Career
Planner
Workbook
National Pork Board
1776 NW 114th St, Clive, IA 50325
800-456-PORK • pork.org
Career Planner
Workbook
Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1
Personal Values Inventory ............................................................................................... 2
Work Values and Personal Values ................................................................................... 3
Lifestyle Inventory ........................................................................................................... 4
Matching Your Values and Preferences to Careers ......................................................... 5
Interests Inventory ........................................................................................................... 6
Completing a Gap Analysis ............................................................................................. 8
Career Planner
Workbook
1
INTRODUCTION
Welcome to the Career Planner Workbook!
Whether you’re a student looking for internship opportunities, a recent graduate entering the job market
for the rst time, or a seasoned employee who’s ready to make a career change, your values, interests,
and lifestyle preferences are generally the foundation on which you base your career and job decisions.
Since your job satisfaction and happiness will largely depend on how well your work matches and reects
your values, interests, and desired lifestyle, thinking through these things as you do career research can
help you narrow down your options.
In addition to understanding your values, interests, and preferences, you also should know what knowl-
edge, skills, and abilities you possess as a result of your work, school, or volunteer experience. Once
you nd a position that aligns with your values, interests, and lifestyle, you can compare your experience
to the requirements of the position and begin planning how to ll the gaps so that you can achieve your
career goals.
About the Workbook
The Career Planner workbook contains several self-directed activities designed to help you:
Identify the things that are important to you—your values, interests, and lifestyle preferences
Compare your current work experience -your knowledge, skills, and abilities- to requirements for
positions you’re interested in learning more about
This workbook was created as a companion to the Pork.org/careers Web site, which offers a wealth of
information, including video clips, tools, and resources related to careers in the pork industry. Some of
the activities in this workbook are designed to be used in conjunction with the Job Profiler tool at www.
pork.org/careers.
Before you work through the activities provided in this document, you should visit the Pork.org/careers
Web site to get familiar with the materials available to you. Take a few moments to complete Job Pro-
ler tool, and then use your results from that exercise to help you complete the activities provided in this
workbook.
We’re condent that you’ll nd interesting and exciting career opportunities waiting for you in the pork
industry!
Career Planner
Workbook
2
PERSONAL VALUES INVENTORY
Directions
What do you value most? It is important to consider the principles that guide you in your life and the
things that you value. To that end, choose ten of your most important values from the list below and
rank order them. NOTE: this list of values is here to help you, but you can write in your own if they
don’t appear here.
I value:
_____Achievement
_____Career Advancement
_____Comfort
_____Control
_____Contribution/Charity
_____Creativity
_____Diversity
_____Education
_____Environment
_____Equality
_____Faith
_____Family
_____Financial Stability
_____Flexibility
_____Freedom (Liberty)
_____Health
_____Independence
_____Integrity
_____Meaningful Job
_____Justice
_____Leadership
_____Leisure
_____Love
_____Marriage
_____Morality
_____Non-Violence
_____Optimism
_____Order
_____Personal Growth
_____Privacy
_____Quality of Life
_____Recognition
_____Relationships
_____Respect
_____Responsibility
____Safety/Security
_____Spirituality
_____Status
_____Time
_____Travel
_____Variety
_____Wealth/Money
Other Values (list and rank below):
Rank Value Rank Value
Career Planner
Workbook
3
WORK VALUES AND PERSONAL VALUES
Directions:
You will need to complete the Job Proler tool at www.pork.org/careers before you begin this exercise.
The Job Proler tool will help you identify your top work values and “match” you with some careers in the
pork industry that may be a good t.
In the spaces provided, list your top three personal values from the Personal Values Inventory. Next, refer
to your Job Proler results. List your top work values in the spaces provided. Answer the questions that
follow to complete this exercise.
Personal Values Work Values
Is there consistency between your work values and personal values?
If not, how do you resolve the conict?
How does this inuence your occupational choices?
Career Planner
Workbook
4
LIFESTYLE INVENTORY
Directions
Consider your personal and work values. How do they inuence lifestyle? Read the following and make
an X along the line that represents the lifestyle you currently have. Next, make an O along the line that
represents the lifestyle you would like to have. Continually refer back to this information to determine if
your career choice is aligned with your values and desired lifestyle.
My Desired Lifestyle
Own my house Rent my house
Have time to devote to family/friends Have time to devote to your career
Live in a rural area Live in an urban area
Frequent job travel Little job travel
Time for personal/leisure activities Little time for personal/leisure activities
Access to education Little need for educational facilities
Live in constant climate Live in seasonal climate
Walk or bus to work Commute to work (30+ minutes)
I plan my time Others plan my time
Need a high income Need enough to survive
Career Planner
Workbook
5
MATCHING YOUR VALUES AND PREFERENCES TO CAREERS
The more aware you become of your fundamental values and preferences, the easier it will be for you to
make decisions and choices.
When considering career choices or employment offers, it’s important to be sure the career path or job
is consistent with your values and preferences. Your happiness and satisfaction will greatly depend on
how well your career, job, and values match. For example, if being physically active at work is important
to you, you would likely be unhappy sitting at a desk all day. If working with people is important to you,
you’d probably be miserable working off by yourself in seclusion.
Directions:
You will need a Job Prole from the Job Proler tool on www.pork.org/careers to complete this exercise.
