Safer food
bet ter business
for caterers
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Working with food?
What you need to know
before you start
It is easy for you to spread bacteria to food without realising.
These bacteria are invisible and could make customers ill.
Your personal hygiene is important.
This is what you need to do to keep food safe:
Before you start working with food
Always wash your
hands
Wear clean clothes Wear an apron if
handling unwrapped
food
Tell your manager
if you have vomiting
or diarrhoea and do
not work with food
Take off your watch and jewellery It is a good idea to tie hair back and wear a hat or
hairnet
When you are working with food
No smoking
No eating or drinking Avoid touching your
face, coughing or
sneezing over food
Cover cuts with a
brightly coloured
waterproof dressing
Washing hands effectively
Step 1: Wet your
hands thoroughly
under warm running
water and squirt liquid
soap onto your palm
Step 2: Rub your
hands together palm
to palm to make a
lather
Step 3: Rub the palm
of one hand along
the back of the other
and along the fingers.
Repeat with the other
hand
Step 4: Put your
palms together with
fingers interlocked
and rub in between
each of the fingers
thoroughly
Step 5: Rub around
your thumbs on each
hand and then rub
the fingertips of each
hand against your
palms
Step 6: Rinse off
the soap with clean
water and dry your
hands thoroughly on a
disposable towel. Turn
off the tap with the
towel and then throw
the towel away
When to wash hands
Before touching any
food, especially ready-
to-eat food
After going to the
toilet
After every break After touching raw
meat, poultry, fish,
eggs or unwashed
vegetables
After touching a
cut or changing a
dressing
After touching or
emptying bins
After any cleaning After touching
phones, light switches,
door handles and cash
registers
How to use this pack
Welcome to Safer food,
better business for caterers
Is this pack for me This pack is for small catering businesses such as restaurants,
cafés and takeaways.
It has been developed by the Food Standards Agency,
working with catering businesses, to be practical and
easy to use.
How does this pack help me comply with the
law?
Food safety and hygiene regulations say that you must be
able to show what you do to sell food that is safe to eat
and have this written down. The pack helps you do this.
This pack is based on the principles of HACCP (hazard
analysis and critical control point), but you will not find
words such as ‘HACCP’ or ‘hazard’ in the pack because
we have cut out all the jargon.
Who should take charge of the pack? The person who is responsible for the day-to-day running
of the business is the best person to work through the
pack.
It is a good idea to involve other staff to help the pack
work in your business.
How does the pack work?
The pack contains sheets for you to work through and
complete. These are called ‘safe methods’.
It also contains a diary for you to fill in every day and
write down anything different that happens, including
anything that goes wrong.
Defrosting
Safety points Why? How do you do this
4.Oryoucoulddefrostfoodin
themicrowaveonthe
‘defrost’ setting.
This is a fast way to defrost food.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
5. If necessary you could defrost
food at room temperature.
Follow the manufacturer’s
defrosting instructions. Food
should be left out at room
temperature for the shortest
time possible. Ideally, defrost
these foods in the fridge.
Foods will defrost quite quickly at room
temperature, but harmful bacteria
could grow in food if it gets too warm
while defrosting.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
6.Ifyouhaveanothermethodofdefrosting,writethedetailshere: Which foods do you defrost in
this way?
Think twice!
Keepmeat/poultryseparatefromotherfoodwhenitisdefrosting,topreventcross-contamination.Oncefoodhas
been defrosted you should use it immediately (within one day).
Check it Why? How do you do this?
When you
think food has
defrosted, it is
important
to check to make
sure.
The outside may
look defrosted
but the inside
could still be
frozen.
1. Check for ice crystals in the
food using your hand or a skewer.
Do you use this check? Yes
2. With birds, check the joints
are flexible.
Do you use this check? Yes
3. If you use another check, write the details here:
What to do if things go wrong How to stop this happening again
• Iffoodhasnotfullydefrosted,continuetodefrost
the food until no ice crystals are left. Test again
before cooking or reheating.
• Speedupthedefrostingprocesse.g.byusingcold
wateroramicrowave(seethefrontofthissheet).
• Useanalternativemenuitem.Ifyoudonothave
time to defrost for longer, replace the dish with a
similardishthatisreadytoserve.
• Changeyourdefrostingmethodandmakeitsafer,
e.g. defrost smaller amounts.
• Makesureyouallowenoughtimetodefrost.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
• Ifyoudefrostlotsoffoodinyourbusinessyou
may wish to consider creating extra fridge space or using
a special defrosting cabinet.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Defrosting
Harmful bacteria can grow in food that
is not defrosted properly.
Safety points Why? How do you do this?
Food should be thoroughly
defrosted before cooking
(unless the manufacturer’s
instructions tell you to cook
fromfrozenoryouhavea
provensafemethod).
If food is still frozen or partially frozen, it
will take longer to cook.
The outside of the food could be
cooked, but the centre might not be,
which means it could contain harmful
bacteria.
Do you check food is thoroughly
defrosted before cooking?
Yes
If not, what do you do?
Options for defrosting food
1.Ideally,planaheadtoleave
enough time and space to
defrost small amounts of food
in the fridge.
Puttingfoodinthefridgewillkeepitat
a safe temperature while it is defrosting.
Do you use this method? Yes
How much time do you
allow for defrosting?
2. If you cannot defrost food in
the fridge, you could put it in
a container and then place it
under cold running water.
Cold water will
help to speed
up defrosting
without
allowing the
outside of the
food to get too
warm.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
3. If you use the sink to defrost
some foods, make sure the
sink is clean and empty. The
sink should be cleaned and
then disinfected after being
used for defrosting.
Cold water will help speed
up defrosting.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
How to use the safe methods
The ‘Safety point’ column highlights things that are
important to make food safely.
The ‘Why?’ column tells you why the safety point is
important.
The ‘How do you do this?’ column is for you to write
down what you do.
In some places you only need to tick a box and in
other places write a small amount.
Pictures help to illustrate the safety points.
Sometimes the pictures are marked with one of these symbols:
Some safe methods have a ‘Check it’ section, which
tells you what to look for to make sure your method
has worked.
= right = wrong
The ‘What to do if things go wrong’ column gives
practical tips on how to tackle problems.
The ‘How to stop this happening again’ column tells
you how you can prevent problems.
If things go wrong, write down what happened
and what you did in your diary. Each safe method
reminds you to do this.
Front
Back
Diary pages
Week commencing:
Monday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
/ /
Tuesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Thursday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Saturday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Extra checks
We have performed the following extra checks this
week.
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Wednesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Friday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Sunday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks
Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
How to use the diary
The diary should be filled in every day by the person responsible for running the business. There is also a
4-weekly review so you can look back at previous weeks and identify any persistent problems.
Fill in the date at the start of the week.
Each day, tick here to say you have completed your
Opening checks and your Closing checks – see the
Management section for more information on these.
Each day, write your name and sign to say that all the
safe methods have been followed.
If anything different happens or something goes
wrong, make a note of it under the appropriate day.
If you do any Extra checks, make a note in the section
at the end of the week – see the Management
section for more information on these.
Questions
What do I do next?
Work through the pack one section at a time and complete
all the safe methods that are relevant to your business. It
will take you about one hour to complete a section. We
suggest you do one section at a time, for example one a
week. So that is just one hour of your time to get started.
When you have worked through all the sections, make sure
you and your staff:
• follow the safe methods all the time
• ll in the diary every day
How do I use the ‘Working with food?’ factsheet
and the DVD with the pack?
Use the ‘Working with food?’ factsheet to train your staff on
good personal hygiene on their first day at work. It has been
designed to help overcome language difficulties.
There are videos available online to help you use the pack
and train your staff, and there are 16 languages for you to
choose from. You do not have to work through the videos
to use the pack in your business, but it will help you do this.
This and other helpful videos are available at
food.gov.uk/foodindustry/caterers
How will I benefit from using this pack?
Using the pack in your business will help you to:
comply with food hygiene regulations
show what you do to make food safely
train staff
protect your business’s reputation
improve your business, e.g. by wasting less food
Do I need to keep lots of daily records?
No, you do not need lots of daily records. Once you have
worked through the pack and completed all the relevant
safe methods, you only need to fill in the diary each day.
This should take just one minute, unless you have
something special to write down.
It is a legal requirement to keep a record of what food
products you have bought, who you bought them from, the
quantity and the date. Usually the easiest way to do this is
to keep all your invoices and receipts.
Questions
Do I need to use a temperature probe?
You can use this pack in your business without using a
temperature probe. However, if you use methods or checks
for cooking, reheating, hot holding or chilling that are
different to what is recommended in the pack, you will
need to use a probe to prove that what you do is safe. You
may also like to use a probe for extra reassurance that your
methods are safe. See the ‘Prove it’ safe method in the
Management section.
Where can I get more information?
For more information on food safety, talk to the
environmental health service at your local authority or visit
food.gov.uk/foodindustry/caterers
For details of Food Standards Agency publications, visit
food.gov.uk or call 0845 606 0667.
About this guidance
This guidance follows the Government Code of Practice on Guidance. If you believe this guidance
breaches the Code for any reason, or if you have any comments on the guidance, please contact us at
FoodBusinessHygiene@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk
This guidance was originally published in September 2005. The most recent update is April 2012 and it will be
reviewed again in April 2015.
Copyright
The material featured in this publication is subject to Crown copyright protection unless otherwise indicated.
You may re-use the information in the SFBB pack (not including the Food Standards Agency logos and photographs
that are the copyright of a third party) free of charge in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open
Government Licence at: nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/
This is subject to the material being reproduced accurately and not used in a misleading context. The material
must be acknowledged as Crown copyright and the source identified as the Food Standards Agency.
Any enquiries regarding the use and re-use of this information resource should be emailed to:
psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk
Or you can write to:
Information Policy Team
The National Archives
Kew
London
TW9 4DU
The permission to reproduce Crown protected material does not extend to any material in this publication which
is the copyright of a third party. Authorisation to reproduce such material must be obtained from the copyright
holders concerned. Please note that some of the images in this resource are third party copyright, therefore you do
not have permission to re-use them.
Note that the Agency has produced supporting guidance about the use and re-use of SFBB, which can be found at:
food.gov.uk/multimedia/pdfs/guidancelaadaptingsfbb.pdf
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Diary
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Cross-contamination
Cross-contamination is one of the most common causes of food poisoning.
It happens when harmful bacteria are spread onto food from other food,
surfaces, hands or equipment.
These harmful bacteria often come from raw meat/poultry, fish, eggs and
unwashed vegetables. So it is especially important to handle these foods
carefully.
Other sources of bacteria can include:
• staff
• pests
• equipment
• cloths
• dirt or soil
When you handle raw and ready-to-eat food in your business you may need
to consider extra procedures to help keep the food you produce safe. More
information can be found at: food.gov.uk/ecoliguide
Do not forget that you should also protect food from ‘physical contamination’
(where objects get into food, e.g. broken glass or pieces of packaging) and
‘chemical contamination’ (where chemicals get into food, e.g. cleaning
products or pest control chemicals).
This section also includes information on food allergies.
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Safe method:
Personal hygiene
It is vital for staff to follow good personal hygiene
practices to help prevent bacteria from spreading to food.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Staff should always wash their hands
thoroughly before preparing food.
(See the ‘Handwashing’ method in the
Cleaning section.)
Handwashing is one of the best ways
to prevent harmful bacteria from
spreading.
Are all staff trained to wash their
hands before preparing food?
Yes No
All staff should wear clean clothes when
working with food. Ideally, they should
change into clean work clothes before
starting work and not wear these clothes
outside food preparation areas.
Clothes can bring dirt and bacteria
into food preparation areas. Wearing
clean clothes helps to prevent this.
Do your staff wear clean work
clothes?
Yes No
Do your staff change clothes
before starting work?
Yes No
Describe your staff’s work
clothes here:
Ideally, work clothes should be long-
sleeved and light-coloured (to show the
dirt) with no external pockets. It is also
a good idea to wear a clean apron or
disposable apron over work clothes.
This prevents skin from touching food
and helps to stop hairs, fibres and the
contents of pockets (which can carry
bacteria) getting into food.
Staff should change aprons after working
with raw food e.g. meat, poultry, eggs or
unwashed vegetables.
Aprons help to stop dirt and bacteria
from getting onto work clothes
and they can be removed easily for
washing, or thrown away if disposable.
What type of aprons do you use?
Which tasks do you use them for?
It is good practice
for staff to keep
hair tied back
and wear a hat
or hairnet when
preparing food.
