Functional Listening Evaluation
(FLE)
by Cheryl DeConde Johnson, Ed.D.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 2
Purpose of the Functional Listening Evaluation (FLE)
student. When comparing performance without and with the
addition of hearing assistance technology such as an FM
system, the evaluation results provide evidence of the
benets of the device in enhancing access to the desired
input. The FLE format may also be useful in justifying other
accommodations, such as sign language or oral interpreting,
note-taking, captioning, special seating, and room acoustic
modications. This protocol is based on a listening paradigm
suggested by Ying (1990), and by Ross, Bracken, and Maxon
(1992).
How it works
Materials needed
CD player, ipad, ipod, or laptop computer to play noise
source
Sound Level Meter or SLM App – use A weighted scale
Classroom noise source (.wav sound le or CD; classroom
noise or multitalker is recommended)
The student’s classroom should be utilized during a time
when students are not present. If the student has multiple
classrooms choose the one where most speaking and
listening instruction occurs or where there is concern
regarding communication access. If one of the student’s
classrooms is not available, choose a room that most closely
The purpose of the FLE is to determine how listening abilities
are aected by noise, distance, and visual access in a
student’s everyday listening environment. The FLE can also be
used as a validation tool to demonstrate the benets of
hearing assistance technology. It is designed to simulate
listening ability in situations that are representative of typical
classrooms and other settings that cannot readily be
replicated in sound booth assessment. Through observation
of the administration of the evaluation, the student’s
teachers, parents, and others may gain appreciation of the
eects of adverse listening conditions encountered by the
Word/Phrase/Sentence Lists for test stimuli
Tape measure
Acoustic Hoop
Environment for testing
approximates the size, ambient noise level, and oor and wall
surfaces of the student’s classroom. While performance
during actual class sessions would seem ideal, the test
process itself may be disruptive to instruction for the rest of
the class and therefore may not reect the true listening
conditions encountered by the student throughout the day.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 3
Physical set-up of test environment
Diagram A – Close
Noise source
Student
Examiner
3 FT 3 FT
Diagram B – Far
Noise source
Student
Examiner
3 FT
12–15 FT
Due to room size and instructional style variations, the
occupied classroom should be observed to determine
maximum listening distances. Record this as the “far”
distance on the Summary and Interpretation Form. When
setting up for the close conditions, measure the 3 foot
distance from the student’s ear to the examiner’s mouth.
Close: Noise and examiner are 3 feet in front of the student
(see Diagram A).
Far: Noise remains 3 feet in front of the student; the
examiner moves back to the pre-determined distance (12 to
15 feet in this example) from the student (see Diagram B).
Types of evaluation materials
In order to simulate classroom listening ability, the speech
evaluation material utilized should be developmentally
appropriate and approximate material that is encountered by
the student in the classroom. Additionally the stimuli should
have sucient length to reect reverberation characteristics
of the room. Consideration should also be given to both
familiar and new material that a student may encounter.
Individuals will usually perform better with familiar material
than with stimuli containing unfamiliar vocabulary. Students
with unilateral and mild hearing losses tend to perform well
under all conditions due to the audibility and inherent
redundancy in phrase and sentence material utilizing familiar
vocabulary. Nonsense phrases have been constructed to
increase listening diculty.
Age, language competency, and memory abilities of the
individual should also be considered when determining the
test stimuli. In selecting word, phrase or sentence materials,
consider whether the vocabulary and syntax are appropriate
for the student’s language level. For students with poor
speech intelligibility, as well as young children, it may be
necessary to use materials that incorporate picture-pointing
responses. If closed-set materials are utilized, performance
can be expected to be better than with open-set materials.
