1. The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), published in March 2012 brought in
a fundamental change to the strategic planning system. The NPPF retains the
statutory status of the development plan as the starting point for decision making,
and the fact that proposed development which accords with the Local Plan is
generally expected to be approved. The Framework is however much simpler than
the previous planning policy framework and the more detailed policy documents, for
example the set of Planning Policy Guidance Notes, have been dropped. This
includes the Planning Policy Guidance Note 17 on Planning for Open Space, Sport
and Recreation of 2002, which had been the main policy guidance up to the release
of the new NPPF.
2. Each local planning authority is now expected to produce a Local Plan which can be
reviewed in whole or in part to respond flexibly to changing circumstances. The
Local Plan sets the strategic priorities for the area which specifically includes leisure
development and “the provision of health, security, community and cultural
infrastructure and other local facilities” (para 156). Additional development
documents are only to be used where they are clearly justified, such as where they
help applicants to make successful applications or to aid infrastructure delivery.
3. The policies in the Local Plan are required to follow the approach of the presumption
in favour of sustainable development, and should be based on an adequate, up-to-
date and relevant evidence base, including in relation to; housing, business,
infrastructure, minerals, defence, environment (historic, health and well-being),
public safety from major accidents, ensuring viability and deliverability (Paras 158
177). The Leisure Facilities Strategy will form one part of this evidence base.
Authorities are also able to use evidence already produced which was initiated to
underpin the emerging (or existing) local plan policies.
4. Local planning authorities are encouraged to cooperate on planning issues that cross
administrative boundaries, particularly in relation to the strategic priorities set out in
Para 156 of the NPPF, which includes specific reference to leisure and to community
infrastructure. This report therefore takes into consideration the duty to co-operate
and so the cross-border implications of sport and recreation provision.
5. The policies within the new NPPF which related specifically to leisure, sport and
recreation are set out below.
APPENDIX 1: National Planning Policy Framework summary
Para 70
To deliver the social, recreational and cultural facilities and services the community needs,
planning policies and decisions should:
Plan positively for the provision and use of shared space, community facilities
(such as .... sports venues...) and other local services to enhance the
sustainability of communities and residential environments;
Guard against the unnecessary loss of valued facilities and services, particularly
where this would reduce the community’s ability to meet its day-to-day needs;
Ensure that established shops, facilities and services are able to develop and
modernise in a way that is sustainable, and retained for the benefit of the
community; and
Ensure an integrated approach to considering the location of housing, economic
uses and community facilities and services.
Para 73
Access to high quality open spaces and opportunities for sport and recreation can make an
important contribution to the health and well-being of communities. Planning policies
should be based on robust and uptodate assessments of the needs for open space, sports
and recreation facilities and opportunities for new provision. The assessments should
identify specific needs and quantitative or qualitative deficits or surpluses of open space,
sports and recreational facilities in the local area. Information gained from the assessments
should be used to determine what open space, sports and recreational provision is required.
Para 74
Existing open space, sports and recreational buildings and land, including playing fields,
should not be built on unless:
an assessment has been undertaken which has clearly shown the open space,
buildings or land to be surplus to requirements; or
the loss resulting from the proposed development would be replaced by
equivalent or better provision in terms of quantity and quality in a suitable
location; or
the development is for alternative sports and recreational provision, the needs
for which clearly outweigh the loss.
Para 81
Once Green Belts have been defined, local planning authorities should plan positively to
enhance the beneficial use of the Green Belt, such as looking for opportunities to provide
access; to provide opportunities for outdoor sport and recreation; to retain and enhance
landscapes, visual amenity and biodiversity; or to improve damaged and derelict land.
Para 89
A local planning authority should regard the construction of new buildings as
inappropriate in Green Belt. Exceptions to this are:
.........
provision of appropriate facilities for outdoor sport, outdoor recreation and for
cemeteries, as long as it preserves the openness of the Green Belt and does not
conflict with the purposes of including land within it;
..........
Para 171
Local planning authorities should work with public health leads and health organisations to
understand and take account of the health status and needs of the local population (such as
for sports, recreation and places of worship), including expected future changes, and any
information about relevant barriers to improving health and well-being.
6. A key issue within the Local Plan for South Oxfordshire will be how the new housing
developments can contribute towards the facilities and services needed for the new
population. The NPPF gives general guidance on planning obligations.
Para 204
Planning obligations are expected to only be applied where they meet all of the following
tests:
necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms;
directly related to the development; and
fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the development.
7. There are also some additional policies relating to playing fields, such as the ability of
local communities to identify a playing field as Local Green Space, on which new
development can be prevented.
8. Overall in relation to sport and recreation, the new NPPF has retained a similar
approach to the previous guidance, and in particular the themes underpinning
PPG17. The most significant change is the greater protection afforded to all sports
facilities which was previously only applicable to playing fields under the new Para
74.
31/03/2016 1
Small-Area Population Forecasts for West Northamptonshire
To inform the emerging Open Space, Sports and Recreation Study (OSSRS)
Methodology Note
1. Introduction:
i. This note summarises the process and main findings of population forecasting work
undertaken to inform the study reference in the header above. It should be read alongside
the project brief for the work prepared and agreed prior to instruction (copy enclosed).
ii. West Northamptonshire is an area with an adopted Joint Core Strategy Local Plan (Part 1)
which provides for the objectively assessed housing needs of the area, as agreed by the
Inspector appointed to undertake Examination of the Plan. The inputs informing population
and household projections change frequently and no one source should ever be treated as
entirely representative. The projections which informed the Joint Core Strategy were a
snapshot in time from when the strategy was being prepared. They brought together and
made amendments to a number of source data. There have also been various revisions at
the national level since the Joint Core Strategy was adopted.
iii. However, the assessment underpinning the Joint Core Strategy remains the most robust and
accepted forecast for the area. It is with this source that the outputs for the small-area
population forecasts to inform the OSSRS have aimed to be broadly consistent.
2. Update on Methodology
Demographic Inputs and Geography:
i. Population forecasts have been prepared on the basis on the methodology set out in the
project brief (copy provided).
ii. These have been on the basis of Middle Super Output Areas (MSOA) for Daventry,
Northampton and South Northamptonshire (maps provided).
iii. The forecasts themselves are based on broadly consistent inputs to the forecast from those
used in the projections for the Joint Core Strategy in terms of fertility, mortality, in-migration
and out-migration (from both the UK and overseas).
iv. The main adjustment is that for Daventry and South Northamptonshire, ONS Fertility Rates
for the 2010-based projections have been used, rather than 2008-based figures used in
previous work by the Joint Planning Unit. This reflects that work by external consultants for
the Joint Core Strategy also used inputs informed by the 2011 Census, which provide a
slightly higher fertility rate per head of population. This change maintains a 0-4 age
population more consistent with the Joint Core Strategy. It is also necessary in part in as a
response to the previous ‘over-estimation’ of population estimates in Daventry and South
Northamptonshire. The previous understanding was that the lower 2008-based fertility rates
would be applied across a higher population, generating an overall number of births. In
APPENDIX 2: Demographic modelling summary
31/03/2016 2
effect, the rates must be higher if applied to a smaller population to generate a broadly
equivalent number of births.
v. It has been necessary to apply the same input assumptions to each individual MSOA. As set
out in the project brief, in practice there will be variations in demographic patterns and
behaviours in individual areas, but these are not accurately modelled in any nationally
available dataset.
vi. Notwithstanding the above demographic inputs informing the population forecast, the main
determinant of the population in any one area is more likely to be the level of housebuilding
and how this influences changes in household formation and demographic change.
vii. Assumptions on household formation rates in each Partner Authority which are identical to
those that inform the Joint Core Strategy have been applied identically to each MSOA
forecast. Again, local patterns may vary but this approach is considered the most robust. The
advantage of the Joint Core Strategy household formation rates is they take account of
constraints on household formation resulting from the recession and project a recovery over
the plan-period.
Dwelling-Led Projections:
viii. The latest housing trajectories for the Partner Authorities have been used to inform
‘dwelling-led’ forecasts for the individual MSOAs. This work combines a variety of:
information on the delivery of major strategic sites; information on the delivery of existing
commitments; and realistic assumptions on windfall across various areas. These input data
will be passed to the Partner Authorities for information.
The dwelling completion assumptions used are as follows:
Area
JCS 2011-2029
MSOA 2011-2029
(OSSRS Forecast)
% Difference
Daventry
6,985
7,089
1.49%
Northampton Related
Development Area
18,873
18,974
0.54%
South
Northamptonshire
7,173
7,352
2.50%
Table 1: Dwelling-Led Trajectories for the MSOA Forecasts
ix. In summary, small differences arise in dwelling estimates for individual years but it is
important that the overall number of dwellings to be provided broadly matches the
provision set out in the Joint Core Strategy. The predominant cause for any difference is the
distribution of small-scale allowances for windfall (and urban capacity) across the different
Middle Super Output Areas.
31/03/2016 3
x. When evaluating any difference, one should bear in mind that building very few homes in
one area for a sustained period may have a profound effect on population. If assumptions of
rates for ageing, migration and changes in household formation from the population
forecast conflict with estimates of dwellings to be provided, population forecasts must
assume that individuals either leave the area or do not have scope to migrate in. It is
important to note that even in a scenario with no net migration, there remains a demand for
additional housing as part of overall trends towards smaller household sizes (in-particular
due to ageing and household separation).
xi. This is the key purpose of a ‘dwelling-led’ projection and inevitably its effects may be more
pronounced in small spatial areas. Realistic allowances for windfall help to mitigate this.
3. Overall Comparison with West Northamptonshire Joint Core Strategy Projections
(Note Total Population Shown on any graphs is in reality approximately 3,000 people greater for
the MSOA projection this is due to issues in translating the SUE Population Model into PopGroup.
Numbers shown in tables take precedence over any figures indicated on graphs)
i. The outputs have produced data which are broadly consistent with the Joint Core Strategy
Projections, as anticipated by the methodology. Individual comparisons for the Partner
Authority Areas are also shown separately below.
ii. The percentage difference for total populations comparing the Joint Core Strategy against
MSOA forecasts are shown below:
Area
JCS 2029 Population
MSOA 2029
Population
% Difference
Daventry
89,134
89,850
0.80%
Northampton Related
Development Area
267,687
267,606
-0.03%
South
Northamptonshire
96,635
97,610
1.01%
Table 2: Comparison of JCS and MSOA Population Forecast Outputs
31/03/2016 4
4. Comparison of Output Areas
i. A separate population forecast has been prepared for each MSOA. As discussed, these are
highly sensitive to the level of housebuilding. The areas with greatest forecasts for
population growth accurately reflect the locations where the highest level of housing
delivery is intended. Such outputs are consistent with the Joint Core Strategys objective to
concentrate development in the largest and most sustainable centres. All results for
Daventry and South Northamptonshire and a sample from Northampton Borough are shown
below:
DDC
DDC001
DDC002
DDC003
DDC004
DDC005
DDC006
DDC007
DDC008
DDC009
DDC010
9.1%
6.7%
4.2%
8.2%
7.4%
8.7%
30.6%
21.3%
-3.0%
5.3%
-0.3%
14.4%
1.2%
-0.6%
13.0%
0.5%
18.1%
85.9%
-2.0%
-4.6%
10.6%
5.6%
0.8%
0.6%
0.4%
0.7%
0.6%
0.7%
2.6%
1.8%
-0.3%
0.4%
0.0%
0.9%
0.1%
0.0%
0.8%
0.0%
1.1%
5.4%
-0.1%
-0.3%
0.7%
0.4%
Table 3: Change by individual MSOA for Daventry District (Daventry NE SUE in DDC006)
YEAR
NBC
NBC010
NBC011
NBC012
NBC013
NBC014
NBC015
NBC016
NBC017
NBC018
NBC019
NBC020
NBC021
NBC022
01-13
11.5%
1.7%
0.0%
7.3%
6.1%
-2.1%
-8.6%
-0.7%
15.4%
2.3%
7.0%
-4.2%
43.3%
12.8%
13-29
11.9%
1.0%
-4.4%
-5.6%
5.7%
-2.0%
7.0%
-0.1%
34.6%
53.6%
6.5%
4.9%
6.3%
-4.0%
01-13
p.a
1.0%
0.1%
0.0%
0.6%
0.5%
-0.2%
-0.7%
-0.1%
1.3%
0.2%
0.6%
-0.3%
3.6%
1.1%
13-29
pa
0.7%
0.1%
-0.3%
-0.4%
0.4%
-0.1%
0.4%
0.0%
2.2%
3.4%
0.4%
0.3%
0.4%
-0.3%
Table 4: Change by sample of individual MSOAs for Northampton Borough
31/03/2016 5
YEAR
SNC
SNC001
SNC002
SNC003
SNC004
SNC005
SNC006
SNC007
SNC008
SNC009
SNC010
SNC011
01-13
10.01%
0.00%
1.26%
53.59%
-2.96%
8.09%
-1.69%
10.41%
22.54%
-1.65%
3.31%
9.79%
13-29
11.61%
-0.73%
-2.49%
-0.80%
2.32%
66.75%
3.04%
6.39%
2.71%
56.39%
-3.02%
-3.12%
01-13
p.a
0.83%
0.00%
0.10%
4.47%
-0.25%
0.67%
-0.14%
0.87%
1.88%
-0.14%
0.28%
0.82%
13-29 pa
0.73%
-0.05%
-0.16%
-0.05%
0.14%
4.17%
0.19%
0.40%
0.17%
3.52%
-0.19%
-0.20%
Table 5: Change by individual MSOA for South Northamptonshire (Towcester and Brackley Urban
Extensions in SNC005 and SNC009 respectively)
ii. It can also be seen that between 2001 and 2013, a number of MSOAs have separately
experienced population growth and population decline. It is also the case that in some areas
(especially urban areas) recent constraints on household formation and patterns of
migration and lifestyle (e.g. use of HMOs) mean that population growth can seem high even
if few dwellings have been built.
iii. Local differences are therefore to be expected, however based on population change per
annum and given that the population forecasts sum almost exactly to the Joint Core Strategy
totals, this is not considered to affect the robustness of the small area forecasts, based on
the inputs that it is necessary to use to prepare them. Any small local discrepancies,
especially in urban areas, are likely to be negated when individual Middle Super Output
Areas are combined to provide ‘sub-areas’ for the OSSRS outputs.
5. Comparison of Age Groups
i. The graphs at Appendix 1 show a comparison at 2029 between the Joint Core Strategy and
MSOA forecast populations split by different age groups. Graphs are provided for the whole
West Northamptonshire area as well as for its constituent elements.
ii. Overall any difference between the specific age groups is considered to be minor, immaterial
to the overall demographic makeup and no more than would be expected from applying
assumptions from the District / Borough level to much smaller populations in individual
MSOAs. Much of any difference is due to the rate of housebuilding, household formation
rates and migration patterns for individual areas in the small area forecast. In reality, for
example, it is likely that there is a distinction in the age-sex migration flows between
Towcester and its rural hinterland which the input data for this work is unable to identify or
distinguish.
