholastic League (UIL) does not discriminate on the basis of race,
color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs.
See Section 360, Non-Discrimination Policy, UIL Constitution and Contest Rules.
https://www.uiltexas.org/policy/constitution/general/nondiscrimination
The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-
discrimination policies:
Dr. Mark Cousins
University Interscholastic League
Director of Compliance and Education
1701 Manor Road, Austin, TX 78722
Telephone: (512) 471-5883
Email: policy@uiltexas.org
For further information on notice of non-discrimination, visit
http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/contactus.cfm
or call 1-800-421-3481 or contact OCR in Dallas, Texas:
Office for Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education
1999 Bryan Street, Dallas, TX 75201-6810
Telephone: 214-661-9600, Fax: 214-661-9587, TDD: 800-877-8339
Email: OCR.Dallas@ed.gov
2019 - 2020 UIL Speech and Debate At—a – Glance
August 15
F
First Lincoln-Douglas Debate Topic available online (for use in September through
December)
August 15
F
CX Debate: Schedule district planning meetings
September 7
F
SuperConference, Tyler Junior College - Tyler
September 10
F
Congress: Deadline to submit Intent to Participate. Submit online
Congress: Deadline to submit Region Legislation
September 21
F
SuperConference, TAMU Corpus Christi
October
F
First vote for 2019-2020 CX Debate Resolution
October
F
National High School Activities Month
October 1
F
CX Debate: Deadline to hold district planning meetings
October 3-5
F
Texas Speech Communication Association Convention, Amarillo
October 20-21
F
UIL Legislative Council Meeting, Austin
October 26
F
SuperConference, University of Texas, Austin
November 1
F
CX Debate: District information form due with District Director's Name. Submit online.
November 2
F
SuperConference, Texas Tech - Lubbock
November 1-15
F
Congress Region Meets
November 18
F
Congress: Deadline to submit Region Results & State Legislation.
December
F
Final voting for 2019-2020 CX Debate Resolution.
December 1
F
CX Debate: Deadline for District officials to set up district meet online.
December 1
F
Congress: State Legislation posted.
December 15
F
Second UIL Lincoln-Douglas Debate Topic available online (for use in January thru
May including District, Region, and State).
January 3
F
First day hosting district CX debate competition. Entries must be submitted online at
least 10 calendar days prior to meet. Results submitted online no later than 10 calendar
days after district meet. Schools should complete Required Judging Forms for State
online immediately following their district meet.
January 13-15
F
Congress State Meet
January 10
F
First day for holding high school invitational meets using UIL Set A materials
(Materials may be used from January 10February 1)
February 7
F
First day for holding high school invitational meets using UIL Set B materials
(Materials may be used from February 7 March 14)
February 8
F
CX Debate: Final day to hold district CX competition.
February 10
F
CX Debate: Final deadline to submit district results online
February 13
F
CX Debate: Final deadline to submit Required Judging Information for State Meet
without a $100 late fee. Deadline to certify second place CX teams (in districts with
fewer than eight participating teams) and first place CX teams (in districts with only one
school participating) to the League office. Submit online.
March 15 -21
F
Cross-Examination Debate State Meets
March 23-28
F
First Week for Speech District Meets
Mar 30-31, Apr 1-4
F
Second Week for Speech District Meets
April 17-18
F
Regional Academic/Speech Meets
May 27-28
F
Speech State Meet
TBA
F
UIL Capital Conference
1
RESOURCE GUIDE AND MANUAL FOR THE BEGINNING UIL
SPEECH/DEBATE COACH
Table of Contents
Chapter 1
Introduction to UIL
Commitment of UIL Coach
Academic Conflict Pattern
The UIL Speech Program
UIL Speaking Events
Forensics in Texas: A Comparison
Chapter 2
Resources to Help You
Speech & Debate on the ‘Net
Getting to Know UIL
Chapter 3
How to Build a Team
Squad Criteria Packet
Hints for New Coaches
Chapter 4
Questions & Answers
Ethics in Forensics
UIL Spring Meet Code
Special Needs Students
Appendix
Acknowledgment Form
Prose: Category and Ballot
Poetry: Category and Ballot
Informative Speaking: Ballot, and Sample Topics
Persuasive Speaking: Ballot, and Sample Topics
Computers in Extemp
LD: Ballot, Judging Information
CX: Ballot, Judging Information
Computers in CX, LD Debate
Congress: Legislation Template, Judging Information
SuperConferences
TILF Scholarships
2
CHAPTER 1
3
At a state meeting in 1910, debate teachers enthusiastically began an interscholastic
forensic program to motivate their students and provide them with a practical application
for the skills they were developing. Two years later, they asked the University of Texas to
administer the program in such a way that it would be fair and equitable for all interested
schools in the state. Since that time, the University Interscholastic League has grown into
a vibrant organization not only for debate but interscholastic contests in academics,
athletics, and music.
Currently, UIL membership includes over 1500 public high schools, as well as private
schools meeting prescribed criteria. These schools range in student body size from 9 to
almost 6,000. An elected body of school administrators representing each conference and
region in the state make up the Legislative Council that governs UIL. Local schools are
realigned every two years into UIL districts, which are governed by their District Executive
Committee.
The UIL academic program has become the largest program of its kind in the nation and
has flourished because of the support and input of the teachers whose students benefit
from it.
Our purpose is to develop academic competition that provides enrichment beyond the
classroom curriculum, where the best and the brightest are challenged to demonstrate
mastery in a variety of academic skills. We currently sponsor 30 high school and 20
elementary/junior high contests. Our staff continually strives to correlate our contests to
standardized tests such as college entrance exams, so that students have a training
ground that prepares them for the rigorous academic world of higher education. Objectives
outlined in the state curriculum are also strong determining factors in the design of our
contests that provide advancement from district to regional to state in order to crown a
state champion in all 6 conferences.
Our scholarship program is second to none, having disbursed over $32 million since its
conception in 1954. More than 20,000 Texas high school students who have competed at
the UIL State Academic Meet have received scholarships to attend Texas colleges and
universities. This year alone, the Texas Interscholastic League Foundation is awarding
over 1.1 million dollars in scholarships.
4
Professional Acknowledgement Form
The UIL requires that all coaches of UIL activities (grades 9 — 12) sign in the presence of a notary
the Professional Acknowledgement Form at the beginning of their tenure in that position. This
applies to full-time district employees as well as non-school coaches. The school administrator is
responsible for seeing that all the forms are properly signed and kept on le. Do not mail copies
to the League ofce. The signed form indicates the coach has read and agrees to abide by the
rules. A copy of the Professional Acknowledgement Form is provided online and in the Academic
Coordinator’s Manual sent to your campus.
http://www.uiltexas.org/les/professional-acknowledgement.pdf
Speech coaches shall review from the Constitution and Contest Rules (C&CR), Section 400, and their
respective contest rules before signing the acknowledgement form. The UIL mails a copy of the
C&CR to each school in August. Schools may order additional copies on the academic, music and
athletic order forms. The C&CR is also available online on the ofcial UIL web site.
http://www.uiltexas.org/policy/constitution/category/constitution-academics
The Professional Acknowledgement Form has no relationship to a teacher’s normal classroom
responsibilities and therefore, if coaches are suspended from UIL duties because of a rule violation,
they carry the suspension or any other penalty to any school they might move to for the length of
the time of the penalty.
A copy of the Professional Acknowledgement Form can be located in the front of this
manual’s appendix.
University Interscholastic League
PROFESSIONAL
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT F ORM
STATE OF TEXAS §
COUNTY OF _________________________ §
BEFORE ME, the undersigned authority, on this the ______ day of _______________, 20_____, personally
appeared ____________________________, who after being duly sworn upon his/her oath stated as follows:
(1) I am ___________________ of ____________________, Texas.
(2) I am currently employed by the ___________________________ Independent School District in the
following capacity: _______________________________________. I am in char ge of district students
who participate in activities of the University Interscholastic League.
(3) I have read and am familiar with, and will continue to read the Leaguer , an online official publication
by the UIL, located on UIL web site.
(4) I have read and am familiar with, and will continue to read the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules,
activity manuals and other League bulletins and will keep myself informed as updated editions are
received, in the contests for which I am responsible, throughout my tenure with this school district.
(5) I understand the contents of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules and activity manuals and relevant
web sites in my activity(s) as they are applicable to me, to the students in my char ge, to the school to
which I am assigned, and to the school district.
(6) It is my intention to comply with all of the provisions of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules.
Further, in the event of an official rules change, or an official interpretation, I understand that I will be
responsible for abiding by said rules after official notification of the change or interpretation.
(7) It is my intention to describe to my students all applicable provisions of the UIL Constitution and
Contest Rules within a UIL activity of which I am in charge. If I do not understand a provision of the
UIL Constitution and Contest Rules, I shall seek a written clarification. If a student, parent, or any
other person requests more than a description of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules, I will refer
them to my district’s superintendent or designee, or the UIL staff for opinions and explanations, and to
the UIL State Executive Committee for official interpretations.
(8) I am giving this professional acknowledgement to acknowledge the above stated facts and the
professional responsibility I freely accept with respect to my actions or omissions in activities of the
UIL, and to assure my students, the parents of my students, my school, my school district, and UIL
officers: (a) that I am aware of those actions and omissions that constitute violations of the UIL
Constitution and Contest Rules; (b) that I am aware of the ranges of possible penalties that may be
imposed following a violation; and (c) that I am aware of the persons against whom the UIL may
impose penalties.
(9) In particular, I acknowledge my understanding of the penalties that may be assessed against me should
I fail to comply with the provisions of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules.
(10) I acknowledge that I am making this sworn statement to be filed with my superintendent.
This professional acknowledgement is made solely for the purpose set forth herein and does not waive any right nor constitute any
admission.
Signed: ___________________________________________ _________________________________________
Signature of Coach/Sponsor/Director Notary Public in and for the State of Texas
My commission expires on:___________________
(Notary Seal)
This form is to be filled in and notarized only once, at the beginning of employment of a high school coach, academic sponsor , and
music and One-Act Play director. It is to be filed in the superintendent’s office.
click to sign
signature
click to edit
5
Academic Conict Pattern
The conict pattern is not
mandated at district, but it will
be honored at all regional and
state meets.
Regional and state schedules
will not be modied to allow
participation in conicting
events.
Prep & Contest
Prelims
Finals
The following events may begin at the same time: prose, poetry, Lincoln-Douglas debate, ready writing*, computer
applications* and current issues & events. Calculator applications, number sense and computer applications may not
be held at the same time. Students may also participate in both current issues & events and computer applications so
long as they are set up and do not delay the start of the computer applications contest. Number sense and calculator
applications conict with current issues & events, ready writing, prose/poetry interpretation and Lincoln-Douglas
debate. Ready Writing and Copy Editing may not be scheduled at same time. Computer Applications and Copy Editing
may be held at same time.
The following events may begin at the same time: informative speaking, persuasive speaking, spelling & vocabulary,
science and accounting. News writing* and feature writing* may not be held at the same time. Note: informative and
persuasive speaking nals and computer science programming may conict.
The following events may be held at the same time: mathematics, social studies, prose, poetry and Lincoln-Douglas
debate. Editorial writing* and headline writing may not be held at the same time. Computer science and mathematics
shall not be held at the same time.
The following events may begin at the same time: informative speaking nals, persuasive speaking nals, literary
criticism and computer science programming**. Programming is administered at all levels of competition – district,
regional and state.
SET 1
3 hours
SET 2
2.5 hours
SET 3
2 hours
SET 4
2.5 hours
Set 1
3 Hours
Set 2
2.5 Hours
Set 3
2 Hours
Set 4
2.5 Hours
Accounting
Computer App.
Current I & E
Literary Criticism
Ready Writing
Social Studies
Spelling
Calculator App.
Computer Sci.
Mathematics
Number Sense
Science
Copy Editing
Editorial
Feature
Headline
News
Informative
Lincoln Douglas
Persuasive
Poetry
Prose
Speech & Debate
Journalism
STEM
Academics
*- Events utilizing computers (computer applications, editorial, feature, news, and ready writing) must have at least
30 additional minutes earlier than indicated on the chart to set-up equipment. The contestant is not required to be
present for equipment set-up.
** – The 2.5 hour block indicated for Computer Science hands-on programming allows 30 minutes for roll call,
preliminary announcements and the dry run practice problem, followed by a full two hours for the actual contest.
NOTE: teams must also have at least 30 additional minutes earlier in the day to set up equipment. The equipment set-
up may take place at any point during the contest day; all team members are not required to be present for equipment
set-up.
6
UIL Speech Program
The UIL high school speech program consists of six events from three basic skill categories, plus Congress:
Debate:
• Lincoln-Douglas and Cross-Examination (Team Debate)
Extemporaneous Speaking:
• Informative and Persuasive
Oral Interpretation:
• Prose and Poetry
Students are permitted to enter 2 events in speech, and cross-examination debate.
* UIL also sponsors Congress as an event. It is a fall/winter contest, so there is no restriction on entering
Congress in addition to other speech or academic events.
If You Enter:
Team Debate (CX)
Lincoln-Douglas Debate
Prose Interpretation
Poetry Interpretation
Informative Speaking
Persuasive Speaking
You May Not Enter These Contests:
Lincoln-Douglas Debate
Team Debate (CX), Prose Interpretation,
Poetry Interpretation
Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Poetry
Interpretation
Lincoln-Douglas Debate,
Prose Interpretation
Persuasive Speaking
Informative Speaking
Invitational tournaments are hosted throughout the year. They are sponsored by a host school and are not
specifically sanctioned by UIL, so they may or may not follow all UIL rules and procedures. Many of these are
posted on the UIL website.
