Table of Contents
Operating and Maintaining School Facilities and Grounds ............................................................ 2
Facility Audits ................................................................................................................................. 2
Custodians ....................................................................................................................................... 3
Essential Duties and Responsibilities of Custodians .................................................................. 3
Daily Duties ............................................................................................................................ 4
Weekly Duties ......................................................................................................................... 4
Monthly ................................................................................................................................... 5
Winter and Spring Break ........................................................................................................ 5
Summer Duties........................................................................................................................ 5
Typical Minor Maintenance Duties for Custodians ................................................................ 5
Custodian Schedule Form ........................................................................................................... 6
Custodian Inspection Form ......................................................................................................... 7
Maintenance Request Form .................................................................................................... 7
Maintenance Request Form .................................................................................................... 8
Outdoor and Grounds Management ............................................................................................ 9
Cleaning Procedures ................................................................................................................. 10
Auditorium Cleaning and Care ............................................................................................. 10
Classroom Cleaning and Care ............................................................................................... 10
Corridors and Entrance Care ................................................................................................. 11
Gymnasium Care .................................................................................................................. 12
Health Room Cleaning .......................................................................................................... 12
Kitchen and Cafeteria Cleaning and Maintenance ................................................................ 13
Restroom Cleaning................................................................................................................ 14
Shower and Locker Room Care ............................................................................................ 15
Stairs and Stairwells .............................................................................................................. 15
Weight Lifting/Exercise Room ............................................................................................. 16
Playground Equipment.......................................................................................................... 16
Playground Inspection Checklist .......................................................................................... 17
Other Maintenance and Operations Issues .................................................................................... 20
Additional Resources .................................................................................................................... 22
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Operating and Maintaining School Facilities and Grounds
School facility operations and maintenance exist to support the primary purpose of K-12 education: quality
learning. The core responsibility is to ensure that through the provision of quality custodial and maintenance
services- administrators, teachers, and students have an environment that is safe, healthy, and responsive to
educational programming. A comprehensive facility custodial and maintenance program is a school district’s
foremost tool for protecting its investment in school facilities. Moreover, preventive maintenance is the cornerstone
of any effective maintenance initiative.
School facility operations services include the day-to-day running of the school facilities. These services
include but are not limited to: energy management, HVAC, cleaning, inspections, opening and closing school; boiler
operation; responding the daily emergencies; mowing grass; and generating work requests to maintenance.
School plant maintenance provides for the repair, replacement and renewal of failed infrastructure
elements. There is no one way to maintain schools they are a gamut of size, age, structural systems, etc. A well-
designed facility management system generally encompasses four categories of maintenance: emergency (or
response) maintenance, routine maintenance, preventive maintenance, and predictive maintenance. The one
everyone dreads is emergency maintenance (the air conditioner fails on the warmest day of the year or the main
water line breaks and floods the lunchroom). When the pencil sharpener in Room 12 finally needs to be replaced, it
is routine maintenance. Preventive maintenance is the scheduled maintenance of a piece of equipment (such as the
replacement of air conditioner filters every 10 weeks or the semiannual inspection of the water fountains). Finally,
the cutting edge of facility management is now predictive maintenance, which uses sophisticated computer software
to forecast the failure of equipment based on age, user demand, and performance measures.
A good maintenance program is built on a foundation of preventive maintenance. It begins with an audit of
the buildings, grounds, and equipment. When planning preventive maintenance, decision-makers should consider
how to most efficiently schedule the work i.e., concurrently with academic breaks or other planned work. For
example, preventive maintenance work such as boiler pipe replacements can be conducted while the boiler is out of
commission for routine maintenance (such as when cleaning the scale and mud from inside the boiler or cleaning the
manhole and handhold plates). Whereas emergency events demand immediate attention whenever they occur,
preventive maintenance activities can be scheduled at a convenient time. Because a rigorous preventive maintenance
system results in fewer emergency events, it tends to reduce disruptions to the school schedule.
Facility Audits
A facility audit (or inventory) is a comprehensive review of a facility’s assets. Facility audits are the
standard method for establishing baseline information about the components, policies, and procedures of a new or
existing facility. An audit is a way of determining the ―status‖ of the facility at a given timethat is, it provides a
snapshot of how the various systems and components are operating. A primary objective of a facility audit is to
measure the value of an aging asset relative to the cost of replacing that asset. Thus, facility audits are a tool for
projecting future maintenance costs. Facility audits are accomplished by assessing buildings, grounds, and
equipment; documenting the findings; and recommending service options to increase efficiency, reduce waste, and
save money. Thus, an audit provides the landscape against which all facilities maintenance efforts and planning
occur.