31/03/2016 6
Potential Discrepancy in SNC Populations Age 0-18 at 2029
iii. For the total population in the age groups referred to above, the small area forecasts
generate a greater departure from the Joint Core Strategy projection (approximately 15-
20%). This highlights that the area relies on a significant in-migration of younger families to
support the total number and proportion of younger residents. In past years, the
development at Grange Park in-particular has significantly boosted the number of younger
residents and by definition a projection assumes this pattern will continue. In reality, this
pattern has not continued, and such growth is functionally related to the Northampton
Related Development Area. In addition, the timing and location of housing delivery will
dampen levels of in-migration in some areas where house-building is lowest.
iv. It should be noted that this is a discrepancy that is likely to equally be an issue from the Joint
Core Strategy projections rather than the small area forecast work. For example, when
comparing the MSOA outputs at 2029 against the more recent ONS2012 Projections the
difference in the total population for people aged 0-18 is less than when comparing against
the Joint Core Strategy. To some degree, future national projections are likely to correct for
the same discrepancy.
v. This issue should be monitored when preparing the outputs from the OSSRS and any
unrealistic results may be reported to the team preparing the small area population
forecasts. If necessary, an adjusted set of results could be prepared to give a population
aged 0-18 which was entirely consistent with the Joint Core Strategy outputs but reflect the
population distribution across Middle Super Output Areas. However, the Partner Authorities
should bear in mind that this would depart in principle from the outputs of a specific
population forecast prepared from specific demographic and household inputs. It would not
be robust to change the inputs themselves on an ad-hoc basis.
6. Approach to Sustainable Urban Extensions (SUEs)
Northampton Related Development Area
i. It was agreed at the outset of the project brief that the specific proposed delivery of housing
to meet the dwellings figures in the Joint Core Strategy was a material consideration for the
study. This includes the delivery of a significant amount of housing in areas outside of the
administrative area of Northampton, where for statistical purposes the population will be
recorded as being part of Daventry or South Northamptonshire and therefore spread across
fairly large MSOA boundaries.
ii. It is also significant that these areas are considered to functionally relate to Northampton as
part of growth in the Northampton Related Development Area, and that the existing
population of any nearby areas (e.g. Harpole and Boughton) does not necessarily reflect this
pattern. It is also significant that new extensions are likely to have distinct demographic
patterns. It is also the case that by definition, the starting population of these areas can be
treated as zero if they are treated as discrete.
31/03/2016 7
iii. Work has been undertaken to inform the potential population that may arise from these
extensions. Examples in West and North Northamptonshire have been prepared. It is
significant that these areas tend to have a much younger demographic profile.
iv. A SUE Population Model has been built for each SUE in the NRDA. This is based on a pro-rata
ratio between the numbers of dwellings built on Grange Park (as the main comparator
location) against the 5-yr age band of the population at a given time. The ratio was taken at
5-year intervals, which broadly reflects that development of the SUE and the ageing of the
population.
v. The Joint Core Strategy Dwelling trajectories for each SUE were then multiplied by the age
ratios described above to establish the cumulative population for each SUE as it develops.
vi. These populations have then been added to the MSOA projections for the Northampton
Administrative Area.
vii. This provides the total population of 267,606 people within the Northampton Related
Development Area described above.
viii. Each SUE can be assigned to its nearest MSOA in Northampton for the purpose of future
modelling in the OSSRS and for the development of ‘sub-areas’ for the study.
SUEs in the rest of West Northamptonshire
ix. It has not been considered necessary to repeat the same exercise for populations of SUEs in
Daventry and South Northamptonshire.
x. The difference here is that these areas already have substantial standing populations in the
towns and surrounding villages and it may be that the urban extensions have a greater
immediate relationship with these areas. It would also be necessary to model the
populations of the affected MSOA separately, without including the dwelling trajectory for
the SUE. As these sites make up a high proportion of delivery in towns like Daventry and
Towcester, it would be expected that the population growth would be highly constrained
without the extensions.
xi. For information, the potential populations of the SUEs have been modelled based on the
methodology for the Northampton Related Development Area. These populations may
therefore be deducted from the total of the whole MSOA to give a remainder for the town
or other rural areas.
xii. It is noted that the MSOA covering the SUE South of Towcester only covers part of the town
and extends to the rural area to the South. However, to model the SUE separately (or as part
of the town) it would be necessary to split the MSOA in two and give two smaller starting
populations (at 2013). Given that the relevant input rates are already being disaggregated
from a District to a small-area level, this should not be considered preferable. However,
more work can be undertaken if required. This might depend on the choice made by the
consultants preparing the OSSRS in developing ‘sub-area’ geographies for the study.
31/03/2016 8
Appendix 1: Age Group Comparisons at 2029 for JCS and MSOA Small-Area Forecasts
Fig 1: Comparison at Joint Core Strategy Level
Fig 2: Comparison for Daventry District (excl. NRDA)
31/03/2016 9
Fig 2: Comparison for Northampton Related Development Area
Fig 4: Comparison for South Northamptonshire (excl. NRDA)
APPENDIX 3: MSOA map for Daventry
NRDA SUE populations
2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029
0-4
158 297 286 363 768 973 53 235 323 574 1299 1582
5-9 89 290 342 203 752 1162 31 186 316 323 1228 1820
10-14 80 210 238 184 542 809 27 155 228 290 907 1275
15-19
52 160 190 120 413 644 15 103 174 187 676 1008
20-24 36 104 128 84 270 436 11 65 113 131 439 677
25-29 124 167 154 283 433 522 40 153 182 447 754 858
30-34 169 296 285 387 766 969 56 247 322 612 1309 1576
35-39 164 371 360 377 959 1224 59 288 403 600 1618 1987
40-44 102 298 328 235 771 1116 31 207 324 368 1277 1768
45-49
58 211 236 134 546 802 16 123 229 209 880 1267
50-54 32 117 151 73 304 513 13 69 128 118 490 792
55-59 27 75 89 63 193 302 7 48 81 97 315 472
60-64 20 64 64 45 167 218 6 39 70 70 270 352
65-69 7 40 58 16 105 198 2 22 44 25 167 300
70-74 5 23 29 12 59 100 3 15 25 20 96 154
75-79 5 20 20 12 51 69 1 16 21 18 86 110
80-84 1 20 25 2 52 87 1 13 22 4 85 134
85-89 1 25 25 1 64 87 0 8 27 2 97 139
90+ 0 17 28 1 44 96 0 5 19 1 67 142
Total 1130 2805 3037 2593 7258 10327 372 1997 3048 4095 12060 16412
Buckton Fields
Northampton
North
Northampton
West
NRDA total in
Daventry District
Age
APPENDIX 4: Demographic forecasts for Daventry district
Daventry district excluding NRDA SUEs
2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 2029
Persons 0-4 4,255 4,333 4,450 4,467 4,495 4,498 4,520 4,563 4,594 4,619 4,631 4,645 4,663 4,676
5-9 4,766 4,717 4,765 4,805 4,859 4,866 4,940 4,973 4,915 4,895 4,893 4,924 4,976 5,023
10-14 4,710 4,766 4,843 5,024 5,050 5,065 4,988 4,966 4,959 4,983 4,987 5,068 5,102 5,052
15-19 4,417 4,372 4,418 4,397 4,440 4,429 4,443 4,443 4,555 4,550 4,563 4,491 4,475 4,487
20-24 3,968 4,132 4,590 4,748 4,629 4,416 4,258 4,162 4,057 4,057 4,032 4,060 4,070 4,172
25-29 4,104 4,240 4,225 4,399 4,697 4,872 4,998 5,244 5,201 4,934 4,711 4,572 4,473 4,386
30-34 3,706 3,762 3,995 4,250 4,525 4,681 4,807 4,617 4,663 4,869 5,038 5,186 5,493 5,492
35-39 4,191 4,200 4,284 4,276 4,278 4,339 4,383 4,530 4,710 4,930 5,080 5,227
5,021 5,086
40-44 5,227 4,930 4,791 4,655 4,606 4,619 4,608 4,593 4,509 4,461 4,506 4,560 4,716 4,916
45-49 6,500 6,298 6,253 6,110 5,929 5,555 5,213 4,984 4,779 4,687 4,694 4,690 4,673 4,600
50-54 6,643 6,762 6,953 7,006 6,855 6,775 6,531 6,385 6,169 5,946 5,567 5,229 5,012 4,815
55-59 5,738 6,012 6,163 6,364 6,648 6,770 6,856 6,945 6,929 6,732 6,651 6,424 6,289 6,086
60-64 5,099 5,110 5,269 5,448 5,580 5,775 6,021 6,094 6,239 6,487 6,602 6,695 6,791 6,789
65-69 5,502 5,331 5,191 5,149 5,094 5,090 5,077 5,167 5,296 5,396 5,586 5,835 5,913 6,066
70-74 4,259 4,702 5,097 5,214 5,350 5,388 5,205 5,019 4,945 4,870 4,866 4,863 4,958 5,090
75-79 2,853 2,984 3,155 3,531 3,789 4,046 4,447 4,776 4,856 4,967 5,003 4,847 4,687 4,628
80-84 1,985 2,126 2,292 2,363 2,480 2,553 2,663 2,783 3,097 3,308 3,532
3,899 4,201 4,282
85-89 1,219 1,248 1,326 1,408 1,472 1,551 1,664 1,783 1,828 1,920 1,984 2,084 2,194 2,459
90+ 720 775 830 891 964 1,023 1,071 1,140 1,225 1,310 1,407 1,522 1,654 1,743
Total 79,861 80,798 82,889 84,505 85,739 86,311 86,694 87,168 87,523 87,921 88,335 88,820 89,360 89,848
Daventry district up to 2029 including NRDA SUEs
2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029 2021 2026 2029 2016 2021 2026 2029 2016 2021 2026 2029
0-4 158 297 286 363 768 973 53 235 323 574 1299 1582 4255 4498 4631 4676 4255 5072 5930 6258
5-9
89 290 342 203 752 1162 31 186 316 323 1228 1820 4766 4866 4893 5023 4766 5189 6121 6843
10-14 80 210 238 184 542 809 27 155 228 290 907 1275 4710 5065 4987 5052 4710 5355 5894 6327
15-19 52 160 190 120 413 644 15 103 174 187 676 1008 4417 4429 4563 4487 4417 4616 5239 5495
20-24 36 104 128 84 270 436 11 65 113 131 439 677 3968 4416 4032 4172 3968 4547 4471 4849
25-29 124 167 154 283 433 522 40 153 182 447 754 858 4104 4872 4711 4386 4104 5319 5465 5244
30-34 169 296 285 387 766 969 56 247 322 612 1309 1576 3706 4681 5038 5492 3706 5293 6347 7068
35-39 164 371 360 377 959 1224 59 288 403 600 1618 1987 4191 4339 5080 5086 4191 4939 6698 7073
40-44 102 298 328 235 771 1116 31 207 324 368 1277 1768 5227 4619 4506 4916 5227 4987 5783 6684
45-49 58 211 236 134 546 802 16 123 229 209 880 1267 6500 5555 4694 4600 6500 5764 5574 5867
50-54 32 117 151 73 304 513 13 69 128 118 490 792 6643 6775 5567 4815 6643 6893 6057 5607
55-59 27 75 89 63 193 302 7 48 81 97 315 472 5738 6770 6651 6086 5738 6867 6966 6558
60-64 20 64 64 45 167 218 6 39 70 70 270 352 5099 5775 6602 6789 5099 5845 6872 7141
65-69 7 40 58 16 105 198 2 22 44 25 167 300 5502 5090 5586 6066 5502 5115 5753 6366
70-74 5 23 29 12 59 100 3 15 25 20 96 154 4259 5388 4866 5090 4259 5408 4962 5244
75-79 5 20 20 12 51 69 1 16 21 18 86 110 2853 4046 5003 4628 2853 4064 5089 4738
80-84 1 20 25 2 52 87 1 13 22 4 85 134 1985 2553 3532 4282 1985 2557 3617 4416
85-89 1 25 25 1 64 87 0 8 27 2 97 139 1219 1551 1984 2459 1219 1553 2081 2598
90+ 0 17 28 1 44 96 0 5 19 1 67 142 720 1023 1407 1743 720 1024 1474 1885
Total 1130 2805 3037 2593 7258 10327 372 1997 3048 4095 12060 16412 79861 86311 88335 89848 79861 90406 100395 106260
Daventry District incl NRDA SUEs
Age
Buckton Fields
Northampton North
Northampton West
NRDA total in Daventry District
Daventry District excl NRDA SUEs
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Ben participates in
33%
24%
18%
15%
13%
6%
5%
4%
4%
4%
4%
17%
9%
5%
14%
2%
4%
2%
1%
1%
0% 10% 20% 30% 40%
Football
Keep fit/gym
Cycling
Athletics
Swimming
Tennis
Golf
Badminton
Squash/racketball
Cricket
% of segment
Ben All adults
Ben -
1
Competitive Male Urbanites
About Ben
Ben, 22, has recently graduated and is now working as a trainee accountant. Loving his
single life, which is just an extension of university days, he is certainly in no hurry to settle
down. His ‘work-hard, play-hard’
attitude to life sees him putting in long hours at the
office, doing a lot of sport and enjoying plenty of socialising with friends. Ben is also more
likely to be a student than other groups.
Currently renting with ex-university friends, he is contemplating the housing ladder, but
will probably move back into the parental home. Whatever he chooses, little time is spent
at home.
Image and brand conscious, Ben tries to keep a healthy diet, but
with little success. Post-
work and post-exercise fast foods are almost daily regimes.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (74%), or Other White (12%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (7%), of Irish heritage (5%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Josh, Luke, Adam, Matesuz, Kamil
Ben: Sports Overview
Ben is a very active type that takes part in sport on
a regular basis: he is the most sporty of the 19
segments.
The top sports that Ben participates in are shown
in the chart opposite: 33% of Bens play football,
compared to 4% of all adults; 24% of this segment
take part in ‘keep fit and gym' compared to 17% of
all adults;18% of this segment take part in cycling,
and 15% take part in athletics or running.
Swimming is also popular with Ben, with his
participation in this sport being in line with all
adults. He may also take part in tennis, golf,
badminton, squash/racketball
and cricket.
Male, recent graduates, with a ‘work-hard, play-hard’
attitude
5% of all adults; 10% of adult men
Ben is similar to/lives near:
Chloe (segment 3), other Bens (segment 1)
Ben is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Maidenhead, Putney, High Wycombe, Wimbledon, Richmond-
upon-Thames
Mainly aged 18-25
Single
Graduate professional
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
APPENDIX 5: Sport England Market Segmentation summaries
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Jamie participates in
28%
22%
12%
12%
10%
4%
4%
3%
3%
3%
4%
17%
5%
9%
14%
2%
2%
1%
0%
4%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%
Football
Keep fit/gym
Athletics
Cycling
Swimming
Badminton
Tennis
Cricket
Basketball
Golf
% of segment
Jamie All adults
Jamie -
2
Sports Team Lads
About Jamie
Jamie is 20 and has just finished studying for an HND at his local college. Since leaving
college he’s been unable to find a related job and currently works at the local
supermarket, but hopes to find something better soon. Jamie lives with his parents in the
family home, and still hangs out with his old school-mates.
Jamie plays football in the local youth league, and often plays computer games with his
mates from the team. Tight finances mean that Jamie puts a lot on his credit card. His
spare cash goes on nights in the sports bar with the boys, either drinking or playing late
night pool.
Jamie isn’t fussed about his health or diet. He may smoke, and enjoys fast
food and
takeaways.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (60%), or Other White (15%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (14%), of Irish heritage (5%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (2%).
Alternative names
Ryan, Nathan, Ashley, Adeel, Pawel
Jamie: Sports Overview
Jamie is a very active type that takes part in sport on
a regular basis (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Jamie participates in are shown in
the chart opposite: 28% of this group play football,
compared to 4% of all adults; 22% take part in ‘keep
fit and gym’
compared to 17% of all adults; 12% take
part in both athletics (running) and cycling, and 10%
go swimming.
Jamie may also take part in badminton, tennis,
cricket, basketball and golf.
Young blokes enjoying football, pints and pool
5% of all adults; 11% of adult men
Jamie is similar to/lives near:
Jackie (segment 8), other Jamies (segment 2)
Jamie is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Hounslow, Croydon, Slough, Leeds, Coventry
Mainly aged 18-25
Single
Vocational Student
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Chloe -
3
Fitness class friends
About Chloe
Chloe is 23 and works in HR for a large firm. She shares a house with ex-university
friends who are also on graduate schemes. Without the pressures of family or a
mortgage, Chloe isn’t worried about her student loan, she likes to spend her income on
clothes, nights out and holidays with friends.