Tournaments sanctioned by the UIL State Office include:
Congress Region Meet
May be held anytime between a 2-week window.
November 1-15, 2019 (ESC regions select date)
Congress State Meet
January 13-15, 2020
C-X Debate District Meet
May be held anytime during a 6-week window
January 3 February 8, 2020 (UIL districts select
date)
C-X Debate State Meet
March 15-17, 2020 (1-2-3A)
March 19-21, 2020 (4-5-6A)
Academic District Meet
May only be held during March 23-28, 2020
Speech District Meet
May be held during March 23-28, 2020 (District I)
March 30-31, April 1 - 4, 2020 (District II)
Speech/Academic Regional Meet
April 17-18, 2020
OAP Regional Meet
April 15-18, 2020
OAP State Meet
April 30, May 1-2, 2020
Academic State Meet
May 1-2, 2020
Speech State Meet
May 27-28, 2020
7
Forensics in Texas: A Comparison
Prose
Interpretation
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
7 minutes
no grace
5 minutes
30 second grace period
7 minutes
30 second grace period
Synopsis
oral interpretation of prose;
prepare 2 performances
from 2 specified literary
categories;
documentation of
categories required
state-qualifying event
oral interpretation of prose;
selection from published
works
supplemental event
only at nationals
oral interpretation of prose;
selection from published
works
offered in even years only
Delivery
oral reading;
not memorized
except introduction
oral reading;
not memorized
except introduction
oral reading;
not memorized
except introduction
Poetry
Interpretation
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
7 minutes
no grace
5 minutes
30 second grace period
7 minutes
30 second grace period
Synopsis
oral interpretation of poetry;
prepare 2 performances
from 2 specified poetic
categories;
documentation of
categories required
state-qualifying event
oral interpretation of poetry;
selection from published
works poetic in nature
supplemental event
only at nationals
oral interpretation of poetry;
selection from published works
poetic in nature
offered in odd years only
Delivery
oral reading
not memorized
except introduction
oral reading
not memorized
except introduction
oral reading
not memorized
except introduction
8
Forensics in Texas: A Comparison
Informative*/US
Extemporaneous
Speaking
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
7 minutes
allowed to finish sentence
7 minutes
30 second grace period
7 minutes
30 second grace period
Synopsis
speaker draws 5
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of
preparation time;
speech is informative in
nature; topics cover
domestic, international
and Texas issues
state-qualifying event
speaker draws 3
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of
preparation time; final round
has a two minute cross-
examination period
topics cover domestic
issues
national qualifying event
speaker draws 3
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of
preparation time; final round at
state has a three-minute
cross-examination period;
topics cover domestic issues
state-qualifying event
Delivery
1 3X5notecard
allowed
district/regional/state
notecard use
prohibited
1 3X5 notecard allowed in
preliminary rounds
prohibited in elimination
rounds; prohibited at
state tournament
Persuasive /Int’l
Extemporaneous
Speaking
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
7 minutes
allowed to finish sentence
7 minutes
30 second grace period
7 minutes
30 second grace period
Synopsis
speaker draws 5
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of
preparation time; speech
is persuasive in nature;
topics cover domestic,
international and Texas
issues
State qualifying event
speaker draws 3
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of
preparation time; final round
has a two-minute cross-
examination period: topics
cover international issues
National qualifying event
speaker draws 3
current event topics,
chooses one to speak on
after 30 minutes of preparation
time; final round at state
tournament has a three-minute
cross-examination period;
topics cover international
issues
State qualifying event
Delivery
1 3”X5 notecard
allowed
district/regional/state
notecard use
is prohibited
1 3”X5 notecard allowed in
preliminary rounds prohibited
in elimination rounds; notecard
use is prohibited at state
tournament
*Both NSDA and TFA have an Informative Speaking event, but it is not extemporaneous in nature and has its own rules
and guidelines.
9
Forensics in Texas: A Comparison
Cross-Examination
Policy Debate
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
8-3-8-3-8-3-8-3-5-5-5-5
8 minute
preparation
8-3-8-3-8-3-8-3-5-5-5-5
5 minute
preparation
8-3-8-3-8-3-8-3-5-5-5-5
8 minute
preparation
Synopsis
two-member teams
debating policy question;
broad national or
international topic remains
the same all year; released
each January for the
following year
two-member teams
debating policy question;
broad national or
international topic remains
the same all year; released
each January for the
following year
two-member teams
debating policy question;
broad national or
international topic remains
the same all year; released
each January for the
following year
Delivery
Extemporaneous
Extemporaneous
Extemporaneous
Lincoln-Douglas
Debate
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
6-3-7-3-4-6-3
4 minute
preparation
6-3-7-3-4-6-3
4 minute
preparation
6-3-7-3-4-6-3
4 minute
preparation
Synopsis
A one on one value debate;
Fall topic used August
December; Spring topic
used January May;
available on UIL website
A one on one value
debate; NSDA topic
changes every 2 months
A one on one value
debate; can debate UIL or
NSDA current topic based
on local tournament choice
Delivery
Extemporaneous
Extemporaneous
Extemporaneous
Congress
UIL
NSDA
TFA
Time
Each session approx.
3 hours
Each session approx.
3 hours
Each session approx.
4 hours
Synopsis
Mock U.S. Congress
Bills/Resolutions authored
by students
Mock U.S. Congress
Bills/Resolutions authored
by students
Mock U.S. Congress
Bills/Resolutions authored
by students
Delivery
Prepared by
Extemporaneous
Prepared by
Extemporaneous
Prepared by
Extemporaneous
10
2015–UniversityInterscholasticLeague
TimeLimits
Debate
Speech
CrossExaminationDebate
AffirmativeConstructiveSpeech
8minutes
NegativeCrossExaminesAffirmative
3minutes
NegativeConstructiveSpeech
8minutes
AffirmativeCrossExaminesNegative
3minutes
AffirmativeConstructiveSpeech
8minutes
NegativeCrossExaminesAffirmative
3minutes
NegativeConstructiveSpeech
8minutes
AffirmativeCrossExaminesNegative
3minutes
NegativeRebuttal
5minutes
AffirmativeRebuttal
5minutes
NegativeRebuttal
5minutes
AffirmativeRebuttal
5minutes
Preptime,perteam
8minutes
LincolnDouglasDebate
AffirmativeConstructive
6minutes
NegativeCrossExamination
3minutes
NegativeConstructive
7minutes
AffirmativeCrossExamination
3minutes
AffirmativeRebuttal
4minutes
NegativeRebuttal
6minutes
AffirmativeRebuttal
3minutes
PrepTime,perdebater
4minutes
CongressionalDebate–
appliestoeachnewlegislation
SponsorSpeech
3minutes
QuestioningofSponsor
2minutes
FirstNegativeSpeech
3minutes
QuestioningofFirstNegative
2minutes
Allsubsequentspeeches
3minutes/each
Questioningofallsubsequentspeakers
1minute/each
Event
PreparationPeriod
Maximum
Time
ExtemporaneousSpeaking
30minutes 7minutes
Poetry
7minutes
Prose
7minutes
11
CHAPTER 2
12
UIL RESOURCES TO HELP YOU
Constitution & Contest Rules
Available in hard copy and on the UIL website; this book is absolutely essential for you to
read. Contains UIL eligibility information. Always carry to UIL tournaments or have access.
UIL Speech Website: www.uiltexas.org/speech
Quickest method to get up-to-date information about UIL, including the latest news, debate
topic, order forms for study materials, state judging forms, surveys & ballots, event
information, rule clarifications, research links, calendar of events. Practice topics for
informative and persuasive speaking are posted throughout the season. You will access this
website to enter contestants in the district meet. It is critical to submit Speech Coach
Information form from this site to receive announcements and reminders throughout the
year.
Contest Manuals
Step-by-step procedures for how each UIL contest should be conducted. Available for
anyone to download free of charge from the UIL website. Assist students in preparing for
contests. Handbooks essential for each speaking event; provide clarification of C&CR rules,
theory, preparation practices and procedures for students, along with coaching techniques &
tips for success. Download at the first of the school year for aid in coaching.
State Round Recordings
Digital downloads and some DVD’s of the State Meet final rounds of Congress, Informative
and Persuasive speaking, CX and LD Debate are available from the UIL online store.
Speech Coach Mailing
E-mailed in August to all speech coaches; includes a wealth of information pertinent to UIL
Speech to get your year stared off smoothly. Be sure to register as a current speech coach
to receive this and other important announcements throughout the year.
https://www.uiltexas.org/form/speech-coach/
Leaguer
Available online only. Provides news, articles and official notices. Check Speech online
overview page periodically for updates. Alerts also sent via email.
Capital Conference
Coach workshop held each summer at the University of Texas in Austin; provides valuable
instruction for coaching UIL speaking events. Register online.
Student Activities Conferences
Better known as SuperConferences; free to coaches & students; hosted at 4 regional college
sites during the fall providing workshops in all academic events. Explanation &
demonstration of speaking events by successful coaches and students. Dates/locations
posted on website. Flyer with additional info included in appendix.
Regional Advisory Committee
Experienced speech coaches selected by the State Office as advisory panels for the regional
meet; great mentors for new coaches. Contact information on web:
www.uiltexas.org/speech/regional-advisory-committees
13
Speech & Debate On The Net
www.uiltexas.org/speech
UIL Speech & Debate Events
• Informative & Persuasive Speaking
• Prose & Poetry Interpretation
• Cross-Examination & Lincoln-Douglas
Debate
• Congress
New Coach Information
• Register on Coach Database
• Resources
• Tournament Survival Tips
• Frequently Asked Questions
• New Coach Manual
Contest Information
• Current UIL State Champions
• Clarication of New Rules
• Using Computers in CX and LD Debate
• CX Debate Topic Selection, Ballot &
Results
• Current Topics for CX and LD Debate
• Oral Interpretation Categories
• Documentation Details, Rulings
• Practice Extemporaneous Speaking
Topics
• Computer Guidelines for Electronic
Retrieval
Devices in Extemporaneous Speaking
• TalkTab Tabulation Software
• Special Needs Requests
• Online store for all contest materials
Contest Forms
Online Entry Form Submission
• Required State Judge Forms: CX & LD
• CX District Contest Director Form
• CX District Contest Material Requisition
• Order State digital downloads and
DVDs
Speech Judges
• Judging Database
• Judging Criteria
Application to Judge UIL Contests
Committees
• Volunteer for Committees
• Regional Advisory Committee
Contact Information
Web Links
• Research Links on the Web
• Debate Topic Information
• Prose/Poetry Reference Sites
• Extemporaneous Speaking News
Sources
• Contest Material Resource Links
• Lincoln-Douglas Philosophy Links
Calendar
• Important Calendar Dates
• Capital Conference Coaches
Workshop
• Registration Info
• Conference Program
Tournament Instructions
• Sites and Dates of Invitational
Tournaments
• Important State Meet Information,
Required forms and Submission
Deadlines
Feedback
• Coach Surveys
• Submission Form for LD Topic Ideas
• Submission Form for Prose/Poetry
Category Ideas
14
GET TO KNOW UIL
I. Things to Know for All UIL Contests
Constitution and Contest Rules (available online)
Academic Coordinator’s Manual (available online)
•TEA-UIL Side by Side (Question & Answer format concerning State Laws, eligibility;
available online)
•Importance of Tournament Procedures, Roll Call, Checking Ballots, Contest Verification
Procedures
Speech Handbooks for all seven contests (available free of charge from UIL website)
II. Things to Know for CX Debate
•Topic Release Topic announced in January and debated the following fall; posted on
website, in Leaguer and C&CR
•CX Fall District Planning Meet held prior to October 1; contact principal to know the
date and permission to attend
•District selects CX District Director register name and contact info online by
November 1
•Fall Planning Meeting Agenda all agenda items should be discussed; discussion
agenda posted online at: www.uiltexas.org/speech/agenda
•District CX Meet District Director sets up entry form in the Spring Meet Entry System
by December 1; link to system found on speech web homepage.
•Dates for CX Debate District contest (see UIL calendar for window)
•Tournament Format: District: prelim rounds, advancing to elimination rounds or round
robin
•District Entry Formsubmit online 10 calendar days before meet
•Winner’s Packet with details about State tournament posted online (Tournaments page
of UIL Speech) for students.
•Coaches’ Packet (large red and white envelope you are responsible for picking up from
District Contest Director before leaving the district tournament)
•Judging requirement if qualify for State Meet Deadline posted online.
•Judging form completed online. There is a late fee if you miss the deadline.
•UIL A Guide to Cross-Examination Debate Handbook (available free of charge from the
UIL website)
•Rules particular to UIL Debate (Certification of some 1
st
and 2
nd
place teams,
procedures for substitutions at State; prompting, open c-x, scouting prohibited, use
of computers) These are included in the contest handbook.
III. Things to Know for LD Debate
•Topic Release: August 15 & December 15; posted online
•Tournament Format: District: prelim rounds, advancing to elimination rounds or round
robin
LD Debate Handbook (download from UIL website)
•Winner’s Packet posted online (Tournaments page of UIL Speech) for students
•Coaches’ Packet large red and white envelope you are responsible for picking up
from Regional Contest Director before leaving Regional contest site
•Judging requirement if qualify debaters for State Meet Deadline posted online.
15
IV. Things to Know for Prose & Poetry
•Contestants prepare two performances, one from Category A and one from Category B.
•Categories/Category restrictions: See UIL Prose & Poetry Handbook
•Documentation requirements (students don’t compete w/out approval of documentation)
Prose and Poetry Handbook (responsible for reading; critical for documentation
explanation; order from UIL website.)