Once the type of stimuli is determined, it must remain
constant throughout the assessment so that the variables
manipulated are noise, distance, and visual input. Report the
material used on the Summary and Interpretation Form.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 4
Common materials include are listed below. In many of these
materials there will not be sucient lists for the entire
protocol (8 lists are needed). If it is necessary to use a list
twice, select the lists that were more dicult for the student
in order to reduce familiarity with the material. The Common
Children’s Phrases and the Children’s Nonsense Phrases,
included with this protocol, each contain eight lists of twenty
phrases and provide the option of phrase or word scoring.
Sentence materials: BLAIR sentences WIPI sentences
SPIN sentences (older students) BKB sentences
PSI sentences HINT-C sentences
Phrase materials: Common children’s phrases Children’s nonsense phrases
Word lists: PB-K NU-6
Picture – Closed set: WIPI NU-CHIPS
The Recorded Functional Listening Evaluation Using
Sentences (Johnson & Anderson, 2013) is available on CD
from www.successforkidswithhearingloss.com. This version
utilizes 5-word HINT-C (Hearing in Noise Test for Children)
sentences that were based on the original Bamford-Kowal-
Bench (BKB) sentences (1979). Half of the sentences are
recorded in quiet and the other half with a +5 SNR and
follow the condition presentation order of the FLE. This
version simplies presentation of the FLE by eliminating the
need for a noise le and adjusting noise and speech sound
levels; however the SNR cannot be altered. Additional
instructions are provided with the CD.
Presentation levels
The conditions of close/far and auditory/auditory-visual are
presented in quiet (4 presentations) and then in noise (4
presentations) to achieve the total of eight conditions.
Speech to noise ratio levels (SNR) should be based upon the
auditory environments encountered by the students in their
classrooms. Sound level measurements of classroom
discourse and activity may be necessary to determine these
levels. For this example, the levels will achieve values
resulting in a +5 dB speech advantage in the close conditions
and a –5dB speech to noise ratio in the far conditions
(12-15ft). Levels will vary slightly depending upon the
acoustics of the room and consistency of the examiner’s
voicing of the stimuli. Measure and record the classroom
ambient noise level (unoccupied), approximate teacher or
talker levels, and noise levels as directed on the scoring form.
Speech: Calibrate the examiner’s voice at a distance of 3 feet
from the listener (close condition). Ask the student to hold
the SLM to their ear and the examiner to talk measuring the
examiner’s voice with the sound level meter so that speech
averages 65dBA SPL at the listener’s ear. Once that level is
measured, check the SPL level when the sound level meter is
held one foot from the examiner’s mouth (being careful to
keep the voice level the same) so that the examiner can hold
the sound level meter to monitor his/her voice for all
conditions to verify that the proper speech level is
maintained. The level at 1 foot from the examiner will be
approximately 3 dBA SPL greater that at the listener’s ear for
close conditions.
Noise: Locate the noise source 3 feet from the student and
adjust the volume of the noise source (classroom/multitalker
noise) using a sound level meter, so that the noise averages
60 dBA SPL at the student’s ear. This yields a +5 speech-to-
noise ratio level.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 5
Presentation protocol
4. Auditory: Close Noise
5. Auditory-Visual: Far Noise
6. Auditory: Far Noise
7. Auditory: Far Quiet
8. Auditory-Visual: Far Quiet
When presenting the FLE via live voice, the examiner should
present the speech materials at a normal speaking rate.
Instruct the student to repeat the speech stimuli or point to
the appropriate picture, as indicated by the material used.
Repeat far conditions (9-12) to validate benet of hearing
assistance technology. Test administration takes
approximately 30 minutes, including set up. For the auditory
conditions it is recommended that the examiner use an
acoustically transparent hoop over his/her face or instruct
the student to look down during these conditions as placing
a hand or paper in front of the talker’s mouth will change the
acoustic characteristics of the speech sounds.
The FLE should be conducted in the student’s typical hearing
mode. If hearing aids or cochlear implants are usually worn
at school, they should also be worn during the evaluation.
When this evaluation is used as a validation tool to
demonstrate improvement in listening ability with FM or
other hearing assistance technology, the examiner should
repeat the far conditions to demonstrate the benets of the
technology.