Chloe and her housemates go to classes at their local gym a couple of times a week, and
like to swim afterwards. At weekends, Chloe likes to go for a big night out, including a
nice meal and a few drinks with her friends.
Chloe is reasonably health conscious, watching what she eats and
exercising to stay trim.
She isn’t fanatical though, wanting to live a fun packed life while she’s young, free and
single.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (75%), or Other White (12%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (6%), of Irish heritage (5%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (2%).
Alternative names
Nisha, Sophie, Lauren, Charlotte, Lucy
Chloe: Sports Overview
Chloe is an active type that takes part in sport on
a regular basis (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Chloe participates in are
shown in the chart opposite: 28% of this group
take part in ‘keep fit and gym’
compared to 17%
of all adults; 24% take part in swimming
compared to 14% of all adults; and 14% take
part in athletics or running.
She may also take part in horse riding, tennis,
badminton, football, netball and hockey.
Young image-conscious females keeping fit and trim
5% of all adults; 9% of adult women
Chloe is similar to/lives near:
Ben (1), other Chloes (3)
Chloe is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Kingston upon Thames, Guildford, Cambridge, St Albans,
Chiswick
Mainly aged 18-25
Single
Graduate professional
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Top sports that Chloe participates in
28%
24%
14%
11%
5%
4%
3%
2%
2%
1%
17%
14%
5%
9%
1%
2%
2%
4%
0%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Athletics
Cycling
Equestrian
Tennis
Badminton
Football
Netball
Hockey
% of segment
Chloe All adults
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Leanne participates in
23%
18%
9%
6%
4%
3%
2%
2%
2%
1%
17%
14%
5%
9%
4%
2%
1%
2%
0%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Athl etics
Cycling
Football
Badminton
Netball
Equestrian
Tennis
Volleyball
% of segment
Leanne All adults
Leanne -
4
Supportive Singles
About Leanne
Leanne is 23 and lives with her parents and her daughter, Carly,
in a small terraced
house. Leanne is studying beauty therapy part-time at college, and does the odd
cleaning job when her mum can look after Carly.
Leanne doesn’t get much time to herself. Juggling Carly, college and her cleaning shifts is
demanding, and childcare is a difficult expense. A couple of times a week though Leanne
treats herself to a night out with the girls, at bingo or maybe in the local pub.
Leanne relies on her mum and girlfriends helping her out. Her mates often come with her
to the swimming pool at the weekend and are really good with Carly. Sometimes it’s hard
to miss out on the fun though, when they go off to a dance class
or bowling afterwards
and she has to take Carly home.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (65%), or Other White (14%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (12%), of Irish heritage (5%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Hayley, Kerry, Danielle, Nisha, Saima
Leanne: Sports Overview
Leanne is the least active segment of her age
group (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Leanne participates in are
shown in the chart opposite: 23% of this group
take part in ‘keep fit’
and gym compared to 17% of
all adults; 18% of this group take part in swimming
compared to 14% of all adults; 9% take part in
athletics or running, and 6% take part in cycling
Leanne may also take part in football, badminton,
netball, horse-riding, tennis and volleyball.
Young busy mums and their supportive college mates
4% of all adults; 8% of adult women
Leanne is similar to/lives near:
Jamie (segment 2), Brenda (segment 14)
Leanne is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Blackburn, Ilford, Harrow, Leicester, Chatham
Mainly aged 18-25
Likely to have children
Student/part time vocational
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Helena participates in
26%
22%
11%
9%
3%
3%
2%
17%
14%
9%
5%
1%
2%
2%
4%
4%
1%
1%
1%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Cycling
Athletics
Equestrian
Tennis
Badminton
Netball
Football
Golf
% of segment
Helena All adults
Helena -
5
Career-Focussed Females
About Helena
Helena is 30 and lives in a small, stylish flat on her own. She’s working her way up the
career ladder and is now starting to enjoy the financial freedoms her salary affords her. In
the future Helena may buy a larger house, but at the moment she prefers having more
disposable income to enjoy designer clothes, meals out and holidays.
After a long train commute home, Helena prepares herself a quick, healthy meal before
heading out to the gym. If she’s not worked too late at the office she might catch a class,
otherwise opting for a long workout on the machines. Helena likes to keep in shape; she
is very image conscious and her healthy diet and exercise regime
is an important part of
her social and career life.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (76%), or Other White (11%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (6%), Asian/Asian British (5%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Claire, Tamsin, Fiona, Sara, Joanne
Helena: Sports Overview
Helena is a fairly active type that takes part in sport
on a regular basis (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Helena participates in are
shown in the chart opposite: 26% of this segment
take part in keep fit/gym compared to 17% of all
adults; 22% take part in swimming compared to
14% of all adults; 11% of this segment take part in
cycling and 9% in athletics or running.
Helena may also take part in horse-riding, tennis,
badminton, netball, football and golf.
Single professional women, enjoying life in the fast lane
5% of all adults; 9% of adult women
Helena is similar to/lives near:
Chloe (segment 3), Tim (segment 6)
Helena is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Chelsea, Cheltenham, Harrogate, Reading, Brighton
Mainly aged 26-45
Single
Full time professional
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Tim participates in
21%
20%
15%
15%
13%
7%
4%
4%
3%
3%
9%
17%
14%
4%
5%
4%
2%
2%
1%
1%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Cycling
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Football
Athl etics
Golf
Badminton
Tennis
Squash/racketball
Angling
% of segment
Tim All adults
Tim -
6
Settling Down Males
About Tim
Tim is 33 and works in IT. He lives with his wife Lorna in a semi-detached house they own
in a desirable suburb. At the moment it’s just the two of them, but Lorna is expecting their
first baby in a few months’
time.
Tim loves sport. Since his job has got busier he doesn’t do as much as he used to, but
he still manages trips to the gym and the odd mid-week game of squash. He hopes
things won’t change too much when the baby arrives, but knows they may not be able to
enjoy such regular holidays in the future.
Tim’s healthy diet is due to Lorna cooking most nights, but he’s not particularly health
conscious himself. He enjoys a burger and maybe a pint after playing sport, and he may
drink at home, albeit lightly.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (77%), or Other White (10%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (6%), of Irish heritage (5%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Simon, Jonathan, Jeremy, Adrian, Marcus
Tim: Sports Overview
Tim is an active type that takes part in sport on a
regular basis (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Tim participates in are shown in
the chart opposite: 21% of this segment take part
in cycling compared to 9% of all adults; 20% of this
segment take part in keep fit/gym, compared to
17% of all adults.
Swimming, football and athletics or running are
also popular sports for Tim. His participation in
swimming is in line with that of all adults, however
Tim is more likely than all adults to take part in
football and athletics.
Sporty male professionals, buying a house and settling down with
partner
9% of all adults; 18% of adult men
Tim is similar to/lives near:
Helena (segment 5), Alison (segment 7)
Tim is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Camberley, Tunbridge Wells, Banbury, Haywards Heath, Milton
Keynes
Mainly aged 26-45
Married or single
May have children
Professional
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Alison participates in
27%
25%
12%
11%
3%
3%
2%
17%
14%
9%
5%
2%
2%
4%
1%
1%
1%
1%
0%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Cycling
Athletics
Equestrian
Tennis
Badminton
Netball
Rounders
Football
% of segment
Alison All adults
Alison -
7
Stay at Home Mums
About Alison
Alison is 38 and married with two children, aged 6, and 3. As a stay-at-home mum her
career is temporarily on hold, whilst her husband works as an accountant. Alison’s life is
busy. She does the school or playschool run, takes the children to music and horse-riding
lessons and keeps the house in order. After putting the children
to bed, Alison often
spends an evening at PTA meetings. This year she is involved in organising the school
fete.
Alison manages to attend a few exercise classes each week whilst
her youngest is at
playschool, and the family go swimming at the weekend. Concerned
about a healthy diet
for her family, Alison gets organic vegetables delivered each week. She may enjoy a well-
deserved glass of wine while she’s cooking dinner.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (78%), or Other White (9%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (6%), Asian/Asian British (5%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Justine, Karen, Suzanne, Tamsin, Siobhan
Alison: Sports Overview
Alison is a fairly active segment with above average
levels of participation in sport.
The top sports that Alison participates in are shown
in the chart opposite: 27% of this segment take
part in keep fit/gym compared to 17% of all adults;
25% of this group take part in ‘swimming’
compared to 14% of all adults; 12% of this
segment take part in cycling, and 11% take part in
athletics (including running).
Alison may also take part in horse-riding, tennis,
badminton, netball, rounders and football.
Mums with a comfortable, but busy, lifestyle
4% of all adults; 9% of adult women
Alison is similar to/lives near:
Tim (segment 6)
Alison is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Orpington, Bromsgrove, Maidstone, Newbury, Horsham
Mainly aged 36-45
Married
Stay-at-home mum
Children
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Jackie participates in
22%
20%
9%
6%
2%
2%
2%
1%
17%
14%
9%
5%
2%
1%
2%
4%
1%
1%
0%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Cycling
Athletics
Badminton
Equestrian
Tennis
Football
Rounders
Netball
% of segment
Jackie All adults
Jackie -
8
Middle England Mums
About Jackie
Jackie, 43, is married with three school age children. She works
part time at a call centre
and her husband Dave is a salesman.
Life is hectic for Jackie. She doesn’t get much time for herself, being busy taking the
children to school and after school activities, grocery shopping, working, and getting
dinner on the table. She feels like a taxi service for the kids these days, forever taking
them to one activity or another both during the week and at weekends.
Jackie goes to an aerobics class one evening a week and tries to
take the kids swimming
or ice skating on Saturdays. Dave bought her an exercise bike last Christmas, but it is
just gathering dust in the garage. Healthy eating isn’t high on Jackie’s list of priorities.
Dinners just have to be quick, easy and something the kids will eat.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (79%), or Other White (8%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (6%), Asian/Asian British (5%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Andrea, Cheryl, Deborah, Jane, Louise
Jackie: Sports Overview
Jackie has above average participation in sport,
although is less active then others in her age
group. (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Jackie participates in are
shown in the chart opposite: 22% of this group
take part in keep fit/gym compared to 17% of all
adults; 20% of this group take part in swimming
compared to 14% of all adults.
In line with the general adult population, 9% of this
segment take part in cycling; and 6% take part in
athletics or running (compared to 5% of all adults).
Jackie may also play badminton, go horse-riding,
play tennis, football, rounders or netball.
Mums juggling work, family and finance
5% of all adults; 10% of adult women
Jackie is similar to/lives near:
Kev (segment 9), Philip (segment 11)
Jackie is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Dover, Aldershot, Wigan, Uxbridge, Chesterfield
Mainly aged 36-45
Married
Part-time skilled worker
or stay-at-home mum
Children
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Kev participates in
14%
12%
11%
10%
6%
4%
4%
2%
2%
2%
17%
4%
9%
14%
5%
4%
2%
1%
1%
1%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Football
Cycling
Swimming
Athletics
Golf
Ang ling
Badminton
Archery
Martial arts/combat sports
% of segment
Kev All adults
Kev -
9
Pub League Team Mates
About Kev
Kev, 40, lives with his long-term partner and stepson, working as a self-employed
plumber.
On Saturday mornings Kev occasionally trains with the pub football team, and sometimes
makes the Sunday side –
although he’s struggling more and more to keep up with the
lads in the team. Alternatively Kev may spend his weekends doing
DIY at home and
watching TV. Evenings and weekends may see him down the local pub, smoking,
drinking and watching sport, or taking part in other social activities, when work allows.
Kev used to enjoy lifting weights or using his punch bag at home, but lately his shoulder
has been playing him up, so instead it is a few games of snooker
or darts. He can’t
understand healthy eating fads -
salads just don’t seem like a proper meal to him, so he
tends to stick to a relatively unhealthy processed food diet.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British heritage (67%), or
Asian/Asian British heritage (12%); or may be of Other White origin (11%), of Irish heritage
(6%), Black/Black British (2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Lee, Craig, Steven, Tariq, Dariusz.
Kev: Sports Overview
Kev has average levels of sports participation
(more details overleaf).
The sports that Kev participates in most are shown
in the chart opposite: 14% of this segment take
part in keep fit/gym compared to 17% of all adults;
12% of this segment take part in football compared
to 4% of all adults. In addition, 11% of people in
this segment take part in cycling, and 10% go
swimming.
Kev may also take part in athletics or running, golf,
angling, badminton, archery or martial arts/combat
sports.
Blokes who enjoy pub league games and watching live sport
6% of all adults; 12% of adult men
Kev is similar to/lives near:
Jackie (segment 8), Paula (segment 10)
Kev is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Walthamstow, Walsall, Rotherham, Bradford, Wakefield
Mainly
aged 36-45
Married or single
May have children
Vocational job
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Paula participates in
18%
17%
5%
4%
3%
2%
1%
1%
1%
17%
14%
9%
5%
4%
2%
2%
1%
1%
0%
0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Swimming
Cycling
Athletics
Football
Badminton
Tennis
Rounders
Equestrian
Netball
% of segment
Paula All adults
Paula -
10
Stretched Single Mums
About Paula
Paula, 33, lives in a council owned property with her three children. Jade and Kyle are at
school now, but Ruby is still at home. Paula receives some state
benefits, but things are
still very difficult. Her debt has built up over the last few years and she hasn’t been able
to work because of the children.
A couple of times a week a friend looks after Ruby so Paula can get a break at afternoon
bingo. At the weekend she sometimes takes the kids swimming or ice skating. It’s not
cheap, but they need entertaining.
Paula can’t afford much fresh healthy food; instead she buys convenience meals from
the discount freezer store. Given her stress-filled life she feels it’s understandable she
needs to smoke and enjoy the odd drink.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (70%), or Other White (10%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (10%), of Irish heritage (6%), Black/Black British
(3%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Donna, Gemma, Shelley, Tina, Tammy
Paula: Sports Overview
Paula is not a very active type and her participation
levels are slightly below those of the general adult
population (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Paula participates in are shown
in the chart opposite: 18% of people in this
segment participate in keep fit/gym compared to
17% of all adults; 17% of people in this segment
take part in swimming compared to 14% of all
adults; 5% of this segment take part in cycling, and
4% in athletics or running.
Paula may also take part in football, badminton,
tennis, rounders, horse riding and netball.
Single mums with financial pressures, childcare issues and little time for
pleasure
4% of all adults; 7% of adult women
Paula is similar to/lives near:
Kev (segment 9), Brenda (segment 14)
Paula is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Bootle, Stratford (east London), Widnes, Bolton, Altrincham
Mainly aged 26-45
Single
Job seeker or part
time low skilled
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running.
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Philip participates in
16%
15%
12%
9%
8%
7%
9%
17%
14%
4%
4%
5%
1%
2%
1%
2%
3%
3%
3%
2%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Cycling
Keep fit/gym
Sw imming
Football
Golf
Athletics
Angling
Badminton
Tennis
Squash/racketball
% of segment
Philip All adults
Philip -
11
Comfortable Mid-Life Males
About Philip
Philip is 48, an owner-occupier, and married with two older children. One recently
graduated and left home, the other is on a gap year before starting university next
autumn. Whilst there are still some university fees to pay, Philip is at the height of his
career, enjoying a comfortable salary at an established firm.
Philip still keeps up his love of sport, hindered only by office
pressures. He plays
badminton in a local team, and if he gets home early enough, enjoys a swim at the health
club. He shares football season tickets with his son, and together they play cricket for the
local Sunday side –
alas, his rugby days are over.