•State Office assistance is available if you have a documentation question; ask well in
advance of district meet.
•Research opportunities (website links)
•Contest Procedures: Sectioning, Drawing for the Category, Time Limit
•Speech IE Ranking System for Multiple Judges: TalkTab software downloadable free
from UIL speech web page. (become familiar with the ranking system for UIL)
V. Things to Know for Persuasive & Informative
•Rules in the Prep Room: what materials are allowed and not allowed
Informative/Persuasive Handbook (download from UIL website)
•Sources for files (website links, news sources to explore) at
www.uiltexas.org/speech/extemp-resources
•Contest Procedures: No talking in prep room; Draw at 10-minute intervals, no outlines in
prep, one card no larger than 3” x 5” is permissible; limitation on what can be taken
out of prep room, specific guidelines for use of computers
•Speech IE Ranking System for Multiple Judges: TalkTab software downloadable free
from UIL speech web page (become familiar with the ranking system for UIL)
VI. Things to Know for Congress
•Contest held November 1-15.
•Intent to Participate form must be submitted online by September 10.
Regions organized by Education Service Centers rather than by traditional UIL Districts
or Regions.
See website for your Regional Clerk’s contact info
•Access contest rules, structure and procedures on the UIL website and review the UIL
Congress Handbook posted on the UIL website.
•Contestants can submit legislation to ESC Regional clerk for consideration by
September 10.
•Specific guidelines for writing and formatting legislation and use of computers.
16
CHAPTER 3
17
RECRUITING IDEAS: HOW TO BUILD A UIL TEAM
1. Make creative recruitment announcements over public address system or school media channel.
Hang recruitment signs in hallways.
Social media: Utilize outlets of Social Media i.e. Facebook, Twitter, etc., in accordance with school
policy, to encourage strong ties between current speech & debate team members and to foster
development of the thriving program.
2. Early in the school year, put a memo in teachers’ mailboxes. Include a brief description of UIL
events, request recommendations of students who they think possess talent for particular speaking
contests.
3. Once you identify these students, send them a personal invitation to join the team. Mail student
invitation to home address, attention parents. Make the student feel he/she has been “selected” to
be among the elite. Be sure to include information for parents about the TILF scholarship
opportunities. That often motivates!
4. Recruit from junior high feeder school(s). Contact junior high counselors for pre-registration dates
(usually January or early February). Get permission to do a “showcase” of your best performers just
prior to pre-registration.
5. Get to be friends with your high school counselor and sell them on your program. (Remember: they
make out student schedules.)
6. Early in the school year, find out if your students do other academic UIL contests. (Study the
Conflict Pattern to insure events don’t conflict with each other.)
7. Decorate lockers, identifying students who become part of the UIL academic team. Make them feel
special. Get shirts made so students feel they belong to a team. Have a UIL shirt day once a week
and/or always wear when traveling.
8. Bring a busload of students to the nearest UIL Student Activities Conference (SuperConference)
each fall. It’s free and no registration is required.
9. Issue each student a Squad Criteria Packet:
Include a Medical Release Form, squad rules/philosophy, curfews on trips, tournament entry
rules, consequences for drops, tourney dress code, violation of school district policies, etc.
approved by your administration. Require commitment signatures from both students and
parents.
10. Demonstrate you are willing to go the extra mile for your students. This will inspire your students.
(Kids will only give as much as their coach does, but if they see you care to give your time to them,
they will be inspired to be loyal to the program.)
11. As your team grows, go to Homeroom/Activity Periods to showcase their talent so student-
body/teachers can see what forensics is all about.
Have experienced students perform for peers.
Schedule oral interpers to perform for English classes.
Schedule Extempers, L-Ders, CXers (with modified rounds) to speak for Social Study classes.
Work within the curriculum, using topics relevant to cross curriculum currently being studyied.
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12. Recognize your students = Luncheon, Assembly, Awards Night
Get administrative approval of a Letterman Policy (see Section 480 of the C&CR for award
limitations)
Give patches at end of year.
Attend board meetings, publicize success in the newspaper
(write the article yourself make it easy for newspaper to print)
Contact your state legislator’s office when your students qualify for UIL State.
Establish a squad website and Facebook page so photos and kudos can be posted.
13. Announce UIL scholarship winners in local paper send notices to School Board, Administration,
State Representative.
14. Don’t forget to celebrate the small successes along the way. Make the journey fun!
15. Network with other teachers who have effective programs in your school and in neighboring
schools. (Find a mentor.)
16. Learn along with the kids. (Admit you are new at this and learning alongside them.)
Attend workshops: UIL Capital Conference in the summer, UIL SuperConference in the fall,
arrange for a successful coach or retired coach to come to your school to do a workshop.
Not
only will your students benefit, but you’ll learn successful coaching methods.
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SQ U AD C R IT E RI A P AC KE T
Publish a “Squad Criteria” packet pre-approved by your administration. If administration knows
that you have established these regulations, their confidence in your credibility as a coach will
increase and you will have laid the groundwork for their support in critical situations, if ever
needed. Then give the packet to students and parents to review before students join your
squad. Insist on their signatures of commitment to these guidelines. A “Squad Criteria packet
might include:
COVER LETTER TO PARENTS
PHILOSOPHY OF COMPETITION
Describe your commitment to the forensic program and your expectations of students
who participate in the program.
SQUAD OBJECTIVES
List life skills students can acquire through speech competition, scholarship opportunities
CRITERIA FOR PARTICIPATION
*Tourney Preparation
- after school workshop attendance, rehearsals (mandatory or voluntary?)
- specific days you are willing to commit to after school practice
*Tournament Responsibilities
- commitment to the events the student enters (have student sign form for each
tournament including events they want to enter)
- consequences for “dropping” events
- dress code for competition
- behavior at tournaments
(i.e., No complaining in public about judges, contestants, tournament:
procedures such as if there is a problem in the round, coach handles it,
not the student.)
- goals of the meet
(How to make every competition a “learning” experience; high level of
concentration; time to arrive at rounds; support for other squad members
by attending final rounds of their events to learn what makes a champion)
TOURNAMENT REGULATIONS
*School policy concerning alcohol, tobacco, drugs
*Regulations concerning transportation to and from the meet
*Regulations concerning leaving the tourney site during the meet
*Regulations governing out-of-town, overnight tournaments
- hotel room assignments, behavior, curfew, room checks, lights out policy
CONSEQUENCES FOR VIOLATING RULES AND REGULATIONS
*Address unwritten rules
*Individual squad member responsibilities
*FORMS to be signed and kept on file
*Student commitment to the rules and regulations
*Parental commitment to the rules and regulations
*Medical Release
-Critical! Allow no student to travel without having this on file! Require that the
form be notarized. Get your local health department or hospital to help design
one that will meet regulations for emergency medical treatment. Carry it with you
on all tri
ps.
20
HINTS FOR NEW COACHES
UIL tournaments are exciting for coaches as you see the hard work of your students come to
fruition. However, without careful planning, first-year coaches may find tournaments almost
overwhelming. It is important to be prepared for the additional responsibilities that competition
requires of you so that you can create a healthy balance between forensics and your regular
classroom duties. Being organized and knowing what to expect ahead of time are keys to
meeting this challenge successfully. Here are a few hints and unwritten rules you might find
helpful to know as you begin the tournament circuit.
Before the Tournament:
1. Upon receiving the tournament invitation, make sure there are no major conflicts with the
school calendar that might adversely affect your students or their ability to compete (i.e.,
stock show, football or basketball game, prom). If there are, understand that all students
might not wish to participate at that time.
2. Post the tournament date and events early and set your own deadline for signing up that
will allow you to submit the entry form in time to meet the tournament’s deadline.
3. Arrange for transportation (bus request, etc.) well in advance, following your district’s
guidelines.
4. If the tournament necessitates an overnight stay, make room reservations immediately.
(This is especially important if your students qualify for UIL State. Reserve rooms well in
advance of the meet. For UIL CX Debate State, reserve in early fall and then cancel
reservation promptly if your team does not qualify.)
5. Submit purchase orders for check requests as soon as you know how many competitors
you will be entering. Most tournaments charge by the event entries rather than by the
student. Know your school district policies and meet important deadlines for the central
office/business department.
6. Arrange for the appropriate number of judges required, either by serving as the judge
yourself, taking someone with you or paying the judging fees. Usually coaches are asked
to fill one of the judging slots, so be prepared to do so. It’s the best way to learn and you
become a stronger coach. (If you qualify debaters to State, you are required to provide a
judge with strong experience that can adequately judge state-level rounds.) Avoid buying
out” of your judge obligation at invitational meets so you can serve as the judge.
7. Hand out tournament attendance permission slips to be signed and returned by a specific
deadline. This keeps parents aware of dates and holds students accountable for
tournament attendance.
8. Pay attention to the “add/drop” deadline. Any drops made after that date usually result in
an additional drop fee”. Most tournaments will not allow any additions after that date.
9. During the week before the tournament, make sure each competitor has performed for
you. This not only allows you to make sure the student is prepared, but also focuses the
student on the task at hand.
10. Make sure you have communicated to your squad what kind of attire is required for
competition. Because appearance affects credibility, appropriate dress is almost as
important as the performance.
21
11. Prepare your students for performing in front of an audience since UIL rules allow for
observers.
Getting on the Bus
1. Set a departure time that allows you extra time for any unforeseen difficulties in getting to
the contest and hold to it. Waiting for a late student only penalizes everyone else and sets
a bad precedence for the future. If necessary, assign one or two team captains to contact
all entrants 30 minutes before departure to make sure everyone arrives in time for roll call.
2. Have specific travel directions and on-site parking instructions for the bus driver. Discuss
with them before departing for the tourney.
3. Carry to the tournament:
Copy of the entry form and tournament schedule
All necessary checks or purchase orders
Medical releases and permission slips or copies of these since you might want to leave
the originals in a file in your classroom
Specific directions to the tournament site; be sure bus driver gets a copy to review.
School and parent emergency telephone numbers
Legal pad, notebook, pens, pencils, stopwatches
Copies of your interpers’ documentation
Magazine, book, papers to grade, tablet computer, etc. as there will be lots of
“downtime” waiting for results
An “emergency” kit containing band-aids, Neosporin (or equivalent), head and stomach
pain relievers, emergency toiletries, incidentals such as an extra necktie, hose, safety
pins and a small sewing kit.
Permission slip from parents allowing you to dispense the above medications.
4. Just before leaving, have everyone show you their interp folders and documentation. SEE
THEM. This can avoid surprises when you get to the tournament site.
Arriving at the Tournament Site
1. Make sure the students know where the common area is, usually the school cafeteria,
where squads gather to wait for contests to begin and results to be posted. Arrange to
meet them there once you get checked in at registration. Do not bring your entire team to
the registration table.
2. Make sure you know where the bus will be during the tournament. The driver needs to be
available for any emergency. Tournaments often provide hospitality for coaches, judges
and bus drivers.
3. At the registration table, inform the tournament directors of any changes you haven’t
already made, including drops and replacements. There is usually no charge for
replacements, but there will be an additional fee if you drop an entry. You might wish to
consider instituting the policy that students are responsible for their own drop fee. Avoid
dropping entries unless it is an extreme emergency. Even then, try to get another student
to cover the event. Dropping contestants impacts sectioning and pairings your host has
worked many hours to complete. Time to redo can make the tourney schedule late.
4. Make sure to check in your judges, if necessary. Make arrangements for paying the extra
judging fees should any of your judges not show.
22
5. While at the registration table, check all entries to make sure everyone is on the
appropriate list. Mistakes do happen, and it’s better to catch them at the registration desk
rather than when an event is about to begin.
6. Most tournaments have a registration packet containing school maps, sectioning, event
times, and other pertinent information for you and your students. This is often referred to
as a “poop book.” Hosts may provide a version downloadable to your smart phone and
tablet.
During the Tournament
1. Immediately upon finishing registration, meet with your students in the common area.
Inform them of their school code (usually a number or letter, which can be found in the
tournament packet) and each contestant’s sectioning room number and time of event.
2. Arrange specific times when you will meet with the students in the common area
throughout the day. Also, let the students know where they can find you should they need
to do so.
3. While you don’t have to accompany the students to every round, do make sure they know
where they are going and when to arrive, especially if they advance to the final rounds.
4. Check in at the judgestable frequently to see if you are needed. The registration packet
usually will have your judging assignments, but not always. You need to check,
regardless, in the event you have been assigned a round. Even if you have not, stand-by
judges are always appreciated. Failing to pick up your assigned ballot may result in your
student(s) being disqualified so fulfilling your judging obligation is imperative.
5. Make sure you know where you can pick up contestants’ ballots after a round. UIL
tournaments have a verification period after the preliminary rounds; know when and where
it is and be there. Otherwise, tabulation errors cannot be corrected.
6. The official verification period at UIL tourneys are a must for you to be present. This is a
time to check rankings on your students’ ballots and final tabulation Take your
Constitution & Contest Rules and UIL contest handbook to verification so you are certain
of the ranking procedure. Verification is not a time to dispute a judge’s decision.
You should stay for the entire verification period. Results remain unofficial until it is over
and those results have publicly been declared official. While verification is still underway
changes can still be made if tabulation is found to be incorrect.
7. Each tournament has its own tabulation room policy some are open tab rooms, where
you can go in at any time to view ballots, judging assignments, etc; others are closed tab
rooms, where you cannot. (Most UIL district tab rooms are open, while most Regional and
all State tab rooms are closed.) Should you experience a problem during the course of the
tournament that requires entry to the tab room, find a tournament official.
