Job Search:
Your Career From First Year to Graduation
How to build skills, meet people, and reach your career goals
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CAREER PLANNING PART 2: YOUR JOB SEARCH
Learning to speak a language, play a musical instrument or play a sport takes time and practice. You need to develop the
necessary skills to be successful. The very same concept applies to the job search process it is a learned skill! This guide
will help you recognize and develop the skills necessary to effectively look for work throughout your lifelong career
journey: from summer to part-time to full-time jobs. As a student, making intentional decisions and using a strategy can
mean that your summer and part-time jobs will lead to the development of knowledge, skills, and connections for future
employment beyond graduation.
THE JOB SEARCH STARTS IN YEAR ONE: Finding Work as a Student
There are plenty of reasons to work while you’re still in school, both during the year and in summer.
Be strategic! Find a job that connects you with the people you want to work with or gives you the skills you need to be
successful when you graduate. This is also a great opportunity to find out about yourself, from where you like to work to
the types of work you enjoy, and assess that you’re on the right path. Sometimes students just need to make money to
survive and finding directly related work is not an option. In that case, be creative and remember that entry level
positions can provide you with transferable skills like communication, teamwork, or customer service. Consider the skills
you want to develop and remember to highlight them when you eventually search for your “career” job.
TIP:
Gain a reference. Be sure to make a great impression as a student staff member so you can use
your supervisor as a reference for other opportunities.
Searching for a Full-Time Job
The skills throughout this book are applicable to all types of job searchers. You have been gaining skills and building your
network throughout your time in university, even if you didn’t realize it. Searching for full-time work will require you to
reflect on your experiences, use your industry specific knowledge, and rely on the people you’ve met. It is never too
early to get started, and the process is typically easier the sooner you begin planning your career strategy. We
recommend that students start actively searching for work at least 6 months before graduation.
STEP 1: KNOW YOURSELF
It is hard to even begin your job search if you don’t have a clear idea of what you have to offer employers or what
positions you want. If your plan is unclear, take the time to use Career Services’ resources before you move forward.
BUILD
SKILLS
MAKE
MONEY
See Appendix A: Maximizing Your Experiences for details on how
to get the most out of student work.
Check out Career Planning online, use Appendix B: Skills Matching Worksheet,
or Drop In to talk to us!
NETWORK
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Whether it is at an interview, a networking event, or in your resumé, you need to communicate your worth. Knowing
what skills you have to offer an employer will allow you to market yourself effectively in person, on paper, and online.
STEP 2: DO YOUR RESEARCH
Once you have a clear understanding of your skills and have identified an employment goal, it is time to do your
research. This is a crucial step towards creating a clear plan for your future. By building a library of information about
your career, you can make informed decisions throughout your degree that will put you in a position to be a competitive
candidate for your profession when you graduate.
You need to determine:
POSSIBLE JOB
TITLES AND JOB
DESCRIPTIONS
ORGANIZATIONS
WHERE YOU CAN
WORK
SECTORS WHERE
YOU CAN WORK
THE JOB
OUTLOOK AND
ECONOMY
TIP:
Save your research. Keep electronic copies of interesting job postings, articles, and information
you come across. Use “dream” job postings as a checklist: these are the skills you need to develop
by working and volunteering to be a candidate for that position someday.
KNOW THE JOB MARKET
Understanding the labour market can provide a solid foundation for career planning and your job search.
Labour Market Information
Use Labour Market Information (LMI) to understand your industry. Keep in mind that for university graduates there is
more than one industry that can utilize your skills. LMI can assist you in your job search by providing important
information about which industries have the most job openings.
WHERE TO FIND LABOUR MARKET INFORMATION
LABOUR MARKET REPORTS
MEMOS PUBLISHED BY
GOVERNMENT
PEOPLE IN THE INDUSTRY
Industry associations publish
reports highlighting the demand for
certain positions, subsectors, and
skills. Check out your field in our
occupational library.
Government labour departments
report on economic, social, and
political forces that impact industries
and job seekers.
Manitoba Occupational Forecasts
Canadian Occupational Projection
System (COPS)
Find job outlook: Search by job title
& region through the Job Bank.