Reasonably health conscious, Philip wants to stay healthy for later in life so he can keep
playing sport for as long as possible. He’s not in any hurry to hang up his pads, and
anyway, he’d keep up his involvement in the club as fixture secretary.
Philip: Sports Overview
Philip’s sporting activity levels are above the national
average (more details overleaf).
The top sports that Philip participates in are shown in
the chart opposite: Cycling is the top sport, and 16%
of this segment do this at least once a month, almost
double the national average.
Philip also enjoys keep fit/gym, swimming, football,
golf and athletics (running). His participation in most
of his top sports is above the national average, which
is indicative of the priority he places on sport.
Mid-life professional, sporty males with older children and more time for
themselves
9% of all adults; 18% of adult men
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (82%), or Other White (7%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (6%), Asian/Asian British (4%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (0.5%).
Alternative names
Graham, Colin, Keith, Stuart, Clive
Age 18-25
Single
Graduate
Professional
Philip is similar to/lives near:
Jackie (segment 8), Elaine (segment 12)
Philip are likely to live in towns such as:
Chippenham, Eastleigh, Aylesbury, Andover, Southport
Mainly aged 46-55
Married with Children
Full time employment
and owner occupier
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Elaine -
12
Empty Nest Career Ladies
About Elaine
Elaine is 53 and married with two children who have now left home. Having picked up her
career again after the children went to school, Elaine is now a full time senior teacher. In a
few years’
time she’ll consider dropping her hours ready for retirement, but for now
she’s
enjoying the career opportunities and chance to stretch herself.
When Elaine gets home from work she enjoys a glass of wine while
making a healthy
dinner for herself and her husband. They chat over dinner and might even call their son
who is away at university, though inevitably they’ll be talking to his voicemail.
Elaine goes to a class at the gym one evening a week and enjoys watching dramas or
reading a book other nights. Weekends see her going to the stables, gardening or going
for a long walk with her husband.
Elaine: Sports Overview
Elaine’s sporting activity levels are consistent with the
national average, and slightly above average for some
indicators (more detail overleaf).
The top sports that Elaine participates in are shown in
the chart opposite: Keep fit/gym and swimming are
the most popular sports with around a fifth of the
segment doing these, followed by cycling (7%),
athletics or running (3%), tennis (2%), badminton (2%)
and horse riding (2%).
Her participation levels are above average for keep
fit/gym and swimming.
Mid-life professionals who have more time for themselves since their
children left home
6% of all adults; 12% of adult women
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (83%), or Other White (7%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (6%), Asian/Asian British (3%), Black/Black British
(1%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (0.5%).
Alternative names
Carole, Sandra, Penelope, Julie, Jacqueline
Elaine is similar to/lives near:
Philip (segment 11), Roger & Joy (segment 13)
Elaine are likely to live in towns such as:
Bishop’s Stortford, Camberley, Dorchester, Stafford,
Shrewsbury
Mainly aged 46-55
Married
Full time employment
and owner occupier
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Top sports that Elaine participates in
21%
18%
7%
3%
2%
2%
17%
14%
9%
5%
2%
2%
1%
4%
1%
1%
1%
2%
2%
0.9%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Keep fit/gym
Sw immin g
Cycling
Athletics
Tennis
Badminton
Equestrian
Golf
Martial arts/combat
Bow ls
% of segment
Elaine All adults
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Roger & Joy participate in
13%
13%
8%
6%
2%
2%
17%
14%
9%
4%
1%
5%
1%
2%
4%
1%
1%
2%
2%
2%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Sw imming
Cycling
Golf
Angling
Athletics
Bow ls
Badminton
Tennis
Football
% of segment
Roger & Joy All adults
Roger & Joy -
13
Early Retirement Couples
About Roger & Joy
Roger is 57 and Joy is 56. Last year Roger’s accountancy firm made cutbacks and he
was offered a generous long-service redundancy payment with which to take early
retirement. Joy has always worked mornings as a receptionist in the local GP surgery, but
is planning to retire herself late next year.
Having paid off the mortgage on their semi-detached house, Roger and Joy may not
have a large income, but also haven’t many financial responsibilities. If they need to they
can always downsize, possibly to be nearer the grandchildren.
Roger walks the dog to the paper-shop each morning, and often plays golf. When Joy’s
around, they often go for a walk together or help out with childcare.
Sometimes Joy goes to over fifties aqua aerobics class at the leisure centre. Her
daughter said it might be good exercise and easier on her joints.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (87%), or Other White (5%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (5%), Asian/Asian British (2%), Black/Black British
(0.5%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (0.5%).
Alternative names
Melvyn, Barry, Geoffrey, Linda, Susan, Patricia
Roger & Joy: Sports Overview
Roger & Joy are slightly less active than the average
adult population.
The top sports that Roger & Joy participate in are
shown in the chart opposite: Keep fit/gym and
swimming are the most popular sports with 13% of
the segment doing these, followed by cycling (8%),
golf (6%) and angling (2%).
Their participation levels are below average for all of
these sports, with the exception of bowls, golf and
angling.
Free-time couples nearing the end of their careers
7% of all adults; 6% of adult women, 8% of adult men
Age 18-25
Single
Graduate
Professional
Roger & Joy are similar to/live near:
Roger & Joy (segment 13)
Roger & Joy are likely to live in towns such as:
Newton Abbot, King’s Lynn, Poole, Beverley, Southend
Mainly aged 56 –
65
Married
Full time employment
or retired
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Brenda -
14
Older Working Women
About Brenda
Brenda is 51 and works in a local food factory on the production
line. Her two children
have left home now, so it’s just Brenda and her husband in the terraced house.
Brenda gets up early and walks to the early shift at the factory. After a long day on her
feet and a walk back home again, she’s too tired to do much with her evenings. A good
dose of TV soaps provide some welcome relaxation, or she might go to the bingo hall
instead. Dinner is inevitably oven food
she’s too tired to go to any effort.
On Saturdays, Brenda looks after her grandchildren while her daughter works, often
taking them swimming. If she doesn’t have them she’ll go to an exercise class instead,
but with the kids in tow, and the adventure playground being pricey, that doesn’t happen
often.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (76%), or Other White (8%)
origin; or may also be Asian/Asian British (7%), of Irish heritage (6%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (1%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Shirley, June, Maureen, Janet, Diane
Brenda: Sports Overview
Brenda is generally less active than the average adult
population.
The top sports that Brenda participates in are shown
in the chart opposite: Keep fit/gym is the most
popular sport with 15% of the segment doing this,
followed by swimming (13%) and cycling (4%).
Athletics (including running) is enjoyed by 2% of
Brendas. In all cases her participation levels are
below the national average for all adults.
Other sports that she may participate in are
badminton, horse riding, tennis, martial arts (including
Tai Chi), football and golf.
Middle aged ladies, working to make ends meet
5% of all adults; 10% of adult women
Brenda is similar to/lives near:
Kev (segment 9) and Terry (segment 15)
Brenda are likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Hackney, Rochdale, Lancaster, Corby
Mainly aged 46 -
65
Married
Part time employee
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Top sports that Brenda participates in
15%
13%
4%
2%
1%
1%
17%
14%
9%
5%
2%
1%
2%
1%
4%
1%
1%
1%
1%
4%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Sw immin g
Cycling
Athletics
Badminton
Equestrian
Tennis
Martial arts/combat
Football
Golf
% of s egm e nt
Brenda All adults
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Terry participates in
8%
6%
6%
4%
4%
3%
17%
14%
9%
1%
4%
4%
1%
5%
1%
1%
1%
2%
3%
2.0%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Sw immin g
Cyc ling
Angling
Golf
Football
Archery
Athletics
Badminton
Bow ls
% of segment
Terry All adults
Terry -
15
Local ‘Old Boys’
About Terry
Terry is 59 and lives on his own in a council flat. Having worked on and off as a builder,
he has struggled in recent years to get work. At the moment he has a small income as a
school caretaker, barely covering the bills.
During the day Terry might do the odd job around the school, but
invariably he’s not
needed until the end of the day once the children have gone home. He spends his
mornings watching TV, and afternoons playing darts in the pub, fishing or on the
allotment. As part of the local darts team, he plays the occasional competition at
weekends, otherwise he goes to the bookies or stays at the pub watching boxing into the
early hours. He wishes he still had the fitness to box himself, but those days are a thing of
the past.
Terry eats oven food or at the pub most nights. Healthy eating isn’t high on his list of
concerns –
it’s expensive and he’d rather have pie and chips.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (79%), or of Irish heritage
(7%); or may also be Asian/Asian British (6%), of Other White (6%) origin; Black/Black
British (1%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Derek, Brian, Malcolm, Raymond, Michael
Terry: Sports Overview
Terry is generally less active than the general adult
population.
The top sports that Terry participate in are shown in
the chart opposite: Keep fit/gym is the most popular
sport with 8% of the segment doing this, followed by
swimming (6%) and cycling (6%). Angling and golf are
the next most popular sports, both being played by
4% of this segment.
Golf, angling and archery are the only sports where a
higher proportion of Terrys participate than the
national average. In all other cases his participation in
his top sports is below average.
Generally inactive older men, low income and little provision for retirement
4% of all adults; 8% of adult men
Terry is similar to/lives near:
Brenda (segment 14), Norma (segment 16)
Terry are likely to live in towns such as:
Mansfield, Sunderland, Doncaster, Hull, Dewsbury
Mainly aged 56-65
Single/Married
Unemployed
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Norma participates in
12%
10%
2%
1%
1%
1%
17%
14%
9%
1%
1%
1%
4%
2%
4%
1%
1%
1%
1%
5.3%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit /gym
Sw imming
Cycling
Bow ls
Martial arts/combat
Angling
Golf
Tennis
Athletics
Football
% of segment
Norma All adults
Norma -
16
Later Life Ladies
About Norma
Norma is 60 and has now retired. Having spent the last few years
as a part time cleaner,
she has little income now and a basic private pension to subsidise her state allowance.
She lives in a small bungalow, although thankfully the small mortgage has been paid off.
Norma likes to get out for a bit during the day. She goes to an
aqua aerobics class at the
leisure centre, which is heavily subsidised for her as a pensioner. She also walks to buy a
lottery ticket, go to the library or to afternoon bingo. She has
to take her time though, as
she’s not as well these days, having seen the late onset of diabetes
in the last few years.
When she gets home, Norma likes to sit and watch TV, knit or do some embroidery. At
weekends her family usually visit her.
Norma prefers traditional home cooking, she smokes, but rarely drinks –
her health and
diet are therefore not a great concern.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (79%), or Other White (8%)
origin; or may also of Irish heritage (7%), Asian/Asian British (4%), Black/Black British
(2%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (1%).
Alternative names
Pauline, Angela, Irene, Denise, Jean
Norma: Sports Overview
Norma is generally less active than the average adult
population.
She is likely to be doing the same or less sport than
12 months ago, with health the main issue for those
doing less.
The top sports that Norma participate in are shown in
the chart opposite: Keep fit/gym is the most popular
sport with 12% of Normas doing this, followed by
swimming (10%). Other sports are much less popular
with cycling the next choice with only 2% of this
segment participating.
Older ladies, recently retired, with a basic income to enjoy their lifestyles
2% of all adults; 4% of adult women
Norma is similar to/lives near:
Terry (segment 15), Frank (segment 18)
Norma is likely to live in towns/areas such as:
Middlesbrough, East Ham, Barnsley, Newcastle, Sheffield
Mainly aged 56-65
Single
Unemployed/Retired
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Ralph & Phyllis
participate in
10%
9%
7%
4%
4%
2%
17%
14%
4%
1%
9%
2%
1%
2%
5%
1%
1%
1%
1%
1%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit and gym
Sw imming
Golf
Bow ls
Cycling
Tennis
Angling
Badminton
Martial arts/combat
Athletics
% of s egm e nt
Ralph & Phyllis All adults
Ralph & Phyllis -
17
Comfortable Retired Couples
About Ralph & Phyllis
Ralph and Phyllis are in their late 60s and have been retired for some time now. Their
children are grown up and have moved out of the family home. Ralph was a successful
banker, enabling them to retire early. They’ve downsized recently, benefiting from Ralph’s
investment portfolio and comfortable private pension.
Both Ralph and Phyllis feel there is still much of life to live.
They enjoy playing golf
together, and Ralph competes at weekends sometimes. Phyllis likes to go for the
occasional swim while Ralph is out trout fishing, and they also love to go for long walks
together. In their earlier years the pace was faster, but they’re proud they’re still active,
enjoying life and can just about keep up with the grandchildren.
Ralph and Phyllis enjoy volunteering in the local community, organising church bazaars
and raising money for the local museum.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (89%), or Other White (5%)
origin; or may also be of Irish heritage (4%), Asian/Asian British (1%), Black/Black British
(0.5%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group (0.5%).
Alternative names
Lionel, Arthur, Reginald, Beryl, Peggy, Marjorie
Ralph & Phyllis: Sports Overview
Ralph & Phyllis are generally less active than the
average adult population, but their activity levels are
higher than others in their age range.
They are likely to be doing the same or less sport
than 12 months ago, with health the main issue for
those doing less.
The top sports that Ralph & Phyllis participate in are
shown in the chart opposite: 10% of this group take
part in keep fit or gym, 9% swim, 7% play golf and
4% play bowls.
Retired couples, enjoying active and comfortable lifestyles
4% of all adults; 5% of adult men, 4% of adult women
Age 18-25
Single
Graduate
Professional
Ralph & Phyllis are similar to/live near:
Other Ralph & Phyllis (segment 17)
Ralph & Phyllis are likely to live in towns such as:
Stratford-upon-Avon, Chichester, Kendal, Farnham, Evesham
Mainly aged 66+
Married/single
Retired
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Top sports that Frank participates in
7%
6%
6%
6%
4%
2%
4%
17%
1%
14%
9%
1%
1%
4%
5%
1%
1%
1%
2%
2%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Golf
Keep fit/gym
Bow ls
Sw imming
Cycling
Angling
Archery
Football
Badminton
Athletics
% of segment
Frank All adults
Frank -
18
Twilight Year Gents
About Frank
Frank is 69 and lives with his wife in a small bungalow. Having put money into a private
pension during his years working as a sales manager, Frank has a
reasonable income,
and though he can’t afford luxuries he enjoys a flutter on the horses, the odd scratch card
and spoiling the grandchildren.
Frank spends most of his days watching TV or having a pint at his local. He enjoys playing
snooker there, and has taken part in mini tournaments occasionally. At weekends he may
take his grandson fishing, but he’s not sure for how much longer he’ll be able to -
his
eyesight is getting worse and he won’t be able to drive for much longer.
Frank is not particularly health conscious, enjoying hearty traditional meals and a good
pint at his local. He is also likely to smoke.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (89%), or of Irish heritage
(5%); or may also be of Other White (4%) origin, Asian/Asian British (2%), Black/Black
British (0.5%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group
(0.5%).
Alternative names
Roy, Harold, Stanley, Alfred, Percy
Frank: Sports Overview
Frank is generally much less active than the average
adult population, but his activity levels are more
consistent with other segments in this age range
(more details overleaf).
He is are likely to be doing the same or less sport
than 12 months ago, with health the main issue for
those doing less.
The top sports that Frank participates in are shown in
the chart opposite: 7% of this group take part in golf,
6% in keep fit/gym and 6% in bowls and swimming.
Retired men with some pension provision and limited sporting opportunities
4% of all adults; 8% of adult men
Frank is similar to/lives near:
Elsie (segment 19), Ralph & Phyllis (segment 17)
Frank is likely to live in towns such as:
Eastbourne, Bognor Regis, Skegness, Colchester, Bishop
Auckland
Mainly aged 66+
Married/single
Retired
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Creating sporting opportunities in every community
Elsie & Arnold -
19
Retirement Home Singles
About Elsie & Arnold
Elsie and Arnold are aged 81 and live on their own in warden-controlled sheltered
accommodation. Their spouses passed away three years ago and they are just about
getting used to life on her own, thanks to the support of the other residents.