8. Throughout the tournament, keep an eye on your students. Unruly behavior is, by far, the
largest complaint at contests. Remind your students that decorum and politeness go a
long way toward success.
9. Should you be called upon to judge, do so fairly and objectively. Bitter school rivalries
have no place on a ballot. Be prompt to rounds so the tournament can stay on schedule.
23
Fill your ballots with well-written, constructive comments; always include areas needed for
improvement.
10. Should you wish to observe your students in competition, it is wise to ask them if they are
comfortable with you doing so. Some students are intimidated by having their coach in the
room with them; this will hinder their performance. Respect their wishes. Be careful not to
“coach” during the round.
11. Even if your students do not make finals, have them observe the round and learn from the
“best” that day so they will see what the standards are for winning.
12. Two-day tournament sites may have an area assigned for overnight storage. Know where
it is and make sure your students get their materials there prior to leaving for the night.
Return early enough the next day to remove them in a timely manner. For ultimate
security of materials, take them with you!
At the end of the Tournament
Once the competitive rounds are over, most tournaments have an awards assembly. If any of
your students made the finals, you and your students should definitely attend. If there is no
formal awards assembly scheduled (some tournaments give out the medals or trophies as soon
as results are known) or if none of your students advanced, you may leave. But before you do
so, do the following:
1. Collect all ballots from the tab room or hospitality room.
2. Make sure all debate tubs, extemp files, and/or computers are loaded on the bus. Don’t
just take the students’ word this has been done; check yourself.
3. Make sure your portion of the commons area is free of all trash and cleaned to the best of
your ability. (The tournament directors will thank you, remember you, and invite you back
next year!)
4. Have the students change into traveling clothes, if necessary, and require that they double
check they have all their possessions with them on the bus. Having a polo shirt or t-shirt
with school logo works well for traveling. It makes it easy to keep up with your students if
you plan stops along the way.
5. Thank the tournament directors.
6. On the way home, use cell phones to have the students call or text their parents, giving
them an approximate time of arrival. Most tournament returns are very late at night, and
parents will be very appreciative if they aren’t left waiting in the school parking lots for
hours. Besides, you don’t want to have to wait long periods of time for students to be
picked up once you get back to your home school.
7. Use social media to announce success of the squad.
8. Tell your students you are proud of them. . .because you are!
24
The Following Week
1. Publicize the squad’s success.
Write up the results for school announcements.
Develop contacts with the school and community newspapers. Present them with an
article you wrote yourself. Doing this will make it easy for them to print and the details
will be correct.
Make use of local radio, television, and cable stations if possible.
Post successes on your squad webpage and Facebook page.
2. Analyze the Judges’ ballots.
Screen ballots before handing to the students. Some judges may have written comments
damaging to a student’s self-esteem.
Review the ballots with your students. Afterwards, assign specific items for each student
to be working on before the next competition.
File ballots in the student’s performance folder so they can be reviewed at
different stages of the tournament season. Always use ballots as learning tools.
*See appendix for example form of student assessment of previous tournament
25
CHAPTER 4
26
Q & A
WHERE CAN I LOCATE THE UIL SPEECH WEB PAGE?
www.uiltexas.org/speech
I’VE NEVER COACHED SPEECH OR DEBATE BEFORE! WHERE CAN I GET HELP?
First, study the rules for your event(s) from the Constitution and Contest Rules and especially in
the appropriate speech contest handbook. Then visit the UIL speech web page for additional
information and resources. Contact the State Director for rule clarifications and speech teachers
in your area for coaching tips. Attend conferences hosted by UIL.
HOW CAN I NETWORK WITH OTHER SPEECH COACHES?
The best way is to attend teacher conferences. Spend two days of your summer in Austin at the
UIL Capital Conference. You’ll participate in sessions with other novice and veteran speech
coaches and hear presentations from some of the best. Plus, you can get Continuing
Professional Education Credit (CPE hours). Join the Texas Speech Communication Association
(www.etsca.com/home.asp) and attend their annual convention held in October which
features professional development for speech teachers & coaches not to mention fun and
friendships you’ll experience! Contact your UIL Regional Advisory Committee members listed on
the UIL website. They are coaches in your geographical area who can offer advice.
I HEAR ABOUT UIL, TFA, NSDA, and TSCA. I GET CONFUSED!
Each is a speech organization. UIL, TFA and NSDA all host speech competitions for Texas
high school students. Each has a website you can access to learn more about what makes
them unique. When you go to a tournament, make sure you know which event rules are going to
be followed, because UIL events and rules and LD topics differ from Texas Forensic Association
and the National Speech & Debate Association. (see comparison chart included in this manual.)
TSCA stands for the Texas Speech Communication Association and is the state professional
organization for speech educators at the high school, university, as well as middle school level.
WHAT IS A TOURNAMENT “POOP” BOOK?
It’s the booklet or weblink you may receive at registration that gives you all the important
information you and your squad needs to know about the tournament: i.e., time schedule, room
assignments, sectioning of each event, rules & procedures. Many tournaments no longer print a
hard copy but include critical information on their online registration site. (i.e., Joy of
Tournaments).
HOW DO I KNOW IF MY STUDENTS ARE ELIGIBLE TO COMPETE?
All students must meet the no pass no play law established by the State of Texas. The TEA-
UIL Side by Side manual provides answers to many of your eligibility questions. This manual
can be located on the home page of the UIL website. Review it first and then consult with your
Academic Coordinator and/or local administrator. If you still have questions, call the League
(512-471-5883) and ask to speak to an Eligibility Officer.
WE’VE BEEN INVITED TO A SPEECH TOURNAMENT THAT IS SCHEDULED ON A
SUNDAY. CAN I TAKE MY SQUAD?
School district personnel may accompany students to four school-sanctioned academic or fine
arts competitions that do not count toward League standing if they are held on Sunday. These
competitions must have prior approval of the superintendent or designated administrator. In
27
addition, a college or university must sponsor the competition. See the C&CR. Greater detail
and explanation is provided on the Tournament page of the UIL Speech website.
WHAT IS SECTIONING?
Because speech contests are oral, contestants in individual events such as extemporaneous
speaking and oral interpretation are divided into sections, if numbers warrant. A UIL section
consists of no more than 8 contestants. If 9 or more students are entered, preliminary and final
rounds are held. Depending on the number of sections, the top 2 or 3 ranked students advance
from prelims to the final round.
WHO MAKES UP A JUDGING PANEL?
Panels are often used in UIL speech contests. If so, there must be an odd number of judges.
Commonly, 3 judges make up a panel. Judges should not confer prior to rendering a decision
and turning in their ballots to the contest director.
HOW IMPORTANT ARE THE TIME LIMITS IN UIL INDIVIDUAL SPEAKING CONTESTS?
Time is critical. In prose and poetry, contestants are disqualified if exceeding the time limit of
seven minutes, even if only by a second or two. Extemporaneous speaking contests
(informative and persuasive) also have a seven-minute limit, but since these speeches are not
pre-prepared from a manuscript, a speaker is allowed to complete the sentence they are
speaking when the seven-minute time limit has been reached. This will not disqualify them,
although they may run over the seven-minute limit by a few seconds. However, if they start a
new sentence, the time rule calls for a disqualification.
WHAT IS BALLOT VERIFICATION?
It is a required contest procedure at UIL tournaments. After results are tabulated and before
they are certified as official” results and medals awarded, contest directors should announce a
period of approximately 15 minutes when coaches and students have an opportunity to look at
rankings and ballots.
In debate contests, the contest director announces the win-loss record it took to advance to the
elimination rounds. You should check each of your debate ballots, totaling the wins, losses, as
well as speaker points. Once elimination rounds begin, during verification check that your
debaters are listed correctly as either affirmative or negative and the judges’ decision. Speaker
points do not apply in elimination rounds.
In interpretation and extemporaneous speaking contests, the contest director will return your
student(s) individual evaluation form and display the master ballot(s) that indicate how all
contestants (not just your own) were ranked by each judge in the round, and/or the diagnostic
sheet downloaded and printed from the UIL TalkTab software tabulation program when multiple
judges were used. You should check to insure the master ballot ranking for your student(s)
match what is recorded on the individual evaluation form. Study in advance the procedure on
ranking when multiple judges are used so you can tabulate for yourself, in the event the contest
director did not implement the official UIL TalkTab program.
WHAT ARE CATEGORIES FOR UIL PROSE AND POETRY CONTESTS?
Each contestant is required to prepare two performances. The League establishes categories
each performance must meet. The categories change every 2-3 years.
Study the category descriptors carefully. Visit the UIL website and review the UIL Prose and
Poetry Handbook for expanded explanations of the categories. The handbook can be
downloaded from the UIL website.
28
WHY IS DOCUMENTATION OFTEN REQUIRED FOR THE PROSE AND POETRY
CATEGORIES?
To insure that each student has met the guidelines required promotes a fair and equitable
contest.
HOW DO I KNOW IF THE DOCUMENTATION MY STUDENT FOUND FOR UIL PROSE OR
POETRY IS ADEQUATE?
Check the chapter in the UIL Prose & Poetry Handbook that discusses appropriate and
inappropriate documentation, and the official website for recent rulings. If you still aren’t sure,
contact the State Speech Director. Tip: Don’t wait until the week of your district meet to call the
League office. Allow plenty of time for your student to polish another piece, in the event the
ruling isn’t in your favor.
Note: UIL Cross-Examination State Meet is conducted the entire week prior to District I week
so, your State Director will not be in the office that week. If you need a ruling from the State
Director, request it by March 1.
WHAT IS THE RULE ON ENTERING BOTH LD AND CX?
Students are limited to entering one debate event, one interp contest and one extemp contest
as well as Congress. Students who compete in CX cannot also enter LD at the UIL district meet.
They can, however, enter other speaking events and academic contests.
IF A CX TEAM IS ENTERED AS A DISTRICT ALTERNATE BUT DOES NOT COMPETE,
ARE THOSE STUDENTS ELIGIBLE TO ENTER LD DEBATE?
Yes. The restriction against cross-entering CX and LD takes effect when the students actually
compete at district.
MY TEAM QUALIFIED FOR CX STATE. NOW WHAT DO I DO?
Your district spring meet director will certify the results to the State Office so there is no
registration for you to complete. However, be sure to pick up a red and white winning Coaches’
Packet before leaving the District Meet. There is important information in it, especially the
deadline for submitting your state judging forms online. These are required for your debaters to
advance. Carefully read the State Meet page online for deadlines, procedures and required
paperwork. Direct your students and their parents to the Winner’s Packet posted for them
online.
WHY DO I NEED A JUDGE FOR CX STATE?
Constitution & Contest Rules require every school that qualifies a team to supply an
experienced judge. The state tournament is incredibly large with over 850 rounds to be covered
by judges. Having schools bring judges, in addition to the 75 or so judges that the League hires,
attempts to provide students with a geographically balanced judging pool.
WHAT IF I DON’T FEEL QUALIFIED TO JUDGE STATE ROUNDS?
When you start the year with your debaters, realize that at least 1 of your teams just might
qualify for state. Therefore, it’s a good idea to watch rounds at invitational tournaments and
volunteer to judge. Tournament officials will welcome a willing judge for CX! The more rounds
you observe, the more confident you will feel judging. Besides, judging at tournaments makes
you a better coach since you can discuss the rounds you heard with your students after the
tournament. If, after judging throughout the year you still do not feel qualified, find a former
debater or someone qualified to bring as your judge. NOTE: If your district waits until the last
weekend of the CX window to hold their meet, you will need to contact someone much earlier, in
the event that your team(s) qualified, so that you meet the deadline for submission.
29
WHAT HAPPENS IF I LOSE MY COACH’S PACKET FROM CX DISTRICT OR REGIONALS?
Check the UIL website for information and for the required judging forms you must submit for
your students to compete at State. The forms are posted there for online submission to the
State Office.
WHAT HAPPENS IF I MISS THE CX STATE DEADLINES?
Not only do you risk your team not debating at State, but also your school is accessed a $100
late fee.
WHEN SHOULD I MAKE TRAVEL ARRANGEMENTS FOR REGIONALS OR STATE?
Make tentative hotel arrangements months in advance. Because CX Debate State is held during
Spring Break in the Capitol City, early fall is recommended. Follow your school district’s policies
for paperwork.
WHAT IF ONE OF MY CX DEBATERS QUALIFIED FOR STATE GETS SICK AND CAN’T
COME?
You are allowed to substitute ONE member of the CX team, as long as one member from the
original team that qualified remains. If both debaters are unable to attend State, you are
required to contact the district director so that the alternate may have the opportunity to
advance. Failure to notify the State Office that your team will not attend state meet can result in
sanctions by the State Executive Committee.
WHEN AND HOW DO I FIND OUT WHAT THE UIL LD DEBATE TOPIC WILL BE?
UIL uses 2 topics each year 1 for the fall semester and 1 for the spring semester. The fall
topic is released in mid - August and the spring topic is released in mid - December. The
quickest way to get it is to access the UIL Debate web page where you will find it posted. (The
CX Debate topic is also posted there.)
I QUALIFIED A LD DEBATER FOR STATE. DO I HAVE TO PROVIDE A JUDGE FOR THE
MEET?
Yes. Instructions on completing your judging forms are included in your Coach’s Packet you
pick up at Regionals. If you fail to do so, look on UIL website for deadlines and judging forms.
CAN WE FILE DEBATE BRIEFS AS RESOURCES IN OUR EXTEMP TUBS OR IN OUR
EXTEMP ELECTRONIC FILES?