If hair is not tied
back or covered,
it is more likely
to fall into food
and staff are
more likely to
touch their hair.
Do staff keep hair tied back?
Yes No
Do staff wear hats or hairnets
when preparing food?
Yes No
Staff should not wear watches or
jewellery when preparing food
(except a wedding band).
Watches and jewellery can collect and
spread dirt and harmful bacteria, or
fall in the food.
Do your staff take off watches
and jewellery before preparing
food?
Yes No
Staff should not smoke, drink, eat or
chew gum while handling food.
Staff should also avoid touching their
face or nose, or coughing and sneezing.
All of these lead to staff touching their
face or mouth. Harmful bacteria can be
spread from someone’s face or mouth
to their hands and then onto food.
Are staff trained not to do
these things?
Yes No
Fitness for work
Safety point Why?
Staff should be ‘fit for work’ at all times. This means that
they must not be suffering from, or carrying, an illness or
disease that could cause a problem with food safety.
People who are not ‘fit for work’ could spread harmful
bacteria or viruses to food.
Any member of staff who has diarrhoea and/or vomiting
should report it to their manager immediately and either
stay at home or go home straight away.
People suffering from these symptoms often carry
harmful bacteria on their hands and can spread them
to food or equipment they touch.
Staff who have had diarrhoea and/or vomiting should
not return to work until they have had no symptoms
for 48 hours.
Even if the diarrhoea and vomiting has stopped,
someone can still carry harmful bacteria for
48 hours afterwards.
Staff should tell their manager if they have any cuts or
sores and these should be completely covered with a
brightly coloured waterproof dressing.
Cuts and sores can carry harmful bacteria. Covering
them prevents bacteria spreading to food.
What to do if things go wrong How to stop this happening again
• Ifstaffarenot‘tforwork’,movethemoutoffood
handling areas or send them home. Throw away any
unwrapped foods they have handled.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Manage it Why? How do you do this?
Make sure that all staff
understand the importance
of being ‘fit for work’ and
what they need to report.
This is so they understand how some types
of illness can affect the safety of food and
that they must tell their manager if they
have these types of illness.
Make a note in your diary of when
you have trained staff on this safe
method.
It is a good idea to have a
separate area where staff
can change and store their
outdoor clothes.
Clothes could be a source of bacteria if
they are left lying around.
Where do staff change and store
their outdoor clothes?
It is good practice to keep a
clean set of work clothes or
disposable aprons for visitors.
Anyone entering the kitchen can bring in
bacteria on their clothes.
Where do you keep clean uniforms/
disposable aprons?
Personal hygiene
Safe method:
Cloths
Cloths can be one of the top causes of cross-contamination
in the kitchen. It is essential to use them safely to prevent
bacteria from spreading.
Safety point Why?
Use disposable cloths wherever possible, and throw
them away after each task.
This will make sure that any bacteria picked
up by the cloth will not be spread.
Always use a new or freshly cleaned and disinfected
cloth to wipe work surfaces, equipment or utensils that
will be used with ready-to-eat food.
It is especially important to protect ready-to-eat food
from bacteria. This is because the food will not be
cooked, so any bacteria on the food will not be killed.
Take away re-usable cloths for thorough washing
after using them with raw meat/poultry, eggs or raw
vegetables – and surfaces that have touched these
foods.
Raw meat/poultry and eggs are more likely
to contain harmful bacteria than other foods. The soil
on vegetables can also contain harmful bacteria.
If using re-usable cloths, make sure they are thoroughly
washed, disinfected and dried between tasks (not just
when they look dirty).
Ideally, wash cloths in a washing machine on a hot cycle
e.g. at more than 82°C.
If you wash and disinfect cloths by hand, make sure
all the food and dirt has been removed before you
disinfect them. Use very hot water to disinfect the
cloths.
Using dirty cloths can spread bacteria very easily.
A hot wash cycle will clean the cloths thoroughly and
kill bacteria (disinfect).
If food or dirt is still on the cloths, this will prevent the
disinfection process from being effective, so harmful
bacteria might not be killed.
How do you do this?
How do you clean re-usable cloths?
Different cloths for different jobs
Jobs The best cloth
for the job
Do you
do this?
If not, what do you do?
Holding hot items (e.g.
oven trays) – use tea
towel or chef’s cloth
Yes
Washing up dishes –
use a dish cloth
Yes
Use disposable cloths
or paper towels for the
following jobs:
Wiping surfaces
Yes
Mopping up spills
Yes
Wiping hands
Yes
Wiping sides of dishes
before serving
Yes
Drying ingredients
Yes
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyounoticedirtyclothsinthekitchen,removethem
for cleaning immediately or throw them away.
• Ifyouthinkyourstaffhaveusedadirtycloth,wash,
disinfect and dry any equipment, work surfaces or
utensils it has touched and throw away any food that
might have been contaminated.
How to stop this happening again
• Considerusingdisposableclothsifyouarenotusing
them already.
• Increaseyoursupplyofdisposable/cleancloths.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvesupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Manage it Why? How do you do this?
Have a special place in the
kitchen for dirty re-usable cloths.
This is to prevent them
being re-used before they
have been washed.
Where do staff put
dirty re-usable cloths?
Always keep a good supply of
disposable/clean cloths in your
kitchen.
Staff are more likely to use
clean cloths if plenty are
available.
Where do you keep
new/clean cloths?
Cloths
Safe method:
Separating foods
Keeping raw and ready-to-eat food separate is
essential to prevent harmful bacteria from spreading.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Delivery and collection
Plan delivery times so that, if possible,
raw foods arrive at different times to
other foods.
If you collect food from shops yourself,
make sure it is kept at the correct
temperature when you transport it
and that raw and ready-to-eat food is
kept separate.
Unload deliveries in a clean, separate
area. Remove outer packaging and
throw it away. Before you do this, make
a note of any cooking instructions or
ingredient information, if you need to.
Sometimes the information is only on
the outer packaging.
This helps to prevent harmful
bacteria spreading from raw meat/
poultry to other foods.
This will prevent dirty outer
packaging or leaks from deliveries
from spreading bacteria. Packaging
can also contain pests.
When do deliveries come?
Make a note in your diary.
Storage
Ideally, store raw and ready-to-eat food
in separate fridges, freezers and display
units. If they are in the same unit, store
raw meat, poultry, fish and eggs below
ready-to-eat food. Unwashed fruit and
vegetables should also be kept separate
from ready-to-eat food and above raw
meat.
Cover cooked foods and other
ready-to-eat food.
This helps to prevent harmful
bacteria spreading from raw food
to ready-to-eat food.
How do you make sure raw
and ready-to-eat food is stored
separately?
Defrosting
Keep foods that are defrosting in the
fridge in a covered container, below
ready-to-eat food, or in a separate area
of the kitchen away from other foods.
(See the ‘Defrosting’ method in the
Chilling section.)
When foods are defrosting,
the liquid that comes out can
contain harmful bacteria, which
could spread to other foods.
Where do you defrost foods?
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Preparation
Prepare raw meat/poultry and
other foods in different areas.
If this is not possible, separate
by preparing them at different
times and clean and then disinfect
thoroughly between tasks.
Never use the same chopping
board or knives for preparing
raw meat/poultry and for
ready-to-eat food (unless they
have been thoroughly cleaned
and disinfected in between).
This helps to prevent harmful bacteria
spreading from one food to another.
Harmful bacteria from raw meat/poultry
can spread from chopping boards and
knives to other foods.
How do you separate raw meat/
poultry and other foods during
preparation?
Do not wash raw meat or poultry. Washing meat does not kill bacteria, but
it can splash harmful bacteria around the
kitchen contaminating sinks, taps and
surfaces.
Always use separate equipment,
such as vacuum packers, slicers or
mincers, for raw and ready-to-eat
food.
It is not possible to remove harmful
bacteria from complex machinery and
these bacteria can spread to food.
Cooking, eg grill, barbecue
When you add raw meat make
sure it does not touch or drip
onto the food already cooking.
Bacteria could spread from the raw meat
to the other food and stop it being safe
to eat.
How do you keep raw meat
separate from food already
cooking?
Think twice!
Equipment with moving parts
You should not use the same equipment, such as vacuum packing machines, slicers and mincers, for both raw
and ready-to-eat food. These are complex pieces of machinery with lots of moving parts and it is not possible
to clean them sufficiently, so any bacteria from raw food could easily be transferred to ready-to-eat food.
Separating foods
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyouthinkthatready-to-eatfoodhasnotbeen
kept separate from raw food throw away the food.
• Ifequipment/surfaces/utensilshavebeentouched
by raw food, wash, disinfect and dry them to prevent
harmful bacteria from spreading.
How to stop this happening again
• Re-organisedeliverytimes,storageandfood
preparation to make it easier to keep food separate.
• Makesureyouhaveenoughstoragespaceanditis
well organised.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Food allergies
It is important to know what to do if you serve a
customer who has a food allergy, because these
allergies can be life-threatening.
Safety point Why?
If someone asks if a dish contains a certain food, check all
the ingredients in the dish (and what they contain), as well
as what you use to cook the dish, thicken a sauce and to
make a garnish or salad dressing. Never guess. A customer
may also give you a ‘chef card’ listing the foods that they
are sensitive to.
If someone has a severe allergy, they can react to
even a tiny amount of the food they are sensitive to.
You can find out more about allergies at
food.gov.uk/safereating/allergyintol/guide/
Keep a copy of the ingredient information of any ready-
made foods you use.
This is so you can check what is in them.
When you have been asked to prepare a dish that does
not contain a certain food, make sure work surfaces and
equipment have been thoroughly cleaned first. Make sure
staff wash their hands thoroughly before preparing the
dish.
This is to prevent small amounts of the food that a
person is allergic to getting into the dish accidentally.
Give detailed information in the name or description of
dishes on the menu, especially if they include the foods
listed over the page, e.g. chocolate and almond slice,
sesame oil dressing. Remember to update the menu when
recipes change.
This allows people with food allergies to spot that
dishes contain certain foods.
How do you do this?
How do you check if food does not contain a particular ingredient?
How do you prepare food for someone with a food allergy?
Think twice!
Which ingredients can cause a problem?
These are some of the foods people may be allergic to and some of the places where they may
be found:
Nuts In sauces, desserts, crackers, bread, ice cream, marzipan, ground almonds,
nut oils.
Peanuts In sauces, cakes, desserts. Don’t forget groundnut oil and peanut flour.
Eggs In cakes, mousses, sauces, pasta, quiche, some meat products. Don’t forget foods containing
mayonnaise or brushed with egg.
Milk In yoghurt, cream, cheese, butter, milk powders. Also check for foods glazed with milk.
Fish In some salad dressings, pizzas, relishes, fish sauce. You might also find fish in some soy and
Worcestershire sauces.
Crustacea Such as prawns, lobster, scampi, crab, shrimp paste.
Molluscs These include mussels, whelks, squid, land snails, oyster sauce.
Cereals containing
gluten
Such as wheat, rye and barley. Also check foods containing flour, such as bread, pasta, cakes,
pastry, meat products, sauces, soups, batter, stock cubes, breadcrumbs, foods dusted with
flour.
Celery This includes celery stalks, leaves and seeds and celeriac. Also look out for celery in salads,
soups, celery salt, some meat products.
Lupin Lupin seeds and flour in some types of bread and pastries.
Mustard Including liquid mustard, mustard powder and mustard seeds, in salad dressings, marinades,
soups, sauces, curries, meat products.
Seseme seeds In bread, breadsticks, tahini, houmous, sesame oil.
Soya As tofu or beancurd, soya flour and textured soya protein, in some ice cream, sauces,
desserts, meat products, vegetarian products.
Sulphur dioxide In meat products, fruit juice drinks, dried fruit and vegetables, wine, beer.
Food allergies
What to do if things go wrong
If you think a customer is having a severe allergic
reaction:
• Donotmovethem.
• Ring999andaskforanambulancewithaparamedic
straight away.
• Explainthatyourcustomercouldhaveanaphylaxis
(pronounced ‘anna-fill-axis’).
• Sendsomeoneoutsidetowaitfortheambulance.
How to stop this happening again
• Makesureallyourstaffunderstandhowimportantitis
to check all the contents of a dish if asked by someone
who has a food allergy.
• Makesureyoukeepingredientinformation
for all ready-made products and staff know
to check it.
• Reviewthewaythatstaffprepareadishforsomeone
with a food allergy – are they cleaning effectively first
and using clean equipment?
• Improvethedescriptionsonyourmenu.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvesupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Physical and chemical contamination
It is very important to prevent objects
and chemicals getting into food.
Safety point Why?