The sheltered housing is good and the warden checks if anything is needed, and they
have card mornings, dance afternoons and bingo evenings in the community lounge each
week. Despite this Elsie and Arnold find themselves on their own
quite a bit, and like to fill
the quiet with TV shows, particularly programmes on the War or black and white films.
They can no longer drive, due to their cataracts. Instead they look forward to a once a
week walk to the post office to collect the pension, having a good natter with the lady
who works there.
Ethnic origin
Individuals in this segment are predominantly of White British (88%), or of Other White
origin (5%); or may also be of Irish heritage (5%), Asian/Asian British (1%), Black/Black
British (0.5%), Chinese (0.5%) or belong to another ethnic group
(0.5%).
Alternative names
Doris, Ethel, Gladys, Stanley, Walter, Harold
Elsie & Arnold: Sports Overview
Elsie & Arnold are much less active than the average
adult population, but their activity levels are more
consistent with other segments in this age range
(more details overleaf).
They are likely to be doing less sport than 12 months
ago, mainly due to health or injury.
The top sports that Elsie & Arnold participate in are
shown in the chart opposite: 10% of this group take
part in ‘keep fit/gym’, 7% take part in swimming, and
3% take part in bowls.
Retired singles or widowers, predominantly female, living in sheltered
accommodation
8% of all adults; 2% of adult men, 14% of adult women
Elsie & Arnold are similar to/live near:
Frank (segment 18), other Elsie & Arnolds (segment 19)
Elsie & Arnold are likely to live in towns such as:
Hartlepool, Pontefract, Durham, Scarborough, West Bromwich
Mainly aged 66+
Widowed
Retired
Source: Sport England Market Segmentation 2010. Sporting activity based on Sport
England Active People Survey data (for the period April 2009 to April 2010): based on
participation levels at once per month. This chart shows the top
ten sports (or sport
groups) that this segment participates in. Athletics includes jogging and road running
1
Top sports that Elsie & Arnold
participate in
10%
7%
3%
1%
1%
1%
17%
14%
1%
4%
9%
1%
2%
1%
2%
0.4%
0.4%
0.4%
1%
0.5%
0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Keep fit/gym
Sw immin g
Bow ls
Golf
Cycling
Martial arts
Badminton
Angling
Table Tennis
Tennis
% of segment
Elsie & Arnold All adults
1.1 The following map and graphs use as a central point postcode NN4 5FZ, which
is the Grange Park Community Centre. The radius is 5km, which is the
smallest available on Sport England’s Market Segmentation tool.
1.2 Figure xx gives the percentage population in each Market Segment. Over
38% of the residents are middle-aged with families, and there are only a
relatively small number of young singles or older age groups.
Figure xx: Percentage of population by segment
1.3 The map in Figure xx shows the distribution of the dominant market
segments around the Grange Park area. Grange Park itself is primarily “Tim”,
with the other market segments appearing in this pie chart primarily because
of the 5 km radius, encompassing parts of Northampton and the rural areas
around Blisworth and Roade.
1.4 Figure xx shows the sports and physical activities in which these groups
currently participate, and the activities to which they are attracted.
Swimming, cycling and keep fit are the more important sports for the future,
although also attractive is athletics (including all running and jogging), tennis
and golf.
16.6
10.9
10.8
6.8
6.7
6.6
5.8
5.4
30.5
Tim
Alison
Philip
Chloe
Elaine
Roger & Joy
Ben
Jackie
Others
APPENDIX 6: Grange Park market segmentation
Figure xx: Dominant market segment map
Figure xx: Sports attractive to Grange Park and surrounds residents
1st
2nd 3rd 4th
5th 1st
2nd 3rd
4th 5th
Tim
Settling Down
Male
26-45
Married or
single.
May have
children
Professional
Cycling Keep fit/gym Swimming
Football Athletics Cycling
Swimming Keep fit/gym
Athletics Golf
Alison
Stay-at-home
mum
36-45
Married
with
children
Stay-at-home mum
Keep fit/gym
Swimming Cycling Athletics
Equestrian Swimming Keep fit/gym
Cycling Athletics Tennis
Philip
Comfortable Mid-
Life Male
45-55
Married
with
children
Full time
employment and
owner occupier
Cycling Keep fit/gym Swimming Football
Golf Swimming Cycling Keep fit/gym Golf
Athletics
Chloe
Fitness Class
Friends
18-25 Single
Graduate
professional
Keep fit/gym Swimming Athletics
Cycling Equestrian Swimming
Keep fit/gym Cycling Athletics Tennis
Elaine
Empty Nest
Career Ladies
46-55 Married
Full time
employment and
owner occupier
Keep fit/gym Swimming
Cycling Athletics Tennis Swimming
Keep fit/gym Cycling Badminton Tennis
Roger &
Joy
Early Retirement
Couples
56-65
Married
Full time
employment or
retired
Keep fit/gym Swimming Cycling
Golf Angling Swimming Keep fit/gym Cycling Golf
Athletics
Ben
Competative
Male Urbanites
18-25 Single
Graduate
professional
Football Keep fit/gym Cycling Athletics Swimming Swimming
Football Cycling Tennis Athletics
Jackie
Middle England
Mum
36-45 Married
Part time skilled
worker or stay-at-
home mum
Keep fit/gym Swimming Cycling Athletics Badminton
Swimming Keep fit/gym Cycling Athletics Tennis
Sports do now, decreasing order top 5
Sports would like to do more of, decreasing order top 5
Segment
Characteristic
Age
Marital
status
Work type
Aylesbury Vale
The Assessment of Leisure and Cultural Facilities for Aylesbury Vale of 2012 considered the
implications of the housing growth of 13,500 dwellings in the period up to 2031. The
conclusions were:
Sport halls
One 6-court hall would be required in the Aylesbury area. “There is an indication here that
sports hall space may be working close to capacity”, and specific unmet demand was
identified from the largest badminton club in the district, and consultation feedback
suggested a lack of ancillary hall/studio space.
Swimming pools
No additional swimming pool space is required.
AGPs
One AGP should be provided in the Aylesbury area.
Grass pitches
A further 10 football and 1 cricket pitch is required for Aylesbury, plus 3 football pitches and
one cricket pitch for the Buckingham area. There is also a requirement for 1 additional
football pitch in the Winslow area.
Other facilities required
Specific facility needs identified are:
8 x outdoor tennis courts for Aylesbury, and 3 x courts for Buckingham.
1 rink for indoor bowls in Aylesbury
Improvements to the existing athletics provision
APPENDIX 7: Adjacent local authority strategy summaries
2
Cherwell
Sports halls
An FPM Interim Report was published in April 2014 which was submitted as part of the local
plan evidence base. The report considered the supply/demand balance in 2013 and forecast
the expected changes up to 2031 using the forecast population but no change in the supply
of facilities.
The increase in hall demand up to 2031 across the authority as a whole up to 2031 is
estimated to be approximately 4 badminton court, largely because the aging population
balances out the new demand from the new housing. The demand in Cherwell for sport
hall space currently is of the same order but slightly above the demand in the adjacent
authorities of South Oxfordshire and South Northamptonshire, and in each of the
authorities the demand per 1000 population is expected to fall up to 2031.
The only places with any notable unmet demand currently are Banbury and Bicester, but
this does not change up to 2031. The current satisfied demand is around 95% and but this
may fall slightly to 93% by 2031. About 9% of the current satisfied demand is met outside
the authority, and this is expected to rise slightly to 10% by 2031. Of this exported
demand, about 2% is currently exported to South Northamptonshire and this may rise to
about 3%.
About 15% of the use of the sports halls in Cherwell is imported from surrounding
authorities, with about a third of these visits being from South Northamptonshire. On
average the halls in Cherwell are running at about 70% full, with the Bicester Leisure Centre,
Kidlington & Gosford Leisure Centre and Spiceball Leisure Centre running at 100% full. Of
the schools sites Cooper School and North Oxfordshire Academy are running above the 80%
capacity level whilst the other schools are running at less than 50% full.
No new facilities are specifically proposed, but the report notes that there may be
justification for additional all space in Bicester.
Swimming pools
An FPM Interim Report for pools was also published in April 2014 which was submitted as
part of the local plan evidence base. The report considered the supply/demand balance in
2013 and forecast the expected changes up to 2031 using the forecast population but no
change in the supply of facilities. The forecast growth was for 13,552 dwellings.
The increase in swimming pool demand up to 2031 across the authority as a whole up to
2031 is estimated to be approximately 184 sq m, largely because the aging population
balances out the new demand from the new housing. The demand in Cherwell for
swimming pool space currently is of the same order but slightly above the demand in South
Northamptonshire, and in both of the authorities the demand per 1000 population is
expected to fall up to 2031.
3
The current satisfied demand is around 94% and but this may fall slightly to 93% by 2031.
About 10% of the current satisfied demand is met outside the authority, and this is expected
to rise slightly to 11% by 2031. Of this exported demand, almost all of it is to Oxford with
very minimal amounts to South Northamptonshire. At the present time there is no lack of
capacity in the Cherwell pools, but this becomes an issue by 2031 because of the location of
the housing growth in relation to the network of pools.
About 18% of the used capacity of the swimming pools is imported from surrounding
authorities, with about just under half coming from South Northamptonshire. On average
the pools in Cherwell are running at about 70% full and this will around 75% full by 2031.
The FPM estimates that the used capacity of the leisure centre pools at Bicester, Banbury
(Spiceball) are operating at above the 80% benchmark rate considered as “full” by Sport
England but there is some spare capacity at the Kidlington leisure centre. The other pools in
the district, including school and commercial pools are running below the 80% capacity.
There are no facility specifically proposals in the report, and it is implied that additional
provision is not a high priority.
Artificial grass pitches
An FPM Interim Report for artificial grass pitches was also published in April 2014 which was
submitted as part of the local plan evidence base. The report considered the supply/
demand balance in 2013 and forecast the expected changes up to 2031 using the forecast
population but no change in the supply of facilities. The forecast growth was for 13,552
dwellings.
In 2013 the authority had 7 sand based/dressed pitches on 6 sites but no 3G or water-based
pitches.
Very little increase in AGP demand is expected up to 2031 across the authority as a whole,
largely because the aging population balances out the new demand from the new housing.
The total demand is and remain equivalent to around 4.5 full size pitches and 96% of the
demand is, and will continue to be “satisfied”.
About 25% of the current satisfied demand is met outside the authority, and this is expected
to rise slightly to 27% by 2031. Of this exported demand, almost all of it is to Oxford.
There is approximately a balance between the number of visits which are imported and the
number which are exported from South Northamptonshire.
The FPM estimates that the used capacity of the existing AGPs in Cherwell are close to or
above 90%, with one exception, the Dewey Sports Centre (Bloxham School).
There are no facility specifically proposals in the report, but the report suggests that
resurfacing one or more hockey pitches to 3G should be a priority.
Other facilities
4
The PPG17 assessment audit and strategy for Open Space, Sport and Recreation dated 2006
has not yet been updated. This suggested that, by 2026 Cherwell would have an
oversupply/ shortfall of:
Health and fitness oversupply of 190 stations
Indoor bowls shortfall of 2.95 rinks
Playing pitches
The Cherwell Playing Pitch Strategy is dated 2008. At that time the strategy suggested that
there was no additional requirement for adult football pitches but there was a small need
for mini and junior football pitches. Two additional cricket pitches were an identified need
for the Rural South area of the authority. There was no additional requirement for rugby
pitches.
Update April 2016
As the playing pitch strategy and indoor sports facilities strategy are now out of date, the
authority is starting work on replacement strategies. This will also provide an opportunity
to consider the implications of further housing growth.
The authority is in the process of introducing CIL but will be looking for the strategies to
justify standards of provision for use in S106 negotiations.
Current proposals
Bicester Sports Village 2017
Phase 2 of the new sports facility being developed as part of the Bicester Kingsmere housing
site. Will have grass pitches, 3G pitch and pavilion.
Bicester Indoor Sports Centre 2020
£5-6m expansion proposed but dependent on land negotiations of ex school playing field
space north of site. Hall, fitness gym, 25m x 6 lane pool with moveable floor, studio space.
North West Bicester 2022
17 ha of space identified for outdoor sports facilities. Mix of provision to be determined.
Banbury
Improvements to Wood Green Leisure Centre, including small expansion of fitness gym.
Potentially considering using winter cover for the outdoor pool (50m).
Possibly 2 x 3G full size pitches, on school academy sites, so no guarantee of delivery.
Banbury United being relocated from existing site (due to be developed) to site adjacent to
Banbury RFC. Considering potential for joint use 3G stadium pitch.
5
Grass pitches some to be provided, but only sufficient to meet needs of new housing.
Cherwell and S Northants share services from June 2016.
Harborough District
There are no current built facility or playing pitch strategies for this authority. It is
anticipated that a playing pitch strategy will be undertaken during 2016.
An early 2015 draft of the Harborough built facilities strategy being produced by Leicester-
shire and Rutland Sport, using the FPM figures, suggest that Harborough Leisure Centre is
operating at around 84% used capacity at peak time, and Lutterworth Sports Centre is
operating at around 75% used capacity. The actual usage rate is however closer to 75% and
72% respectively. The usage of the sports halls at both the leisure centres increased slightly
between 2012 and 2015. The school sports hall facilities which are available for community
use are operating at much lower levels of used capacity.
The peak time used capacity of Harborough Leisure Centre pool is estimated to be 65% and
that of Lutterworth Sports Centre at 56%. The usage of both pools appears to have
increased in the period 2012-2015.
The usage of the health and fitness provision at Harborough Leisure Centre has fallen
slightly between 2013 and 2015, but there has been an increase at Lutterworth Sports
Centre. There appears to be a current balance between supply and demand for sports
facilities.
The indoor bowls centre at Harborough Leisure Centre is estimated to be running at about
6% used capacity, and this has decreased from around 8% in 2012.
There is one purpose built indoor tennis facility, at Harborough Leisure Centre. It is
available on a pay and play basis but the facility has a number of quality issues. Its
estimated usage at peak time is about 39% and this has fallen since 2012. The dome is also
used for netball, but is not ideal and the netball club are looking to find a new home.
There is currently 1 full size 3G AGP and 6 small size 3G AGPs.
Future growth in Harborough town is expected to generate an additional demand for (based
as relevant on the Sports Facilities Calculator), but no assessment has been undertaken as to
how this need should be met.
3 badminton courts
121 sq m of water space
1 rink for indoor bowls
1 x 3G full size pitch
There are no recommendations yet developed for the draft strategy.
6
Kettering
The Kettering Borough Council’s Sports Facilities Strategy and Action Plan 2011-2021
considers the facility needs of the borough up to 2021 with its planned housing growth and
incorporates a 1% per annum growth in participation target.
The strategic and potential strategic facilities were considered to be:
Kettering Conference Centre
Kettering Olympic Gymnastics Club
Kettering Athletics Track and artificial grass pitch
Desborough Leisure Centre
Key points in the strategy relating to these and other main facilities are:
Issue
Proposal
Kettering Olympic Gymnastics Club
currently trains and competes in a
warehouse that they have use of on a short
lease which
could be terminated with little
notice.
A bespoke facility for Kettering Olympic
Gymnastics club is in the action plan
Lake Avenue in Kettering is already the
base for a lot of sports facilities, including
Kettering Conference Centre, the Kettering
Athlet
ics track, a full size synthetic turf
pitch, Kettering Cricket Club, Kettering
Archery Club, four hard surfaced tennis
courts, a boxing facility, a bowls green and
a football pitch.