A facility audit is a data collection process, pure and simple. It should include data on all facilities,
infrastructure, grounds, maintenance staff (e.g., specialized training courses attended), and equipment (including
boilers and HVAC systems), floor finishes, plumbing fixtures, electrical distribution systems, heating and air
conditioning controls, roof types, flooring, furniture, lighting, ceilings, fire alarms, doors and hardware, windows,
technology, parking lots, athletic fields/structures, playground equipment and landscaping, and the building
envelope. Other issues to consider during an audit include accessibility (does a facility meet the requirements of the
Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA?), clean air, asbestos, fire, occupant safety, energy efficiency,
susceptibility to vandalism, and instructional efficiency (e.g., alignment with state and local classroom standards).
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More specifically, building components include, but are not limited to:
rooms
interior walls
interior doors
floors
plumbing
electrical systems
HVAC systems
kitchens
hardware
egresses
communication equipment (audio, video, and data)
exterior envelope (walls and windows)
roof and roofing materials
foundations and basements
Grounds include, but are not limited to:
courtyards
unimproved fields
athletic fields
playgrounds
parking lots
Equipment includes, but is not limited to:
fixed equipment (motors, compressors, telephones, computers)
tools (lawn mowers, snow blowers, leaf blowers, drills)
vehicle fleets (buses, vans, trucks, cars)
supplies (motor oil, cleaning agents, pesticides, and other chemicals)
Custodians
The Custodian is responsible for keeping assigned buildings clean, safe, functional, and secure in
accordance with prescribed codes and established district policies and standards. A custodial worker must maintain
all assigned buildings in a state of operational excellence such that they present no interruptions, distractions, or
obstacles to the education program.
Essential Duties and Responsibilities of Custodians
Perform regular custodial duties in assigned areas of buildings.
Accept instructions from head custodian/supervisor verbally or in writing.
Provide services as necessary to support curricular and extracurricular events and activities.
Maintain inventory of custodial/maintenance supplies and equipment.
Restock disposable custodial/maintenance items and provide head custodian/supervisor with inventory
usage data.
Clean and preserve designated spaces, equipment, furniture, etc. in the buildings.
Assist visiting members of the public who are utilizing the facilities.
Maintain work related records and prepare work reports as directed.
Project a positive image for the schools district with his/her team, whenever the public, guests, or visitors
are in the building.
Work closely with the head custodian/supervisor and/or building administrators to be prepared for
scheduled evening activities and unscheduled events as needed.
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Maintain building and grounds security by opening/closing the building each school day and during special
events as directed.
Work on call as needed at any time for emergency repairs, equipment monitoring, overtime, or special
needs falling outside of normal working hours.
Identify and schedule work to be performed during school extended school breaks.
Daily Duties
Perform general cleanupany and all incidents as they arise.
Inspect entrances and sidewalks for damage, clutter/dirt, malfunction, or other hazards.
Vacuum all entrance mats, outside mats, and clean sidewalk up to 10 feet from entrance.
Wet mop inside of entrances if wet or in bad condition.
Sweep all stairways.
Machine vacuum all carpeted corridors, walkways, and 10 feet in from doorway of each room.
Clip all carpet sprigs as necessary.
Remove all spots from carpet.
Extract soiled areas on carpets as needed.
Remove gum from floors.
Dust mop and sweep corners of all tiled classrooms and adjacent rooms. Wet mop if needed.
Spot vacuum all classrooms, offices, and other carpeted areas. Pick up any paper left on floor.
Make sure rooms appear orderly.
Empty all trash cans (rinse or wash if needed).
Put all trash in dumpsters.
Remove all marks from walls and lockers nightly.
Replace defective light bulbs as needed.
Wash all main entrance windows.
Thoroughly clean all surfaces in restrooms.
Clean all drinking fountains.
Lock all doors as directed by the director of facilities/administration or his/her designee and lock all outside
doors as soon as daily activities are over.
Close and lock windows.
Clean all equipment after use (e.g., mop buckets and custodian’s service sink).
Hang up brooms, dust mops, and wet mops. Do not stand them against wall.
Clean and straighten janitor’s closet.
Keep shelves and supplies in neat order and stocked with supplies.
Turn in any items or articles found to the Lost and Found Department.
Check entire area for vandalism and report to the director of facilities/administration or his/her designee.
Assist other employees with cleanup after large activities (e.g., after a basketball game).
Weekly Duties
Sweep under all entrance mats (both inside and outside).
Dust mop and sweep out corners of all the tiled areas that are not covered under daily routines.
Vacuum all carpets thoroughly in all classrooms and work areas according to schedule.
Wet mop tiled areas. Wax, if needed.
Wash all desktops, chairs, and furniture according to schedule.
Dust everything in rooms and corridors according to schedule.
Make sure all lockers are dusted and marks removed.
Wash all hallway door windows.