Use one of the job proles that matched your work values in the Job Proler tool. List the job duties
in the rst column. Then, evaluate whether each duty you listed is a good match or poor match with
your personal values. Next to each job duty listed, check (X) “Good” if the task matches your values, or
“Poor” if the task does not. Do the same evaluation for your work values.
Job Duties
Personal Values Work Values Lifestyle Preferences
Good Poor Good Poor Good Poor
*Download a soft-copy version of this form at www.pork.org/careers.
How well does this career match your values and lifestyle preferences?
___ Very well ___ Fairly well ___ Not very well ___ Not well at all
Career Planner
Workbook
6
INTERESTS INVENTORY
John Holland RIASEC Model*
John Holland’s RIASEC Model helps people select and plan their careers, and helps you learn about
yourself and your educational and life/career choices. It is based upon the theory that people can be
loosely classied into six different groups: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and Con-
ventional (RIASEC).
How are the six types similar or different?
A six-sided gure--called a hexagon--is used to show the similarities and differences among the six
types. Types that are next to one another on the hexagon are most similar. The following hexagon shows
the relationships among the six types. For example, Realistic and Investigative types tend to have similar
interests, but Realistic and Social types tend to be most different.
*This RIASEC model of occupations is the copyrighted work of Dr. John L. Holland, and his publisher,
Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. (PAR). For an assessment of your career interests, take Dr.
Holland’s Self-Directed Search assessment online at www.self-directed-search.com.
Career Planner
Workbook
7
Directions:
You will need your results from the Job Proler tool at www.pork.org/careers to complete this exercise.
Read the descriptions below for each of the RIASEC* types. Use the information to try to identify which
type you might be. Then, list the careers from your Job Proler results next to the interests they support.
Type Description
Typical
Characteristics
Pork Industry Careers
Realistic
People who have athletic or mechanical
ability, prefer to work with objects, ma-
chines, tools, plants or animals, or to be
outdoors.
Persistent
Modest
Natural
Thrifty
Investigative
People who like to observe, learn, investi-
gate, analyze, evaluate or solve problems.
Usually have math or science abilities and
Likes to work alone and solve problems.
Analytical
Complex
Critical
Methodical
Artistic
People who have artistic, innovating or intu-
itional abilities and like to work in unstruc-
tured situations using their imagination and
creativity. Usually musicians & actors.
Expressive
Imaginative
Impulsive
Intuitive
Social
People who like to work with people to en-
lighten, inform, help, train, or cure them, or
are skilled with words. Many are teachers,
nurses and therapists.
Understanding
Generous
Helpful
Sympathetic
Enterprising
People who like to work with people, inu-
encing, persuading, performing, leading or
managing for organizational goals or eco-
nomic gain. Good salespeople and travel
agents.
Acquisitive
Domineering
Energetic
Self-condent
Conventional
People who like to work with data, have
clerical or numerical ability, carry out tasks
in detail or follow through on others’ instruc-
tions.
Conscientious
Obedient
Persistent
Practical
*This RAISEC model of occupations is the copyrighted work of Dr. John L. Holland, and his publisher,
Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. (PAR). For an assessment of your career interests, take Dr.
Holland’s Self-Directed Search online at www.self-directed-search.com.
Career Planner
Workbook
8
COMPLETING A GAP ANALYSIS
Directions:
You will need a pork industry Job Prole from www.pork.org/careers to complete this exercise. Complete
this exercise with any career you are considering to help you understand what steps you need to take to
qualify for a position.
Column A – Record the required qualifications of your career target using one or more Job Proles.
Under level of education required, please indicate the highest level of education or training required.
Note: You may have to search some additional career Web sites to nd this information.
Column B – Compare the required qualications with your current qualications. If you have NOT met
the required qualications, place a check in column B. This represents a gap that you must address be-
fore you are qualied for a position.
Column C – Determine how you would address each of the gaps you have identied. Use this informa-
tion to help you set long- and short-term goals.
A
Required Qualications
B
Gaps
(X if does not meet)
C
Ways to Address Gap
My Career Target: Veterinary Medicine
KNOWLEDGE
Level of education required
RCST course and OJT
X
Enroll in Purdue University Correspon-
dence Course or an approved IAHCSMM
course.
Level of certification required
IAHCSMM Certication Examination with a
70% grade average
X
Work several months while also studying
for the international exam. Take exam.
JOB-REQUIRED SKILLS
Organize and assemble routine and spe-
cialty surgical instrument trays and other
sterilized supplies, lling special requests
as needed
X
Enroll in Purdue University Correspon-
dence Course or an approved IAHCSMM
course to learn how to organize and as-
semble trays.
ABILITIES
The ability to tell when something is wrong
or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve
solving the problem, only recognizing there
is a problem.
* Download a soft-copy of this form at www.pork.org/careers
Career Planner
Workbook
9
A
Required Qualications
B
Gaps
(X if does not meet)
C
Ways to Address Gap
My Career Target: Veterinary Medicine
KNOWLEDGE
Level of Education Required
Level of Certication/Licensure required
JOB-REQUIRED SKILLS
ABILITIES
National Pork Board
1776 NW 114th St, Clive, IA 50325
800-456-PORK • pork.org
©2009 National Pork Board, Des Moines, IA USA. This message funded by America’s Pork Checkoff Program. #04848 9/09
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