No. Remember: anything that resembles an outline of a speech is not allowed in the
extemporaneous speaking prep room. Read in the UIL Informative and Persuasive Handbook
what is and isn’t allowed.
CAN WE HIGHLIGHT OUR EXTEMP ARTICLES BEFORE FILING?
Highlight an article in only one color.
WHAT IF I HAVE A QUESTION THAT IS NOT ANSWERED IN THIS BOOKLET?
Feel free to contact the UIL State Director. E-mail is the easiest and quickest way to get a
response. You may also call or write:
Jana Riggins
UIL Director Speech & Debate
University Interscholastic League
Box 8028, Austin, TX 78713-8028
jriggins@uiltexas.org
512-471-5883
512-232-1499 fax
30
Ethics in Coaching Forensics
Competition can bring out the best or the beast in coaches and students. Although there are
sometimes differences among Texans about just what is “ethical”, there is general consensus
that unethical behavior occurs all too often in forensic competition. The attitude of win at all
costs”, “if your squad is going to use a tactic my students will use it too, whether its
right or not,” is a trap you won’t want to fall into as a beginning coach.
What is unethical when it comes to competition? What should you avoid?
Unsportsman-like conduct Never treat judges and tournament officials
disrespectfully, even if you disagree with their opinion. Your students learn by example. Teach
your students sportsmanship and courtesy.
Taking shortcuts Don’t resort to skipping the important steps of having students
check all evidence before using it in a debate round, trying to pass off inappropriate
documentation in prose and poetry contests, or illegal materials in the extemporaneous
speaking preparation room. You not only risk disqualification of your student, but your credibility
with your coaching colleagues.
“Everybody else is doing it” attitudeNever excuse unethical behavior just because
it seems other coaches are doing something. There are many more coaches who are following
the letter of the law.
Looking for Loopholes Violating the spirit of the rule when the intent is clear by
arguing the “letter of the law is not exemplary behavior. Don’t try to skirt the rules nor teach
your students to do so.
Abuse of scholarship of the activity Forensics is a noble endeavor. Set high
standards of decorum for yourself and your students. Using a ballot to punish students from a
school you don’t like or whose coach you aren’t fond of, manipulating sectioning/pairings in the
tabulation room, doing your students work for them, dropping teams without notice, berating or
intimidating tournament officials, demonstrating a lack of courtesy toward other competitors, and
a general disrespect for rules are not what forensics should be about.
Conflict of Interest Be upfront about contestants you have a personal affiliation with
or that you have professionally coached or consulted. Recuse yourself from judging them not
because you could not be unbiased but because you understand how unfair it might be
perceived by other coaches and contestants. Everyone wants to feel assured all competitors
were treated equally and fairly.
As speech educators, we have a responsibility to our profession as well as our students. We
must ensure that the educational aspect of our activities takes precedence over the competitive
aspect and we must be careful how we help students define “winning.”
Place Integrity over Victory. Be proud of your students if they have done their best. Teach your
students n
ot only the written rules, but also the unwritten rules of etiquette and ethics.
31
Section 901 C&CRAcademic Contest Ethics Code
(a) The Academic Contest Ethics Code shall carry the force of rule. Member school districts,
member schools and/or covered school district personnel who violate any of the provisions of
this code shall be subject to penalty.
(1) Participate in contests in the spirit of fairness and sportsmanship, observing all rules
both in letter and in spirit.
(2) Sponsor and advise individuals and teams without resorting to unethical tactics, trickery
that attempts to skirt the rules or any other unfair tactic that detracts from sound educational
principles.
(3) Accept decisions of officials and judges without protest and extend protection and
courtesy to officials.
(4) Regard opponents as guests or hosts while placing personal and/or team integrity above
victory at any cost. Maintain grace and poise in victory or defeat. Conduct that berates,
intimidates or threatens competitors has no place in interscholastic activities.
(5) Provide information or evidence regarding eligibility of any contestant or school to local
school administrators or to the appropriate judicial bodies upon request.
(6) Understand and appreciate the educational values of competition and abstain from
modifying or soliciting another teacher to modify grades for eligibility purposes, knowing that
such behavior defeats the character-building purposes of extracurricular competition.
(7) Abstain from any practice that makes a student feel pressured to participate in non-
school activities.
(8) At all times, ensure that competition is relative to a more important overall educational
effort, using competition as a tool in the preparation of students for citizenship and
successful adulthood.
(9) Ensure that UIL Academic district, regional and state meets receive precedence over
non-qualifying contests or meets.
(10) School districts shall notify the academic regional or state meet director no later than the
end of the second school day following academic district or regional competition if a student
or a team knows that it will not compete at the next higher academic meet.
(b) SALARY/STIPEND. Any salary or stipend arrangement which makes it to the financial
interest of a coach, director or sponsor to win a UIL Contest will be in violation of the Academic
Ethics Code, and the member school district, member school and the school district personnel
shall be subject to the range of penalties outlined in Sections 27 and 29.
32
Academics - Request for Accommodation Process
Submitting a Request
The University Interscholastic League will consider requests to accommodate a student with physical
or mental impairments. The school should submit the Request for Accommodation form located
at the link below with the appropriate signatures a minimum of two weeks before the contest in
which the accommodation is sought. Requests submitted after that time, absent extenuating cir-
cumstances, will not be granted.
Request For Accommodation Form
http://www.uiltexas.org/les/academics/UIL_Request_for_Accommodation-9-16-posting.pdf
The request shall adhere to the accommodations provided by the student’s Sec. 504 Committee and/
or A.R.D. Committee. No student records are to be submitted to UIL. The only required submis-
sion is the signed request with rationale for the accommodation. The completed form should be
submitted to the UIL ofce, Music, Athletics or Academics, that administers the game or contest in
question.
Approval Letter
A response letter from UIL granting or denying the requested accommodation will be provided to the
school. A UIL letter approving the accommodation can be submitted at any level of the competi-
tion. It is the coach’s or sponsor’s responsibility to notify and provide a copy of the UIL approval
letter to the meet director well in advance of the competition. If the student advances to the next
higher meet, it is the responsibility of the student’s school to notify the region and/or state meet
director immediately.
Additional costs or equipment required for accommodations are the responsibility of the school dis-
trict. It is the responsibility of the host school, contest director and contestant to follow any appli-
cable UIL ethics code or other applicable UIL rule to ensure the honesty of the competitors and
the integrity of the competition.
Approval Process
Requests are handled on a case-by-case basis. The facts matter in each case. Just as an example,
accommodations have been approved for visual impairments, dyslexia, motor skill impairments
and special circumstances to take the test in a separate room. Such accommodations have
included the use of an enlarged test copy, a magnifying glass, colored overlay, converting a test
to Braille format or use of a computer and printer. UIL, however, will not alter a contest’s judging
criteria as an accommodation or make other accommodations that would fundamentally alter the
game or contest.
Appendix
University Interscholastic League
PROFESSIONAL
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM
STATE OF TEXAS §
COUNTY OF _________________________ §
BEFORE ME, the undersigned authority, on this the ______ day of _______________, 20_____, personally
appeared ____________________________, who after being duly sworn upon his/her oath stated as follows:
(1) I am ___________________ of ____________________, Texas.
(2) I am currently employed by the ___________________________ Independent School District in the
following capacity: _______________________________________. I am in charge of district students
who participate in activities of the University Interscholastic League.
(3) I have read and am familiar with, and will continue to read the Leaguer, an online ofcial publication
by the UIL, located on UIL web site.
(4) I have read and am familiar with, and will continue to read the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules,
activity manuals and other League bulletins and will keep myself informed as updated editions are
received, in the contests for which I am responsible, throughout my tenure with this school district.
(5) I understand the contents of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules and activity manuals and relevant
web sites in my activity(s) as they are applicable to me, to the students in my charge, to the school to
which I am assigned, and to the school district.
(6) It is my intention to comply with all of the provisions of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules.
Further, in the event of an ofcial rules change, or an ofcial interpretation, I understand that I will be
responsible for abiding by said rules after ofcial notication of the change or interpretation.
(7) It is my intention to describe to my students all applicable provisions of the UIL Constitution and
Contest Rules within a UIL activity of which I am in charge. If I do not understand a provision of the
UIL Constitution and Contest Rules, I shall seek a written clarication. If a student, parent, or any
other person requests more than a description of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules, I will refer
them to my district’s superintendent or designee, or the UIL staff for opinions and explanations, and to
the UIL State Executive Committee for ofcial interpretations.
(8) I am giving this professional acknowledgement to acknowledge the above stated facts and the
professional responsibility I freely accept with respect to my actions or omissions in activities of the
UIL, and to assure my students, the parents of my students, my school, my school district, and UIL
ofcers: (a) that I am aware of those actions and omissions that constitute violations of the UIL
Constitution and Contest Rules; (b) that I am aware of the ranges of possible penalties that may be
imposed following a violation; and (c) that I am aware of the persons against whom the UIL may
impose penalties.
(9) In particular, I acknowledge my understanding of the penalties that may be assessed against me should
I fail to comply with the provisions of the UIL Constitution and Contest Rules.
(10) I acknowledge that I am making this sworn statement to be led with my superintendent.
This professional acknowledgement is made solely for the purpose set forth herein and does not waive any right nor constitute any
admission.
Signed: ___________________________________________ _________________________________________
Signature of Coach/Sponsor/Director Notary Public in and for the State of Texas
My commission expires on:___________________
(Notary Seal)
This form is to be lled in and notarized only once, at the beginning of employment of a high school coach, academic sponsor, and
music and One-Act Play director. It is to be led in the superintendent’s ofce.
2019 – 2020 UIL PROSE CATEGORIES
Prose Category A Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category A of Prose Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to four selections of literature may be used.
(B) If performing a single selection, the source shall be published, printed material; internet material shall be
published concurrently in hard copy.
(C) If multiple selections are used, one selection may be unpublished.
(D) Selections from plays, screenplays, movies, and monologues shall not be used.
(E) Speeches shall not be used in this category.
(F) No contestant shall use the same writer in more than one category in the contest.
(G) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(H) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category A: This Is Me
The goal of this category is to examine the performer’s ancestry, origin, heritage, and/or dreams and aspirations. The
performer should explore their own personal background and/or what their future may hold.
In this category, the contestant may read a single literary work of prose, an excerpt of a work of prose or may create a
program containing no more than four literary works. If a program is used, one selection from an unpublished source is
allowed to be included in the program. The majority of the performance must be published prose. The intent of this
category is not to encourage an entirely originally-authored program.
The performance may be fiction or non-fiction. Examples may include, but are not limited to oral histories, testimonies,
interviews, and letters. For this category, co-authored and anonymous works are permissible. The author(s) used in this
category shall not be used in Category B of prose.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and authors read and should connect the literature to the goal of
the category. If the program is woven, it shall be stated in the introduction, and the different literary works should be
distinguishable through interpretation.
Documentation Requirements
1. If performing a single literary work, it shall be published printed material.
2. If performing a program, all selections shall be published, printed material, with the exception that one may be
unpublished.
3. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Prose A
Documentation online form.
4. Examples of acceptable proof of publication include:
the original published source
a photocopy of the copyright of the original source
online printout of Library of Congress cataloguing information
If a selection is drawn from a literary collection, the contestant shall supply the original source or a photocopy
of the table of contents that designates the title of the book and proof the selection is included in that book,
such as a photocopy of the first page of the selection
A printout from an online source proving the selection is included in the published collection. Printouts of
online documentation shall include the URL of the website downloaded in the header or footer
5. Examples of unacceptable forms of formal documentation include:
Social media (such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr)
Copying and pasting into a word processing document
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original published source of the selection.
2019 – 2020 UIL PROSE CATEGORIES
Prose Category B Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category B of Prose Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to four selections of literature may be used.
(B) All selections may be published, printed material, internet material or transcribed material.
(C) No contestant shall use the same author in more than one category in the contest.
(D) Anonymous works shall not be used.
(E) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(F) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category B: This Speaks to Me
The goal of this category is to select literature that speaks to the performer. This category is reader’s choice.
In this category, the contestant may read a single literary work of prose, an excerpt of a work of prose or may create a
program containing no more than four literary works. For this category, prose includes fiction, nonfiction, news sources,
speeches, essays, letters and diaries. Co-authored works are permissible. Anonymous works are prohibited. The author(s)
used in this category shall not be used in Category A of prose.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and authors read and should relate to the audience why the
literature was chosen. If the program is woven, the contestant shall state it in the introduction, and the different works
should be distinguishable through interpretation.
Documentation Requirements
1. All selections may be published, printed material, online material or transcribed material.
2. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Prose B
Documentation online form.
3. No proof of publication for Category B is required.
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original source of each published selection.
2019 – 2020 UIL PROSE CATEGORIES
Prose Category B Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category B of Prose Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to four selections of literature may be used.
(B) All selections may be published, printed material, internet material or transcribed material.
(C) No contestant shall use the same author in more than one category in the contest.
(D) Anonymous works shall not be used.
(E) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(F) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category B: This Speaks to Me
The goal of this category is to select literature that speaks to the performer. This category is reader’s choice.
In this category, the contestant may read a single literary work of prose, an excerpt of a work of prose or may create a
program containing no more than four literary works. For this category, prose includes fiction, nonfiction, news sources,
speeches, essays, letters and diaries. Co-authored works are permissible. Anonymous works are prohibited. The author(s)
used in this category shall not be used in Category A of prose.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and authors read and should relate to the audience why the
literature was chosen. If the program is woven, the contestant shall state it in the introduction, and the different works
should be distinguishable through interpretation.
Documentation Requirements
1. All selections may be published, printed material, online material or transcribed material.
2. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Prose B
Documentation online form.