Clean cove molding and edges thoroughly.
Vacuum blackboard erasers.
Wash all blackboards, chalkboard rails, and marker boards according to schedule.
Wash display case glass, if needed.
Check the furniture once a week for breakage and either repair it or report it to the head
custodian/supervisor.
Check all playground equipment for damage or unsafe conditions and inform Plant Service of repair needs.
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Monthly
Vacuum or clean all intakes and exhaust ventilating louvers in ceiling of every room.
Clean out all storage rooms.
Winter and Spring Break
Light-scrub and re-wax all hard tile floors. Strip, if needed.
Extract carpeted rooms as needed.
Extract entrance mats.
Lightly dust all rooms.
Wash all desktops.
Wash inside of all windows.
Scrub floors and clean all walls and partitions in restrooms.
Make sure all sinks, urinals, and stools are cleaned (in, under, and around).
Summer Duties
Wash all windows inside and out.
Wash all desks (including teachers’) inside and out.
Wash all walls as needed.
Remove all dirt from lights and high-dust everything.
Wash all doors and frames. Pay special attention around lock assembly.
Scrub all floors and re-wax, strip if needed.
Thoroughly vacuum all carpeted areas and extract.
Completely clean all fixtures, furniture, ceiling, walls and floors.
Typical Minor Maintenance Duties for Custodians
The list below identifies some of the typical minor maintenance activities that custodians are responsible for:
Replace defective lamps (lighting fixtures, exit lamps, etc.)
Repair furniture including desks and chairs, bookcases, cabinets, etc. Replace chair and desk glides.
Repair/replace damaged cafeteria tables and seats.
Replace cove base, ceiling panels, etc.
Repair simple plumbing leaks in faucets, sinks, etc. Remove minor drain blockages in sinks, water coolers, etc.
Replace damaged commode seats.
Clean restroom exhaust fans. Install/repair paper towel, toilet paper and soap dispensers.
Install/repair pencil trimmers.
Hang pictures, maps, projection screens, etc.
Reset clocks after seasonal time changes and power outages.
Simple lock and hardware repairs for doors and windows, door closers, etc.
Simple touchup painting (with prior approval and assistance from the maintenance department).
Monitor HVAC equipment, thermostats, etc. and reset controls when needed.
Clean radiators and repair radiator cabinets.
Clean ceiling fans in classrooms, offices, etc.
Replace defective HVAC filters.
Remove and dispose of trash and debris in gutters and on roofs.
Assist mowing crew by doing the trim mowing, edging and removal of grass clippings and debris.
Prune shrubs, trees, etc. and spread pine straw or mulch around shrubs, flower beds, etc.
Repair playground equipment, fences, and other outdoor equipment.
Preventive maintenance and repair of custodial equipment such as wet and dry vacuum machines, floor
machines, lawn mowers, string trimmers, etc.
Maintain each individual’s set of keys and the key control system and master keys for the facility.
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Custodian Schedule Form
School: ___________________________________________________________________________
Custodian: __________________ Start time: _______________ End time: ________________
Schedule: ___________________ Assigned: __________________________________________
Time
Area Responsibilities (Instructions)
6:00 a.m.
7:00 a.m.
8:00 a.m.
9:00 a.m.
10:00 a.m.
11:00 a.m.
12:00 p.m.
1:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
Additional Comments:
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________
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Custodian Inspection Form
School: ______________________________ Custodian: __________________________
Date: _______________________________ Inspected by: ________________________
AREA INSPECTED
Satisfactory
Unsatisfactory
COMMENTS
Entrances & Lobby
Offices
Classrooms
Restrooms
Corridors & Stairwells
Lounges
Gymnasium
Locker Rooms
Dining Area
Kitchen
Custodial Closets
Other Storage Areas
Trash Dumpster Area
Grounds, Shrubbery, and
Landscaping
Parking Areas
Driveways
Doors, Windows,
and Hardware
Structural Components
and Roof
Plumbing System,
Fixtures, and Equipment
Mechanical Equipment
and Controls
Additional Comments:
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
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Maintenance Request Form
Type of Work Order ______________
Date
Date
Inspected upon Completion by
Date
Must do now
As soon as possible
As time permits
Maintenance Personnel Assigned
Order of Importance:
POINTE COUPEE CENTRAL
For Operations Office Use
Approved by:
Principal's Signature (required)
Date
Employee's Signature
Date
MAINTENANCE REQUEST
Room number
Email
Identify below the need for maintenance. Include Location (room number, teacher name,
hallway, specific piece of equipment, etc.) and description of work to be done.