Eight phrase, sentence or word lists should be presented in
the order indicated by the numbers on the scoring matrix.
This order balances for diculty across conditions so that the
nal task is the easiest of the far conditions. The examiner
may choose to alter the order for other reasons however.
1. Auditory-Visual: Close Quiet
2. Auditory: Close Quiet
3. Auditory-Visual: Close Noise
Scoring
Scoring should be completed using the established
procedures for the selected test material. Scoring may be
made on total phrase/sentence correct (recommended) or by
number of words correct. In some situations it is useful to
have another person (such as the classroom teacher) score
the speech test materials. All scores should be reported in
percent correct in the Scorebox on the Summary and
Interpretation Form. Hearing assistance technology scores
should be entered in the boxes labeled 9-12 for the far
conditions repeated.
Variations in protocol
This protocol is based on the listening situation of a typical
classroom. For an individual student, it may be useful to
modify this protocol to account for variations in the level and
source of noise, classroom size, teacher’s voice, typical
listening distances for the student, or other factors. In order
to accommodate these variations, placement of the noise
source, level of noise, distance from the student in the far
condition, and order of presentation may be adjusted. Be sure
to note these modications on the test form.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 6
Interpretation matrix
The Interpretation Matrix analyzes the eects of noise,
distance, and visual input. This auto-calculating form will
transfer the percentage correct scores from the scorebox to
the appropriate box in the interpretation matrix. Individual
scores are automatically summed and averaged to determine
the overall eect of each condition. Although scores may be
aected by dierent speakers, rate of speaking, attention of
the listener, or status of amplication, comparisons are valid
as long as these variables are kept constant throughout the
evaluation.
When validating hearing assistance technology, the target for
desired performance is the score from box 1 (for auditory
visual) or box 2 (auditory only) of the Scorebox. In other
words, the eects of noise and distance can be considered
eliminated when the performance with the technology
matches the individual’s best performance in quiet, or at least
reduced, if the performance is improved. This information can
be used as evidence to justify technology and other
accommodations that may be benecial for the student. The
ndings should be discussed with the student, his/her
parents, and teachers to help them understand the student’s
listening abilities and communication accommodations
options. A summary of the Interpretation Matrix and
appropriate recommendations should be written on the
scoring form.
References
Johnson, C.D. (2012). Common Children’s Phrases, Children’s
Nonsense Phrases, In Educational Audiology Handbook
(2nd Ed.) (150-153). Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Cengage
Learning..
Johnson, C.D. (2013). Functional Listening Evaluation.
Available from www.ADEvantage.com
Johnson, C.D. & VonAlmen, P. (1993). The Functional Listening
Evaluation. In Educational audiology handbook, (336-339).
Johnson, Benson, & Seaton (1997). San Diego: Singular
Publishing Group, Inc.
Ross, M., Brackett, D. & Maxon, A. (1991). Communication
Assessment. In Assessment and management of
mainstreamed hearing-impaired children (113–127).
Austin, Tx: Pro-Ed.
Ying, E. (1990). Speech and Language Assessment:
Communication Evaluation. In
M. Ross (Ed.), Hearing-impaired children in the mainstream
(45–60). Parkton, MD: York Press.