The close proximity of these facilities provides
an opportunity for sportspeople of all abilities
to train together, and could even encourage
the formation of multi-
discipline sports clubs.
The Kettering town centre action plan
identifies a possible site for a University at
Lake Avenue. Although the University bid
didn’t make it
past appraisal in 2009 the
development of a university continues to be a
possibility and associated new sports facilities
for community use will need to be considered
There is currently no theoretical need for
additional sports hall space, but this may
change as the borough grows
There is no requirement for additional sports
hall space in the action plan but the existing
sports hall access needs to be maintained.
The borough has considerably less water
space per 1000 population than the
regional or national average and there is a
high unmet theoretical demand with many
borough residents travelling outside of the
borough to swim
There are swimming pools in Corby and
Wellingborough that are within a 20 minute
drive of many Kettering Borough residents
but the growth in the
borough will increase
the theoretical demand for water space in the
borough.
As lack of time is a main contributor to low
participation the extension of the Kettering
Swimming Pool in the town centre is
considered to be the best option to address
7
the deficit in water space.
The action plan of the strategy covers a significant number of investment proposals, but the
following are those which will have the most relevance to the West Northamptonshire
authorities in terms of cross-border participation in sport.
Develop a regional gymnastics facility with at least a 25 year lease as a home for
Kettering Olympic Gymnastics Club. The existing club is at capacity and has a
long waiting list.
Continue to support England National Volleyball Centre and the development of
other elite sport
Build a replacement leisure centre for Desborough
Develop a regional judo facility with a minimum 25 year lease as home for
Kettering Premier Judo Club. This may be co-located with the Gymnastics Club or
possibly with the boxing club and martial arts clubs. The existing judo facility is
at capacity
Develop a boxing facility, potentially in association with martial arts
Develop junior football academies at Burton Latimer and Desborough
Develop a type 3 rugby facility as a home for Kettering Rugby Club
Consider the development of a new replacement swimming pool with more
water space
Develop a 3G pitch in Kettering, with the preferred site as Tresham College
Develop 1,800 sq m for sport and community leisure in the District Centre in
Kettering East in Phase 1, plus a further 600 sq m across 3 local centres in Phase
2.
Milton Keynes
The Sport and Active Communities Strategy of 2104 considered the facility needs of the
authority area up to 2026.
In relation to sports halls, it anticipated that up to 27 new badminton courts of space would
be required. Some of this was likely to be met in the proposed new National Badminton
Arena [now not being progressed], or an alternative 12 court hall development at a site to
be confirmed. It was also envisaged that a 6-8 court hall would be developed in the central
area of Milton Keynes, co-located with the proposed competition pool. Three new 4-court
halls were expected to be developed and available for community use at new secondary
school sites. Specialist hall facilities were proposed for further consideration through
feasibility studies, for boxing and roller skating.
The swimming pools in Milton Keynes were running almost full at peak time and there was
an overall lack of capacity. It was proposed that an 8-lane pool should be developed in the
central part of the city as part of a new wet-dry leisure centre. A new 6-lane pool was
proposed to be developed on the west flank of Milton Keynes.
8
The existing pools in the network other than for Bletchley and Wolverton are aging and
either require major refurbishment or replacement. Stantonbury pool was previously used
for competition, but is now the incorrect dimension.
In relation to artificial grass pitches, hockey is based at Woughton on the Green on a double
pitch site, and football uses sites across the authority. Additional 3G pitches were
proposed: Central MK (training size), plus full size 3G pitches associated with the proposed
secondary schools in the Western Expansion area, Brooklands and 2 sites to be confirmed.
Sites proposed to be re-carpeted to 3G were Sir Herbert Leon in Bletchley and Stantonbury
Campus. The hockey pitches at Woughton on the Green were proposed to be retained and
one further hockey pitch developed at a site to be confirmed.
There is one athletics track, at Stantonbury Campus, which was proposed to be retained. A
need for better indoor training has been explored, with the focus on the existing sports hall
space on site.
A significant amount of additional health and fitness provision was expected to be required
up to 2029, and it was proposed that some of this new provision should be associated with
the proposed new pool and sports hall facilities.
There is one 7-rink indoor bowls facility at Bletchley and a small 2 rink facility in the north
of Milton Keynes. Further indoor bowls is expected to be needed as the population ages,
with the preferred location being the north side of the city.
Indoor tennis is currently only provided at the David Lloyd centre, which has 13 courts.
There was a proposal to develop a 6 court facility in association with the National
Badminton Area, but this has not now progressed.
Squash was assessed as being under-provided but any new provision would expect to be
commercially led, so no new facilities were proposed.
There were 11 outdoor tennis sites across Milton Keynes but the quality was variable. It
was expected that up to 14 new courts would be required to meet the needs of the new
housing growth, of which 6 were expected to be provided at the National Badminton Arena,
now not going ahead. The remainder of provision was identified as being needing to be a
new club site, but the location was to be confirmed.
The outdoor bowls greens were well used but additional provision was necessary as the
population ages and grows. New provision was proposed for the west (single green),
central/east area (single green) and a double green site for the north.
New community centres were expected to be developed to service the expanding
community and 7 new facilities were proposed in the growth areas. The existing network
of provision requires some improvement.
Additional golf provision was expected to be required; 2 x 18 hole standard courses, 1 x par
3 nine hole course, and 24 driving range bays.
9
The proposals for the specialist sports were:
to develop a cycling centre of excellence, but the site was to be confirmed.
to develop a second dedicated gymnastics centre dependent on feasibility study,
but site to be confirmed
retention of the existing ice rink
intensification of the water sports use of the lakes and canals
retention of the motocross at Pineham
Rugby Borough
Rugby Borough Council completed its playing pitch strategy in November 2015 and the built
facilities strategy is at the final draft report stage. The key findings and proposals are
summarised below.
Sports halls
The total amount of sports hall space currently available for community use is well above
what is actually needed at this time by the community. However there is very limited
sports hall space open during the school day, and not all of this is accessible to all of the
residents.
The assessment of the future requirements for sports hall space in Rugby indicates that, on
a purely quantitative basis, that if all of the existing network was to be retained and
maintained at a reasonable quality, then no additional sports hall space would be required
to meet the currently planned housing growth up to 2031.
However the access by residents of the urban area to sports hall space will become
increasingly difficult due to the number of people living in the urban area. All of the spare
capacity at the existing sites within the urban area is likely to be absorbed by 2031, by which
stage the demand will potentially exceeded the supply of facilities. The opportunity should
therefore be taken to design the proposed new secondary school and its sports hall on the
Rugby Radio Station site for community use.
In the longer term, should additional housing sites come forwards for development, then
there is a need to reconsider the facility network in Rugby.
The strategy proposes to retain the existing network of facilities in Rugby town, and to
ensure that the proposed new secondary school at the Rugby Radio Station site is designed
to enable community use and that this is secured in the long term.
Swimming pools
The amount of water space in Rugby is slightly higher than that required by the community
for swimming, and everyone should have good access to a pool. However there is limited
pay and play access and both clubs and commercial swimming lesson providers are rely on
10
school pools. The clubs are successful and have some swimmers participating up to national
level.
There is sufficient capacity at the present time to meet the current demand for swimming.
By 2031 the balance between supply and demand for swimming is much closer, and some
additional water space may be justified. However the amount of unmet demand based on
the current housing proposals may be insufficient to justify a new community facility.
However if additional housing is identified in the borough which has not been included to
date within the strategy, and once the Coventry pool proposals are clarified, then a Sport
England scenario test using the Facilities Planning Model should be used to confirm the best
fit future facility network.
Fitness facilities
Rugby has about a similar level of fitness station and studio provision compared to its
comparator authorities and the regional and national averages. Over 60% of the supply is
provided by the commercial sector. Everyone with access to a car can reach a fitness facility
with fitness stations within 15 minutes’ drive time.
In relation to fitness facilities there will be a need for both additional fitness stations and
studio space to cater for the demand up to 2031. This is likely to be in the order of 185-260
stations and 3-5 studios. The majority of this demand is expected to be met by the
commercial sector, with new facilities and changes to the existing provision being made as
the market dictates.
On a small scale and for the immediate future, there is justification to expand the fitness
provision at the Wolston Community Leisure Centre.
Athletics
Rugby hosts an active athletics club with around 990 members, of which around 45% come
from the borough. As the club draws members from both Northampton and Rugby, it is
expected that around 300 members may relocate to the new track at Moulton College when
that opens later in 2016.
The 8 lane track is good quality and has “Full UKA Certification for Competition Able to
host events at all permit levels in all events”.
The demand for athletics will increase up to 2031 with more housing in Rugby and a growing
interest in the activities. However as the club “splits” later in 2016, there will be sufficient
spare capacity at the Rugby track to cater for all new demand up to 2031.
Indoor bowls
There is one specialist indoor bowls centre, Thornfield, which is adjacent to the Queen’s
Diamond Jubilee Centre. This is managed by the club on a long lease from the Borough
11
Council. The facility has 8 rinks and is reasonable quality, although the changing and
ancillary facilities are moderate and will require refurbishment and improvement. The main
concern of the club is a lack of car parking and potentially, any proposal to introduce car
park charges.
The indoor bowls club currently has around 440 members but the facility could meet the
needs of up to 1000 members, so there is significant spare capacity.
The location of the specialist indoor bowls centres in Rugby, Daventry and Coventry mean
that everyone with access to a car can reach a facility within a 20 minute drive time.
There are also a number of village and community halls across Rugby which provide for
short mat bowls but the quality is variable and some improvements are required.
The assessment suggests that there is a need to retain the existing indoor bowls centre, but
that there is no requirement for additional specialist indoor bowls provision.
Indoor tennis
There are currently no indoor tennis courts in Rugby, and it has been a long term aspiration
of the Rugby Lawn Tennis Club to cover some of their courts. The Warwickshire Health and
Racquets Club in Coventry is the nearest provision, but this is more than 20 minutes drive
for many residents, falling outside of the LTA’s strategy aspirations for this type of facility.
Furthermore, this Coventry facility is commercial and does not offer the extent of sports
development opportunities that a club site can offer.
The Rugby Lawn Tennis Club’s membership meets the LTA’s criteria for the provision of an
indoor court, but falls below the number justified for a second court. However there are
significant sports development benefits of having two covered courts, and also capital cost
savings in their development.
The LTA is therefore supportive of the proposals at Rugby Lawn Tennis Club to cover two of
their courts.
The recommendation is therefore that a full feasibility study should be undertaken to
determine the cost and viability of covering two tennis courts at the Rugby Lawn Tennis
Club. If the feasibility study shows that it is viable, then two of the courts should be
covered. A decision about which type of indoor court facility should be developed has yet
to be made, but should take account of both the capital and revenue costs of the facility.
Squash
There are currently 5 squash courts available to the community in Rugby, 3 courts at Rugby
School Sports Centre, and 2 courts at Sports Connexion. The independent school site courts
are good quality but have somewhat restricted opening hours, whilst the Sports Connexion
site is of average quality and not easily accessible from all of the urban area in Rugby.
12
The current level of provision for squash in Rugby is lower than most of its comparators, and
below that of the national and regional averages. There appears to be some spare capacity
at Sports Connexion but only limited spare capacity at Rugby School Sports Centre.
The gradual decline in the participation in squash suggests that the rate of provision should
remain the same as at present. However, even on this basis the modelling suggests that 2
new courts may be needed in the period up to 2031, assuming no changes to the existing
network. These are expected to be provided by the commercial sector.
The overall provision for squash should however be kept under review if further housing is
planned in the borough as there may be a case for further new provision as part of a
community sports facility(ies), should this be planned.
Gymnastics centre
There is one dedicated gymnastics centre at Lower Hillmorton Road in Rugby which is hoped
by the club to be replaced by a new, larger centre, at a site to be confirmed. Non-specialist
sites are also used for gymnastics across the borough.
In the short term the priority is the construction and opening of a new dedicated gymnastics
centre, but the site has yet to be confirmed. The club currently has a planning application
submitted to Daventry Council for a brownfield site close to Barby.
Outdoor bowls
There are currently 9 outdoor bowling greens in Rugby Borough, of which 8 are good or
reasonable quality sites of 6-rinks, and which host active affiliated clubs. Of these, 7 are
located in the town. There is one smaller site at Leamington Hastings which is of poorer
quality and hosts unaffiliated bowls.
The greens are all club managed. The ancillary facilities including club house and changing
at most sites need some improvement.
On average across the town the sites are used at just under 50% of their potential capacity,
but the affiliated club at Wolvey is effectively full, based on a maximum capacity of 100
members per club.
Everyone with access to a car can reach a bowls site within 15 minutes drive time, either
within the borough or across the borders of the authority.
Due to the spare capacity at the existing sites in Rugby town, there is no need for additional
outdoor bowls provision in the period up to 2031 based on the emerging housing proposals
of 2015. In the longer term and should new housing be proposed on the west side of the
authority, then some additional provision may be required.
13
Improvement of the existing sites will enable them to cater for more use. Such
improvements, both to the 6-rink greens and to their ancillary facilities are therefore the
priority.
Outdoor tennis
There are currently 17 outdoor tennis courts in the borough which are available for
community use, and most are reasonably good quality but some have no or poor ancillary
facilities. All of the sites other than Rugby School, are available during the day time as well
as evenings.
There is no spare capacity at the Rugby Lawn Tennis Club site and the lack of facilities there
is restricting their growth. They are currently considering covering two courts to ease the
winter demands. There is spare capacity at other courts across the borough.
Assuming that the current network of provision remains, the modelling suggests that no
new outdoor tennis courts are generally required to meet the needs of the known housing
growth up to 2031. The focus should therefore be on retaining and improving the existing
stock of facilities, including the provision of floodlighting where appropriate.
The proposed covering of the courts at Rugby Lawn Tennis Club should be supported to
enable this club to expand its membership, but in the long term additional court space may
be required for the club.
Artificial grass pitches
The FA consider that there is a clear need for a match specification 3G football turf pitch in
the borough, as there are none at present. Rugby Town Juniors were recently unsuccessful
in their bid to Sport England for grant aid towards a full size 3G AGP, although the bid was
strongly supported by both the Football Association and Rugby Borough Council. This bid
was resubmitted.
Hockey as a sport is important in Rugby, and one of the largest hockey clubs in the West
Midlands region is based at Rugby School. The club uses the double pitch site both during
weekday evenings for training, and at weekends. The club will have access to the proposed
3
rd
hockey pitch at Rugby School on the same basis as the existing agreement. However the
critical issue is the lack of access on Saturday afternoons, which is the time for club matches.
This means that the hockey club also has to use a number of other pitch sites across the
town for both training and matches. A key issue for the hockey club is the lack of security of
use of the sites other than at Bilton School. However it is anticipated that the current
arrangements will continue.
There are no rugby specification artificial turf pitches within the borough.
The assessments have shown that there is a need in the period up to 2031 for:
14
two 3G pitches, which should be designed and constructed to meet the Football
Association’s register specifications, and one which may need to be joint football
rugby (RFU) specification
access to one additional hockey pitch for matches.
The most likely site for one of the 3G pitches is Rugby Town Juniors, but the other is to be
determined.
If community access can be secured to the hockey specification pitch at Bilton Grange
School and appropriate changing and car parking can be achieved, this will help towards
meeting the needs of the Hockey Club. This would not however provide them with their
aspiration of a double-pitch site. Depending on the amount of access, this may meet the
future needs of the club, so long as the other sites are retained with the exception of the
Warwickshire College pitch.
Rugby also requires additional training space and there may be insufficient space to cater
for all of the training needs of the growing population of Rugby town in the period up to
2031. Several of the club sites are already under pressure in terms of training provision and
this will worsen over time, even if additional pitches can be provided at Ashlawn Road
Recreation Ground, and the capacity of the other rugby club sites enhanced through
improved pitch drainage and maintenance and more floodlighting.