Professionals working in the field can
confirm published information and
introduce you to key people. We will
discuss this further in Step 4.
Regardless if there is a “good” or “bad” economic climate, there are jobs that need to be filled. There are many ways to
look for jobs. The key is to combine numerous approaches.
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The Job Market includes:
Visible Job
Market
This consists of the published job postings found in newspapers, magazines, websites,
employer websites, social media, and community posting boards (such as Facebook, LinkedIn,
Twitter, Kijiji).
Hidden Job
Market
This is not as straight forward as applying to a job posting on a website. Positions in the
Hidden Job Market are found informally: an overheard conversation on the bus, a help
wanted sign in a window, a suggestion from a friend in conversation, a part-time job that
evolves into full-time work. This requires job seekers to be active and aware of the current
and future opportunities that appear or can be actively sought out in everyday life. We will
come back to this in Step 4.
TIP:
The best way to increase opportunities is through networking. Improve your odds by tapping
into the hidden job market.
ACCESS THE VISIBLE JOB MARKET: Research Online
The internet is the most obvious place to access the visible job market. This is a great starting point for your research.
WORK WHERE? Seek Information on Employers
Explore every aspect of your occupation. Generate a list of employers, discover positions at companies (both advertised
and currently occupied), and get a feel for your field.
Industry Associations & Sector Councils
Directories & Listings
Find industry specific materials, including skill
development and recruitment information. Sign up for a
student membership to attend events and access member
resources. Use this list of Industry Associations and
Sector Councils on our website to begin exploring.
We also link to related associations for each field in our
occupational library or check your degree in the Career
Compass. You can also check out the Alliance of
Manitoba Sector Councils or Winnipeg Economic
Development for broad sector information.
This is a great way to discover organizations. Check out:
Manitoba Companies Directory
Yellow Pages
Employee listings on company websites to determine
position titles and possible contacts
Industry Canada
Manitoba 211 (for social service agencies)
Trade magazines (Google your field + trade magazine)
Online directories
Industry directories
Chamber of Commerce Winnipeg Business Directory
Top Employer Lists
Social Media
Various publications rank employers and create lists of
the best employers in a variety of categories. This can
help you identify employers. For example, check out:
Canada’s Top Employers for Young People
Canadian Business Best Employers
LinkedIn Top Companies
Manitoba’s Top Employers
Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce Awards
Social Media can be a fountain of information. Try
LinkedIn, Facebook, blogs, Twitter. For example, find an
interesting professional on LinkedIn and take a look at
their past employers and position titles for inspiration. If
you find someone who might be a valuable addition to
your network, consider contacting them for an
informational interview (see Step 4 for details). Consider
their current and past employers as possibilities for
yourself.
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Google Search
Job Boards
Company Websites
Type keywords related to your
industry into Google. For example,
“design association Winnipeg.”
There are plenty of job posting
boards to choose from, where
employers recruit. See Appendix C for
a list. Be sure to also read up on
Employment Scams to stay safe.
Some organizations only advertise
open positions on their own website.
Once you’ve identified employers, go
directly to the source to see if each
company has a position posted.
STEP 3: CREATE YOUR MARKETING TOOLBOX
Your marketing toolbox includes all of the materials you use in your job search. This consists of your prepared
documents, the scripts you use when speaking to your network about employment, and your online presence.
Marketing Yourself on Paper: Document Preparation
Having strong documents to provide to your networking contacts and employers is a vital part of an effective job search.
Take the time to use Career Services’ resources to create tailored, well-written documents.
Resumé &
Cover Letter
Your resumé and cover letter should reflect what you have to offer a specific employer and
how your skills, knowledge, education, and training meet the requirements of the employer.
Use the Resumé and Cover Letter Workbooks to help you create these documents, or come to
the Resumé Learning Centre.
Calling
Cards
A small card with your name, contact information and some key information can be helpful
when it is not appropriate to hand someone a resumé. See Appendix D for samples.
For example, if you meet someone at a BBQ, you can provide your elevator pitch and then give
them your card saying, “If you hear of anyone who needs ____ would you please give them my
information?”