SCHOOL FACILITIES
Maintenance Request Form
Employee's Name
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Outdoor and Grounds Management
The entire school grounds must be properly maintained on a routine and preventive basis. School grounds can
be defined as the full extent of all school property, including school sites, the central office, and other administrative
or support facilities. This includes, but is not limited, to:
courtyards
exterior lighting and signage
outdoor learning equipment
pools
museums
bike trails
modular facilities
paved surfaces (e.g., sidewalks, parking lots, and roads)
athletic fields (including synthetic surfaces such as Astroturf )
vacant property owned by the district
Duties consist of keeping school grounds clear of trash, glass, leaves, and other debris; sweeping sidewalks,
parking lots, and paved play areas; hosing down sidewalks, steps, and outside entrance areas; maintaining the lawn
in a neat and presentable condition by mowing grass, trimming around the building, sidewalks, fence lines, etc.;
pulling weeds and trimming shrubbery as necessary; and spreading mulch in tot-lots as needed. During winter
months remove snow and ice from sidewalks, entrances, and bus loading and unloading areas.
OUTDOOR AND GROUNDS CARE
SUPERVISORS/GROUNDS KEEPERS FREQUENCY CHART
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Pick up trash & debris
Sweep entrances & sidewalks
Inspect play area pavement
Remove graffiti
Check playground equipment
Rake grounds
Remove leaves
Clean storm drain grating
Clean roof drains
nspect gutters & downspouts
Mow lawn (in season)
Trim around building & walks
Trim along fence lines
Pull weeds
Trim shrubbery
Remove ice & snow
Salt icy areas
Replace burnt out light bulbs
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Cleaning Procedures
Auditorium Cleaning and Care
This consists of all cleaning associated with the auditorium area such as: stage, prop room, dressing room, orchestra
pit, ticket booth, and seating areas, including proper care of floor surfaces, carpeting, and auditorium equipment.
Classroom Cleaning and Care
This will include emptying pencil sharpeners and wastebaskets; cleaning chalkboards and chalk trays; damp wiping
or dusting of desks, tables, cabinets, and other specified surfaces; cleaning student cloak closets, sinks, and toilets in
assigned work areas; sweeping/dry mopping and wet mopping of floors; vacuuming carpets; washing windows;
adjusting venetian blinds and drapes uniformly.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Dust mop floor
Empty pencil sharpeners
Empty wastebaskets
Secure windows
Adjust blinds/drapes uniformly
Wash sink & fittings
Wash windows & window sills
Dust window sills
Wash wood work & trim
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Sweep/vacuum aisles
Sweep/vacuum floor areas
Clean/vacuum upholstered seats
Clean stage
Clean orchestra pit
Clean dressing rooms
Clean restrooms
Empty waste receptacles
Replace light bulbs/tubes
Clean prop room
Dust walls
Wash walls
Wash doors and door frames
Remove graffiti
Clean ticket booth
Wet mop hard surface floors
Remove chewing gum, tar, etc.
Spot clean upholstery & carpet
Shampoo/extract carpet
Hard surface floor maintenance
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Wash doors & frames
Wash baseboards
Wash furniture
Wash lights & fixtures
Clean chalkboards & trays
Clean venetian blinds
Dust walls & ceiling corners
Vacuum carpet/rugs
Dust wipe clock, TV, etc.
Replace light tubes
Wet mop and/or spray buff floor
Scrub/strip & refinish floor
Corridors and Entrance Care
This will include all cleaning in corridors and lobby entrances; removing all loose paper, trash and rubbish;
removing gum and heel marks from the floors; cleaning drinking fountains and glass surfaces in the areas; mopping
up wet spots due to weather, leaks or spills; keeping walk-off mats clean; and proper care and maintenance of
equipment and materials used. When floors are wet or slippery, keep warning signs in place.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As
Required
Dust mop floors & steps
Secure windows & doors
Wash fountains & fittings
Wash windows & sills
Wash doors, frames & glass
Wash entrance doors & glass
Wash lockers
Wash woodwork & trim
Wash lights & fixtures
Wash steps & handrails
Dust walls & ceiling corners
Dust off tops of lockers, exit lights &
clocks
Damp wipe walls
Clean exhibit cases & art work
Clean/vacuum walk-off mats/other
carpeted areas
Clean/shampoo carpeted areas
Spot/wet mop floors
Spray buff floors
Scrub or strip floors
Refinish floors
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Gymnasium Care
Includes all cleaning associated with the gymnasium such as; dust mopping before and after athletic events; spot
mopping for spills as necessary; cleaning and emptying waste receptacles; washing walls, doors, door frames, and
windows; cleaning trash and debris from under and around the bleachers; and replacing light bulbs/tubes as
necessary.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Dust mop floor
Spot mop floors
Dust walls and bleachers
Wash walls and bleachers
Wash doors and door frames
Wash door glass
Empty trash receptacles
Clean under bleachers
Check bleacher operation
Perform bleacher safety checks
Check partition operators
Check backboard operators
Check volleyball pole anchors
Replace burned out light bulbs
Remove gum/tar from floor
Remove graffiti
Wash windows
Wash light fixtures
Secure windows and doors
Do regular floor maintenance
Health Room Cleaning
The health room is one of the most critical areas in our buildings where regular and proper cleaning is important.