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions
on how to use and store cleaning
chemicals.
Store cleaning chemicals separately
from food and make sure they are
clearly labelled.
This is to prevent these
chemicals getting into food.
Keep food covered. This helps to stop things falling
into the food.
Make sure you control pests
effectively. (See the ‘Pest control’ safe
method.)
This is to stop insects, droppings etc. getting into food, as well as
preventing the spread of bacteria.
Make sure that any chemicals you use
to control pests are used and stored
in the correct way and clearly labelled.
This is to prevent these chemicals getting into food.
Always clear and clean as you go and
take care to throw away packaging,
string etc.
as soon as you remove it. (See the
‘Clear and clean as you go’ safe
method in the Cleaning section.)
Keeping surfaces clear and
clean will help prevent
chemicals and objects getting
into food, as well as preventing
the spread of bacteria.
Repair or replace any equipment or
utensils that are damaged or have
loose parts.
Loose parts may get into food
by accident.
It is a good idea to have a rule of no
glass in the kitchen.
This helps to prevent broken glass getting into food.
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifchemicalsorobjects,suchasglassorinsects,
get into food, throw the food away.
•Ifyoundpestsorsignsofpests,takeaction
immediately. (See the ‘Pest control’ safe method.)
•Ifyoundobjectsinfoodthathasbeendelivered,
reject the delivery, if possible, and contact your
supplier immediately.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewhowyouuseandstorechemicals
in your business.
• Reviewyourpestcontrolarrangements.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Think twice!
When you clean work surfaces, make sure that any cleaning chemicals you use are suitable for surfaces touched
by food.
Think twice!
Covering foods
It is important to keep food covered to help protect it from harmful bacteria. This is especially important for
cooked food and other ready-to-eat food. Always use containers or bags that have been designed to store food.
Suggestedfoodcoveringsincludekitchenfoil,clinglm,plasticboxeswithlidsorfreezerbags.Keepunusedfood
coverings clean and separate from food.
When you are covering food:
• Checkthemanufacturer’sinstructionstoseeifthecoveringissuitableforwhatyouareusingitfor.
• Alwaysmakesurethatthefoodisproperlycovered.
• Takecarenottoletthecoveringfallintofoods.
• Neverre-usefoil,clinglmorfreezerbagsanddonotstorefoodinopenedtins.
• Makesurethatplasticboxesarewashed,disinfectedanddriedbetweenuses.
Avoid re-using food packaging to store food. Often packaging is designed to be used once with a certain food, so
it might not be safe to use it again, or to use it with a different food. If food packaging is used in a way that it was
not designed for, chemicals could transfer into the food. Instead, use re-usable containers that have been designed
to store food.
Physical and chemical contamination
Safe method:
Pest control
Effective pest control is essential to keep pests out of your
premises and prevent them from spreading harmful bacteria.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Check your premises regularly for
signs of pests.
Pests carry harmful bacteria. When do you check for pests?
One option is to employ a pest
control contractor. See the ‘Suppliers
and contractors’ safe method in the
Management section.
Check deliveries thoroughly for signs
of pests. Do not accept a delivery if it
shows signs of pests such as gnawed
packaging or insects, e.g. beetles.
Pests could come into your
premises in a delivery.
How do you check deliveries?
Keep external areas tidy and free from
weeds. Make sure bins have close-
fitting lids and are easy to clean.
Weeds and rubbish can attract
pests and provide them with
food and shelter.
How often do you check external areas?
Type of pest Signs of pests
Rats and mice Small footprints in dust, droppings, holes
in walls and doors, nests, gnawed goods
or packaging, grease or smear marks,
urine stains on food packaging
Flies and flying insects
e.g. moths
Bodies of insects, live insects, webbing,
nests, droning or buzzing, maggots
Pest control
Type of pest
Cockroaches
Signs of pests
Eggs and egg cases, moulted ‘skins’, the
insects themselves, droppings
Ants Small piles of sand or soil, the insects
themselves, flying ants on hot days
Birds Feathers, droppings, nests, noise, the
birds themselves
Beetles and weevils Moving insects, particularly in dry food,
small maggots
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyouseesignsofapestinfestation,callapest
contractor immediately. Write the contact details
for your pest contractor on the Contacts list in the
diary.
• Ifyouthinkanyequipment,surfacesorutensils
have been touched by pests, they should be
washed, disinfected and dried to stop harmful
bacteria from spreading.
• Ifyouthinkfoodhasbeentouchedbypests
in any way, throw it away.
How to stop this happening again
• Makeyourpestchecksmorefrequent.
• Improvestafftrainingonrecognisingsignsofpestsand
encourage them to report problems immediately.
• Ifyouhavepersistentproblemswithpests,consider
employing a pest contractor, if you do not have one
already.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Think twice!
Neverletpestcontrolbait/chemicals,includingsprays,comeintocontactwithfood,packaging,equipmentor
surfaces, because they are likely to be poisonous to people.
Manage it
• Makesurenofoodordirtyplatesetc.areleftoutatnight–theseareasourceoffoodforpests.
• Makesurethatchecksforpestsarecarriedoutregularly.
• Putremindersofwhentocheckforpestsinyourdiary.
• Ifyouhaveapestcontractor,keeparecordoftheircontactdetailsandvisitsinyourdiary,aswellasany
feedback or action points they recommend. Make a note of when you have carried these out.
Safe method:
Maintenance
Effective maintenance is essential to allow
you to clean properly and keep pests out.
Safety point Why?
Repair structural damage as soon as it
happens e.g. damp/chipped plaster,
broken tiles, holes in walls or windows.
Structural damage can make
your premises harder to clean
and can attract pests.
Check extractor fans and filters
regularly to make sure they are
working properly and are free from
grease and dirt.
This is to make sure the fans and filters can do their job properly.
Replace chopping boards that are
scratched, pitted or scored.
Dirt and harmful bacteria can
collect in any areas where the
board is not smooth.
Repair or replace any equipment or
utensils that are damaged or have
loose parts.
Dirt and harmful bacteria
can collect in damaged
equipment/utensils. Loose
parts may fall into food.
Throw away any cracked or chipped
dishes and other tableware.
Dirt and harmful bacteria can
collect in cracks or chips.
Make sure your cooking, hot holding
and chilling equipment is well
maintained and working properly.
If it does not work properly, food may not be kept safe.
Temperature probes should be
checked regularly to make sure their
readings are accurate.
If your probe is not accurate,
then it will not give a reliable
measure of whether food is at
a safe temperature. (See the
‘Prove it’ safe method in the
Management section.)
Maintenance
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyouthinkthatequipmentmightnotbeworking
properly,checkitstraightaway.
Donotwaituntilithasbrokendown.Checkthatstaff
areusingtheequipmentproperly.
• Lookatthemanufacturer’sinstructionsto
seeifthereisatroubleshootingsection.
• Contacttheequipmentmanufactureroryour
maintenancecontractor,ifyouhaveone.
• Usealternativeequipmentuntilthefaulthasbeen
corrected.
How to stop this happening again
• Makeyourmaintenancechecksmorefrequent.
• Encouragestafftoreportanystructuraldamage
orproblemswithequipment,soyouknowabout
problemsearly.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Manage it
• Checkyourpremisesregularlyforanystructural
damageorproblemswithequipment.
• Putproblemsrightassoonaspossible,beforethey
getworseoraffectfoodsafety.Makeanoteinyour
diaryofwhatyoudo.
• Putremindersinyourdiaryofmaintenancechecks
andmakeanoteofanyrepairsyoumake.
How do you do this?
Doyoudothis?
Yes Writeanydetailshere:
Cleaning
Effective cleaning is essential to get rid of harmful bacteria
and stop them spreading to food.
This section tells you about handwashing, cleaning
effectively, how to ‘clear and clean as you go’ and
developing a cleaning schedule.
This page has been left intentionally blank
Safe method:
Handwashing
Effective handwashing is essential to help prevent
bacteria spreading to food.
Make sure that all staff who work with food wash their hands properly before preparing food. Harmful bacteria
can spread very easily from people’s hands to food, work surfaces, equipment etc. Effective handwashing helps to
prevent this. Following the steps below will make sure hands are washed properly.
Washing hands effectively
Step 1:
Wet your hands thoroughly
under warm running water
and squirt liquid soap onto
your palm.
Step 2:
Rub your hands together
palm to palm to make a
lather.
Step 3:
Rub the palm of one hand
along the back of the other
and along the fingers.
Repeat with the other
hand.
Step 4:
Put your palms together
with fingers interlocked
and rub in between each
of the fingers thoroughly.
Step 5:
Rub around your thumbs
on each hand and then rub
the fingertips of each hand
against your palms.
Step 6:
Rinse off the soap with
clean water and dry your
hands thoroughly on a
disposable towel. Turn off
the tap with the towel
and then throw the towel
away.
Check it
For hands to be washed
properly, you need warm
running water, liquid soap
and preferably disposable
towels.
Do you use liquid soap?
Yes No If no, what do you use?
Do you use disposable towels?
Yes No If no, what do you use?
Handwashing
When to wash your hands
When entering the kitchen e.g. after a break or going to the toilet.
After touching or emptying bins.
After any cleaning.
After touching a cut or changing a dressing.
After touching items such as phones, light switches, door handles and
cash registers.
Think twice!
If you use disposable gloves in your business, they should never be used as an alternative to effective
handwashing
When using disposable gloves make sure you:
• Washyourhandsthoroughlybeforeputtingthemonandaftertakingthemoff.
• Alwayschangethemregularly,especiallywhenhandlingrawandready-to-eatfood.
• Throwthemawayafteruseorifdamaged.
Hygienic hand rubs and gels can be useful when used as an additional precaution, but should never be used as a
replacement for effective handwashing.
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyouthinkamemberofstaffhasnotwashedtheir
hands, make sure they wash them straight away and
emphasise how important it is to wash their hands
when working with food.
How to stop this happening again
• Makesurethathandbasinsareconvenientwithplenty
of soap and disposable towels.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Cleaning effectively
Effective cleaning is essential to get rid of
harmful bacteria and stop them spreading.
Safety point Why?
Cleaning needs to be carried out in two stages.
First use a cleaning product to remove visible
dirt from surfaces and equipment, and rinse.
Then disinfect them using the correct dilution
and contact time for the disinfectant, after
rinse with fresh clean water.
Chemical disinfectants only work if surfaces have been thoroughly
cleaned first to remove grease and other dirt.
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on how
to use cleaning chemicals. Disinfectants and
sanitisers should meet BS EN standards. You
can find out more in the ‘cleaning terms’ in the
‘Your cleaning schedule’ safe method.
This is important to make sure that chemicals work effectively.
Wash work surfaces and equipment thoroughly
between tasks, follow the manufacturer’s
cleaning instructions if there are any. Wash
and then disinfect them after preparing raw
food.
This will help prevent dirt and
bacteria spreading onto other
foods from the surface or
equipment.
High-priority cleaning
Regularly wash/wipe and disinfect all the
items people touch frequently, such as work
surfaces, sinks, taps, door handles, switches,
can openers, cash registers, telephones and
scales.
Where possible, allow these to dry naturally at
the end of each day/shift.
This will help prevent dirt
and bacteria being spread to
people’s hands and then to
food or other areas.
Drying naturally helps prevent
bacteria being spread back to
these items on a towel/cloth
used for drying.
Wash and disinfect fridges regularly at a time
when they do not contain much food. Transfer
food to another fridge or a safe cold area and
keep it covered.
To clean a fridge thoroughly,
you should take out all
the food and keep it cold
somewhere else. If food is
left out at room temperature,
bacteria could grow.
Pay special attention to how often you clean
pieces of equipment that have moving parts.
These can be more difficult to clean, but it is important to clean
equipment properly to stop bacteria and dirt building up.
Ideally use a dishwasher. If you do not have a
dishwasher, wash plates, equipment etc. in hot
soapy water using diluted detergent. Remove
grease and any food and dirt. Then immerse
them in very hot, clean water. Leave to air dry,
or dry with a clean disposable cloth.
Dishwashers wash items
thoroughly at a high
temperature so this is a good
way to clean equipment and
kill bacteria (disinfect).
Cleaning effectively
Other cleaning
Safety point
Items that do not touch food are not as
high a priority but they should still be
cleaned effectively. Examples include
dry storage areas and floors.
For equipment or areas that are hard
to clean, you may wish to employ a
contract cleaner.
Why?
This prevents dirt and bacteria
building up in the kitchen.
Contract cleaners have special
equipment and experience of
more difficult cleaning.
Think twice!