When Warwickshire College pitch is are due for re-carpeting, then the preference would be
to a 3G surface, potentially with a joint football-rugby training specification. This would
provide for both football and rugby, but would depend on the relocation of the current
hockey use to elsewhere, and the views of the college at the time. The feasibility of
extending the site in both length and width to enable the hosting of senior football matches
should be considered, and the costs of this will need to be confirmed. The costs of
switching to a football or football-rugby specification surface will however be greater than
the costs of simply re-carpeting again to a sand filled hockey surface.
Grass football pitches
Overall there is currently a surplus of pitch space for football and a number of the existing
sites in the town are only used lightly, and some not at all. At the same time, not all of the
sub areas have pitches of each of the FA recommended sizes in secure community use.
However there is a lack of good quality changing provision on the parks sites, which is
limiting the ability to maximise the flexibility between the sites, particularly for the senior
game. Some of the sites have inherent issues, such as a high water table, which means that
the pitches cannot be used for more than one match or training session per week.
The key issues flagged through the audit process and consultation with clubs are:
a lack of youth size pitches
the moderate or poor quality of some of the sites, both pitches and ancillary
facilities
15
the lack of even basic wash facilities on some sites
the lack of appropriate and sufficient quality changing facilities
the impact of informal recreational use, including dog fouling on pitches which
have open access (parks pitches)
the need to allow some “spare capacity” across the pitch network for a rolling
programme of maintenance. This should be the equivalent of 10% of the
minimum playing field area needed to cater for the football.
Hillmorton Juniors has recently moved from the privately owned Leicester Road site to
Hillmorton Recreation ground as the previous site was privately owned and has now been
closed to use. There is no changing provision on the Hillmorton Recreation ground site and
this is an issue which still needs to be urgently resolved.
Rugby Town Juniors continues to attract new members and is now reaching capacity on its
own site on some of its pitch sizes. It is seeking to increase the available capacity by
developing a full size 3G football turf match quality pitch on its site, as well as provide new
grass pitches.
The pitches in the rural areas are not used to capacity but offer an important resource to
their local communities. The main issue in the rural sub areas is the lack of a mix of pitch
sizes within the individual sub area which are in secure community use. Ideally there should
be pitches of each of the FA recommended pitch sizes in secure community use within easy
travel time, i.e. within each sub area. However there may not be sufficient demand at the
local level to justify this provision as a standalone community facility. In this circumstance,
the use of school pitches of the relevant size may be more realistic, if access to school sites
can be secured.
In terms of the management of sites, the main issue flagged by clubs is a lack of a “home
venue” for some, and poor allocation of sites to teams by the leagues. This causes
frustration, a lack of commitment to sites by clubs, and sometimes leads to games being
cancelled due to a lack of pre-planning.
The two private sites have recently been closed to community football, Leicester Road and
Oakfield. The Leicester Road site is a significant loss because it was a standard quality multi
pitch site with no informal public use. In terms of Oakfield, the pitch at the time of site
assessment in September 2014, was of standard quality though it might reach a good quality
score with improved maintenance regimes.
There are currently two stadium sites in Rugby, Rugby Town FC and Rugby Town Juniors.
The Rugby Town FC site is not currently available for community use.
There is theoretically sufficient existing pitch capacity to cater for all of the football demand
up to 2031 from all of the new housing, both generally across the authority, and within the
urban sub area, which includes all of the housing growth. However the quality of many of
the sites is moderate because of the impact of informal public use, some inherent problems
such as flooding, and the lack of, or poor quality changing provision. In the immediate
16
future there is therefore a need to concentrate the resources onto a small number of sites
to improve the quality of the pitches and ancillary facilities, and to enable/encourage more
intensive use of the sites which are retained for football use.
Those sites which have no or little use for football at the present time should be retained,
with the view to bringing them back/ into use in the longer term, to meet the needs of the
growing population of Rugby, if the demand shows that they are required.
There are proposed to be new pitches developed at the Rugby Radio Station and the
Gateway sustainable urban extensions sites, but the details of the pitch sizes, ancillary
facilities, and when these will become playable, are still to be confirmed. It is not therefore
yet possible to assess the potential of these sites to meet the new demand for football in
the period up to 2031. This should be kept under review both as part of the annual action
plan for this strategy, and at the next full review in around 2019-20.
As much of the new demand will however still need to be met on the existing network of
sites, there is a clear need for significant investment in both the quality of the pitches and
the ancillary facilities, particularly on those sites managed by Rugby Borough Council. The
provision two full size 3G pitches within Rugby urban sub area would help to reduce the
training pressures on the grass pitch stock, and also provide some additional match pitch
provision. However the overall level of grass pitch demand for matches will remain similar.
The playing field sites and their ancillary facilities in the rural areas should be retained and
improved as they provide a local resource to their communities, including as amenity green
space.
The current stadium sites at Rugby Town FC and Rugby Town Juniors should be retained,
and additional “stadia” pitches developed as needed to support higher levels of play. The
requirements will need to be led by the FA’s Ground Grading Criteria based on the needs
and realistic expectations of the clubs involved.
Cricket
There are five large cricket clubs in Rugby Borough which have a number of teams, of which
three have juniors. There are however a number of small clubs with only one or two adult
teams. Overall across the borough there would initially appear to be sufficient space for
cricket, and this is the case if all of the cricket sites in the rural areas were to be used to
their fullest extent and artificial strips can be used for some adult as well as junior matches.
However there is a lack of secure use cricket grounds in the urban area which are of
sufficient quality to cater for the club game. This requirement for better quality sites has led
to the concentration of the game onto sites which are mainly club controlled and have both
the least overlap with winter sports and least informal use.
Even if the existing access to the Rugby School cricket grounds are retained in the long term,
there is a theoretical need to ideally develop 2 new cricket grounds to cater for the
demands arising from the new growth in the urban area of Rugby between 2026 and 2031.
17
Given that there some capacity at the other cricket sites across the Rugby urban area and
the existence of two active clubs just outside the Borough boundary at Barby and Swinford,
it is proposed that one additional cricket site of high quality and in secure community use
should be developed by 2031. The other cricket club sites in the rural area cannot be
considered as offering a real opportunity to meet the new demand, either because they are
already operating at near full capacity, or the cricket ground and football pitches overlap
causing problems for both sports and pitch quality issues, or the site is not in secure
community use.
No sites have yet been identified for the new provision in the urban sub area, but it will be
important that the quality of the new cricket ground is high, and that it does not also form
part of public open space or be overlapped with winter sports use. The details of the
outdoor sports provision at the Rugby Radio Station site have yet to be negotiated, but
there could be scope within this development to provide for at least one cricket pitch.
However it may need to be shared with either another sport or with informal use, so may be
unlikely to meet the required ground standards required for the higher leagues. The Rugby
Radio Station site is a phased development, and the timing of any new provision is therefore
also uncertain.
The cricket grounds and their ancillary facilities in the rural areas should be retained and
improved, where justified by local need.
Rugby
There are seven rugby clubs in Rugby, all of which are located within the urban area of the
authority, with the exception of Broadstreet which is close to Coventry. The clubs in Rugby
town draw most of their members from the borough, whilst Broadstreet only has about a
third of its players living here.
Broadstreet has a large site and does not fully use it, but this contrasts with all of the other
clubs in that they are either almost at full capacity, or have more players than they can
easily provide for.
The RFU have identified the pinch-points for the clubs. In terms of mid week training needs,
there is currently a theoretical shortfall of 10 pitches for training, and 3 for matches within
the urban area.
Rugby St Andrews is based on Ashlawn Road Recreation Ground, a Council site which has 3
rugby and also 3 football pitches. This is the only site where a resident rugby club could
potentially be expanded. However any relocation of the football use will need to be
dependent on investment in football facilities elsewhere, particularly at Whinfield
Recreation Ground, where improvements are needed to the clubhouse to make it
appropriate for a 5 adult pitch site, and there may also be a need to improve the pitches
themselves. In the short-medium term, the priority here is to consider whether additional
space can be made off pitch for the club to use for training.
18
The modelling suggests that there will be an increase in rugby demand, particularly in the
urban sub area which will have younger age profile than elsewhere. There will be more
teams in every age group.
If three extra full size pitches can be provided at Ashlawn Road Recreation Ground, and the
existing grass pitches at all of the other club sites can be improved by floodlighting, drainage
and higher levels of maintenance, plus the ancillary facilities improved where necessary,
then theoretically all of the match and training demand can be met in the period up to 2031
across the urban sub area. However the pitches under this option will be used to their
maximum as the training needs, if met on site, will mainly be on pitches which are also used
for matches at the weekends.
The expansion of rugby at Ashlawn Road Recreation Ground, the home to Rugby St Andrews
is dependent upon ability to relocate the football use to Whinfield Recreation Ground,
which will necessitate investment in the clubhouse and potentially the pitches.
If it is not possible to convert Ashlawn Road Recreation Ground to rugby use or to achieve
the pitch improvements at the other club sites then there is justification for the
development of a rugby specification 3G pitch. The best option would at Warwickshire
College when the site is due for re-carpeting, but this would require the confirmation of
support of the college nearer the time, and also the re-location of the hockey use. This
proposal will therefore need to be under review and confirmed in the annual updates of this
strategy and in its next full review.
In the very long term, consideration should be given to the development of a new rugby
club site on the Rugby Radio Station housing development, potentially sometime after 2031.
19
Stratford-on-Avon
The Open Space, Sport and Recreation Assessment was published in 2011 and updated in
2014.
Sports halls
There is good provision of sports hall space, with a net surplus of over 11 courts across the
authority. However accessibility varies, with the southern-most parts of the district outside
the 20 minute catchment of a facility within the authority, though these areas may have
access to facilities outside of the authority boundary.
Additional sports hall provision is recommended for Shipston on Stour and Wellesbourne.
These sites are 30+ minutes from the western side of Rugby Borough and from Rugby town,
Daventry or Brackley. These developments would therefore be unlikely to have any
significant impact on these districts.
Swimming pools
There is good provision of swimming pools with a net surplus of provision equivalent to 347
sq m. Although most areas have access to a pool within 20 minutes drive time, the central-
eastern area around Kineton is not.
A new community pool is proposed for the Kineton/Gaydon/Lighthorne area. These are
more than 30 minutes travel time from Rugby and Daventry and around 30 minutes to
Brackley, so although the catchments may overlap, any new provision would not have a very
significant effect on the pool usage or the import/export of swimmers in Rugby, Daventry or
Brackley.
Outdoor facilities
A small amount of additional “outdoor sports space” is proposed to meet the forecast
growth needs, based on the FiT standards rather than a separate playing pitch strategy. The
largest area and most significant is 9.37 ha for the Gaydon/Lighthorne new development.
This is however too far away from Rugby or Daventry to be of any significance to these
authorities, particularly as the provision will relate primarily to grass pith sports.
Wellingborough
The Open Space, Sports and Recreation Audit and Assessment is dated November 2015.
This authority borders all three West Northamptonshire authorities; Northampton,
Daventry and South Northamptonshire although the largest amount of cross-border
movement is likely to be with Northampton, due to its proximity.
20
Sports halls
The Weavers Leisure Centre is identified as having capacity issues which is a barrier to use.
Redwell is described as “busy” in the evenings. The netball governing body identified a lack
of provision as a key issue. Boxing at Wellingborough Amateur Boxing Club is noted as
operating at full capacity.
The assessment proposes a standard of 0.37 courts per 1000, and recommends the
development of one additional 4 court hall by 2031, but no site is identified. The
accessibility standard is proposed as 15 minute walking catchment. No reference is made
to FPM or the used capacity of the existing facility network, within or outside of the
authority.
Swimming pools
The existing rate of provision is calculated as 13 sq m per 1000, which will fall to 11 sq m per
1000 by 2031. The strategy proposes retaining the existing rate of provision of 13 sq m per
1000. A 6 lane x 25 m pool is proposed to be developed by 2031 but no site is identified.
No reference is made to FPM or the used capacity of the existing facility network, within
outside of the authority.
Health and Fitness
The current rate of provision is proposed to be retained up to 2031, at 2.85 stations per
1000. No new provision is required based on this standard.
Athletics tracks and indoor training facilities.
There are no tracks and no specialist indoor training facilities in Wellingborough. The
report refers to the track at Kettering, and indicates that the proposed track at Moulton
College would be outside of the drive time for Wellingborough [though the centre of
Wellingborough town centre is within 23 minutes drive time of the new facility at Moulton
College and most of the authority is within 30 minutes]. It notes that there are no specialist
indoor training facilities. The recommendation is for a 6 lane facility “or at least some
smaller facility provision” but with no site identified. No specialist indoor training facilities
are proposed but it is recommended that a standard of 0.0023 is applied.
Gymnastics Centres
There are currently no specialist gymnastics centres in the Borough. Nene Valley
Gymnastics Club are based at the Weavers Leisure Centre. A standard of 0.0023 specialist
centres is proposed, but this does not require any new facilities in Wellingborough.
Indoor bowling centres
There is one indoor bowls centre, the Wellingborough Bowling Club at Hatton Park. The
national governing body is of the view that the existing indoor bowls facility satisfies the
21
demand. The proposed standard is 0.08 rinks per 1000 up to 2031 and there are no
proposals for new facilities.
Indoor tennis
There are currently no indoor tennis facilities in the Borough. There is limited assessment
but it concludes that, based on the proposed standard, 2 courts will be required by 2031.
The recommendation is that a “shared” facility between the authorities of Wellingborough,
East Northamptonshire and Kettering might be considered.
Outdoor bowls
A standard of provision of 0.21 ha per 1000 is proposed to be retained up to 2031. This will
give a deficit of 2 greens by 2031, so this is the proposal for new provision. No site is
identified, and no assessment of the existing capacity of sites is given.
Outdoor tennis
The outdoor tennis sites are identified but there is no assessment of need or
recommendations for this facility type. The proposed standard of provision is 0.21 courts
per 1000 but there is no accessibility standard. On this basis, there is a projected need for 3
courts, but no site identified.
Golf
There are 2 golf courses but no driving ranges in the borough. No new golf courses are
proposed but there is an identified need for more driving ranges. The proposed standard is
0.24 bays per 1000, giving a recommendation for new facility provision of 21 bays by 2031.
Closed road cycle track
There are no closed circuit cycle facilities in Wellingborough. The nearest facilities are in
Milton Keynes and Peterborough. The proposed standard of provision is 0.0023 closed road
cycle tracks per 1000, with a recommendation that a facility should be developed in the
North Northamptonshire area.
Outdoor sports
An overall standard of provision is proposed for outdoor sports (excl golf) of 2.4 ha per
1000, based largely on the FiT standards. This suggests that there is a lack of space currently
in the urban area of more than 20ha, and that this will increase to more than 47 ha by 2031.
The rural areas also have a lack of space, currently about 3.5 ha, rising to over 9 ha by 2031.
The proposal is a 15 minute walk time.
The report appears to follow the broad elements of the Sport England Playing Pitch
Guidance but not all of the steps are fully worked through within the report, for example
the issue and extent of training, and used capacity of pitches and sites.
22
Football
Since 2007 there has been an increase in the participation in youth and men’s football,
whilst there has been a fall in the TGR rates for minis, and girls. Women’s football has
remained steady.
There is a proposed standard of 1.18 ha per 1000, and this would give a deficiency of 16.19
ha by 2031. There is a recommendation of 9 senior pitches or 22 junior pitches by 2031.
The accessibility standard is 15 minutes walk. There are no site specific recommendations
e.g. in relation to Earls Barton.