Health rooms are occupied by students that have cuts, scrapes, contagious infections, and illnesses. Proper cleaning
daily is best to control bacteria and odors in the health rooms. Equipment needed for proper cleaning is just as
important. Only use the wet mops and bowl swabs labeled for use in the health room restrooms.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Wash sinks/basins & fittings
Wash urinals & fittings
Wash commodes including seats
Wash windows
Wash walls & ceiling
Wash lights & fixtures
Damp wipe partitions & walls
Polish metal work
Clean mirrors
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Empty waste receptacles
Clean soap dispensers
Fill toilet tissue dispenser
Fill paper towel dispenser
Fill sanitary napkin dispenser
Fill soap dispenser
Wet mop floor using germicidal
disinfectant cleaner
Secure windows.
Replace light bulbs
Do regular floor maintenance
Strip and refinish floors
Kitchen and Cafeteria Cleaning and Maintenance
This will include removing trash/garbage from the kitchen and dining areas; washing and sanitizing trash/garbage
containers; washing overhead hoods, ducts, pipes, and filters; cleaning refrigerator/walk-in box floors; washing
walls, windows, doors, and door frames; wet mopping the kitchen and dining area floors with a germicidal
disinfectant cleaner; setting up tables before lunch; putting tables away after lunch; and the proper care and
maintenance of the cleaning equipment.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Wash hoods, filters, ducts, etc.
Wash trash/garbage cans
Wash door sills
Wash doors & door frames
Wash windows & sills
Wash walls, woodwork & trim
Wash lights & fixtures
Clean venetian blinds
Clean ventilating fans
Clean grease traps
Dispose of trash/garbage
Sweep cafeteria floor
Wet mop cafeteria floor
Wet mop kitchen floor
Spot mop floors - due to spills
Clean drinking fountains
Replace light tubes
Secure windows & doors
Spray buff cafeteria floor
Do regular floor maintenance
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Restroom Cleaning
The restroom is one of the most critical areas in our buildings where regular and proper cleaning is
important. Restrooms that are dirty and have offensive odors cause germs and diseases that pose a threat to good
health. Proper cleaning daily is the best way to control bacteria and odors in the restrooms.
Equipment needed for proper cleaning is just as important. The equipment used for the restroom should not
be used elsewhere. If possible, mark mops, brooms, and bowl swabs to identify them just for the restrooms so no
one else will use them in other areas. The items needed to clean a restroom are: rubber gloves, wet floor sign,
broom, dust pan, wet mop, mop bucket and wringer, spray bottles, sponges, putty knife, bowl brush, bowl swabs,
germicidal disinfectant cleaner, cream cleanser, hand soap, glass cleaner, hand towels, toilet tissue, sanitary napkins,
and disposable sanitary napkin bags.
Safety precautions should always be used to prevent accidents and injuries to self and others.
First: Use wet floor signs. These let others know that the janitor is working in the restroom and that the floor is wet.
Second: Wear rubber gloves. This will prevent contact of bacteria and germs to hands.
Third: The only chemicals used are germicidal disinfectant cleaner, window cleaner, extractor chemical, and
stripper. Do not mix any cleaning chemicals together under any circumstances.