Effective cleaning needs to be carried out in two stages. Disinfectants will only work on clean surfaces. Always
use a cleaning product to remove visible dirt and grease before disinfecting. Always check the manufacturer’s
instructions for the correct dilution and contact time for disinfectants or sanitisers.
When you are cleaning, remember to move food out of the way, or cover it. This is to prevent dirt, bacteria or
cleaning chemicals from getting onto food.
Manage it Why? How do you do this?
Fill out the cleaning schedule in
the diary to show how you manage
cleaning in your business. (See
the ‘Your cleaning schedule’ safe
method.)
This is to make sure that staff
know what to clean, when and
how.
Have you completed the cleaning
schedule from the diary?
Yes
No
If no, are you using another cleaning
schedule?
Yes
No
Make sure you always have a good
supply of cleaning chemicals,
materials and equipment. It can be
helpful to put a reminder in your
diary of when you should buy more.
Staff are more likely to clean
properly if the right cleaning
chemicals, materials and
equipment are available.
Do you make sure you have a good
supply of cleaning products?
Yes
No
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyoundthatanyiteminyourkitchenisnotproperly
clean, wash and disinfect it and allow it to dry.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewyourcleaningschedule,includinghowyou
clean and how often.
• Makesureyourcleaningchemicals,materialsand
equipment are suitable for the tasks you use them
for and are being used correctly.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Clear and clean as you go
Keeping your kitchen clear and clean makes it safer.
Safety point Why?
Take off outer packaging from food
and throw it away before you bring
food into the kitchen or storeroom.
Outer packaging could have touched dirty floors etc. when it has been
stored or transported before.
Take extra care with how you throw
away packaging and food waste from
raw food. If packaging from raw food
touches work surfaces make sure
you wash and then disinfect them
afterwards.
Packaging and food waste from
these foods are more likely to
spread harmful bacteria to food
and surfaces.
Keep your kitchen free from clutter
and rubbish. Clear away dirty kitchen
equipment as soon as possible.
Work surfaces are easier to
keep clean when they are not
cluttered. It is also important to
clear away used equipment to
prevent bacteria spreading from
it to surfaces or food.
Keep sinks clear and clean them
regularly.
This stops dirt building up and helps prevent bacteria from spreading.
Wash or wipe away spills as soon as
they happen. Clean and then disinfect
work surfaces after wiping up spills
from raw food.
This stops dirt building up and
helps prevent bacteria from
spreading.
Wash work surfaces thoroughly
between tasks. Use a new cloth
(or one that has been washed and
disinfected) to clean work surfaces
beforepreparingready-to-eatfood.
This will help prevent dirt and
bacteria spreading onto other
foods from the surface. A dirty
cloth could spread bacteria to
the surface.
Clear and clean as you go
Manage it
‘Clear and clean as you go’ is the recommended way of keeping your kitchen clean as you work.
How do you do this?
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyoundthatworksurfacesorequipmentarenot
properly clean, wash, disinfect and dry them before
using them to prepare food.
• Ifyoundanypackagingorwastelyingaround,throw
it away immediately and clean and then disinfect the
work surface thoroughly.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewyourclearingandcleaningpractices.
• Reviewstafnglevels.
• Considerchangingtheorder/timingoftaskstomake
it easier to keep surfaces clear and clean.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Your cleaning schedule
A cleaning schedule is a useful tool to help
you clean effectively in your business.
What to do
You can use the cleaning schedule supplied in the diary to write down how you clean in your business.
This safe method should help you do this.
Alternatively, you may already have a cleaning schedule. If so, you can continue to use it, but it is a good idea to
look at this safe method and review your schedule to make sure that it covers the right things.
It is important to write down how you do your cleaning, so you can show what you do. It is also useful for staff
to be able to check how they should clean things, so you may wish to put your cleaning schedule on the wall.
Safety point How do you do this?
Walk through your premises and
make a list of everything that needs
cleaning. This will depend on what
you do in your business.
Some items should be cleaned more
frequently than others and some
should also be disinfected. You do
not need to disinfect everything –
concentrate on those items that will
be touched by food and frequently
touched items such as door handles.
You will also need to clean and then
disinfect surfaces or items that have
been touched by raw food, or leaks
or spills from these.
See the back of this sheet for
information on cleaning terms.
You may find it helpful to go through the following examples:
Items that need cleaning and disinfecting
Items that come into contact with food
• Worksurfacesandchoppingboards
• Equipmente.g.knives
• Fridgesandfreezers
• Equipmentwithmovingpartse.g.foodmixers,slicers,vacuumpacking
machines and processors
• Sinksandsoapdispensers
• Re-usableclothsandworkclothes
• Icemachines
Frequently touched items
• Rubbishbins,broomandmophandles
• Doorhandles,taps,switches,controls,cashregistersandscales
• Canopeners,telephones
Items that need cleaning
• Floors,walls,ceilings
• Storageareas
• Wasteareasanddrains
• Microwaves,ovens,dishwashers,hot-holdinganddisplaycabinets
• Self-serviceandstaffareas
For each item, or group of items,
write down what you do on your
cleaning schedule.
Include details on:
• Howyoucleantheitem(s)
• Whatchemicalsyouuseandhowtousethem
• Whatequipmentyouuse
• Howoftenyoucleantheitem(s)
Review your schedule regularly and
check that all cleaning is being done
properly.
Train staff on the cleaning schedule, so they know
what they have to do, and when. Supervise cleaning.
Your cleaning schedule
Example of a cleaning schedule
Fill in details of all the items you clean
Item Frequency of Precautions Method of cleaning
cleaning e.g. wear
gloves or
After use
goggles
Every shift
Daily
Weekly
Other
Work
surface
X Wear gloves 1. Remove any obvious food and dirt.
2. Wash the surface with hot soapy water (detergent diluted
according to manufacturer’s instructions) to remove grease
and any other food and dirt.
3. Rinse with clean water to remove the detergent and
loosened food and dirt.
4. Apply a disinfectant. Make sure you leave it on for the
contact time recommended by the manufacturer.
5. Rinse with clean water to remove the disinfectant.
6. Leave to dry naturally or use a clean disposable cloth.
Fridge X Wear gloves 1. Remove all food and store it in a cool place, ideally another
fridge or cool box.
2. Remove shelves and compartments from the fridge and
wash them in hot soapy water and then disinfect. Allow
to dry naturally or use a clean or disposable cloth.
3. Wash and then disinfect all surfaces of fridge with hot
soapy water and dry with a clean or disposable cloth.
4. Replace shelves and compartments, and put the food back
in the fridge.
5. Wash and disinfect the outside including the handles and
door seals.
EXAMPLE
Cleaning terms
Detergent
Achemical(e.g.washing-upliquid)usedtoremove
grease, dirt and food. Used for general cleaning.
Disinfectant
A chemical which kills bacteria. Check that surfaces
are clean of grease, dirt and food before you use a
disinfectant.
Sanitiser
Atwo-in-oneproductthatactsasadetergentanda
disinfectant. If you use a sanitiser, make sure you use it firs
to clean and remove grease, and then again to disinfect.
BS EN standards
Disinfectants and sanitisers should meet either BS EN
1276:1997, BS EN 13697:2001 or BS EN 1276:2009
standards.
Dilution rate
Most cleaning chemicals are concentrated, so you need
to add water to dilute them before they can be used. It
is important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions
on how much water to use with the chemical. This
is the ‘dilution rate’. If you add too much or too little
water, then the cleaning chemical might not work
effectively.
Contact time
This is how long a cleaning chemical needs to be left
on the item you are cleaning. It is important to follow
the manufacturer’s instructions on contact time for the
t
chemical to work effectively.
Chilling
Chilling food properly helps to stop harmful bacteria
from growing.
Some foods need to be kept chilled to keep them safe,
such as sandwiches, cooked food, cream and desserts,
food with a ‘use by’ date and food that says ‘keep
refrigerated’ on the label.
This section tells you about storing and displaying chilled
food, chilling down hot food, freezing and defrosting.
This page has been left intentionally blank
Safe method:
Chilled storage and
displaying chilled food
Harmful bacteria can grow in food that is not chilled properly.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Certain foods need to be kept chilled
to keep them safe e.g.
• foodwitha‘useby’date
• foodthatsays‘keeprefrigerated’on
the label
• foodyouhavecookedandwillnot
serveimmediately
• ready-to-eatfoodsuchas
sandwiches,saladsanddesserts
Ifthesetypes
of food are not
keptcoldenough
harmfulbacteria
couldgrow.
Doyoucheckregularly
thatthesetypesoffood
are kept chilled?
Yes
Ifnot,whatdoyoudo?
Makesurethatyoudonotusefood
afterits‘useby’date.
Fordishesyouhavepreparedor
cooked,itisagoodideatouse
stickers,oranothermethodof
labelling,tokeeptrackofwhenfood
shouldbeusedorthrownaway.
Ifyouarenotsurehowlongtokeep
food,askyourenvironmentalhealth
serviceforadvice.
Foodwith‘use
by’dates,cooked
dishes and other
ready-to-eatfood
havealimited
shelflife.Ifyou
keep them too
longtheymight
not be safe to eat.
Howdoyoukeeptrack
ofwhenfoodshouldbe
usedorthrownaway?
Followthemanufacturer’sinstructions
onhowtousefridgesandchilled
displayequipment.
It is important to
useequipment
properlytomake
surefoodiskept
coldenough.
Doyoufollowthe
manufacturer’s
instructionsforusing
your:
Fridge?
Chilleddisplayunit?
Ifnot,whatdoyoudo?
• Pre-coolthedisplayunitbeforeyou
putchilledfoodinit.
• Onlydisplayasmuchfoodasyou
thinkyouwillneed.
• Displayfoodfortheshortesttime
possible.
Youcouldalso:
• Usea‘dummy’portionfordisplay
(whichwillnotbeeaten).
• Usephotographstoshowcustomers
whatthefoodlookslike.
It is important to
keep chilled food
coldwhileitison
displaytoprevent
harmfulbacteria
fromgrowingin
the food.
Whatdoyoudoto
makesurechilledfood
isdisplayedsafely?
Chilled storage and displaying chilled food
Check it
Itisrecommendedthatfridgesandchilleddisplay
equipmentshouldbesetat5˚Corbelow.Thisisto
makesurethatchilledfoodiskeptat8˚Corbelow.
ThisisalegalrequirementinEngland,Walesand
NorthernIreland,andrecommendedinScotland.
Youshouldcheckthetemperatureofyourchilling
equipmentatleastonceadaystartingwithyour
openingchecks(seethe‘Openingandclosing
checks’safemethodintheManagementsection).
How do you do this?
Someequipmentwillhaveadigitaldisplayordialtoshow
whattemperatureitissetat.Youcanusethistocheckthe
temperatureofyourequipment.
Ifyoudothis,youshouldcheckregularlythatthe
temperatureshownonthedisplay/dialisaccurateusinga
fridge thermometer.
Howdoyoucheckthetemperatureofchillingequipment?
Fridge: Digitaldisplay/dial
Thermometer
Chilled display unit:Digitaldisplay/dial
Thermometer
Ifyoudonotdothis,whatdoyoudo?
Think twice!
Chilled food must be kept at 8°C or below, except for certain exceptions.
Whenyoudisplaycoldfood,e.g.onabuffet,youshouldusesuitablechilleddisplayequipmenttokeepitat8°Cor
below.Ifthisisnotpossible,youcandisplayfoodoutofchilledstorageforuptofourhours,butyoucanonlydo
this once.
Foodthathasnotbeenusedwithinfourhourscanbeputbackinthefridgeandkeptat8°Corbelowuntilitis
used.Ifithasbeenoutformorethanfourhoursitshouldbethrownaway.
Ifyoudotakefoodoutofchilledstoragetodisplayit,remembernottomixnewfoodwiththefoodthatisalready
ondisplay.Thiscouldleadtotheolderfoodbeingleftoutfortoolong.
Prove it
Ifyouwouldlikeextrareassurancethatyourchillingequipmentisworkingeffectively,youcanuseatemperature
probetocheckfoodasaone-offtesttoprovethatyourmethodkeepsfoodatasafetemperature.(Seethe‘Prove
it’safemethodintheManagementsectionforadviceonusingprobessafely.)
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyourfridgeordisplayequipmentbreaksdown,use
otherequipment,ormovethefoodtoacoldarea.
Ifyoucannotdothis,oryoudonotknowhowlong
theequipmenthasbeenbrokendown,contactthe
environmentalhealthserviceatyourlocalauthority
foradvice.