Your Job Search Script
Marketing yourself verbally is crucial in any job search. Your enthusiasm, especially when combined with well
researched industry information and clear articulation of your skills, can make you a memorable candidate. Two
essential skills for jobseekers are the 30 second elevator pitch and the cold call.
Elevator
Pitch
Create a 30 second elevator pitch to quickly and clearly present what you have to offer a
potential employer. Practice your pitch and be ready to share it when the opportunity
presents itself at a networking event, in the line at a coffee shop, or during a cold call. The
most effective elevator pitch will consider the audience and industry and be tailored
accordingly. See Appendix E for how to create an elevator pitch.
Cold Calls
Sometimes your network won’t extend to an industry you are interested in. Therefore, after
you have done substantial industry research, you will want to reach out to speak to people
you don’t know. Check out Appendix F for a script that you can follow for this process.
Though sometimes intimidating, cold calls are an excellent way to broaden your network and
find work.
We are here to help at all points of your job search. Drop In to talk to us!
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Manage Your Online Presence
How you appear online can have a significant impact on your future in both positive and negative ways. Employers will
often check social media before deciding whether or not to interview you. For this reason, always be thoughtful about
what you post online. Anything can go viral.
TIP:
Google yourself. To check how you appear online, use private browsing or “incognito mode” in
your browser to Google yourself. This will prevent your previous browsing history from impacting
the results and show you what comes up when others search you.
Popular online platforms include:
LinkedIn
Personal Website / E-Portfolio
ResearchGate
LinkedIn is a social media tool for
connecting with professionals,
learning industry information, and
profiling yourself as an aspiring
professional. Check careerCONNECT
for LinkedIn Workshops on campus.
Use these for an opportunity to
showcase your work, be it artistic,
written, or otherwise. Keep your work
up to date and link it from other social
media outlets and your resumé.
ResearchGate is a social network for
scientists and academics, used to
network and showcase publications.
Twitter
YouTube
Industry Specific Platforms
For industries that are active on
Twitter, this could be a means by
which to show how effectively you
can “tweet” and stay in touch.
A great resource for showing talents
whether you are a videographer,
public speaker, editor, or performer.
New online platforms are created
every day, and some might be specific
to your industry. Seek resources that
can help you advance professionally.
Be a smart consumer!
STEP 4: UNCOVER THE HIDDEN JOB MARKET BY NETWORKING
The best way to access employment is by using multiple strategies. An essential addition to your job search is to uncover
the hidden job market through networking. For some students, this aspect of the job search process can feel
intimidating and it can be tempting to skip this step. We know it can be scary, but the rewards that can come from
growing a strong network are too great to miss out on. If you’re worried, we are here for you – drop in and talk to us.
TIP:
Informal information about the labour market is all around us: whether it is from an impromptu
chat at the store or an opportunity posted on a bulletin board. With reflection, you might even be
able to find employment possibilities if you see a new business being built. Be aware of what is
going on around you and think critically about how you can use new information in your job search.
Put Yourself in Situations to Meet Employers
By attending events, working, volunteering, and being a part of the community, you have naturally created a network of
people who can help you with your job search. Reconnect with your contacts to find more opportunities. You will
Career Planning is not linear. You will grow and learn throughout this process and you
might change your goals as you go. Career Services is here if you need to talk.
P a g e | 6
probably need to go beyond your current network: take networking to the next level by seeking out additional events
and individuals that can help you find work or suggest ways to improve your skills. Start networking early in your degree
and be sure to maintain useful relationships that can help you find student opportunities and eventually full-time work.
Quick Wins: Attend Events
Attending an employment or networking focused event can be a quick, effective way to introduce yourself to employers.
Networking Events
Employer Information
Sessions
Career Fairs
One Day Volunteering
Offered by faculties,
student groups, sector
councils, and Career
Services’ careerCONNECT.
Meet and speak with
professionals in a socially
professional environment
and expand your network.
Companies often hold
information sessions
leading up to a recruiting
season. Keep an eye on
careerCONNECT and check
professional faculty or
department offices for
details.
Learn about potential
employers during career
fairs. Don’t forget to ask for
the employer’s card and
follow up with a short
thank you email. Annually,
Career Services hosts 3
career fairs.
Volunteering for a single
day event can be a way to
meet a variety of people
with similar interests.