Fourth: Report all necessary repairs of lights, plumbing, or fixtures, and put up an out-of-order sign.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Wash sinks/basins & fittings
Wash urinals & fittings
Wash commodes including seats
Wash windows
Wash walls & ceiling
Wash lights & fixtures
Damp wipe partitions & walls
Polish metal work
Clean mirrors
Empty waste receptacles
Clean soap dispensers
Fill toilet tissue dispenser
Fill paper towel dispenser
Fill sanitary napkin dispenser
Fill soap dispenser
Wet mop floor
Secure windows
Replace light bulbs
Do regular floor maintenance
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Shower and Locker Room Care
This will include all cleaning in shower and locker rooms such as: emptying all waste receptacles; servicing sanitary
napkin dispensers, if provided; dusting ledges, grills, and locker tops; cleaning of walls, mirrors, shelves, windows
and window sills, stall partitions and doors, wash basins, commodes and urinals; polishing metal work; and
sweeping, mopping, and scrubbing of floors.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Empty waste receptacles
Sweep locker/shower room
Wet mop and disinfect locker room area
Wet mop and disinfect shower room
area
Clean metal work
Clean locker tops
Fill paper towel dispensers
Fill toilet tissue dispensers
Fill soap dispensers
Fill sanitary napkin dispenser
Wash and disinfect walls and shower
stalls
Wash and disinfect stall partitions
Wash and disinfect sinks/basins
Wash and disinfect commodes
Wash and disinfect urinals
Wash mirrors
Wash and disinfect shelves
Wash and disinfect doors
Replace light bulbs
Do regular floor maintenance
Stairs and Stairwells
This will include the wet and dry cleaning in stairwells; i.e., steps, landings, windows, sills, doors, glass, stair treads,
risers, lights and fixtures, and handrails.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Dust mop steps & landings
Secure windows & blinds
Wash windows & sills
Wash doors, frames, and glass
Wash stair treads
Wash stair risers
Wash lights & fixtures walls
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Damp wipe handrails
Damp wipe walls
Damp wipe exit lights
Dust walls & ceiling corners
Replace light tubes/bulbs
Remove chewing gum
Remove graffiti
Wet mop landings
Scrub or strip landings
Refinish landings
Weight Lifting/Exercise Room
This will include all cleaning in weight lifting rooms such as: emptying all waste receptacles and
cleaning windows, dust ledges, furniture, walls, disinfect telephone, equipment, and floors.
DUTIES
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Annually
As Required
Dust or vacuum floor
Empty wastebasket
Secure windows
Adjust blinds/drapes uniformly
Clean & disinfect body contact areas of
equipment
Wash windows & window sills
Dust window sills
Wash woodwork & trim
Wash baseboard
Wash furniture
Wash lights & fixtures
Dust walls & ceiling corners
Vacuum carpet/rugs
Dust & wipe clock, TV, etc.
Replace light tubes
Wet mop floor
Playground Equipment
Playground equipment should be inspected semi-annuallybefore school begins and in the early spring. Inspections
are important to determine faulty equipment to eliminate risk of injury to students and other community users.
Following preventative maintenance inspections and detailed record keeping will aid in the reduction of liability
issues.
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Playground Inspection Checklist
School _______________________________________________________ Date ___________________________
Inspected by __________________________________________________________________________________
Playground equipment should be inspected for safety before school starts in the fall. A July inspection allows time
for repairs to be made before students return for the first day of school. An early spring inspection (early-March)
should also be accomplished. The following checklist should be used for these semi-annual inspections and should
be kept with other preventive maintenance records. Minor repairs should be made at the school level. Repairs
beyond the capability of in-school personnel should be placed on a ―Maintenance Requisition.‖
Checked
Play Equipment
State the Repairs
Needed
What Repairs Were
Made
SLIDES
Exposed concrete footing
Protruding bolts or hardware
Head entrapment areas (between 3" and 9")
Metal slide bed separating from equipment
base at entrance, exit or joints
Loose, bent, sharp, or missing parts
Unstable equipment
Rough or broken slide bed
Finger entrapment areas (between 3/8" and 1")
Rust or dry rot on frame
Peeling paint or graffiti
Obstructions in 8' fall zone
Rusty/worn hardware
Debris littered steps
CLIMBERS
Exposed concrete footing
Protruding bolts or hardware
Head entrapment areas (between 3" and 9")
Loose, bent, sharp, or missing parts
Unstable equipment
Peeling paint or graffiti
Finger entrapment areas (between 3/8" and 1")
Rusty-worn hardware
Rust or dry rot on frame
Loose railings
Obstruction in 8' fall zone
TENNIS COURTS
Surface cracked or pitted
Concrete Footing of net supports loose
Fixtures broken
Fencing around courts loose, torn or broken
Broken glass or gravel on courts
FOOTBALL/SOCCER FIELDS
Goals bent or broken
Grounds in poor shape
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BASEBALL/SOFTBALL DIAMONDS
Backstop fencing bent, torn or broken
Glass or rocks scattered on fields
Grounds in need of care (i.e., ground hog
holes, gullied areas, etc.)
Glass, bottles, paper or cans need to be
cleaned up
SWINGS
Loose/worn chain swivels
Badly worn chain links
Seats cracked or broken
Protruding nuts and bolts
Loose concrete footings - unstable equipment
Loose, bent or missing parts
Excessively/dangerously rusted parts
SEESAWS
Rotted or cracked boards
Protruding or exposed nuts or bolts
Badly worn pivotal joints
Cracked boards or handles
Loose concrete footing
BASKETBALL COURTS/ HOOPS
Hoops loose/broken
Backstop loose
Surface (concrete or blacktop) cracked, loose
or pitted
Surfaces with broken glass or gravel
CRAWL TUNNELS
Peeling paint
Finger entrapment areas (between 3/8‖ and
1‖)
Cracked or broken areas
Obstruction in 8’ fall zone
Rough/sharp edges
Glass or debris present
PLAY AREA SURFACING AND
BORDERS
Surfacing border has rough or cracked
concrete, rough boards, or protruding bolts or
nails
The depth of loose surfacing material is less
than 6‖
Surfacing border is not adequately containing
the material
Glass and/or debris present
Play pieces are not at least 8’ apart
WOODEN CLMBING EQUIPMENT
Split uprights on wooden equipment
Exposed footings
Uprights worn/loose
Platforms, rungs, railings loose or worn
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Loose bolts
SPRING RIDING TOYS
Concrete footing loose
Exposed bolts and nuts
Plastic structure broken or cracked
Please Note: In no case should the fall height of a child to the cushioned ground surface
exceed 7 feet.