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 7
The Functional Listening
Evaluation –
Summary & interpretation form
Student name
Date of birth
Home language
School
Grade
Teacher/parent
Hearing care professional
Examiner
Date
Current hearing technology
Usage
consistent
inconsistent
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 8
Autometric results
Sound eld
Aided Unaided
Quiet % @ dBHL
Noise % @ dBHL @ S/N
Hearing sensitivity
Pure Tone Ave: Right Ear dB
Left Ear dB
Word recognition
Right Ear % @ dBHL
Left Ear % @ dBHL
Functional Listening Evaluation conditions
Amplication
None
Hearing aid(s)
Cochlear implant(s)
Bone-conduction device
Hearing assistance technology
Personal FM
Classroom
Other
Classroom noise level
Unoccupied: dBA SPL
Occupied: dBA SPL
Assessment material:
Distance at far conditions: ft
Noise stimulus: Multitalker
Classroom
Other
Speech level @ listener’s ear: dBA SPL
@ 1 ft from examiner: dBA SPL
Noise level @ listener’s ear: dBA SPL
Approximate speech to noise levels: close + dB
far - dB
Modications in protocol:
Functional listening scorebox
close/quiet close/noise far/quiet far/noise
auditory-
visual
1 3 8 5
12 9
auditory
2 4 7 6
11 10
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 9
Interpretation matrix
Interpretation and recommendations
Noise
quiet noise
close –
aud
2 4
close –
aud/vis
1 3
far –
aud
7 6
far –
aud/vis
8 5
Average
scores: % %
quiet noise
Noise
quiet noise
far –
aud/vis
12 9
far –
aud
11 10
Average
scores:
% %
quiet noise
Visual input
aud/vis aud
far –
quiet
12 11
far –
noise
9 10
Average
scores:
% %
aud/vis aud
Distance
close far
quiet –
aud
2 7
quiet –
aud/vis
1 8
noise –
aud
4 6
noise –
aud/vis
3 5
Average
scores: % %
close distant
Visual input
aud/vis aud
close –
quiet
1 2
close –
noise
2 4
far –
noise
5 6
far –
quiet
8 7
Average
scores: % %
aud/vis aud
With hearing assistance technology:
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 10
List 1
Condition:
1. He fell down.
2. Clean this up.
3. It’s not for you.
4. Can you see me?
5. Can I play now?
6. Look over there.
7. It’s lunch time.
8. Can you help me?
9. Close your eyes.
10. Let me have it.
11. Clean up the mess.
12. Hold this toy.
13. Bring it here.
14. Who is missing?
15. Take my hand.
16. Ring the bell.
17. Let me have it.
18. You can’t make me.
19. Can I have some?
20. Go right now.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 69 = %
List 2
Condition:
1. Can I go play?
2. Who is that?
3. Can we go?
4. Have a nice day.
5. What’s the matter?
6. What’s going on?
7. How are you?
8. Can you play?
9. I don’t want to.
10. It’s snowing outside.
11. That is neat.
12. No way man.
13. Leave me alone.
14. Do I have to?
15. Where’s the crayons?
16. Why can’t I go?
17. I want that.
18. That’s cool.
19. When can I?
20. No way.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 63 = %
List 3
Condition:
1. See you later.
2. Got to go now.
3. Let me have it.
4. I’m tired.
5. That’s awesome.
6. Way to go.
7. That’s tough.
8. Turn the light o.
9. Stop that now.
10. Guess what?
11. Do you want to play?
12. Give it over.
13. Can we be friends?
14. She did it.
15. Do you know what?
16. You can’t do that.
17. Watch this.
18. Tie my shoe.
19. What’s up?
20. I can’t nd it.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 63 = %
List 4
Condition:
1. Can I watch TV?
2. Where is it?
3. Let’s go play.
4. I don’t feel good.
5. Can we draw?
6. I want to.
7. Like my picture?
8. Can I go too?
9. Can we play that?
10. I want that toy.
11. Where are we going?
12. Where’s my shoe?
13. Leave me alone.
14. Can we stop?
15. I want some.
16. That one is mine.
17. I get the front.
18. It was my turn.
19. Did you see mine?
20. Let’s stop there.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 70 = %
Appendix
Common children’s phrases
1
Scoring
The phrase method is usually preferred because it yields
performance more similar to classroom listening. Which ever
one is selected, use the same method for all conditions.
Phrase: exact repetition of each phrase is required;
enter the number of correct phrases (the percent correct is
automatically calculated).
Word: circle incorrect word responses and subtract from
total number of words; enter number of correct words (the
percent is automatically calculated).