• Iffoodondisplayhasnotbeenkeptchilledformore
thanfourhours,throwitaway.
Rememberthatsomefoodsneedextracare.Seethe
safemethod‘Foodsthatneedextracare’intheCooking
section.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewyourchilleddisplaymethodandsee
ifyoucanmakeitsafer(usingthefrontof
thissheet).
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
• Ifyouhavefrequentproblemswithyourchilling
equipment,considerwhetheritissuitableforyour
business.Generally,commercialequipmentwillbe
moresuitableforcatering.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Chilling down hot food
Harmful bacteria can grow in food that
is not chilled down as quickly as possible.
Safety point Why?
If you have cooked food that you will not serve
immediately, chill it down as quickly as possible
and then put it in the fridge.
Harmful bacteria can grow in food that is left to chill slowly.
Avoid cooking large quantities of food in
advance, unless you need to.
Large quantities of food are more difficult to chill down quickly,
especially solid food.
Options for chilling
down food (you can
use one or more of these)
Why? Tick if
you do
this
Divide food into smaller
portions.
Smaller
amounts of
food chill down
more quickly.
Cut joints of meat in half. Smaller pieces
of meat will
cool more
quickly.
Cover pans of hot food and move them
to a colder area e.g. a storage room, or
stand them in cold water. You can also
use ice to speed up chilling.
This will make
the contents of
the pans chill
more quickly.
Stir food regularly while it is chilling
down.
Stirring helps
food chill more
evenly.
Cover hot food and move it to a colder
area (e.g. a larder).
Food will chill
more quickly in
a colder place.
Spread food out on a tray e.g. rice. Spreading the
food out will
help it cool
more quickly.
Chilling down hot food
Options for chilling
down food (you can
use one or more of these)
Why? Tick if
you do
this
If you have a ‘cool’ setting on your
oven, use it to chill down food.
Some ovens have a ‘cool’ setting, which can help to chill
down food by increasing the air flow around it. (The oven
should be cool first.)
Use a blast chiller to chill down food. A blast chiller is specially designed to chill down hot
foods quickly and safely.
If you have another method of chilling
down hot food, e.g. putting pasta
under cold running water, write the
details here:
Prove it
If you would like to compare different chilling options, try them out with the same food. You will only need to do
this once. When you have just cooked the food, use a probe to test its temperature. (See the ‘Prove it’ method in
the Management section for advice on using probes safely.) Then test the temperature again at regular intervals to
find out how fast the food is being chilled down. Remember to use a clean probe each time you check the food.
Repeat the process with different chilling options to find out which is most effective.
What to do if things go wrong
• Iffoodhasnotbeenchilleddownsafely,
re-cook it, if appropriate, or throw it away.
Remember that some foods need extra care.
See the safe method ‘Foods that need extra care’ in the
Cooking section.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewyourchillingmethodstomakesuretheyare
working properly. If appropriate, try out different
methods and choose the one that best meets your
needs.
• Makesureyoualwaysallowenoughtime
and make portions small enough.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
• Ifyouchilldownlotsofhotfoodinyourbusinessyou
may wish to consider using
a blast chiller.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Defrosting
Harmful bacteria can grow in food that
is not defrosted properly.
Safety points Why? How do you do this?
Food should be thoroughly
defrosted before cooking (unless the
manufacturer’s instructions tell you
to cook from frozen or you have a
proven safe method).
If food is still frozen or partially
frozen, it will take longer to cook.
The outside of the food could be
cooked, but the centre might not
be, which means it could contain
harmful bacteria.
Do you check food is thoroughly
defrosted before cooking?
Yes
If not, what do you do?
Options for defrosting food
1. Ideally, plan ahead to leave enough
time and space to defrost small
amounts of food in the fridge.
Putting food in the fridge will keep
it at a safe temperature while it is
defrosting.
Do you use this method?
How much time do you
allow for defrosting?
Yes
2. If you cannot defrost food in
the fridge, you could put it in a
container and then place it under
cold running water.
Cold water will
help to speed
up defrosting
without
allowing the
outside of the
food to get too
warm.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
3. If you use the sink to defrost some
foods, make sure the sink is clean
and empty. The sink should be
cleaned and then disinfected after
being used for defrosting.
Cold water will help speed
up defrosting.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
Defrosting
Safety points Why? How do you do this
4. Or you could defrost food in the
microwave on the ‘defrost’ setting.
This is a fast way to defrost food.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
5. If necessary you could defrost
food at room temperature. Follow
the manufacturer’s defrosting
instructions. Food should be left
out at room temperature for the
shortest time possible. Ideally,
defrost these foods in the fridge.
Foods will defrost quite quickly at
room temperature, but harmful
bacteria could grow in food if it
gets too warm while defrosting.
Do you use this method? Yes
Which foods do you
defrost in this way?
6. If you have another method of defrosting, write the details here: Which foods do you defrost in
this way?
Think twice!
Keep meat/poultry separate from other food when it is defrosting, to prevent cross-contamination. Once food has
been defrosted you should use it immediately (within one day).
Check it
When you
think food has
defrosted, it is
important
to check to make
sure.
Why?
The outside may
look defrosted
but the inside
could still be
frozen.
How do you do this?
1. Check for ice crystals in the
food using your hand or a skewer.
Do you use this check? Yes
2. With birds, check the joints
are flexible.
Do you use this check? Yes
3. If you use another check, write the details here:
What to do if things go wrong
• Iffoodhasnotfullydefrosted,continuetodefrost
the food until no ice crystals are left. Test again
before cooking or reheating.
• Speedupthedefrostingprocesse.g.byusingcold
water or a microwave (see the front of this sheet).
• Useanalternativemenuitem.Ifyoudonothave
time to defrost for longer, replace the dish with a
similar dish that is ready to serve.
How to stop this happening again
• Changeyourdefrostingmethodandmakeitsafer,
e.g. defrost smaller amounts.
• Makesureyouallowenoughtimetodefrost.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
• Ifyoudefrostlotsoffoodinyourbusinessyou
may wish to consider creating extra fridge space or using
a special defrosting cabinet.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Freezing
It is important to take care when freezing
food and handle frozen food safely.
Safety points Why? How do you do this?
Put frozen food in the freezer as
soon as it is delivered.
If frozen food starts to defrost, harmful
bacteria could grow.
Is frozen food put in the freezer
as soon as it is delivered?
Yes No
If you are freezing fresh food,
freeze it as soon as it has been
delivered or prepared.
Freeze hot food as soon as it has
been properly chilled down.
The longer you
wait before
freezing food,
the greater
the chance of
harmful bacteria
growing. (See
the ‘Chilling
down hot food’
method.)
Is fresh and cooked food put
in the freezer as soon as it has
been delivered, prepared, or
chilled down?
Yes No
Divide food into smaller portions
and put it in containers or
freezer bags before freezing.
Smaller portions
will freeze (and
defrost) more
quickly.
The centre of
larger portions
takes longer to
freeze, allowing
harmful bacteria
to grow.
Using containers
and freezer bags
prevents cross-
contamination.
Is food divided into smaller
portions to help it freeze better?
Yes No
Is frozen food stored in
containers or freezer bags?
Yes No
How do you do this?
If you answered ‘no’ to any of the above questions, write down what you do:
Freezing
Think twice!
When you freeze food, make a note (e.g. on a sticker) of the date it is frozen and the date when it is removed
for defrosting, including the day, month and year. Once food has been defrosted you should use it immediately
(within one day).
What to do if things go wrong
If you find that your freezer is not working properly,
you should do the following things:
1. Food that is still frozen (i.e. hard and icy) should
be moved to an alternative freezer straight away.
If there is no alternative freezer, defrost food using
the ‘Defrosting’ safe method.
2. Food that has begun to defrost (i.e. starting to
get soft and/or with liquid coming out of it) should
be moved to a suitable place to continue defrosting
using the ‘Defrosting’ safe method.
3. Fully defrosted food (i.e. soft and warm) should be
cooked, if appropriate (e.g. raw meat and poultry),
until it is piping hot all the way through. After
cooking, use the food immediately or chill or freeze
it safely straight away. If this is not possible, throw
it away.
4. Food that has to be kept frozen (e.g. ice cream)
cannot be re-frozen once it has started to defrost.
You will have to use it immediately or throw it away.
Remember, some foods need extra care. See the
‘Foods that need extra care’ safe method in the
Cooking section.
How to stop this happening again
• Getyourfreezermendedorbuyanewone.
• Havefreezersservicedregularlyandcheckthatthey
are working properly as part of your opening checks.
• Re-organisefreezerssothereismorespaceandthey
are kept closed as much as possible.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Increasestaffsupervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Cooking
It is essential to cook food properly to kill any harmful
bacteria. If it is not cooked properly, it might not be safe
for your customers to eat.
It is also very important to handle ready-to-eat food
carefully to protect it from harmful bacteria. This is because
it will not be cooked or reheated before serving.
This section includes information on cooking safely,
foods that need extra care, reheating, hot holding and
ready-to-eat food.
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Safe method:
Cooking safely
Thorough cooking kills harmful bacteria.
Safety points Why?
Where appropriate, follow the manufacturer’s
cooking instructions for food products.
The manufacturer has tried and tested safe cooking
methods specifically for its products.
Preheat equipment such as ovens and grills before
cooking.
If you use equipment before it has preheated, food will take
longer to cook. This means that recommended cooking
times in recipes or manufacturer’s instructions might not
be long enough.
Do not let raw food touch or drip onto cooked food
e.g. when adding food to the grill/barbecue. Never
use the same utensils, plates or containers for raw
and cooked or ready-to-eat food.
Raw food can carry harmful bacteria, which could spread
onto cooked food and stop it being safe.
If you serve beef or lamb rare (whole cuts such as
steaks and whole joints only), make sure all of the
outside surfaces are fully cooked, e.g. by sealing in
a pan.
This will kill harmful bacteria on the outside of the meat.
Pork and rolled joints should not be served rare.
Liver and offal must be cooked all the way through.
When preparing dishes, such as liver pâté or parfait,
the liver should be cooked until there is no pink
meat left.
Harmful bacteria can be found in the centre of liver as well
as the outside.
Turn meat and poultry during cooking. This helps it cook more evenly.
Make sure liquid dishes, e.g. soups and sauces, are
simmering and stir them frequently.
This is to make sure the food is hot enough to kill
bacteria. Stirring will help make sure the food is the same
temperature all the way through.
Cooking safely
Check it – use these checks to tell if food is properly cooked.
Check that birds are
cooked properly in the
thickest part of the leg.
The meat should not be
pink or red.
The juices should not
have any pink or red in
them.
The largest piece of meat in stews, curries etc. should
be steaming hot all the way through with no pink or
red.
Check that whole cuts of pork and processed meat
products, such as sausages and burgers, are steaming
hot all the way through with no pink or red in the
centre.
Check that combination dishes are piping hot
(steaming) in the centre. If you are cooking a large dish
or batch, check in several places.
Check that liquid dishes bubble rapidly when you stir
them.
Check that all the outside surfaces of whole cuts of
meat and whole joints (beef or lamb) are fully cooked.
To check fish is cooked through cut into the centre of
fish, or by the bone if there is one, to check that the
colour and texture has changed. Tuna steaks can be
served ‘rare’ as long as they have been fully seared on
the outside.
To check a pork
joint or rolled
meat joint, insert
a skewer into the
centre until juices
run out. The juices
should not have
any pink or red in
them.
What to do if things go wrong
Cook the food for longer.
Speed up the cooking process, for example by
dividing the food into smaller quantities, or
using different equipment.
How to stop this happening again
Repair or replace equipment.
Review your cooking method. You might need to
increase the time or temperature, or use different
equipment.
Train staff again on this safe method.
Improve staff supervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Foods that need extra care
Some foods need to be treated with extra
care to make sure they are safe to eat.
Remember that raw food is often the main source of bacteria in the kitchen.
Follow the advice in the ‘Cooking safely’ safe method on how to cook these foods. You should
also take care with the following foods.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Eggs
Cook eggs and foods containing
eggs thoroughly until they are
steaming hot.
Eggs can contain harmful bacteria.
If you cook them thoroughly this
kills any bacteria.
List the dishes containing eggs that you
prepare or cook.
Do you cook eggs and food containing
eggs thoroughly until they are steaming
hot?
Yes
If not, what do you do?
Use pasteurised egg (not ordinary
eggs) in any food that will not be
cooked, or only lightly cooked
e.g. mayonnaise and mousse.
Pasteurisation also kills bacteria,
which is why pasteurised egg is
the safest option.
Do not use eggs after the ‘best
before’ date.