Overall comments on playground:
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Other Maintenance and Operations Issues
Boilers Boilers, which can be used to generate hot water for domestic use (e.g., kitchens, showers, and bathrooms)
or for heating buildings, should definitely be included in an organization’s preventive maintenance program. Most
large boilers are subject to state or local inspection laws, which typically require that the boiler be maintained on a
regular basis (at least annually) and that maintenance records be kept on-site. Records of hours of operation and fuel
use must also be maintained on-site and made available to inspectors. Moreover, permits may be required for boilers
that generate more than 10,000,000 btu/hour. Energy-saving techniques include equipping boilers with hot-water
temperature resets (which adjust the temperature of the hot water being produced based on the outside temperature)
and using boiler economizers to capture and recycle heat that would otherwise be lost in the stacks.
Electrical Systems Electrical equipment must be maintained like any other piece of equipment, whether it is a
distribution pole with transformers or a breaker box for controlling a classroom’s electrical power. Professional
engineers and electricians should help to determine preventive maintenance tasks and schedules for electrical
components. Thermo graphic scanning, which identifies overheating in connections, motors, bearings, and other
electrical switchgear, can be an important tool for determining the condition of electrical gear (the principle behind
the test is that a loose connection, bad bearing, or bad breaker bars will produce more heat than a proper
connection). With the widespread use of computers, the proper maintenance of electrical systems is more important
than ever. Reliance upon extension cords and an excessive number of power poles is an indication that permanent
upgrades to the electrical system are needed. However, upgrading existing electrical systems in old buildings must
be carefully managed. Building codes vary by locality, but whatever procedures, standards, and inspection
requirements exist are designed for standardization and safety and must be carefully followed by school personnel.
Energy Management The cost of energy is a major item in any school budget. Energy Management Systems are
computer-controlled systems that operate HVAC units. They can automatically turn on and off air conditioning,
lights, and boilers according to pre-programmed instructions entered by facilities staff. The following guidelines will
help to accomplish more efficient energy management:
Establish an energy policy with specific goals and objectives.
Assign someone to be responsible for the district’s energy management program, and give this energy
manager access to top-level administrators.
Monitor each building’s energy use.
Conduct energy audits in all buildings to identify energy-inefficient units.
Institute performance contracting (i.e., contracts requiring desired results rather than simply a list of needed
products) when replacing older, energy-inefficient equipment.
Reward schools that decrease their energy use.
Install energy-efficient equipment, including power factor correction units, electronic ballast, high-efficient
lamps, night setbacks, and variable-speed drives for large motors and pumps.
Install motion detectors that turn lights on when a room is occupied (and off when the room is unoccupied).
Floor Coverings Often lunchrooms, main halls, and secondary halls are covered in terrazzo, vinyl composition tile
(VCT), or quarry tile. These coverings have hard surfaces that are easily cleaned and do not collect dirt. In
classrooms where noise control is important, carpets with an impermeable backing, which prevents the passage of
water or dirt and are easily cleaned, may be used. Carpets can also be purchased with adhesives already attached to
the backing, which helps to ensure complete adhesion without the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
Some primary schools use area rugs rather than carpets, because they can be easily removed and cleaned at the end
of the school year or as needed. Periodic cleaning of both carpets and rugs is necessary to minimize the likelihood of
dirt and other contaminants causing indoor air quality problems.
Gym Floors Gym floors are generally constructed with vinyl composition tile (VCT), one of several grades of
maple flooring, sheet rubber, or other synthetic materials. Regardless, all floor types must be kept clean and properly
maintained. VCT floors must be periodically stripped and re-waxed to ensure a safe surface. Wood floors require
annual screening and resealing with a water-based sealant. They should also be sanded, re-marked, and resealed in
their entirety every 10 years. Synthetic floors (including sheet rubber but excluding asbestos tile) require monthly
cleaning and scrubbing with buffers.