Converse with fellow
volunteers and stay in
touch with anyone worth
adding to your network.
TIP:
Become a student member of a professional organization. Many professional associations have
student memberships available at as reduced rate. Membership perks include: events, directories,
job postings, and professional development. Most importantly: meet people in your field and build
your network. Google your field or find related associations linked in Exploring Occupations.
Longer Term Commitments
Another way to build a strong network and access the hidden job market is to insert yourself into the field through paid
internships, co-op positions, volunteer work, and entry level employment.
PAID INTERNSHIPS
CO-OP
VOLUNTEERING
This is a short-term position with
your industry, during or immediately
after your program. Gain skills and
show the employer that you are a
good fit. Check out job boards and
employer websites to find
internships.
If your program offers co-op, take it!
The opportunities for experience and
networking are incredibly valuable to
your future. Search for your faculty
in Co-Operative Education Programs.
Build skills and gain exposure to an
industry or organization while
connecting with possible mentors or
employers. Contact an organization
directly about volunteering or use
Volunteer Manitoba.
ENTRY LEVEL WORK
ON CAMPUS OPPORTUNITIES
At times, the exact position you want at an organization is
unavailable. A strategy can be to apply for a position that
is different from or even “beneath” your ideal position.
Through this, network within the organization, gain skills,
prove yourself, and eventually, when the opportunity
presents itself, move into your ideal job.
There are numerous opportunities to build transferable
skills on campus and to network with other students.
Consider joining a student group on UMCommunityLINK
or taking part in Service Learning. If you are looking for
on campus work, see On Campus Jobs and the Work-
Study Program.
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TIP:
Opportunity can present itself anywhere. If you encounter someone you would like to speak to,
take a moment to approach them. You might exchange contact details to connect for a longer
conversation at a later date.
Talk to Professionals & Employers in Your Field
Building connections with professional and employers in your field is something you should begin in your first year at
university. If you are graduating, you might have ramped up your event attendance and begun to think critically about
who you know in the field. Reach out to your contacts in the industry, ask to be introduced, or seek out a professional
you haven’t met yet through a cold call (see Appendix F). Your network can alert you of opportunities and put you on
the radar of organizations where you want to work.
Here are a few ways to start an informative dialogue with a professional of interest:
INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWS
MENTORSHIP
Reach out to a professional to request advice. Ask
about their career path, job, education, and seek advice
about employers. Position yourself as a strong future
professional, without explicitly asking for a job. Use
their advice to plan out the skills and experiences you
should build during your education.
If you’re unsure of how to contact someone, the Career
Mentor Program is a great place to start.
Take the opportunity to learn from a seasoned
professional. Be engaged and stay engaged. When your
mentor suggests you do something, reach out to someone,
or try a new skill do it. Begin the relationship as an
informational interview then ask for mentorship from
there. It doesn’t have to be a weekly meeting; however,
you should set up some parameters for regular check-ins.
WORK PROPOSAL
JOB SHADOW
Create an opportunity by proposing a project to an
organization. This promotes your skills beyond your
resumé, shows interest, and provides the employer
with an opportunity to see your value before giving you
a permanent position. Schedule a mutually agreed upon
meeting to pitch your idea.
Spend a work day with a professional in your career of
interest. This will expose you to elements of the job that
you cannot read about online and grow your network. Ask
someone in your network, reach out to a professional
organization, or cold call someone of interest.
TIP:
Keep a job search and networking journal. Track the people you speak with, notes about your
interaction, and record the contact information of people you plan to speak with in the future. Use
Appendix G as a starting point.
STEP 5: KEEPING AT IT
Every job search is different. Your job search might take a couple weeks or it might stretch on for months. Sometimes
the search can be discouraging and it can be hard to cope with a lack of responses or rejection. Remember: keep
applying and keep networking. Don’t stop while you wait for a response from an organization. Here are a few tips for
keeping up your job search momentum if times get tough.
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SEEK SUPPORT
Friends and family can be
great cheerleaders.
Career Services is here
for you too we are
available up to 6 months
after graduation.
SCHEDULE
Create a reasonable
schedule. Unemployed?
This is your full-time job:
8 hours per day with
breaks and a weekend.