Make sure you rotate stock and
use the oldest eggs first.
After this date, there is a greater
chance of harmful bacteria
growing in the eggs.
Rice
When you have cooked rice,
make sure you keep it hot until
serving or chill it down as quickly
as possible and then keep it in the
fridge.
You can make rice chill down
more quickly by dividing it into
smaller portions, spreading it out
on a clean tray, or running it under
cold water (make sure the water is
clean and drinking quality).
Rice can contain spores of a type
of harmful bacteria that may not
be killed by cooking or reheating.
If cooked rice is left at room
temperature, spores can multiply
and produce toxins that cause
food poisoning. Reheating will not
get rid of these
How do you keep rice hot before
serving?
If you chill down rice how do you do
this?
Pulses
Follow the instructions on the
packaging on how to soak
and cook dried pulses, such
as beans.
Pulses can contain natural toxins
that could make people ill unless
they are destroyed by the proper
method of soaking and cooking.
Tinned pulses will have been
soaked and cooked already.
Do you follow the manufacturer’s
instructions when cooking pulses?
Yes
If not, what do you do?
Foods that need extra care
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Shellfish
Make sure you buy shellfish from a
reputable supplier.
If you do not use a reputable
supplier, you cannot be confident
that shellfish have been caught and
handled safely.
Crabs, crayfish and lobster should
be prepared by someone with
specialist knowledge.
Some parts of these shellfish
cannot be eaten and some are
poisonous, so it is important to
know how to remove these parts
safely.
If you prepare crabs, crayfish or lobster,
are these prepared by someone with
specialist knowledge?
Yes
If not, what do you do?
Shellfish such as prawns and
scallops will change in colour and
texture when they are cooked.
For example, prawns turn from
blue-grey to pink and scallops
become milky white and firm.
Langoustines (also called scampi
or Dublin Bay prawns) are pink
when raw and the flesh becomes
firm and pink-white when they are
cooked.
If you use ready-cooked (pink)
prawns, serve them cold or reheat
them until they are piping hot all
the way through.
List the types of shellfish you serve or use
as an ingredient.
Before cooking mussels and clams,
throw away any with open or
damaged shells.
If the shell is damaged or open
before cooking, the shellfish might
not be safe to eat.
To check that a mussel or clam
is cooked, make sure the shell
is open and that the mussel or
clam has shrunk inside the shell.
If the shell has not opened during
cooking, throw it away.
Fish
Make sure you buy fish from a
reputable supplier.
If you buy fresh fish make sure you
store it between 0°C and 4°C. If
you buy frozen fish then keep it
frozen until you are ready to use it.
Certain types of fish, such as
mackerel, tuna, anchovies and
herrings, can cause food poisoning
if not kept at the correct
temperature.
Safe method:
Reheating
It is very important to reheat food properly to kill harmful
bacteria that may have grown since the food was cooked.
Safety points Why?
Make sure you use equipment
that reheats/cooks food
effectively and follow the
equipment manufacturer’s
instructions.
If equipment is not suitable for reheating, or is not used properly, the food might
not get hot enough to kill bacteria.
Preheat equipment such
as ovens and grills before
reheating.
Food will take longer to reheat if you use equipment before it has preheated.
This means that recommended reheating times in recipes or manufacturer’s
instructions might not be long enough.
If you are reheating food in a
microwave, follow the product
manufacturer’s instructions,
including advice on standing
and stirring.
If you use a microwave to
reheat food that you have
cooked yourself, it is a good
idea to stir it at stages while
reheating.
The manufacturer has tested its instructions to make sure that products will be
properly reheated. Standing and stirring are part of the process of cooking/
reheating in a microwave and help make sure the food is the same temperature
all the way through.
When food is microwaved, it can be very hot at the edges and still be cold in the
centre – stirring helps to prevent this.
Serve reheated food
immediately, unless it is going
straight into hot holding.
If food is not served immediately, the temperature will drop and harmful
bacteria could grow.
Think twice!
Remember, reheating means cooking again, not just warming up. Always reheat food until it is steaming hot all the
way through (you should only do this once). Do not put food into hot holding without reheating it properly first.
Reheating
Check it
Check that reheated food is piping hot (steaming) all the way through.
Your check
If you use a different check,
you will need to prove that it
is safe. See the ‘Prove it’ safe
method in the Management
section. Give details of your
check here:
Types of dish
What to do if things go wrong
If the equipment seems to be working, reheat
the dish for longer and then test it again.
Speed up the reheating process by using
smaller portions.
How to stop this happening again
Check your equipment is working correctly.
Review your reheating method – you may need to
increase the time and/or temperature, use different
equipment or change the size of portions.
Train staff again on this safe method.
Improve staff supervision
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Safe method:
Checking your menu
It is important to show how you check that
dishes on your menu are properly cooked.
How to use this sheet
This sheet is for you to show how you check key cooked dishes. It focuses on types of dish where proper cooking
is essential to kill harmful bacteria. Before you start, make sure you have read the ‘Cooking safely’ and ‘Foods that
need extra care’ safe methods.
Different checks are suitable for different types of dish. For each type of key cooked dish on your menu, choose a
check from the list below and write the type of dish next to the appropriate check.
You do not need to write down eggs and pulses, these are covered by the ‘Foods that need extra care’ safe
method. Also fruit and vegetables and ready-to-eat food are included in the ‘Ready-to-eat food’ safe method.
Check Types of dish
If you serve beef or lamb rare
(whole cuts such as steaks and
whole joints only), make sure all
of the outside surfaces are fully
cooked.
e.g. steaks, leg of lamb
Check that birds are cooked
properly in the thickest part of the
leg. The meat should not be pink
or red and the juices should not
have any pink or red in them.
e.g. roast chicken, turkey
Check that rolled meat joints,
whole cuts of pork and processed
meat products, such as sausages
and burgers, are steaming hot all
the way through with no pink or
red in the centre.
e.g. sausages, pork chops, rolled joint
Check that livers and offal are
cooked thoroughly. When
preparing dishes such as liver
pâté or parfait, the liver should be
cooked through and should not be
pink inside.
e.g. fried liver, pâté, parfait
Check that liquid dishes bubble
rapidly when you stir them.
e.g. gravy, soup
Cut into the centre of fish, or by
the bone if there is one, to check
that the colour and texture has
changed and the fish is cooked
through.
e.g. salmon
Checking your menu
Check Types of dish
The largest piece of meat in stews,
curries, stir-fries etc. should be
steaming hot all the way through
with no pink or red.
e.g. curries, casseroles
Check that combination dishes
are piping hot (steaming) in the
centre.
e.g. lasagne, fish pie
Check that shellfish such as prawns
have changed in colour and
texture.
e.g. prawns in garlic butter
To check that a mussel or clam
is cooked, make sure the shell is
open and the mussel or clam has
shrunk inside the shell.
e.g. moules marinière
Steaming hot
Make sure food is piping hot (steaming) all the way through.
You should use this check:
• whenreheatingfood
• whenyoucannotndanothersuitablecheckforoneof
your dishes
Types of dish
Probes
You could also use a temperature
probe to check that dishes are
properly cooked or reheated. See
the ‘Prove it’ safe method in the
Management section.
Types of dish
Your check
If you use a different check, you
will need to prove that it is safe.
See the ‘Prove it’ safe method in
the Management section.
Give details of your check here:
Types of dish
If your menu changes substantially, you may need to fill out this sheet again.
You can download another copy from www.food.gov.uk/catering
Safe method:
Hot holding
It is very important to keep food hot until serving
to prevent harmful bacteria from growing.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
If you need to keep
food hot before serving,
you should use suitable
equipment.
It is difficult to hold food at a consistent, safe
temperature without suitable equipment.
Bain-marie Soup kettle
Do you hot hold?
Yes No
What equipment do you use?
Preheat hot holding
equipment before you
put any food in it.
Putting food into cold equipment means it
might not be kept hot enough to stop
harmful bacteria growing.
Food must be cooked
thoroughly and
steaming hot before hot
holding begins.
Hot holding equipment is for hot holding only.
It should not be used to cook or reheat food.
Do you do this?
Yes No
Think twice!
Hot food must be kept at 63°C or above, except for certain exceptions.
When you display hot food, e.g. on a buffet, you should use suitable hot holding equipment to keep it above 63°C.
If this is not possible, you can take food out of hot holding to display it for up to two hours, but you can only do this
once.
Food that has not been used within two hours, should either be reheated until it is steaming hot and put back
in hot holding or chilled down as quickly as possible to 8°C or below. If it has been out for more than two hours
throw it away. Remember to keep the food at a safe temperature until it is used.
If you do take food out of hot holding to display it, remember not to mix new food with the food that is already on
display. This could lead to the older food being left out for too long.
Hot holding
Check it
Make sure food is piping
hot (steaming) all the way
through from the moment
it is cooked to the moment
it is served.
If you do not do this, what
do you do?
What to do if things go wrong
If a dish is not hot enough at any point during hot
holding:
reheat it until it is steaming hot and put back into
hot holding (you should only do this once)
or chill down the food safely (see the ‘Chilling
down hot food’ safe method in the Chilling section)
and reheat it later before serving
If you cannot do either of these things, throw the
food away.
Remember that some foods need extra care. See the
‘Foods that need extra care’ safe method.
How to stop this happening again
Check your equipment is working correctly.
Review your hot holding safe method. Try using a higher
temperature setting or smaller quantities of food.
Train staff again on this safe method.
Improve staff supervision.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Prove it
If you would like extra reassurance that food in hot holding is hot enough, you can use a temperature probe
as a one-off test to prove that your method keeps food at a safe temperature. (See the ‘Prove it’ method in the
Management section for advice on using probes safely.)
Safe method:
Ready-to-eat food
It is important to handle ready-to-eat food safely
to protect it from harmful bacteria.
What are ready-to-eat food
Ready-to-eat food is food that will not be cooked or reheated before serving. These include salads, ham, smoked
fish, desserts, sandwiches, cheese and food that you have cooked in advance to serve cold.
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
To protect food from harmful
bacteria:
keep ready-to-eat food
completely separate from raw
meat, poultry, fish, eggs and
unwashed vegetables
make sure work surfaces,
chopping boards, knives etc.
are clean (and disinfected if you
have prepared raw food)
keep ready-to-eat food covered
at all times during preparation
and storage
This is to prevent harmful bacteria
getting onto the food. This is
especially important for ready-
to-eat food because it will not
be cooked or reheated before
serving.
List the types of ready-to-eat food you
use:
Follow the manufacturer’s
instructions on how to store and
prepare the food, if these are
available.
The manufacturer’s instructions
are designed to keep the food
safe.
Are you confident that you do this for all
ready-to-eat food where instructions are
available? Yes
When preparing fruit, vegetables
and salad ingredients:
peel, trim, or remove the outer
parts, as appropriate
wash them thoroughly by
rubbing vigorously in a bowl of
clean water
wash the cleanest ones rst
Wash your hands before and after
handling fruit and vegetables.
If you have prepared vegetables
that have dirt or soil on the
outside, clean and then disinfect
chopping boards and work
surfaces before preparing other
food.
The dirt on vegetables and salad
ingredients can contain harmful
bacteria. Peeling and washing
helps to remove the dirt and
bacteria.
If not, what do you do?
Do you do this? Yes
Ready-to-eat food
Safety point Why? How do you do this?
Make sure you keep ready-to-eat
food cold enough. See ‘Chilled
storage and displaying chilled
food’ in the Chilling section.
Do not use ready-to-eat food after
the ‘use by’ date, if there is one.
For food you have prepared,
or removed from its original
packaging, you should have a
method of keeping track of when
food should be used or thrown
away.
If these types of food are not kept
cold enough, harmful bacteria
could grow.
You should never use food that has
passed its ‘use by’ date because it
might not be safe to eat.
If not, what do you do?
Do you do this? Yes
If you slice cooked meat:
mak
e sure you follow the
manufacturer’s instructions
when you clean the slicer
avoid handling the meat as
much as possible – it is a good
idea to use clean tongs or slice
meat straight onto a plate
Meat slicers need careful cleaning
and disinfecting to prevent dirt
building up and to stop harmful
bacteria growing, in particular on
the slicing blade.
Hands can easily spread harmful
bacteria onto food.
Are staff trained how to clean the meat
slicer properly, or supervised?
Yes
No
What to do if things go wrong
If you think that a food delivery has not been
handled safely, reject the delivery.
If ready-to-eat vegetables, fruit or salad ingredients
have not been washed properly, wash them
following the advice on the front of this sheet and
clean any work surfaces etc. they have touched.