3. No proof of publication for Category B is required.
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original source of each published selection.
2019 – 2020 UIL POETRY CATEGORIES
Poetry Category A Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category A of Poetry Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to six poems may be used.
(B) If performing a single selection, the source shall be published, printed material; internet material shall be
published concurrently in hard copy.
(C) If multiple selections are used, one selection may be unpublished.
(D) Selections from plays or screenplays, movies, and monologues shall not be used.
(E) Song lyrics published only as music may be used, but for transition purposes only.
(F) No contestant shall use the same poet in more than one category in the contest.
(G) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(H) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category A: This Is Me
The goal of this category is to examine the performer’s ancestry, origin, heritage, and/or dreams and aspirations. The
performer should explore their own personal background and/or what their future may hold.
In this category, the contestant may read one single poem, an excerpt of a poem or poems, or may create a program
containing no more than six literary works. If a program is used, one poem from an unpublished source is allowed to be
included in the program. The majority of the performance must be published poetry. The intent of this category is not to
encourage an entirely originally-authored program.
Unless published as poetry, song lyrics may be used only as transitions, and if transitions are sung, the singing should be
limited in scope. For this category, co-authored and anonymous works are permissible. The poet(s) used in this category
shall not be used in Category B of poetry.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and poets read and should connect the literature to the goal of the
category. If the program is woven, it shall be stated in the introduction, and the different poems should be distinguishable
through interpretation. If song lyrics are used as transitions, it shall be stated in the introduction.
Documentation Requirements
1. If performing a single literary work, it shall be published printed material.
2. If performing a program, all selections shall be published, printed material with the exception that one selection may be
unpublished.
3. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Poetry A
Documentation online form.
4. Examples of acceptable proof of published include:
the original published source
a photocopy of the copyright of the original source
online printout of Library of Congress cataloguing information
If a poem is drawn from a literary collection, the contestant shall supply the original source or a photocopy of
the table of contents that designates the title of the book and proof the poem is included in that book, such as a
photocopy of the first page of the poem
A printout from an online source proving the poem is included in the published collection. Printouts of online
documentation shall include the URL of the website downloaded in the header or footer
5. Examples of unacceptable forms of formal documentation include:
Social media (such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr)
Copying and pasting into a word processing document
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original published source of the selection.
2019 – 2020 UIL POETRY CATEGORIES
Poetry Category B Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category B of Poetry Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to six poems may be used.
(B) All poetic works may be published, printed material, internet material or transcribed material.
(C) No contestant shall use the same poets in more than one category in the contest.
(D) Anonymous works shall not be used.
(D) Song lyrics published only as music shall not be used.
(E) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(F) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category B: This Speaks to Me
The goal of this category is to select poetry that speaks to the performer. This category is reader’s choice.
In this category, the contestant may read a single poem, an excerpt of a poem or may create a program containing no more
than six poems. For this category, poetry may include traditional and contemporary poetry and novels-in-verse. Co-
authored poems are permissible. Anonymous works are prohibited. The poet(s) used in this category shall not be used in
Category A of poetry.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and poets read and should relate to the audience why the poetry
was chosen. If the program is woven, it shall be stated in the introduction, and the different poems should be
distinguishable through interpretation.
Documentation Requirements
1. All poems may be published, printed material, online material or transcribed material.
2. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Poetry B
Documentation online form.
3. No proof of publication for Category B is required.
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original source of each published selection.
The best critiques teach and encourage the student. Please offer specic areas of improvement and positive attributes of the performance.
Prose Interpretation
Individual Evaluation Sheet
Speaker # _____Contestant __________________________________ Round ______________ Section ______
Selection(s) ______________________________________________________________ Conference ______
Author(s) ______________________________________________________________ Category A B
Please make certain the rank on this ballot matches the rank on the master ballot.
I rank this contestant
Note: Evaluate each performer individually based on the total presentation. At the end of the round, rank the performers in order of the
quality of the presentations: Best is 1st, second best is 2nd, and so on. Rank every contestant. Do not tie any contestants.
Judge’s Signature
Did the performer prepare you
to listen to the selection?
Did the content meet the cate-
gory requirements, and did de-
livery style of the introduction
add to the overall effectiveness
of the performance?
Was the material appropriate
for the performer and goal of
the category?
Did the performer success-
fully recreate the narrator, the
characters, and the scene?
Did the performer demon-
strate an awareness of the nar-
rators purpose and audience?
Did the performer make ap-
propriate use of physical and
vocal skills?
Was the use of manuscript,
internal pacing, pauses, and
closure appropriate?
What did you like about the
performance and why?
What specific areas of im-
provement are needed?
Did the performer adhere to
the prescribed category?
Introduction
Evaluation
Selection/Performance
Print Judges Name
2019 – 2020 UIL POETRY CATEGORIES
Poetry Category B Restrictions
Material chosen for use in Category B of Poetry Interpretation shall meet the following restrictions:
(A) One to six poems may be used.
(B) All poetic works may be published, printed material, internet material or transcribed material.
(C) No contestant shall use the same poets in more than one category in the contest.
(D) Anonymous works shall not be used.
(D) Song lyrics published only as music shall not be used.
(E) No contestant shall use selections from the same literary work more than one year at UIL State Meet.
(F) Selections shall be read in the English translation; however, incidental use of foreign language words and
phrases in any selection may be used as in the original.
Category B: This Speaks to Me
The goal of this category is to select poetry that speaks to the performer. This category is reader’s choice.
In this category, the contestant may read a single poem, an excerpt of a poem or may create a program containing no more
than six poems. For this category, poetry may include traditional and contemporary poetry and novels-in-verse. Co-
authored poems are permissible. Anonymous works are prohibited. The poet(s) used in this category shall not be used in
Category A of poetry.
The introduction and/or transitions shall include all titles and poets read and should relate to the audience why the poetry
was chosen. If the program is woven, it shall be stated in the introduction, and the different poems should be
distinguishable through interpretation.
Documentation Requirements
1. All poems may be published, printed material, online material or transcribed material.
2. The contestant shall prepare and provide for the contest director and each judge a hard copy of the UIL Poetry B
Documentation online form.
3. No proof of publication for Category B is required.
See the UIL Prose and Poetry Handbook and the official UIL website for expanded, detailed information about acceptable
and unacceptable documentation.
Students are urged, but not mandated, to take to the contest site the original source of each published selection.
The best critiques teach and encourage the student. Please offer specic areas of improvement and positive attributes of the performance.
Poetry Interpretation
Individual Evaluation Sheet
Speaker # _____Contestant __________________________________ Round ______________ Section ______
Selection(s) ______________________________________________________________ Conference ______
Author(s) ______________________________________________________________ Category A B
Judges Signature
Please make certain the rank on this ballot matches the rank on the master ballot.
I rank this contestant
Note: Evaluate each performer individually based on the total presentation. At the end of the round, rank the performers in order of the
quality of the presentations: Best is 1st, second best is 2nd, and so on. Rank every contestant. Do not tie any contestants.
Did the performer prepare you
to listen to the selection?
Did the content meet the cat-
egory requirements and did de-
livery style of the introduction
add to the overall effectiveness
of the performance?
Was the material appropriate
for the performer and goal of
the category?
Did the performer successfully
recreate the persona and the
scene?
Did the performer demonstrate
an awareness of the persona’s
purpose and audience?
Did the performer make appro-
priate use of physical and vocal
skills?
Was the use of manuscript,
internal pacing, pauses, and
closure appropriate?
What did you like about the
performance and why?
What specific areas of im-
provement are needed?
Did the performer adhere to
the prescribed category?
Introduction
Evaluation
Selection/Performance
Print Judges Name
The best critiques teach and encourage the student. Please offer areas of improvement and positive attributes of the speech.
Extemporaneous Informative Speaking
Individual Evaluation Sheet
Speaker # _____Contestant __________________________________ Round ______________ Section ______
Topic ___________________________________________________________________ Conference ______
Judges Signature
Please make certain the rank on this ballot matches the rank on the master ballot.
I rank this contestant
Note: Evaluate each speaker individually based on the total presentation. At the end of the round, rank the speakers in order
of the quality of the presentations: Best is 1st, second best is 2nd, and so on. Rank every contestant. Do not tie any contestants.
Did the speaker answer the question?
Was the content informative?
Was there sufcient use of logic, facts,
examples and/or expert opinion?
Was the information adequately docu-
mented?
Was the information pertinent to the
specic topic?
Introduction
Did the speaker get attention?
Was the topic clearly stated?
Did the speaker preview and give focus
to the key ideas?
Body
Were divisions clear and appropriate to
the topic?
Did the speaker make effective use of
signposting, internal summaries, and
transitions?
Was adequate time devoted to each divi-
sion within the 7 minute time limit?
Was there a logical progression of
ideas?
Conclusion
Did the speaker tie the speech together?
Was the answer to the question clear?
Was there a note of nality?
Language Style
Was the language suitable to informing
the audience?
Was the language precise, grammati-
cally correct and vivid?
Was the delivery natural and spontane-
ous?
Did it reinforce the ideas of the
speech?
Vocal Delivery
Was enunciation clear?
Was volume appropriate?
Was there sufcient variety in rate,
pause and pitch?
Physical Delivery
Did the speaker exhibit poise and
condence?
Were gestures varied, movement mo-
tivated and eye contact direct?
If note card was used, was it an
unobtrusive part of the delivery?
Analysis and Content
Delivery
Organization
Print Judges Name
Print Judges Name
Extemporaneous Informative Speaking
Finals – Region
Effective Date: April 12-13, 2019
(This copy is for the contest director.)
1. How does the issue of intellectual disability apply to capital punishment in Texas?
2. What is contributing to the popularity of Thierry Baudet in the Netherlands?
3. Who in Congress are President Trump’s more outspoken critics?
4. What issues are fueling the lingering protests in Serbia?
5. What is the latest news about the safety of Boeing 737 Max aircraft?
6. Social media: To what extent do individuals risk privacy violations when utilizing it?
7. Who are the leading contenders for the Democratic Party presidential nomination?
8. What role does Jared Kushner play in U.S. Middle East policy planning?
9. Why has Harvard law professor Ronald Sullivan become a target for criticism?
10. What is the current state of Japan’s whaling industry?
11. How can U.S. consumers protect themselves from identity theft?
12. Why did the Philippines withdraw from the International Criminal Court?
13. What are challenges currently facing the Texas Education Agency?
14. Why is General Motors planning to expand its operations in Brazil?
15. What are the latest discoveries in sustainable energy technology?
16. What Caribbean nations currently support Venezuelan President Maduro?
17. What is the extent of damage Nebraska has experienced due to flooding?
18. What are the immediate challenges facing Kurdish groups throughout the Middle East?
19. Why did the state of Oklahoma initiate a lawsuit against the Purdue Pharma LP Company?
20. How have leaders of China’s tech giant Huawei responded to security concerns of clients?
Extemporaneous Informative Speaking
Finals – State
Effective Date: May 29 - 30, 2019
(This copy is for the contest director.)
1. What are the future plans for restoration of France’s Notre Dame Cathedral?
2. Children and Technology: What do the new World Health Organization guidelines reveal about screen
time?
3. What are President Trump’s objectives regarding creation of the Space Force as a new military branch?
4. What action is the United States taking to initiate talks with the Taliban in Afghanistan?
5. Why is South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg gaining notoriety?
6. What does the future hold for Julian Assange?
7. What policy changes is the Trump administration making with respect to immigrant asylum seekers?
8. How is Colombian President Ivan Duque attempting to deal with FARC leaders in his country?
9. Why is the College Board changing the SAT test?
10. In terms of student safety, what does the latest national data suggest regarding the current school year?
11. What factors are fueling diplomatic tension between the United States and Iran?
12. What can Cuba do to stave off an economic crisis?
13. Why is the Pentagon advocating to send more troops to the Middle East?
14. How is the U.S. banking sector being affected by digital technology innovations?
15. In the aftermath of revolution, why are protests in Sudan continuing?
16. Why is the issue of “net neutrality” of concern to U.S. consumers?
17. Why have opponents of Nicolas Maduro failed to end his presidency of Venezuela?
18. What steps are public health officials taking to halt the spread of measles in the United States?
19. Why has the greater Houston area become one of the fastest growing regions in the United States?
20. How is Joe Biden’s candidacy changing the race for the Democratic presidential nomination?
The best critiques teach and encourage the student. Please offer areas of improvement and positive attributes of the speech.
Extemporaneous Persuasive Speaking
Individual Evaluation Sheet
Speaker # _____Contestant __________________________________ Round ______________ Section ______
Topic ___________________________________________________________________ Conference ______
Judges Signature
Please make certain the rank on this ballot matches the rank on the master ballot.
I rank this contestant
Note: Evaluate each speaker individually based on the total presentation. At the end of the round, rank the speakers in order
of the quality of the presentations: Best is 1st, second best is 2nd, and so on. Rank every contestant. Do not tie any contestants.
Did the speaker answer the question?
Was the content persuasive?
Was there sufcient use of logic, facts,
examples and/or expert opinion?
Was the information adequately docu-
mented?
Was the information pertinent to the
specic topic?
Introduction
Did the speaker get attention?
Was the topic clearly stated?
Did the speaker preview and give focus
to the key ideas?
Body
Were divisions clear and appropriate to
the topic?
Did the speaker make effective use of
signposting, internal summaries, and
transitions?
Was adequate time devoted to each divi-
sion within the 7 minute time limit?
Was there a logical progression of
ideas?
Conclusion
Did the speaker tie the speech together?
Was the answer to the question clear?