Still in school? Schedule a
job search hour daily.
SET GOALS
Set a daily goal of how
many phone calls you’ll
make, how much
research you will do, or
how many applications
you will send out. Then
do it.
BE KIND
Be kind to yourself! This
process is hard and you
are doing your best.
Celebrate your small
successes, like making a
new contact or
identifying an employer.
REFLECT, REPEAT
Attending one networking event might not do the trick find more. Two cold calls might not lead to the
informational interview you’re seeking – keep calling other professionals. Reflect on your wins and consider
areas you can improve. At what point are you having the least success? If you aren’t getting calls, it might be
time to have someone examine your resumé. If you’re getting interviews, but not offers, practice answering
questions with a friend. If it is lack of experience, consider volunteering. Then keep going, repeating all
aspects of the process until you land that job. This can sometimes take a while, but keep at it: you are
building an exciting and meaningful career. It will be worth it in the end!
Searching for a job can sometimes be a difficult or exhausting process. If you need a pep
talk or a new perspective, Drop In to talk to us!
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Appendix A: Maximizing Your Experiences
Evaluating & Articulating Competencies
It is important to reflect on the skills that you have gained by working as a student in order to effectively market your
skills and move toward your career goal. Here are a few tips for making the most out of your student work experiences:
1. Keep electronic copies of the job posting or job description so you can refer back later on
Consider which of these competencies you developed in this position and how you achieved them.
Are there competencies and knowledge you gained that are not listed in the posting?
What did you achieve? What problems did you solve? Consider improvements, projects, changes,
or ideas you brought to the position. Make note so you can brag about this to your future
employers.
2. Communicating your competencies: Add your student work experience to your application
materials
Take the competencies you determined and follow the demonstration statement format to write
clear, concise and detailed points. See the Resumé Workbook to learn how.
Remember when you are applying to a new position, you must think about how your experiences
and skills can be framed in such a way that they make sense and demonstrate the skills required by
your prospective employer.
3. Think long term How do these competencies benefit future employers and your career
goals?
Think of a ladder use these experiences to provide you with a step in the right direction.
Keep your career goal in mind
Consider how you can build on the skills you have and add additional skills needed for your career
Be sure to maintain a relationship with the valuable contacts you made in this position
o Networking: Contacts can introduce you to others in the field or suggest possible positions that fit your
skills
o Ask if you can use your supervisor as a reference when looking for other employment opportunities
The exposure and knowledge gained from working in industry can be invaluable
o Reflect on what you like and dislike about the industry, the jobs available in the industry, and the specific
duties involved in your position
o Reflect on the knowledge you have gained about the labour market and skills required for positions you
are interested in
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APPENDIX B: SKILLS MATCHING WORKSHEET
Condense information/produce concise summary notes
accurately with correct grammar, punctuation and spelling.
Write letters and reports that are logically structured and
contain all relevant information.
Adapt writing style in consideration of different audiences.
Ask and answer questions, clarify, and summarize what
others are communicating.
Provide clear explanations and directions while instructing,
educating and providing feedback.
Communicate with others using a variety of
communication strategies to negotiate, mediate, resolve
difficult issues and sell ideas.
Demonstrate respect and care. Is open and supportive of
the thoughts, opinions, and contributions of others.
Actively contribute to team projects/tasks; fulfils required
roles, participates in discussion to improve effectiveness.
Accept and share responsibility. Learn from constructive
criticism and give positive and constructive feedback.
Accept responsibility for decisions and display a positive
attitude and perseverance.
Models a strong desire to succeed by demonstrating
adaptability to achieve goals.
Take initiative in leading, supporting and motivating others
in developing individual skills or tasks to achieve goals.
Effectively apply organizing and planning skills to manage
work.
Work effectively to complete deadlines when under
pressure.
Proactively plans and manages work; monitors results
through to successfully complete plans.
Make decisions in accordance to accepted practices and
guidelines.
Use problem-solving strategies to identify and resolve
problems, issues and determine solutions.
Recognize inconsistencies in reasoning. Makes decisions in
situations that fall outside established guidelines or where
the choice among options is less obvious.