If ready-to-eat food has been prepared on a work
surface or with a knife that has been used for raw
meat, poultry, fish, eggs or unwashed fruit and
vegetables, throw the food away.
If ready-to-eat food has not been chilled safely,
throw the food away.
How to stop this happening again
If you do not think a supplier handles food safely, consider
changing to a new supplier.
Review the way you receive deliveries.
Review the way you store and prepare
ready-to-eat food.
Train staff again on this safe method.
Improve staff supervision.
Think twice!
You should not use the same machinery and equipment, such as vacuum packing machines, slicers and mincers for
both raw and ready-to-eat food. This is because it is not possible to clean equipment thoroughly enough to be sure
all harmful bacteria have been removed. Any bacteria could then spread to ready-to-eat food.
If you are preparing both raw and ready-to-eat food, you should make sure where possible this is done in separate
clean and disinfected areas. If this is not possible, surface and utensils used must be thoroughly cleaned and then
disinfected between tasks.
Make sure staff wash their hands thoroughly between tasks, especially when working with raw and ready-to-eat
food. This stops bacteria being spread onto foods, surfaces and equipment.
Write down what went wrong and what you did about it in your diary.
Management
Managing your business effectively is vital for food safety.
This section includes information on different management
issues, including checks to do when you open and close,
suppliers and contractors, stock control, and training
and supervising staff.
The Management section should be used alongside the
diary, which should be signed every day by the person
responsible for running the business.
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Safe method:
Opening and closing checks
It is essential that you and your staff do certain
checks every time you open and close. This helps you
maintain the basic standards you need to make sure
that your business makes food safely.
Opening checks
You should do these checks at the beginning of the day. You can also add your own checks to the list.
Your fridges, chilled display equipment and freezers are working properly.
Your other equipment (e.g. oven) is working properly.
Staff are fit for work and wearing clean work clothes.
Food preparation areas are clean and disinfected, where appropriate (work surfaces, equipment, utensils etc.)
There are plenty of handwashing and cleaning materials (soap, paper towels, cloths etc.)
Closing checks
You should do these checks at the end of the day. You can also add your own checks to the list.
No food is left out.
Food past its ‘use by’ date has been thrown away.
Dirty cloths have been removed for cleaning and replaced with clean ones.
Waste has been removed and new bags put into the bins.
The opening and closing checks are also listed in the diary.
Safe method:
Extra checks
Carrying out extra checks regularly helps you
make sure your methods are being followed.
Some of the safe methods in the rest of the pack advise you to check certain things regularly. These are less
frequent than the daily opening and closing checks. You might find it helpful to have all these checks written
down in one place.
In the table below there are examples of some extra checks. Write down the details of extra checks that you do
and how often you do them. You can add other checks below.
When you carry out extra checks, do not forget to make a note of them in the diary.
What to do
Deep clean
(example)
e.g. Clean behind
equipment, vents, walls,
ceilings, outside waste areas
etc.
Deep clean e.g. Clean behind
equipment, vents, walls,
ceilings, outside waste areas
etc.
Maintenance e.g. Clear drains, clean
extractor fans/filters and
fridge/freezer condensers.
Dishwasher Remove food debris and
lime scale from water jets,
filters and drains. Clean
around door seals etc.
Temperature
probe
If you use a probe, check
regularly that it is accurate.
Pest control
check
e.g. Look for signs of
damage to walls, doors etc.
that could let in pests, and
signs of pests.
Details of check
Deep clean of whole kitchen area and
outside waste area including walls,
ceilings, extractor fan, vents
How often?
Every 6 weeks usually
on a Thursday
Safe method:
Prove it
Sometimes you might want to use a probe
to prove that your methods are safe.
Safe method What to do How to do it
Cooking and reheating The ‘Cooking safely’ and ‘Reheating’ safe
methods in the Cooking section tell you
how to check that food is thoroughly
cooked/reheated. If you do a different
check then you will n
eed to prove that it is safe.
You only need to do this once.
The food is safe if it has reached a high
enough temperature for a long enough
time.
If you want to check the temperature of a
food, use a clean probe. Insert the probe so
that the tip is in the centre of the food (or
the thickest part).
Examples of safe time/temperature
combinations include:
• 80°Cforatleast6seconds
• 75°Cforatleast30seconds
• 70°Cforatleast2minutes
• 65°Cforatleast10minutes
• 60°Cforatleast45minutes
Hot holding The ‘Hot holding’ safe method in the
Cooking section tells you how to hot hold
safely. It is a legal requirement that hot
food must be kept above 63°C.
To check that food in hot holding is above
63°C,useacleanprobe.Inserttheprobe
so the tip is in the centre of the food (or the
thickest part).
Chilling down hot food
Chilled storage and
displaying chilled food
The ‘Chilling down hot food’ safe method
in the Chilling section tells you how to
chill down hot food safely and the ‘Chilled
storage and displaying chilled food’ safe
method tells you how to keep food cold.
It is a legal requirement in England,
Wales and Northern Ireland, and
recommended in Scotland, that certain
chilled foods must be kept at 8°C or
below.
Sometimes there might be more than
one way of chilling down hot food that is
suitable for what you are doing. Then you
might want to compare different options to
find out which is most effective.
Compare different chilling options by trying
them out with the same food.
Tocheckthatfoodisat8°Corbelow,use
a clean probe. Insert the probe so that
the tip is in the centre of the food (or the
thickest part).
When you have just cooked the food, test
its temperature with a clean probe. Start
to chill it using one option and test the
temperature again at regular intervals to
see how quickly it is dropping.
Repeat this with other options
to see which is fastest.
You can record what you have done to prove your methods on the
‘Prove it: records’ sheet in the diary.
Prove it
Probe type Where to use the probe How to use the probe
Dial thermometer These are commonly used to test meat.
Some are oven-safe and can be left
in the meat while it cooks. Others are
not oven-safe and are designed to be
inserted when you have cooked the
meat.
If the probe is not already in the meat,
insert it and leave it for up to two
minutes before taking a reading. Clean
the probe thoroughly and disinfect it
before you use it again. This helps to
prevent cross-contamination.
Digital thermometer These are generally easy to use and
accurate. They can be used with lots of
foods, but they are not suitable to go in
the oven.
Insert the probe. Wait for the display to
stabilise before taking a reading. Clean
the probe thoroughly and disinfect it
before you use it again. This helps to
prevent cross-contamination.
Checking your probe
It is essential to know that your probe is working properly, so you can rely on its readings.
So you should check it regularly. The manufacturer’s instructions should include details of
how often a probe needs to be checked and how to tell if it is accurate.
A simple way to check a digital probe is to put it in iced water and boiling water:
• Thereadingsinicedwatershouldbebetween-1°Cand1°C.
• Thereadingsinboilingwatershouldbebetween99°Cand101°C.
If the reading is outside this range, you should replace your probe or return it to the manufacturer to be calibrated.
Looking after your probe
It is very important to keep your probe clean, otherwise it could spread dirt and harmful bacteria to the food you
are testing. After a probe has been inserted into food, clean and disinfect it between use.
You need to look after your probe to prevent it from getting damaged and help keep it working properly. Do not
leave a digital probe inside your fridge or freezer, or on hot surfaces. When you are not using it, store it safely,
away from extreme temperatures and liquids. Keep the probe in its case, if it has one. Avoid banging or dropping
your probe. If the battery is low, replace it immediately.
Safe method:
Training and supervision
It is essential to train and supervise your staff
effectively to make sure they handle food safely.
You should train your staff in all the safe methods that are relevant to the job they do. You should also supervise
them to check they are following the safe methods properly.
What to do How?
Once you have worked through them, use the safe
methods in this pack to train staff. You need to be sure
that each member of staff knows the safe methods for
all the tasks they do.
Show the member of staff what to do, question them
carefully on their knowledge and then ask them to show
you.
Make sure you know what training each member of staff
has received.
Make a note on the Staff training record in the diary
every time you train a member of staff.
Watch the member of staff when they are carrying out a
task as part of their work.
hen a member of staff has completed a task, ask them
bout how they followed the safe method, to help you
nd out if they did it correctly.
Make comments and observations to help the member
of staff improve the way they work.
Reward good performance by giving positive feedback
when the member of staff has followed
the safe method successfully.
If the safe method is not being followed by the member
of staff, tell them how they are going wrong and why it
is important to follow the safe method.
W
a
What to do if things go wrong
If staff are not following a safe method properly, train
them again and make sure they understand why it is
important to follow the method.
How to stop this happening again
Usethe4-weeklyreviewinthediarytoidentifyany
problems with how staff are following safe methods and
plan your training to address these.
Manage it
When you sign the diary you are confirming that you have supervised all the staff involved in making food that
day. This means making sure that your staff follow your safe methods and that any problems are being solved and
recorded in the diary.
If you are away from the business, you can give responsibility for the diary to a member of staff. Sometimes there
may be more than one person responsible during the day, e.g. when there is more than one shift, and in these
cases the diary may need more than one signature.
Make a note in the diary of those members of staff who have been given this responsibility and train them on all
the relevant safe methods, including any in the Management section. Staff must understand how the diary works.
If something different happens, or something goes wrong, they will need to take action and make a note of what
theyhavedoneinthediary.Youshouldstillcompletethe4-weeklyreviewyourself.
Safe method:
Customers
Customer feedback is a good indication of
how well you are managing your business.
Keeping your customers happy and protecting their health with good food hygiene is essential
to the success of your business. So it is very important to pay attention to any complaints.
What to do How?
Listen to complaints. Listen to any complaints carefully and write down
the details. These could point out a problem in your
business.
Find the source of the problem. Work out how the problem arose. This is especially
important if it is a problem affecting food safety. If a
customer complains of being made ill by your food
you should investigate carefully.
Solve the problem. Review the relevant safe methods. You may need to
change how you do things. Note any changes in the
diary.
Train staff on how to deal with customers. It is important that staff know how to respond to
customer feedback and what action to take.
Safe method:
Suppliers and contractors
How you handle suppliers and contractors
is important to food safety.
What to do Why? How do you do this?
Choose suppliers
carefully.
It is important to have suppliers
that you can trust to handle food
safely, as well as delivering on time
etc.
Choose contractors
carefully.
Services such as pest control can
be valuable in helping you to make
food safely. It is important to have
contractors you can trust to deliver
these services effectively.
• Makesureyouchoosesuppliersyoucantrust.
• Askthefollowingquestions:
Does the supplier store, transport and pack their
goods in a hygienic way?
Does the supplier/contractor supply fully
referenced invoices?
Do they have any certification or quality
assurance?
• Askotherbusinessesforrecommendations.
Make sure that your
raw ingredients
have been handled
safely.
The starting point for making food
safely is to be confident about
the safety of your raw ingredients
and any ready-made products you
buy in.
• Checkthatthesupplierhasafoodsafety
management system.
• Carryoutregulardeliverytime,temperatureand
quality spot checks.
• Ifyoubuygoodsfromacashandcarry,makesure
that the vehicle you use to transport them is clean
and that you bring chilled and frozen food back as
soon as possible and put it straight into
a fridge or freezer.
Keep a record of
what food products
you have bought,
who you bought
them from, the
quantity and the
date.
This is a legal requirement and is so
that you or an enforcement officer
can check back to see where a food
came from.
Ideally, you should keep these
records until you are reasonably
sure that the food they refer to has
been consumed.
• Usuallytheeasiestwaytodothisistokeepallyour
invoices and receipts. Or you might want to record
the information in a different way, for example
keeping a record of the batch number and other
details.
• Keeptheserecordsinawaythatmakesiteasyfor
you or an enforcement officer to check them.
Choose equipment
carefully.
To allow you to make food safely,
it is very important for equipment
to work effectively.
• Buyequipmentfromreputabledealers.
• Makesureithasaguarantee/warranty.
What to do if things go wrong
If you do not think that the food a supplier delivers has been handled safely (for example, if you think it has not
been kept cold enough) reject the delivery, contact your supplier immediately and write the details in the diary.
If you have repeated problems, you can do the following things:
1. Contactthesupplier/contractorbyphone. 3. Changesupplier/contractor.
2. Writeaformalletterofcomplaint. 4. Contactyourlocalauthority.
Safe method:
Stock control
Effective stock control is an important
part of managing food safety.
What to do Why? How do you do this?
Go through your menu and
estimate how much of each
ingredient you will need.
Working through the menu
allows you to plan for your
specific needs.
• Reviewyourmenuregularlyandhowitaffects
your needs for stock.
• Discussyourneedswithyoursupplier.