Was there a note of nality?
Language Style
Was the language suitable to informing
the audience?
Was the language precise, grammati-
cally correct and vivid?
Was the delivery natural and spontane-
ous?
Did it reinforce the ideas of the
speech?
Vocal Delivery
Was enunciation clear?
Was volume appropriate?
Was there sufcient variety in rate,
pause and pitch?
Physical Delivery
Did the speaker exhibit poise and
condence?
Were gestures varied, movement mo-
tivated and eye contact direct?
If note card was used, was it an
unobtrusive part of the delivery?
Analysis and Content
Delivery
Organization
Print Judges Name
Extemporaneous Persuasive Speaking
Finals – Region
Effective Date: April 12 - 13, 2019
(This copy is for the contest director.)
1. Will reduced property tax rates soon become a reality for Texas homeowners?
2. Does Iran currently maintain close diplomatic ties with North Korea?
3. Did the Mueller report vindicate President Trump?
4. Is the future of the World Trade Organization in question?
5. Will the 2020 presidential election become a referendum for the viability of the Electoral College?
6. Has right-wing extremism become a major political movement in the Netherlands?
7. Should social networking websites be subject to increased regulation by federal government
authorities?
8. Can religious persecution be curtailed in Myanmar and China?
9. Has the FBI become influenced by partisan politics?
10. Are civilian casualties resulting from U.S. involvement in Somalia?
11. Is the Trump administration committed to school choice?
12. Does the United States rely too heavily on foreign trade?
13. Are future manned moon missions under consideration by NASA officials?
14. Did New Zealand respond appropriately to the Christchurch shootings?
15. In the case of Jussie Smollett, was justice achieved?
16. Is the United States justified in recognizing Israeli sovereignty in the Golan Heights?
17. Are states combating the opioid crisis?
18. Is President Trump on a collision course with Mexico and Central America?
19. Does so-called fintech pose a legitimate security threat to the United States?
20. Should the United States pursue an isolationist foreign policy?
Extemporaneous Persuasive Speaking
Finals – State
Effective Date: May 29 – 30, 2019
(This copy is for the contest director.)
1. Should the United States institute a “merit-based” immigration policy?
2. Is the world on the verge of a digital Iron Curtain?
3. Does American capitalism need more defenders?
4. Will Uganda’s oil fields prove to be a blessing or a curse to the country’s economy?
5. Does justification exist for replacing the Electoral College as a means of electing presidents?
6. In spite of political setbacks, is Angela Merkel effectively leading Germany?
7. Will new abortion laws in multiple states force the Supreme Court to re-address Roe vs. Wade?
8. Has the United Nations adequately addressed the issue of international human trafficking?
9. Do rank-and-file Democrats favor a more socialistic direction for the U.S. federal government?
10. Should the United States embrace a neutral stance in the conflict between India and Pakistan?
11. Is teen anxiety on the rise in the United States today?
12. Is a military clash between the United State and Iran becoming a strong possibility?
13. Are Microsoft investors becoming alarmed about possible antitrust legal action against the company?
14. Is cybercrime on the rise in the United Kingdom?
15. Does elite social status play a major role in the U.S. college admissions process?
16. Is the Trump administration’s decision to drop aid to the Northern Triangle impacting immigration?
17. Was the Texas legislature justified in raising the minimum smoking age to 21?
18. Is violent crime becoming a threat to Mexico’s tourism industry in the Yucatan region?
19. Is the United States on the verge of an economic recession?
20. Is the issue of infrastructure reform gaining bi-partisan support in Congress?
- over -
GUIDELINES: ELECTRONIC RETRIEVAL DEVICES IN
EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING
The use of laptop and tablet computers and other electronic retrieval devices by competitors in
UIL Extemporaneous Persuasive and Informative Speaking is permissible for evidence retrieval
so long as wired or wireless connections are disabled and remain disabled during the contest.
These rules in no way are intended to prevent or discourage contestants from utilizing
traditional paper files.
Use of electronic retrieval devices during the contest
A. Computers and other electronic retrieval devices are defined as: laptop, tablet and netbook
computers, other portable electronic retrieval devices and secondary devices such as flash drives
and external hard drives.
B. Cell phones or smart phones or smart watches are not allowed during the contest.
C. Computers may be used only if the wireless capability is disabled. It is the responsibility of the
contestant to disable the equipment.
D. Wired connections (Ethernet or phone) during the contest are not permitted.
E. Computers or other electronic equipment may not be used to receive information from any
sources (coaches or assistants included) inside or outside the preparation room. Internet access,
use of e-mail, instant messaging or other means of receiving information from sources inside or
outside the preparation room are prohibited. This statement does not preclude the use of timing
devices.
F. Contestants may utilize allowable devices for the purpose of accessing stored files, but shall not
use them to outline their speech or otherwise organize their thoughts.
G. The contestant shall not remove the electronic retrieval devices from the preparation area until
after the contestant's speech has been delivered.
Sanction: Contestants found to have violated provisions B-G above shall be disqualified. The
contest director shall be empowered with the final decision concerning disqualification.
H. Devices must be muted in the preparation room during the contest. Contestants should not play
games or engage in other distracting activities on their electronic devices. Tournament officials
may ask a contestant to power off the device if it becomes distracting.
I. Contestants from the same school may share computers during preparation. However, conversing
among contestants is not allowed.
Dist/Reg 2019-20
Source Materials: Contestants may consult magazines, newspapers, journals and other
published source materials saved on their electronic retrieval devices if the following standards are
met:
A. There shall be no modification. Each document shall be a single, complete source in and of itself.
Indexing without annotation is allowed.
B. An article may be highlighted in only one color. Bolding, italicizing, underlining or any other
manipulation of the original text of the article is prohibited.
C. The presence of pre-written extemporaneous speeches, handbooks, briefs or outlines on electronic
retrieval devices during the contest is prohibited. If the contestant also uses the device for the
debate contest, debate materials including but not limited to cases, briefs, outlines and flows must
be stored on a separate external retrieval device disconnected or otherwise inaccessible and shall
not be accessed during the extemporaneous speaking contest.
D. Contestants may not access audio, video or other active multi-media files during the contest.
Logistics
A. Contestants electing to use computers are responsible for providing their own computers and
batteries. Tournaments hosts shall not be responsible for providing computers for contestants.
B. Power plugs or outlets may not be used in the preparation room at any time.
C. Contestants who choose to use laptop computers accept the risk of equipment failure. Should
equipment failure occur, no special considerations or accommodations, including additional
preparation time or speech time, will be given by judges, contest directors or tournament hosts.
D. Contestants accept full responsibility for the safety and security of their electronic retrieval
devices throughout the entirety of all UIL tournaments. Contestants, parents and coaches should
be aware that contestants are bringing and using the computers at their own risk. UIL is not
responsible for lost, stolen or broken computers.
Monitoring. By choosing to use electronic retrieval devices in the preparation room, contestants are
consenting to allow tournament officials to monitor their files. Contestants who do not wish to
consent should not use electronic retrieval devices.
UNIVERSITY INTERSCHOLASTIC LEAGUE
JUDGING LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATE
I.
Purpose:
Lincoln-Douglas debate, one-on-one debate of value resolutions, is excellent training for developing skills in
argumentation, persuasion, research, and audience analysis. In this contest students are encouraged to develop a
direct and communicative style of delivery. The debater's goal is to persuade the judge to accept or reject an
interpretation of the resolution on the basis of analytical, argumentative, and presentational criteria.
A. Case and Analysis
1. Defining the Values: Did the arguments presented focus on the values implicit in the resolution?
2. Establishing Criteria for Evaluating the Resolution: On what basis (universal, moral, social, political,
historical, legal, etc.) is one value proven by the debater to be more important than another?
3. Weighing Importance: Are the values advocated in support of the resolution more important than the
values diminished by the resolution, or are alternative values supported by the negative enhanced by the
resolution?
4. Application of Values and Criteria: Did the debaters apply their cases by filtering appropriate arguments
through the value and criteria?
B. Argumentation
1. Proof:
Did the evidence presented pragmatically justify the affirmative or negative stance?
Did the reasoning presented philosophically justify the affirmative or negative stance?
2. Organization: Are the ideas presented clearly, in a logical sequence, and with appropriate emphasis?
3. Extension, Clash, and Rebuttal:
Did the debaters fulfill their obligation to extend their own arguments?
Did they appropriately refute the contentions of their opponents by exposing weaknesses or inconsistencies?
C. Presentation
1. Expression: Were language, tone, and emphasis appropriate to persuasive communication?
2. Delivery: Were gestures, movement, and eye contact audience oriented and natural components of
persuasive communication?
3. Rate: Was rate of delivery conducive to audience understanding?
II.
Time Limits:
A. Preparation: Each debater has a maximum of four minutes preparation time to be used during the course of
the debate.
B. Debate: Affirmative 6 minutes
Cross-examination by Negative 3 minutes
Negative 7 minutes
Cross-examination by Affirmative 3 minutes
Affirmative Rebuttal 4 minutes
Negative Rebuttal 6 minutes
Affirmative Rebuttal 3 minutes
III.
Selecting the Winner: Putting aside personal biases and based on the analysis, argumentation, and presentation of
the debaters, which debater was the most persuasive?
THANK YOU FOR JUDGING!
District/
Regional 16
S
TATE
LD J
UDGE
S
UMMARY
R
EPORT
- S
CHOOL
J
UDGES
Judge Name
Preferred E-mail Address
Communication skills are more important than resolution of substantive
issues.
Resolution of substantive issues is more important than communication
skills.
Communication skills and resolution of substantive issues are of equal
importance.
Policy Debater in HS
Yes
Policy Debater in College
Judge Value Debate Often?
# Rds. This Year
# Rounds on Topic
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Rate of delivery
Amount of evidence
Appeals
Criteria
Approach to topic
Slower
Faster
Little
Emotional
Unnecessary
Philosophical
Factual
Lots
Essential
Pragmatic
Work Phone
Home Phone
Comm. Skills vs. Res. of Issues
Philosophy Statement
School Obligation
UIL Hired
Not Judging
Cell Phone
Should Not Judge
Fax
LD Debater in HS
Coach LD Debate in HS
CEDA Debater in College
Coach CEDA in College
Status
Experience Description (school judges)
Tournaments on Topic
Dist
Coach
Fulfilling Obligation
Debater
School
Coach name & Contact Info (if different)
Work Phone
Cell Phone
Fax
Preferred E-mail
Alternate E-mail
School Judge Info
Conf
5/30/2017
3:11:15 PM
Date & Time
Submitted
Yes
No
Judge Mobility Issues?
Yes
No
Coach Mobility Issues?
Yes
No
Debater Mobility Issues?
(Afrmative or Negative) (circle one)
CROSS-EXAMINATION DEBATE BALLOT
Conference: _______ Date: __________ Judge: _____________________ Room: _________ Round: ____
Afrmative Team # _____________________________ Negative Team # _____________________________
Assign speaker points to each debater ranging from 20-30 points. Rank each debater from 1 to 4 in order of excellence
(1 for best, 2 for next best, 3 and 4). Delivery that interferes with effective communication should be penalized.
Speaker Criteria
Organization • Evidence • Analysis • Refutation • Oral Style • Speed of Delivery
The best ballots teach and encourage the student. Please offer areas of improvement and positive attributes.
AffirmAtive teAm NegAtive teAm
Points Rank
(20-30) (1-4)
1st Speaker _____________________________ ______ _____
(rst) (last)
2nd Speaker _____________________________ ______ _____
(rst) (last)
Points Rank
(20-30) (1-4)
1st Speaker _____________________________ ______ _____
(rst) (last)
2nd Speaker _____________________________ ______ _____
(rst) (last)
The signicant clash(es)/issue(s) used as the basis for my decision were:
In my judgment, the ________________________ team won the debate. Low point win? Yes No
________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
Signature of Judge Afliation
Revised8/21/17
JudgingCross-ExaminationDebate
1. Debateisacontestinarguingaspecificresolution.Eachaffirmativeteamwillinterprettheresolutiondifferentlyandoffer
aspecificplan,outliningpotentialadvantagestoadoptingtheplan.Yourtaskistodeterminewhethertheaffirmative
provesthattheadoptionofitsplanwouldbedesirable.
2. Regardlessofyourjudgingphilosophy,therearemultipleargumentsthatmayoccurinadebate.Belowaresixcommon
ones.Tomakeyourdecision,youshouldtakenotes,andaftertheround,balancetheissues.Thiswillhelpyoudetermine,
basedonwhatthedebatersactuallypresentedintheround,whetheradoptingtheaffirmativeplanisdesirable.
KeyIssues
Topicality:
Doestheaffirmativeteamofferaplanwithinthecurrentresolution?
Inherency:
Hastheaffirmativecaseshownthatthestatusquoisunableorunwillingtoredressthe
harm?
Impacts
Iftheplanisnotpassed,whatpotentialharmfulsituationwilloccur?Whatadvantageis
theretotheplan?Howbigaretheimpacts?Aretheylikely?
Solvency:
Hastheaffirmativecaseshownthattheplanwillsolveallorasignificantportionofthe
impacts?
Disadvantage:
Thenegativeteammayofferdisadvantagesexplaininghowtheaffirmativecasecausesits
ownharmfulimpacts.Isthisimpactlikely?Doesitoutweightheaffirmativecases’impacts?
Counterplan:
Thenegativemayproposeaspecificcounterplanasanalternativetotheaffirmativeplan.
Doesthecounterplansolvefortheimpactsofthedisadvantagesorothers?