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Systems All schools require HVAC systems to control indoor
climate if they are to provide an environment that is conducive to learning. In fact, oftentimes a school’s ability to
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convene classes depends on acceptable climate control. Different regions of the country may place emphasis on
different elements of the HVAC system, but the bottom line is the same: HVAC components must be maintained on
a timely and routine basis. This preventive maintenance will ensure reliability, reduce operating costs, and increase
the life expectancy of the equipment.
Two effective ways to improve HVAC performance are through air balancing and water balancing. Air balancing
ensures that the desired amount of air reaches each space in the building, as specified in the mechanical plans. Water
balancing ensures that the flow of water from the chiller and boiler is in accordance with the mechanical plans.
Water balancing is normally performed before air balancing. Balancing is usually conducted upon installation of
new equipment and at 5- to 8-year intervals. Balancing should also be conducted when building space is
substantially modified or room use is changed dramatically.
Hot Water Heaters Hot water heaters in schools range in size from small 10-gallon heaters to the larger 100- to
300-gallon units. Preventive maintenance programs must be established for each hot water heater. At a minimum,
maintenance should include inspection for failing safety devices and leaks (especially if fired by natural gas).
Kitchens Kitchens present special problems for school districts: not only must equipment be maintained properly
to ensure reliability, but 1) a high state of cleanliness must be maintained in all food preparation areas; 2) the use of
certain cleaning agents may be discouraged in food preparation areas; and 3) ovens and stoves pose special fire
safety concerns. Floor surfaces are also of particular concern in kitchens since they must be easy to clean yet slip-
resistant. Recommended floor surfaces for kitchens include terrazzo, vinyl composition tile (VCT), quarry tile, and
sealed concrete.
Painting Painting should be done on a regular schedule that is published well in advance of work dates to
minimize inconvenience to building occupants. Painting needs are determined largely by the type of surface, the
type of paint applied previously, and surface use (e.g., a window pane may be expected to receive less wear than a
chair rail). A wall constructed of concrete masonry units (CMU) and painted with a two-part epoxy can last 8 or 10
years whereas drywall will require painting every 5 or 6 years. Bathrooms, special education areas, and other high-
traffic areas will require painting on a more frequent schedule. A durable, cleanable (i.e., able to be cleaned by the
custodial staff with their standard tools), paint from a major manufacturer should be used for indoor areas. Water-
based latex paints are a good choice because they are low in volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and do not produce
noticeable odors. Surfaces must be properly prepared for painting, which may require the use of a primer to cover
stains and discolored patches.
Plumbing Sprinkler systems, water fountains, sump pumps, lift pumps, steam traps, expansion joints, and drains
are likely targets for preventive maintenance. Standing water must be avoided at all costs, since it damages building
materials and can lead to mold concerns that affect indoor air quality.
Public Address Systems and Intercoms These communications tools are vital to the management of school
buildings and, in an emergency, the safety of building occupants. Public address (PA) systems must be connected to
the emergency power system to ensure uninterrupted communications in the event of a power failure. Public address
systems and intercoms should be tested on a daily basis during the broadcast of a school’s morning announcements.
If broadcast systems fail to perform properly, they must be repaired immediately.
Roof Repairs The key to maintaining good roofs is the timely removal of water from the surface and substructure
of the roof. Thus, all leaks and damaged tiles must be repaired as soon as possible to prevent water damage and
mold growth. On composition built-up roofs, hot tar is the only appropriate repair method. Single-ply and modified
roofs should be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. The facility manager must verify the
annual assessment of each roof within the district, recording the date of installation, type of roof, type and thickness
of insulation, type of drainage, and type and frequency of repair work. Detailed drawings or photographs that show
the location of repairs should be maintained, as should contact information for the installing contractor. This
information is extremely important in the event of a major roofing problem or an insurance or warranty claim.
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Additional Resources
The following is a list of additional resources.
American School and University Annual Maintenance and Operations Cost Study
http://images.asumag.com/files/134/mo%20school.pdf
An annual survey that reports median national statistics for various maintenance and operations costs, including
salary/payroll, gas, electricity, utilities, maintenance and grounds equipment and supplies, outside contract labor,
and other costs.
Beyond Pesticides
http://www.beyondpesticides.org
A nonprofit membership organization formed to serve as a national network committed to pesticide safety and the
adoption of alternative pest management strategies.
Budgeting for Facilities Maintenance and Repair Activities
http://www.nap.edu/books/NI000085/html/index.html
An online publication that focuses on how to estimate future facility maintenance and repair needs. Federal Facilities
Council, Standing Committee on Operations and Maintenance, National Research Council (1996) National
Academy Press, Washington, DC.
Building Evaluation Techniques
Step-by-step techniques for conducting an effective building assessment, including the evaluation of overall
structural performance, spatial comfort, noise control, air quality, and energy consumption. Includes sample forms
a