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
ORAL COMMUNICATION
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
TEAMWORK
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
LEADERSHIP
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
PLANNING AND ORGANIZING
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH
P a g e | 11
Gather relevant secondary data and organize information
in a logical manner.
Collect primary data and/or assist in carrying out surveys,
focus groups, and lab analysis.
Analyze samples/surveys for quantitative/qualitative
research.
Perform calculations for adding, subtracting, multiplying
and dividing, and converting between fractions and
decimals.
Perform complex calculations and operations that require
using advanced multi-step mathematical strategies.
Analyze or compare numerical data to identify trends or
compare statistics.
Performs basic computer tasks, such as creating
documents, saving files, and sending email.
Design web pages and a wide range of software skills.
Demonstrate in depth knowledge of computer software
and information technology systems.
Present basic information to one or more people using
appropriate resources, vocabulary, and non-verbal
language.
Prepare and present advanced information with clarity
with the ability to respond to questions in a timely
manner.
Facilitate interactive presentations of advanced
information customized to the interests and needs of the
audience.
Demonstrate professionalism in recognizing expectations
in work culture to maximize success in the workplace.
Embrace new opportunities, learn continuously, and
identify importance in every job/task.
Anticipate the unexpected and respond quickly to sudden
changes in circumstances.
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
NUMERACY: able to carry out arithmetic operations/understand
data
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
PRESENTATION SKILLS
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
PERSONAL MANAGEMENT
I USE THIS SKILL WHEN…
OTHER
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Appendix C: Job Boards
JOB POSTING BOARDS
CareerCONNECT
uofmcareerservices.ca
Indeed
ca.indeed.com
Mbjobs.ca
http://www.mbjobs.ca/
Wow Jobs
wowjobs.ca
Job Bank
jobbank.gc.ca
Monster
monster.ca
Work in NonProfits
workinnonprofits.ca
Find my Job MB
gov.mb.ca/findmyjob
Eluta
eluta.ca
GOVERNMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Federal Student Work Experience Program (FSWEP)
Research Affliated Program (RAP)
Specialized Recruitment Program
jobs.gc.ca (Students tab)
Public Service Commission Recruitment (PSC)
Recruitment Policy Leaders (RPL)
jobs.gc.ca (Graduate tab)
STEP Program
gov.mb.ca/cyo/studentjobs
Manitoba Government Job Opportunities
jobsearch.gov.mb.ca
Regional Health Authorities in Manitoba
gov.mb.ca/health/rha
City of Winnipeg
winnipeg.ca/resumeol/peoplesoft/index.asp
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ON CAMPUS OPPORTUNITIES
careerCONNECT
Click on:
On Campus Job Postings
Work Study
uofmcareerservices.ca
University of Manitoba Human Resources
Click on:
Jobs at the University
Support/Managerial, Sessional Instructor,
Cupe/Student
Research Grant-Funded Student Jobs
umanitoba.ca/employment/
UMSU
(University of Manitoba Student Union)
Digital Copy Centre
G.P.A.’s
IQ’s
Degrees
Answers
The Hub
Archives
Answers @ Bannatyne
umsu.ca
Donor Relations Call Centre
umanitoba.ca/admin/dev_adv/call_centre.html
Various departments on campus also hire through the “hidden job market”
P a g e | 14
Appendix D: Business / Calling Card Examples
Use your business or calling cards:
As your “Value
Proposition” for
networking,
introductory
calls, interviews
For networking
purposes to
explain your goal
and qualifications
To encourage
people to give
you job leads
To summarize
your skills for
your references
To provide to
businesses you
spot in passing
that could use
your skills
For you to review
before interviews
John Buhler (204) 334-5388
John.Buhler@ gm ail.com ca.linkedin.com /in/jbuhler
Biological Research Technician Skills:
- Possess st rong laborat ory skills
- Scient if ic w rit ing and pr esent at ion skills
- Well-developed analyt ical skills
- Sof t w are: (put in exam ples)
- WHIMSI t rained
- Majo r: Biology. Minor: St at ist ics
* Prof essional * Reliable * Works w ell under Pressure
289-5895 or 212-1771
anvi.batra@gmail.com
Customer Service Skills:
2 years customer service experience
Thrive on providing great service to the public
Demonstrated ability to meet deadlines and perform well under
pressure
Strong communication skills verbal and written
Word-processing skills with 55 wpm: Word, Excel
Highly Motivated Dedicated Enjoy Challenges
The only lim it is your im aginat ion!