3. Makingthedecision:Dependinguponyourjudgingphilosophy,youmightfollowthesequencebelow:
a. Istheaffirmativeplantopical?Unlessthenegativedisprovesthis,assumeitis.Don’tuseyourownbias.Ifthe
negativehasshownthattheplanisnottopical,thenmostjudgeswillvotenegative(disregardingitemsbandc
below).
b. Inherency/SolvencyBalancing:Ifthenegativehasmadeargumentsaboutinherencyorsolvency,askhowmuch
wouldbegainedbyadoptingtheaffirmativeplanafterconsideringthesearguments.Ifsomeadvantageremains,then
movetoitemcbelow.
c. DisadvantagesBalancing:Balancethegainsexpectedbyadoptingtheaffirmativeplanwithanydisadvantagesthe
negativehasprovenwouldoccurbyadoptingtheplan.Determineiftheimpactsfromthedisadvantagesareworse
thantheimpactsfromtheaffirmativecase.
d. Plan/CounterplanBalancing:Ifthenegativehasofferedacounterplan,thequestioniswhetherthecounterplan
offersagoodreasontorejecttheaffirmativeplanorwhoseplansolvesformoresignificantimpacts.
4. Speedofdelivery:Somedebatershavedevelopedanexcessivelyrapidstyleofdeliverythatinterfereswiththeelement
ofcommunicationthatisbasictodebate.Theballotprovidesanavenueforindicatingtothedebaterthatspeedofdelivery
didordidnotinterferewithcommunication.Ifthespeaker’sspeedofdeliveryinterfereswithyourabilitytofollowthe
courseofthedebate,youshouldlowerthespeakerpoints.
5. Fillingouttheballot:
a. Recorddecision(affirmativeornegative)
b. Awardpoints(30pointsishighest;20isthelowest)toeachdebater.Sincespeakerpointsareacrucialdeterminant
ofadvancement,avoidexcessivelylowspeakerpointsunlesstrulywarranted.
SpeakerCriteria:Organization,Evidence,Analysis,Refutation,OralStyle,SpeedofDelivery
c. Awardranks(1,2,3,4with1stbeingawardedtothedebaterwiththemostpointsandsoon)todebaters.Pointsand
ranksshouldcorrespond.
d. Writeyourreasonsforyourdecisioninthespaceprovided.
e. Signyourballot.
Presentingaverybriefpreviewofargumentorderbeforespeeches,oftenreferredtoasa“roadmap,”aidsinclarityofthe
roundandisnotconsideredpartofthespeech.However,debatersshouldnotabusethisprivilegebyexcessivelengthof
theroadmap.Abusemaycountagainstateamatthediscretionofthejudge(s).
J
UDGE
S
UMMARY
R
EPORT
- S
CHOOL
J
UDGES
C
ONFERENCE
Style & Delivery
1
2
3
4
5
Unacceptable
Acceptable
JUDGE SUMMARY REPORT - SCHOOL JUDGES
CONFERENCE
Judge Name
Preferred E-mail Address
Dist
Coach
Fulfilling Obligation
Debate Team
Experience/Affiliation
Policymaker
Stock issues
Tabula rasa
Other
Communication skills are more important than resolution
of substantive issues.
Resolution of substantive issues is more important than
communication skills.
Communication skills and resolution of substantive
issues are of equal importance.
Quantity of evidence is more important than quality of
evidence.
Quality of evidence is more important than quantity of
evidence.
Quantity of evidence and quality of evidence are of equal
importance.
Yes
Judge CX Often?
# Rds. on Topic
# Tourn. on Topic
Quantity vs. Quality of Evidence
Work Phone
Home Phone
School
Coach name (if different)
&
Paradigm
Comm. Skills vs. Res. of Issues
Philosophy Statement
School Obligation
UIL Hired
Hired After Drop
Not Judging
Cell Phone
Tourn. list –
Should Not Judge
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Quantity of Arguments
Topicality
Counterplans
Disadvantages
Conditional Arguments
Kritiks
Limited
Unlimited
Rarely vote on
Unacceptable
Not Essential
Unacceptable
Unacceptable
Acceptable
Vote on
often
Essential
Acceptable
Acceptable
Fax
1 for 2, guar. octas
guar. octas only
6/19/2017
9:28:31 AM
Date & Time Submitted
Conf
Policy Debater in HS
Coach Policy Debate in HS
Coach Policy Debate in College
Policy Debate (NDT) in College
Policy Debate (CEDA) in College
LD Debate (NFA) in College
Parli Debate (NPDA) in College
Judging both sessions
(with differing status)
Year graduated
New Arguments in the 2nd
Negative Constructive
Yes
No
Judge Mobility Issues?
Yes
No
Debater Mobility Isuues?
Yes
No
Coach Mobility Issues?
UIL Guidelines: Electronic Retrieval Devices in CX and LD Debate
The use of laptop and tablet computers and other electronic retrieval devices by competitors in UIL cross-
examination and Lincoln-Douglas debate rounds is permissible for flowing or evidence retrieval so long as
wire or wireless connections are disabled and remain disabled while the debate is in progress.
Electronic retrieval devices are defined as laptop and tablet computers, netbook computers, other portable
electronic retrieval devices and secondary devices such as flash drives and external hard drives.
A. Computers may be used only if the wireless capability is disabled. It is the responsibility of the
contestant to disable the equipment.
B. Wired connections (Ethernet or phone) during rounds of competition are not permitted.
C. Computers or other electronic devices may not be used to receive information from any sources
(coaches or assistants included) inside or outside the room in which the competition occurs.
Internet access, use of e-mail, instant messaging, or other means of receiving information from
sources inside or outside the competition room are prohibited. (This does not prohibit non-electronic
communication between debate partners during prep time and is not intended to supersede
paragraph E, requiring that evidence be made available upon request.)
D. Sanction: Contestants found to have violated provisions A B above shall forfeit the round of
competition and receive zero points. Contestants found to have violated provision C above shall be
disqualified from the tournament and shall forfeit all rounds. Contest Directors shall be empowered
with the final decision concerning disqualification.
E. Availability of Evidence: Contestants electing to use computers shall have the responsibility to
promptly provide a copy of any evidence read in a speech for inspection by the judge or opponent.
Printers may be used. Evidence may be printed in the round or produced electronically, but must be
provided in a format that is readable and quickly, easily accessible by the opposing team and judge.
F. Contestants electing to use computers are responsible for providing their own computers, batteries,
extension cords and all other necessary accessories. Tournament hosts shall not be responsible for
providing computers, printers, software, paper, or extension cords for contestants.
Because public speaking decorum remains an important element of debate, debaters are expected to
stand at the front of the room facing the judge while speaking.
Contestants choosing to use laptop computers accept the risk of equipment failure. No special
consideration or accommodations, including no additional prep time or speech time, will be given by
judges, contest directors or tournament hosts should equipment failure occur.
By choosing to use laptop computers in the round, debaters are consenting to give tournament officials the
right to search their files. Debaters who do not wish to consent should not use computers in the round.
For further clarification, access Frequently Asked Questions Concerning the use of Computers in Texas
UIL Debate at https://www.uiltexas.org/speech/debate/frequently-asked-questions-concerning-the-use-of-
computers-in-uil-debate.
2019-20
SCORING CONGRESS
Congress is intended to emulate the U.S. Congress. In theory, the contest combines the best aspects of
debate, oratory, and extemporaneous speaking within the structure of parliamentary procedure.
SCORING
The parliamentarian remains the same throughout Session I and II. Individual scorers, however, will
consider the results of each individual session assigned to score.
A ballot should be completed for all members of Congress whether they spoke during the session
or not. Scorers shall not confer with others about their selection or reasons for ranking before submitting
their decisions.
POINT ASSIGNMENT
v Competitors may have 5 scored speeches per session. They might speak more than 5 times
during the session, but only their first 5 speeches should be scored. Consult the Congressional
Debate Rubric: Speaking for criteria.
v Amendment speeches are scored.
v Speakers may receive up to six points per speech. Complete a Speech Evaluation form for each
individual student.
v The presiding officer may receive up to six points per clock hour based on his/her ability in that
capacity. Use the Presiding Office Evaluation form.
v Rank the students at the end of each session, unless instructed otherwise by the Clerk. Use the
Master Ballot for the overall ranking of legislators.
v There can be no ties for placement.
v Provide as much constructive criticism as possible for each of the student’s speeches.
Scorers will rank the highest scoring participants 1 through 8 (one being the best) at the end of
each session. Ties in the individual rounds will be broken by the Parliamentarian preference, at the end
of the second session. Don’t forget to rank the presiding officer, as he or she warrants.
The parliamentarian and scorers will submit completed scoring sheets to the congressional clerk.
Congressional Debate Rubric: Speaking
This table of evaluation standards may be used by any judge who would like assistance in determining scores for speeches. Each scorer
independently (without collaborating) awards 1 to 6 points for each speech. Each speaker has up to three minutes to presen
t arguments
followed by a questioning period.
Congressional Debate Rubric
1
Mediocre
2-3
Good
4-5
Excellent
6
Superior
Content: Organization, Evidence
& Language
The speech lacked a
clear thesis and
organizational
structure. Claims are
only asserted with
generalizations and no
real evidence.
Language use is unclear
or ineffective.
While the speaker’s
purpose is present, the
speech lacks logical
organization and/or
developed ideas. Analysis
of evidence, if present,
fails to connect its
relevance to the speaker’s
claims. Use of language is
weak.
While a clear purpose is
apparent, organization may
be somewhat loose (weak
introduction/conclusion; no
transitions between points).
Diction represents a grasp of
language. Much evidence is
presented, but not in a
persuasive or effective
manner; or the speaker
relies on one piece of
evidence, but does so
effectively.
Content is clearly and
logically organized, and
characterized by depth
of thought and
development of ideas,
supported by a variety of
credible quantitative
(statistical) and
qualitative (testimony)
evidence analyzed
effectively to draw
conclusions. Compelling
language, a poignant
introduction and
conclusion and lucid
transitions clearly
establish the speaker’s
purpose and frame the
perspective of the issue’s
significance.
Argument &
Refutation
The speaker offers
mostly unwarranted
assertions, which often
simply repeat/rehash
previous arguments.
The speaker fails to either
introduce new arguments
(simply repeating previous
arguments) or the speaker
fails to refute previous
opposing arguments; in
other words, no real clash
is present.
New ideas and response to
previous arguments are
offered, but in an unbalanced
manner (too much refutation
or too many new
arguments). Questions are
answered adequately.
The speaker contributes
to the spontaneity of
debate, effectively
synthesizing response
and refutation of
previous ideas with new
arguments. If the speaker
fields questions, he/she
responds with
confidence and clarity.
Delivery
Little eye contact,
gestures and/or
movement are present.
Vocal presentation is
inarticulate due to soft
volume or lack of
enunciation.
Presentation is
satisfactory, yet
unimpressively read
(perhaps monotonously)
from prepared notes, with
errors in pronunciation
and/or minimal eye
contact. Awkward
gestures/movement may
be distracting.
The presentation is strong,
but contains a few mistakes,
including problems with
pronunciation and
enunciation. The speech may
be partially read with
satisfactory fluency. Physical
presence may be awkward at
times.
The speaker's vocal
control and physical
poise are polished,
deliberate, crisp and
confident. Delivery
should be
extemporaneous, with
few errors in
pronunciation. Eye
contact is effective and
consistent.
WecertifythatthelegislationsubmittedbythisschoolforthisCongressistheoriginalworkofthestudentsofourschooland
haspermissiontobepresented.
ABillto[ActionWord][article][Object]to
[SummarizetheSolutionSpecifically]
BEITENACTEDBYTHISUILCONGRESSHEREASSEMBLEDTHAT:1
SECTION1. Statethenewpolicyinabriefdeclarativesentence,orinasfew2
sentencesaspossible.3
SECTION2. Defineanyambiguoustermsinherentinthefirstsection.4
SECTION3. Namethegovernmentagencythatwilloverseetheenforcementofthe5
billalongwiththespecificenforcementmechanism.6
A. Gointofurtherdetailsifnecessary.7
B. Gointofurtherdetailsifnecessary.8
SECTION4. Indicatetheimplementationdate/timeframe.9
SECTION5. Alllawsinconflictwiththislegislationareherebydeclarednullandvoid.10
IntroducedforUILCongressionalDebateby______(schoolname).
WecertifythatthelegislationsubmittedbythisschoolforthisCongressistheoriginalworkofthestudentsofourschooland
haspermissiontobepresented.
AResolutionto[ActionWord][article][Object]to
[SummarizetheSolutionSpecifically]
WHEREAS, Statethecurrentproblem(thisneedstobeaccomplishedinonebrief1
sentence);and2
WHEREAS, Describethescopeoftheproblemcitedinthefirstwhereasclause(this3
clauseneedstoflowlogicallyfromthefirst)andtheinherentneedfora4
solution;and5
WHEREAS, Explaintheimpactandharmsperpetuatedbythecurrentproblem(once6
again,theclauseneedstoflowinalogicalsequence);and7
WHEREAS, Useadditional“whereas”clausestoelaboraterationalefortheproblem8
thatneedstobesolved;now,therefore,beit9
RESOLVED, ThattheUILCongresshereassembledmakethefollowing10
recommendationforsolution(acallforaction);and,beit11
FURTHERRESOLVED,That(thisisanoptionaladditionalrecommendation;ifnotused,12
endtheprevious“resolved”clausewithaperiod).13
IntroducedforUILCongressionalDebateby____(schoolname).
WecertifythatthelegislationsubmittedbythisschoolforthisCongressistheoriginalworkofthestudentsofourschooland
haspermissiontobepresented.