Cricket
There has been an increase in the number of boys and men’s teams since 2007, but the
female game has stayed the same. Wellingborough Council’s Sports Development officer is
quoted as believing that “several clubs with two or more adult sections are already playing
outside of the local authority boundary which may indicate increased current need in
provision of playing and potentially practice facilities.”
The assessment suggests that there will be a need for 4 more pitches by 2031 (no locations
given). The accessibility standard is proposed as 15 minutes’ walk. The standards are
proposed based on retaining the existing provision, of 0.88 ha per 1000. There are no site
specific proposals.
Rugby
Since 2007 there has been a fall in the number of mini and youth teams whilst the number
of adult teams has stayed constant. The number of girls’ teams (2) has stayed the same.
The assessment suggests that there will be a need for 2 more pitches by 2031 (no locations
given). The accessibility standard is proposed as 15 minutes’ walk. The standards are
proposed based on retaining the existing provision, of 0.29 ha per 1000. There are no site
specific proposals.
23
Artificial grass pitches
There are 3 sand dressed pitches in the borough, 2 of which are at Wellingborough School.
The TGR modelling up to 2031 suggests that the team numbers for hockey will stay the
same or increase only slightly up to 2031.
The FA have prioritised the borough for investment in a 3G pitch as there is currently none
in the authority.
The two sites (Wellingborough School and Wren School) act as hubs for hockey attracting
players from a wide area. England Hockey is keen to retain the sites as at present.
The proposed standard of provision is 0.05 pitches per 1000, with a recommendation to
develop a 3G pitch as soon as possible.
Introduction
Daventry District, Northampton Borough and South Northamptonshire Councils are reviewing how local people use their open
spaces and sporting places across West Northamptonshire. We want to hear from everyone whether you live, work or visit here
and whether you use these spaces and places or not.
We want to know what you think of them; what improvements could be made? What would encourage you to use them more
often?
The survey will take about 10 minutes and is split into three parts. Part one asks about your views on the number of facilities
available, Part two relates specifically to sports and physical activities, and Part three asks questions on open spaces.
Your answers are important to us. We can use what you tell us to make your spaces and places better by planning and investing in
them. So please try to complete all questions as fully as possible.
What you tell us will remain anonymous and will be treated in the strictest confidence.
Thank you for taking part
Introduction
1. Do you live, work, visit or study in Daventry district, Northampton borough or South
Northamptonshire?
*
Live
Work
Visit
Study
None of the above
Section 1 - Level of Provision
APPENDIX 8: West Northamptonshire Individuals Survey
2. Do you use any of the following facilities in Daventry district, Northampton borough or South
Northamptonshire? (Please select all that apply)
*
Formal parks and gardens (e.g. Abington Park or Steane Park)
Country Parks (e.g. Brixworth or Daventry country park)
Natural greenspaces (e.g. meadows and woodland)
Amenity greenspaces (e.g. grass areas in housing areas)
Children's playgrounds
Walking / Running routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Grass pitches
Synthetic / All weather pitches
Outdoor hard courts / Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving ranges
Outdoor bowls
Indoor bowls
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres / Village halls (for sports/active recreation use)
None
Section 1 - Level of Provision
Too much About right Too little No opinion
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country Parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodland)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
Children's playgrounds
Walking / Running
routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Grass pitches
Synthetic / All weather
pitches
Outdoor hard courts /
Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving
ranges
Outdoor bowls
Indoor bowls
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres /
Village halls (for
sports/active recreation
use)
3. Please tell us whether you feel there is TOO MUCH or TOO LITTLE provision for each type of facility:
*
This part of the survey deals with sports facilities and specific sports/activities that you
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
participate in. Please answer all of the questions in as much detail as possible.
1 2 3 4 5
Walking / Running
routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Grass pitches
Synthetic / All weather
pitches
Outdoor hard courts /
Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving
ranges
Outdoor bowls
Indoor bowls
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres /
Village halls (for
sports/active recreation
use)
4. How IMPORTANT are each of the following types of facilities to you? (Please rank your top 5 facilities
in order of importance. 1 = most important)
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
5. Do you currently take part in any form of sport or physical activity in your leisure time?
As well as formal sports, this also includes running, dance, walking and cycling.
Yes
No
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
At least once a week At least once a month
Badminton
Basketball
Bowls
Gym and Fitness Classes
Gymnastics (inc. trampolining)
Martial
Arts/Boxing/Judo/Taekwondo/Wrestling
etc.
Netball
Squash and Racketball
Swimming, pool sports and pool fitness
classes
Volleyball
5-a-side Football/Futsal
Please specify any other indoor sports (including disability sports) you do and how often:
6. How often do you take part in each of the following INDOOR sports/activities?
(Please leave blank if you do not take part)
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
At least once a week At least once a month
Angling
Athletics (incl. running/jogging)
Bowls
Canoeing
Cricket
Cycling
Football
Golf
Hockey
Netball
Rowing
Rugby Union
Sailing
Skateboarding/BMX/Rollerblading
Tennis
Walking/Rambling
Please specify any other outdoor sports (including disability sports) you do and how often:
7. How often do you take part in each of these OUTDOOR sports/activities?
(Please leave blank if you do not take part)
Thinking about the facility that you use the most for sports and physical activity....
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
8. Name of the sports facility in Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire that
you use most frequently?
9. What activity do you use it for?
10. Why do you use this facility over others?
If so, please specify what improvements are required
11. Does this facility require improvements? If so, please specify what improvements are required.
Yes
No
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
12. Do you use facilities outside of Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire?
Yes
No
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
13. Why do you use facilities outside of Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire?
Nearer to home
Nearer to work
On the way home from work
Facilities are better
It is cheaper
No facilities of required type in Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire
Can't get a booking at a time wanted in Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire
Other (please specify)
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
14. Would you like to participate / participate more in sports and physical activities than you do at the
moment?
*
Yes
Possibly
No
Section 2- Sport and Physical Activity
15. What prevents you from participating / participating more?
(Please tick all that apply)
*
I do enough already
Lack of free time
Lack of people do exercise with
Lack of motivation
Lack of Interest
Ill health or disability
Difficulty travelling to facilities/activities
Difficulty accessing facilities/activities during suitable times
Lack of knowledge about what's available
Lack of appropriate clubs
Family commitments/childcare arrangements
Religious reasons
Cost
Lack of parking
Other (please specify)
In this part of the survey we are asking you about the open spaces in Daventry district,
Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire - what they're like, how you use them, how
you travel to them and whether they need be improved.
Section 3 - Open Spaces
1 2 3 4 5
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country Park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodlands)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
Children's playgrounds
16. How IMPORTANT are each of the following types of open spaces to you? (Please rank in order of
importance. 1 = most important)
Section 3 - Open Spaces
Time Mode of transport
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodlands)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
Children's playgrounds
17. How long do you think you should be expected to travel to each type of open space? (Please select
the time, in minutes, and the ideal mode of transport)
Section 3 - Open Spaces
Daily Weekly Monthly Occasionally
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodlands)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
Children's playgrounds
18. How often have you used each of the following types of open spaces, in Daventry district,
Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire, in the last 12 months?
(Please leave blank if you do not use)
Thinking about the Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire open
space that you use the most....
Section 3 - Open Spaces
19. Name of the open space in DAVENTRY DISTRICT, NORTHAMPTON BOROUGH OR SOUTH
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE that you use most frequently? (If not a formal park / garden, please write the
name of the nearest street)
20. What is your main reason for using this space? (e.g. fresh air, entertain the kids, exercise)
21. How do you normally get there?
Walk
Cycle
Car
Bus
Other (please specify)
Significant problem Minor problem
Vandalism and graffiti
Litter / tipping
Anti-social behaviour
Dog fouling
Noise
Smells
Maintenance
Other (please specify)
22. Do you experience any of the following problems at this place? (Please select all that apply)
23. How long does it take you to get there? (in minutes)
0 - 5
6 - 10
11 - 15
15 +
Section 3 - Open Spaces
24. Is there an open space nearer to your home that you don't use?
Yes
No
Section 3 - Open Spaces
25. What is the name of this space?
26. Why do you not use this space?
Any other comments
27. Do you have any other comments about sports facilities and / or open spaces in Daventry district,
Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire that you would like to make?
Section 4 - About you
28. Are you male or female?
Male
Female
29. What age bracket do you fall into?
Under 16
16 - 24
25 - 45
46 - 60
Over 60
Postcode:
30. What is your postcode?
Please enter your full postcode (e.g. NN1 1DE). This information will be used only to monitor the spread
of respondents to the survey and for no other purpose.
*
31. How would you describe the type of work you do?
Student
Unemployed
Manual
Semi-skilled
Skilled
Professional
Manager/Director/Company Owner
Retired
At home, not earning or seeking work
32. Which of the following best describes your ethnicity?
White
Mixed/Multiple Ethnic Groups
Asian/Asian British
Black/African/Caribbean/Black British
Other Ethnic Group
Prefer not to respond
Introduction
A review of how local people use their open spaces and sporting places is taking place. We are particularly keen to hear what
young people feel as you’re our open space and sports enthusiasts for the future.
We want to know what you think of your open spaces and sporting places - what improvements could be made? What would
encourage you to use them more often?
The survey will take about 10 minutes and is split into three parts. Part one asks you about yourself, Part two relates to sports and
physical activities and Part three relates to open spaces.
Your answers are important to us. We can use what you tell us to make your spaces and places better by planning and investing in
them. So please try to complete all questions as fully as possible.
What you tell us will remain anonymous and will be treated in the strictest confidence.
Thank you for taking part.
Part 1 - about you
1. Which school do you attend?
*
2. What school year are you in?
*
Year 7
Year 8
Year 9
Year 10
Year 11
Year 12
Year 13
3. Are you male or female?
*
Male
Female
4. Which of the following best describes your ethnicity?
*
White
Mixed/Multiple Ethnic Groups
Asian/Asian British
Black/African/Caribbean/Black British
Other Ethnic Group
Prefer not to respond
APPENDIX 9: West Northamptonshire Student Survey
Part 2 - Sports facilities
Please specify any other facilities you use
5. Do you use any of the following facilities outside of your school PE lessons? (Please select all that
apply)
*
Walking / Running routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Gymnastics centre
Grass pitches (Football / Rugby / Cricket etc)
Artificial grass pitches / All weather pitches
Outdoor hard courts / Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving ranges
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres / Village halls (for sports/active recreation use)
None
Part 2 - About sports facilities
Too much About right Too little No opinion
Walking / Running
routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Gymnastics centre
Grass pitches (Football
/ Rugby / Cricket etc)
Artificial grass pitches /
All weather pitches
Outdoor hard courts /
Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving
ranges
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres /
Village halls (for
sports/active recreation
use)
Other (as in previous
question)
6. Please tell us whether you feel there is TOO MUCH or TOO LITTLE provision for each type of facility:
This part of the survey deals with sports facilities and specific sports/activities that you
participate in. Please answer all of the questions in as much detail as possible.
Part 2 - About sports facilities
1 2 3 4 5
Walking / Running
routes (traffic free)
Cycle routes
Sports halls
Swimming pools
Gym / fitness facilities
Gymnastics Centre
Grass pitches (Football
/ Rugby / Cricket etc)
Artificial Grass Pitches /
All weather pitches
Outdoor hard courts /
Multi-Use Games Areas
Skate parks
Squash courts
Golf courses / Driving
ranges
Athletics facilities
Indoor tennis
Community centres /
Village halls (for
sports/active recreation
use)
Other (as in previous
question)
7. How IMPORTANT are each of the following types of facilities to you? (Please rank your top 5 facilities
in order of importance. 1 = most important)
Part 2 - About sports facilities
8. Do you currently take part in any form of sport or physical activity outside of your school PE lessons?
As well as formal sports, this also includes running, dance, walking and cycling.
Yes
No
Part 2 - About sports facilities
At least once a week At least once a month
Badminton
Basketball
Gym and Fitness Classes
Gymnastics (inc. trampolining)
Martial
Arts/Boxing/Judo/Taekwondo/Wrestling
etc.
Netball
Squash and Racketball
Swimming, pool sports and pool fitness
classes
Volleyball
5-a-side Football/Futsal
Please specify any other indoor sports (including disability sports) you do and how often:
9. How often do you take part in each of the following INDOOR sports/activities outside of your PE
lessons?
(Please leave blank if you do not take part)
Part 2 - About sports facilities
At least once a week At least once a month
Angling
Athletics (incl. running/jogging)
Canoeing
Cricket
Cycling
Football
Golf
Hockey
Netball
Rowing
Rugby Union
Sailing
Skateboarding/BMX/Rollerblading
Tennis
Walking/Rambling
Please specify any other outdoor sports (including disability sports) you do and how often:
10. How often do you take part in each of these OUTDOOR sports/activities outside of your PE lessons?
(Please leave blank if you do not take part)
Thinking about the sports facility in South Northamptonshire that you use the most for sports
and physical activity outside of your PE lessons....
Part 2 - About sports facilities
11. What is the name of the sports facility that you use most frequently?
12. What activity do you use it for?
13. Why do you use this facility over others?
If so, please specify what improvements are required
14. Does this facility require improvements? If so, please specify what improvements are required.
Yes
No
Part 2 - About sports facilities
15. Do you use facilities outside of Daventry district, South Northamptonshire district or Northampton
borough?
e.g. in Banbury, Rugby, Milton Keynes, Market Harborough etc.
Yes
No
Part 2 - About sports facilities
16. Why do you use facilities outside of Daventry district, Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire?
Nearer to home
Facilities are better
It is cheaper
No facilities of required type nearby
Other (please specify)
Part 2 - About sports facilities
17. Would you like to participate / participate more in sports and physical activities than you do at the
moment?
*
Yes
Possibly
No
Part 2 - About sports facilities
18. What prevents you from participating / participating more?
(Please tick all that apply)
*
I do enough already
Lack of free time
Lack of people do exercise with
Lack of motivation
Lack of interest
Ill health or disability
Difficulty travelling to facilities/activities
Difficulty accessing facilities/activities during suitable times
Lack of knowledge about what's available
Lack of appropriate clubs
Family commitments/childcare arrangements
Religious reasons
Cost
Parents not able to take me
Other (please specify)
Part 3 - Open Spaces
1 2 3 4 5
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country Park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodlands)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
19. How IMPORTANT are each of the following types of open spaces to you? (Please rank in order of
importance. 1 = most important)
Daily Weekly Monthly Occasionally
Formal parks and
gardens (e.g. Abington
or Steane Park)
Country parks (e.g.
Brixworth or Daventry
country park)
Natural greenspaces
(e.g. meadows and
woodlands)
Amenity greenspaces
(e.g. grass areas in
housing areas)
20. How often have you used each of the following types of open spaces, in Daventry district,
Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire, in the last 12 months?
(Please leave blank if you do not use)
Part 3 - Open Spaces
21. Name of the open space in DAVENTRY DISTRICT, NORTHAMPTON BOROUGH OR SOUTH
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE that you use most frequently? (If not a formal park / garden, please write the
name of the nearest street)
22. What is your main reason for using this space? (e.g. fresh air, exercise, to socialise)
23. How do you normally get there?
Walk
Cycle
Car
Bus
Other (please specify)
24. How long does it take you to get there? (in minutes)
0 - 5
6 - 10
11 - 15
15 +
Significant problem Minor problem
Vandalism and graffiti
Litter / tipping
Anti-social behavior
Dog fouling
Noise
Smells
Maintenance
Other (please specify)
25. Do you experience any of the following problems at this place? (Please select all that apply)
Part 3 - Open Spaces
26. Is there an open space nearer to your home that you don't use?
Yes
No
Part 3 - Open Spaces
27. What is the name of this space?
28. Why do you not use this space?
Additional comments
29. Do you have any other comments about sports facilities and / or open spaces in Daventry district,
Northampton borough or South Northamptonshire that you would like to make?
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