Market ing Cards serve as an
exp anded b usiness card or reduced
resum e.
Carry som e w it h you w herever you
go.
Use t hem :
1. f or net w orking purp oses t o t ell
peop le your job goal and
qualif icat ions;
2. t o encourage p eop le t o give you
job lead s;
3. t o sum m arize your skills f or your
ref erences;
4. t o give out t o businesses you
spot in p assing t hat could use
your skills;
5. as a q uick skills r em in d er f o r yo u
t o review bef ore int erview s;
6. as yo u r b asic b en ef it st at em en t
f or net w orking, int roduct ory
em ployer calls, cover let t ers and
int erview s;
7. w it h app licat ion f o rm s:
8. When ap plying f or a job, alw ays
use a com p any f orm and f ill in
every single sect ion. At t aching
your Market ing Card t o t he up per
right hand corner of t his f orm
w ill set your ap plicat ion apart
f rom t he ot hers. Carry paper
clips or a st ap ler f or t his p urpose.
If you cannot ob t ain an app licat ion
f orm and d o not have your resum e,
use your Market ing Card as a
subst it ut e ap plicat ion f orm . You
m ay say:
Anvi Batra
P a g e | 15
APPENDIX E: 30 SECOND ELEVATOR PITCH: NETS
Create your elevator pitch script using the acronym NETS: Name, Education, Target job, Skills.
NAME
State your name
EDUCATION
Share your relevant education
TARGET JOB
Let them know the target jobs you are looking for
SKILLS
Demonstrate at least two skills that match your target job
EXAMPLE
Remember: Name, Education, Target job, Skills
N
Hi! My name is ____.
E
I am a third year Economics major with a minor in Management. My studies
have given me a strong grasp of both the Canadian and international
financial markets and the intricate relationship between the two.
T
My goal is to become a certified financial planner, though I am open to
opportunities within the financial industry. I am looking for an entry-level
position, possibly as a client service representative to kick-start my career.
S
I am a strong communicator who always goes out of my way for my clients
in my current role as a customer service representative. Coupling this with
my knowledge of the sector means I ensure my clients are well taken care
of and well informed as to their choices of products and services.
P a g e | 16
Appendix F: Cold Call Flow Chart & Script
Follow Job Leads
This chart will assist you in reaching out to
professionals for informational interviews. You might
conduct an informational interview to gain
information about a profession and begin
networking early in university. This is also a strategy
to actively seek employment by talking to people in
the field without explicitly asking for work.
Be brief and considerate.
Create a script or talking points before you call -
practice them aloud if you’re nervous
Consider what you are going to say if you reach
their voicemail.
Introduce Yourself
If you reach a receptionist, begin with, Hello,
my name is __. May I please speak with __?
State Your Name & Qualifications
Once you reach the professional of interest, “Hi
__. My name is __ and I am a kinesiology
student at University of Manitoba passionate
about working with older adults.”
If No
“Thank you for your time. I am wondering, do
you have any suggestions of someone in a
similar position who might be willing to speak
with me?”
Thank You
Within a week of your meeting, be sure to send
a thank you email or call to show your
appreciation for the time and advice of the
professional.
Ask for an Informational Interview
“I found you on LinkedIn and was really
inspired by your career. If you’re available, I
would love to meet you for coffee to ask you a
few questions about your work.”
If Yes
Dress and act professionally at your meeting.
Focus your questions on learning about the
individual’s career and workplace rather than
explicitly asking for a job (see these questions).
Ask broadly about possible jobs openings they
know of in the field. Offer your resumé at the
end of the interview and request that the
individual keeps you in mind if any positions
come up.
If No
“I would like to send you my resume. Would
you prefer it by email or in person?
P a g e | 17
Appendix G: Job Search Journal
NOTES
CONVERSATION
DATE
EMAIL / PHONE
COMPANY
TITLE
NAME
Set up your own job search spreadsheet or use this page to track your progress.
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