1 Phrase lists have been matched for length and for comprehension
diculty using the Flesch Reading Ease Index.
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 11
List 5
Condition:
1. Why can’t I?
2. Do we have to?
3. Soccer is cool.
4. Can I open it?
5. Pick a team.
6. Where’s my shoe?
7. How come?
8. I get to go.
9. Stop it now.
10. School was fun.
11. We played outside.
12. I know a song.
13. Can you do that?
14. Come in my house.
15. I don’t know.
16. It’s time for art.
17. Make my day.
18. I am hungry.
19. Go for it.
20. Why not?
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 65 = %
List 6
Condition:
1. Know what Mom?
2. I’m sick.
3. Where’s my present?
4. Give me that.
5. I didn’t do it.
6. Put your shoes on.
7. That’s so cool.
8. Who is it?
9. He threw it.
10. What time is it?
11. He tripped me.
12. Let’s play Nintendo.
13. It’s time for lunch.
14. Want to ride bikes?
15. This is dumb.
16. It’s my turn.
17. I wrecked my bike.
18. Watch out.
19. My tooth is loose.
20. I want money.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 65 = %
List 7
Condition:
1. I broke my arm.
2. My lunch is gone.
3. Is it recess?
4. Do I have to?
5. Stay o the hill.
6. Don’t worry.
7. That’s my sweater.
8. My dog is gone.
9. I want an A.
10. Buy me that book.
11. I hate spinach.
12. I don’t feel good.
13. You can’t make me.
14. That’s my phone.
15. Get that o.
16. Change the channel.
17. What a ride.
18. It’s mine now.
19. Finders keepers.
20. Get o my bed.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 68 = %
List 8
Condition:
1. I bit the dust.
2. He kept it.
3. That song is sad.
4. He poked by eye.
5. I like candy.
6. Get the ball.
7. He kicked me.
8. Why can’t I?
9. No thank you.
10. Where’s the ball?
11. I don’t know.
12. You know what?
13. My homework is late.
14. I hate that.
15. I don’t get it.
16. Don’t mess with me.
17. Keep your hands o.
18. That’s my steak.
19. Let’s get pizza.
20. I skinned my knee.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 68 = %
Scoring
The phrase method is usually preferred because it yields
performance more similar to classroom listening. Which ever
one is selected, use the same method for all conditions.
Phrase: exact repetition of each phrase is required;
enter the number of correct phrases (the percent correct is
automatically calculated).
Word: circle incorrect word responses and subtract from
total number of words; enter number of correct words (the
percent is automatically calculated).
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 12
List 1
Condition:
1. Down fell he boat.
2. Up this clean oor.
3. You table not.
4. Me you see can.
5. Now play I go.
6. There over look.
7. Lunch not time do.
8. Help you can me.
9. Eyes yours on blue
10. Have me let ball.
11. Mess up the clean.
12. Toy hold this now.
13. It here bring me.
14. Missing who done.
15. Hand my take go.
16. The ring bell not.
17. Have it let me.
18. Can make me you.
19. Now go right house.
20. Have some can I.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 77 = %
List 2
Condition:
1. Play go can I.
2. That is who stop.
3. Go we can draw.
4. Day nice have down.
5. Matter the what.
6. Going on what.
7. Snowing you are.
8. Play you here can.
9. I do want not to.
10. Outside it is.
11. Neat that ahead.
12. Man no become.
13. Alone me leave.
14. Do have I to
15. Crayons the where.
16. Can go why I.
17. Want I come book.
18. Cool that on hope.
19. I when can here.
20. Way no ball count.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 73 = %
List 3
Condition:
1. You later see.
2. Now to go got.
3. It have me let.
4. Tired am I.
5. Awesome that is.
6. Go way to here.
7. Tough is that now.
8. O light the turn.
9. Now that stop from.
10. What guess you home.
11. Play to want you do.
12. Over it give.
13. Friends be we can.
14. It did she go.
15. What know you do.
16. That do can you.
17. Watch no this go.
18. Shoe my x now
19. Up what is tie.
20. It nd cannot.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 76 = %
List 4
Condition:
1. TV watch can.
2. Book is it where.
3. Play to let go.
4. Good feel not do.
5. Draw we can here.
6. Food to want dog.
7. Picture my like.
8. To go I can.
9. That play we hope.
10. Toy that want I.
11. Going we are.
12. Shoe my is where.
13. Alone me leave.
14. Stop we can now.
15. Some want I tell.
16. Mine is one that.
17. Front the get back.
18. Turn my was now.
19. Mine see you did.
20. There stop let is.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 76 = %
Children’s nonsense phrases
Scoring
The phrase method is usually preferred because it yields
performance more similar to classroom listening. Which ever
one is selected, use the same method for all conditions.
Phrase: exact repetition of each phrase is required;
enter the number of correct phrases (the percent correct is
automatically calculated).
Word: circle incorrect word responses and subtract from
total number of words; enter number of correct words (the
percent is automatically calculated).
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Updated 2013 by C.D. Johnson. Based on Functional Listening Evaluation by C.D. Johnson & P. Von Almen, 1993 13
List 5
Condition:
1. I not can why.
2. To have we do.
3. Cool is soccer.
4. It open I can.
5. Team a pick you.
6. Shoe my is where.
7. Come how to here.
8. Go to get it.
9. Now it stop pen.
10. Day fun was school.
11. Outside play we.
12. Song to know I.
13. That do you can.
14. House my in come.
15. Know I do not.
16. Art for time is.
17. Day my make go.
18. Hungry am I here.
19. It for go home.
20. Not is why eat.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 79 = %
List 6
Condition:
1. Mom what know me.
2. Sick am I here.
3. Present my where.
4. That me give book.
5. Paper It do.
6. On shoe you put.
7. Cool so that is.
8. It is who gone.
9. Threw he become.
10. It is time what.
11. Me tripped he.
12. Game play us for.
13. Lunch for time is.
14. Bike ride to want.
15. Dumb is this for.
16. Turn my come is.
17. Bike my wreck here.
18. Out is watch go.
19. Loose is my gum.
20. Money want I.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 78 = %
List 7
Condition:
1. Arm my broke I.
2. Gone is lunch my.
3. Recess it is.
4. To have I do.
5. Hill the o stay.
6. Worry not do.
7. Sweater that is.
8. Gone is dog my.
9. Boat want go now.
10. Book that me buy.
11. Spinach like me.
12. Good feel not do.
13. Me make not can.
14. Phone my is that.
15. O that get here.
16. Channel the eat.
17. Ride a what to.
18. Now mine is it.
19. Keep the nd key.
20. Bed my o get.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 76 = %
List 8
Condition:
1. Dust the bit I.
2. It kept he gone.
3. Sad is song that.
4. Eye by poke here.
5. Candy like I done.
6. Ball the get gone.
7. Me kicked he for.
8. I not can why.
9. You thank no see.
10. Ball that where on.
11. Know not do lunch.
12. What know you for?
13. Late is work home
14. That hate to do.
15. It get not done.
16. Me with mess not.
17. O hands your keep.
18. Steak my is that.
19. Pizza get let.
20. Knee my hurt now.
Phrase score
/ 20 = %
Word score
/ 79 = %
Scoring
The phrase method is usually preferred because it yields
performance more similar to classroom listening. Which ever
one is selected, use the same method for all conditions.
Phrase: exact repetition of each phrase is required;
enter the number of correct phrases (the percent correct is
automatically calculated).
Word: circle incorrect word responses and subtract from
total number of words; enter number of correct words (the
percent is automatically calculated).
V3.00/2020-03 © 2020 Sonova AG All rights reserved
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Chrome Web Store
It looks like you haven't installed the Fill Chrome Extension Add to Chrome