Plan ahead to make sure you
have the right amount of stock
and order carefully.
Not having too much stock
is best for food safety – and
your profits.
• Planthestockyouneedforeachshift.
• Makesurestaffknowthestockrequirementsfor
each shift.
• Useasupplierwhounderstandsyourbusiness
needs and supplies stock on time.
• Doastockcheckbeforeplacinganorder.
Check all stock when it is
delivered to make sure that:
• itiswithinits‘useby’date
• ithasbeenkeptcoldenough
• ithasnotgoneoff
• thestockiscleanandnot
damaged, e.g. throw away
any punctured vacuum
packs, swollen packs or
badly dented cans and
check that tops are secure
on bottles and jars and seals
are unbroken
These checks are all to make
sure that food is safe for you
to use.
Damaged packaging could
mean that food will not be
safe to use.
Swollen or ‘blown’ packs can
be a sign that bacteria have
grown in food or drinks.
If bottles or jars have been
opened, or if seals have
been broken, the food or
drink might not be safe to
use.
• Trainyourstaffinwhattolookforwhenchecking
deliveries.
• Haveawrittenagreementwithyoursupplier
about your delivery requirements.
• Carryoutspotchecksonthedeliveriesyourself.
• Usethediarytorecordanyissuesorproblems
with deliveries.
• Ifyoumovefoodfromitsoriginalpackagingto
another container, make sure you make a note
of the name of the food, the ingredients and
the ‘use by’ or ‘best before’ date.
Carry out regular stock checks
and throw away any food that
has passed its ‘use by’ date.
You should never use food
that has passed its ‘use by’
date, because it might not
be safe to eat.
• Followthe‘rstin,rstout’systemofstock
rotation, so that older stock is used first. This
helps to avoid waste.
• Trainyourstaffinstockcontrolandmakesure
they know in what order to use foods.
• Checkregularlythatstockcontrolisbeing
carried out effectively.
• Recordstockchecksinthediary.
What to do if things go wrong
• Ifyoundthatyouhavemorefoodinstockthanyou
need and you do not think you will use it all before the
‘use by’ date, you could freeze some of it to be used in
the future. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on
freezing and label the food as appropriate.
• Ifyoundthatfoodthathaspassedits‘useby’
date has not been thrown away, throw it away
immediately.
• Ifyoudonotthinkthatafooddeliveryhasbeen
handled safely, reject the delivery if possible. Do not
use the food and contact your supplier immediately.
How to stop this happening again
• Reviewyourorderingprocess.
• Reviewyourstockrotationsystem.
• Reviewyouragreementwithyoursupplier.
• Trainstaffagainonthissafemethod.
• Improvestaffsupervision.
Safe method:
Product withdrawal and recall
Responding quickly to any problems with food products
you use or sell is an important part of managing food
safety in your business.
Sometimes there will be a problem with a food product that means you will need to ‘withdraw’ it (when you
should stop using/selling it) and/or ‘recall’ it (when customers are asked to return/destroy a product).
You may find out about a problem with a product from:
• amanufactureroftheproduct
• asupplierorwholesaler
• anoticeinnewspapers
• yourlocalauthority
• atradeassociation
• theFoodStandardsAgency
If you hear about a problem with a product, you should stop using/selling it straight away. You might also need
to tell your customers.
There are a number of reasons that a product might be withdrawn or recalled. For example, it could have been
found to:
• containharmfulbacteria
• bephysicallycontaminated,e.g.withpiecesofglassormetal
• bewronglylabelled,whichcouldbeaproblemforpeoplewithfoodallergies
You or your staff may also notice a problem with a food product that means it may not be safe to eat. If this
happens, you should stop using/selling it straight away and tell your local authority and the Food Standards
Agency.
What to do How?
Make sure you know the details of the
problem.
If a manufacturer or supplier has issued a product withdrawal or recall,
make sure you know which product and which batches are affected.
As soon as you find out about a
problem with a product, stop using/
selling it.
Remove the affected product from anywhere you use, store or sell it and
label it clearly to show it should not be used/sold.
Remember to check if you have used the product as an ingredient in any
food you have prepared and stored, e.g. in the freezer – if you have, ask
your local authority for advice.
Make sure your staff know about the
problem.
This is so your staff know what to do and do not use/sell the product.
Tell your customers if you need to. If the problem is with a product that your customers might not eat or
drink straight away, you may need to let them know that the product is
being recalled and why. If the manufacturer or supplier asks you to put up
a recall notice, you should do this. If you are not sure what to do, contact
your local authority.
Think twice!
It is a legal requirement to keep a record of what food products you have bought, who you bought them from,
the quantity and the date. Usually the easiest way to do this is to keep all your invoices and receipts. You should keep
this information in a way that makes it easy for you or an enforcement officer to check back to see where a product
came from.
This page has been left intentionally blank
Safe method completion record
To complete the pack you need to work through each section and complete all the safe methods that are
relevant to your business. Most small caterers will need to fill in all the methods.Butif,forexample,a
business does not hot hold food then the ‘Hot holding’ method will not be relevant to them.
It does not matter in what order you work through the safe methods. As you complete each one, fill in this record.
When you have completed all the safe methods that are relevant to your business, this sheet will show that you
have worked through the pack.
Safe method
Cross-contamination
Personal hygiene
Cloths
Separating foods
Food allergies
Physical and chemical contamination
Pest control
Maintenance
Cleaning
Handwashing
Cleaning effectively
Clear and clean as you go
Your cleaning schedule
Chilling
Chilled storage and displaying chilled
food
Chilling down hot food
Defrosting
Freezing
Date Signature
Safe method not
relevant to my
business – tick if
this is the case
Safe method completion record
(continued)
Safe method
Cooking
Cooking safely
Foods that need extra care
Reheating
Checking your menu
Hot holding
Ready-to-eat food
Management
Opening and closing checks
Extra checks
Prove it
Training and supervision
Customers
Suppliers and contractors
Stock control
Product withdrawal and recall
Date Signature
Safe method not
relevant to my
business – tick if
this is the case
Diary
Name:
Business:
Address:
Start date:
End date:
This page has been left intentionally blank
Introduction
How does this diary work?
The diary is specially designed to help you run your business effectively. It contains:
• week-to-view diary pages
• checks to do every day when you open and close
• 4-weekly review
• staff training record
• suppliers’ list
• cleaning schedule
The manager should sign the diary every day to say that:
• the opening and closing checks have been done
• your safe methods have been followed
The diary should take about one minute a day to complete, unless you have something special to write down.
If anything different happens, or if something goes wrong, you should make a note in the diary of what happened
and what you did. This is so you can show that you have taken action to make sure that food is safe to eat.
If the manager is not in, he or she can give responsibility for the diary to another member of staff. See the ‘Training
and supervision’ safe method in the Management section.
4-weekly review
The 4-weekly review gives you the opportunity to look back at previous weeks and identify any persistent
problems. Write down details of these and how you decide to tackle them. You might need to train staff again
on certain safe methods and/or change how you do things.
You may find it useful to read the 4-weekly review before starting to use the diary. It will give you an idea of the
kind of things you might need to write down during the week.
Opening and closing checks
It is essential that you and your staff do certain checks every time you open and close. Make sure you have worked
through the ‘Opening and closing checks’ safe method in the Management section. You might find it helpful, on a
daily basis, to use the list of opening and closing checks in this diary (see over).
Introduction
Opening checks
You should do these checks at the beginning of the day. You can also add your own checks to the list.
Your fridges, chilled display equipment and freezers are working properly.
Your other equipment (e.g. oven) is working properly.
Staff are fit for work and wearing clean work clothes.
Food preparation areas are clean and disinfected, where appropriate (work surfaces, equipment, utensils etc.)
There are plenty of handwashing and cleaning materials (soap, paper towels, cloths etc.)
Closing checks
You should do these checks at the end of the day. You can also add your own checks to the list.
No food is left out.
Food past its ‘use by’ date has been thrown away.
Dirty cloths have been removed for cleaning and replaced with clean ones.
Waste has been removed and new bags put into the bins.
Extra checks
Extra checks are less frequent than the opening and closing checks. See the ‘Extra checks’ safe method in the
Management section. There is a box at the end of each week in the diary pages for you to fill in any extra checks
you have done.
Staff training record
For each member of staff, make a note of when they have
been trained on different safe methods.
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Staff training record (continued)
Staff training record (continued)
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Staff training record (continued)
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Name:
Telephone no:
Address:
Safe method
on first day:
Date Initials
Working with food? sheet
Opening and closing checks
Cross-contamination
Cleaning
Chilling
Cooking
Management
Other training or retraining
Suppliers’ list
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
Contact name: Goods supplied:
Telephone:
Address:
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
Contact name: Goods supplied:
Telephone:
Address:
Business name: Delivery day(s):
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
M T W T F S S
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Business name: Delivery day(s): M T W T F S S
Business name: Delivery day(s): M T W T F S S
Goods supplied:
Suppliers’ list (continued)
Business name: Delivery day(s):
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
M T W T F S S
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Business name: Delivery day(s): M T W T F S S
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
Contact name: Goods supplied:
Telephone:
Address:
Business name: Delivery day(s): M T W T F S S
Lead time for
placing an order
e.g. Mon for Wed
Contact name: Goods supplied:
Telephone:
Address:
Goods supplied:
Contacts list
You can use this sheet to write down the contact details of different services or people who you might need to
contact from day to day, or in an emergency. For example:
• environmentalhealthservice
• electrician
• plumber
• pestcontrolcontractor
• refusecollector/recyclingservice
Environmental health service
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Useful for advice on:
Food hygiene
Pest control
Drainage
Noise and odour control
Product withdrawal and recall
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Contact list
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name
Telephone:
Address:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name:
Telephone:
Address:
:
Useful for advice on:
Contact name
Telephone:
Address:
Cleaning schedule
Fill in details of all the items you clean
Item Frequency of cleaning Precautions Method of cleaning
e.g. wear gloves
After use
Every shift
Daily
Weekly
or goggles
Other
Work
surface
x Wear gloves
1. Remove any obvious food and dirt.
2. Wash the surface with hot soapy water (detergent diluted
according to manufacturer’s instructions) to remove grease and
any other food and dirt.
3. Rinse with clean water to remove the detergent and loosened
f
4.
EXAMPLE
ood and dirt.
Apply a disinfectant. Make sure you leave it on for the contact
time recommended by the manufacturer.
5. Rinse with clean water to remove the disinfectant.
6. Leave to dry naturally or use a clean disposable cloth
.
Cleaning schedule
Fill in details of all the items you clean
Item Frequency of cleaning Precautions Method of cleaning
e.g. wear gloves
After use
Every shift
Daily
Weekly
or goggles
Other
Prove it: records
Sometimes you might want to prove that a method is safe, for example if you use a method that is different to
those recommended in the pack, or if you would like reassurance that a method is working properly. See the ‘Prove
it’ safe method in the Management section.
Safe method How did you prove it? Date
Notes
Week commencing:
Monday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Tuesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Thursday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Saturday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Extra checks
We have performed the following extra checks this
week.
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Wednesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Friday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Sunday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Week commencing:
Monday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Tuesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Thursday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Saturday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Extra checks
We have performed the following extra checks this
week.
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Wednesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Friday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Sunday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Week commencing:
Monday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Tuesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Thursday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Saturday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Extra checks
We have performed the following extra checks this
week.
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Wednesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Friday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Sunday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Week commencing:
Monday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Tuesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Thursday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Saturday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Extra checks
We have performed the following extra checks this
week.
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Wednesday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Friday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.
Sunday
Any problems or changes – what did you do?
Opening checks Closing checks
Name Signed
__________________ _____________________
Our safe methods were followed and effectively supervised today.


4-weekly review
You should regularly review the methods used in your
business to check that they are up to date, and still being
followed by you and your staff.
You can use the checklist below to help you.
• Look back over the past 4 weeks’ diary entries. If you had a serious problem, or the same
thing went wrong three times or more, make a note of it here, find out why and do
something about it.
Did you have a serious problem or did the same thing go wrong three times or more?
Yes
£
No
£
Details:
What did you do about it?
• Did you get a new member of staff in the past 4 weeks? Yes
£
No
£
Were they trained in your methods? Yes
£
No
£
• Have you changed your menu? Yes
£
No
£
Have you reviewed your safe methods? Yes
£
No
£
Any changes/new methods?
• Have you changed supplier/bought new ingredients? Yes
£
No
£
Do these affect any of your safe methods?
• Are you using any new/different equipment? Yes
£
No
£
Do these affect any of your safe methods?
• Other changes:
Notes
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