Children and Family Court
Advisory and Support Service
Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
An executive non-departmental public body
Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service
Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
Report presented to Parliament pursuant to paragraph 12(3) of Schedule 2 to the Criminal Justice
and Court Services Act 2000.
Accounts presented to Parliament pursuant to paragraph 13(4) of Schedule 2 to the Criminal Justice
and Court Services Act 2000.
Ordered by the House of Commons to be printed on 20th July 2017.
HC 135
© Crown copyright 2017
This publication is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0 except
where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-
government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives,
Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.
Where we have identied any third party copyright information you will need to obtain permission
from the copyright holders concerned.
This publication is available at www.gov.uk/government/publications.
Any enquiries regarding this publication should be sent to us at:
Cafcass
21 Bloomsbury Street,
London,
WC1B 3HF
Print ISBN 9781474145077
Web ISBN 9781474145084
ID P002879747
07/17
Printed on paper containing 75% recycled bre content minimum.
Printed in the UK by the Williams Lea Group on behalf of the Controller of Her Majestys
Stationery Ofce.
Contents
Section 1 The performance report 06
Overview 06
Section 1.1 Performance analysis 28
Section 2 The accountability report 41
Corporate Governance report 41
Section 2.1 Remuneration and staff report 49
Section 2.2 Parliamentary Accountability and
Audit report 61
The Certicate and Report of the
Comptroller and Auditor General to
the Houses of Parliament 64
Section 3 2016-17 Annual Accounts 66
Financial statements 66
Appendix and glossary 85
General contact details 90
A glossary of terms used in this report, and in the family justice sector more widely, is set out on
page 86. This is based on the excellent glossary produced by the Family Justice Young People’s
Board
[1]
(FJYPB).
We have used the following format of listing proper nouns in full the rst time it is used, with the
acronym or initialisation then set out in brackets. We then use the acronym or initialisation.
All months should be read as falling within the period this report covers (1st April 2016 to 31st
March 2017) unless otherwise specied.
[1] The Family Justice Young People’s Board (FJYPB) comprises over 40 children and young people aged between eight and
25 years old who have had direct experience of the family justice system or have an interest in children’s rights and the family
courts. The FJYPB works to ensure that the family justice system remains child-centred and child inclusive by promoting the
voice of the child.
Secon 1
The performance report
Overview
Overview
Summary
This secon shows what we do and what we are aiming
to achieve, and key risks to achieving these. It also shows
how we have performed during the year.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
07
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview | Introduction from the Chair
I am again reporting on a year that has seen further record increases in
demand for our services. The response to this increase, from frontline staff
to the entire family justice system, has been at the forefront of Board
consideration for the past year. We have focused on two aspects: the rst
being to ensure we have secured sufcient resources to deal with demand.
I am pleased that we have secured a budget for the coming nancial year
that allows us to put in place the extra workforce capacity needed to
manage demand levels. The second aspect is the case for wider reform in
both public and private law. It is clear that the performance of Cafcass cannot
be isolated from external drivers. We are now at a point where a wider family
justice reform agenda is the only viable and sustainable route for achieving
the change needed in our external operating environment. The Board will be
focusing on how we address demand as part of our contribution to the next
stage of reform.
I commend the way in which our staff have responded to ever greater pressure. The way we equip our staff to
remain resilient while maintaining high performance was the subject of a Board seminar in March. Staff have
drawn on the support we make available while keeping an unwavering focus on providing a quality service to
every child and young person they work with. Recognising that driving up quality is a lynchpin for the
organisation, we have incorporated what we have previously reported in a stand-alone Quality Account into our
main Annual Report. The Board is also exploring the development of a sector-wide quality standard for public
sector Boards working in relevant areas. Cafcass will be partnering with Barnardo’s and Social Care Institute for
Excellence (SCIE) to take this forward.
We opened up two of our Board meetings over the last year to stakeholders and the public. We had a
particularly strong turnout for our January meeting which considered how Cafcass approaches domestic abuse
in our casework, showcasing our new Domestic Abuse Practice Pathway. We also set out the joint research we
are carrying out with Women’s Aid to better understand what is happening where domestic abuse is alleged
in private law cases. Moving forward, the Board intends next year to place a clear focus on the signicance of
brother and sister relationships to children and young people in the family justice system; and on
understanding and increasing the added value of our work to courts, children and to families as a whole.
I have continued to enjoy meeting Cafcass staff throughout the year, when I am visiting ofces or as part of
my regular catch-ups with frontline staff. I have begun providing a short overview of Board meetings and action
points to all staff via a video message.
As part of my role in ensuring the Board is providing robust scrutiny and support to Cafcass, I commissioned
an external review of Board effectiveness. This repeats a review carried out in 2013-14 to assess whether we
have continued to develop, especially measuring our strategic leadership impact. I am pleased that the ndings
are positive, conrming that the Board works well with the Cafcass senior management team; that we bring a
broad range of skills and experience which helps us where we need to scrutinise and challenge the
organisation; and critically that the Board is focused on the impact its work has on the children and young
people we work with. In short the Board is adding value and providing strong leadership.
Finally, I would like to thank the Family Justice Young People’s Board (FJYPB) for their ongoing membership
and contribution to the Cafcass Board, and for their contribution to the family justice sector more widely. Once
again the FJYPB hosted a lively and challenging annual conference in July, where they challenged and
encouraged all present to consider how we can improve our communication with children and young people in
order to help them get to a better place.
Signed:BaronessTylerofEneld,ChairofCafcassBoard.
Introducon from the Chair
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
08
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview | Introduction from the Chief Executive
We helped 125,230 children in the year we are reporting on. We assessed
the needs of each child and – at the same time – we sought to help each child
to nd the best person to live with, and who could meet their needs,
particularly any need to recover from abuse, neglect or exploitation. We also
sought to help each child keep in touch with the people who matter to them,
and to help each child go forward through the remainder of their childhood
with greater condence and with hope for the future. We aimed to do this with
a model of assessment, analysis and action in respect of each child – not a
passive assessment in which we stand back and comment, but active
involvement in which we help and assess simultaneously.
To do this well, we need systems and processes to be in place as well as highly
competent and professional staff in every role throughout Cafcass. The
increase of 13.8% in our public law work and 9.1% in our private law work,
taking the year as a whole, put a very great strain on the organisation,
particularly our frontline practitioners. The children involved and our
practitioners both needed reliable systems in place, to make sure cases were managed properly according to a
rigorous standard and that practitioners receive as much support as an organisation can give.
In my assessment, we did well on both of those fronts. The regular audits of our work showed that the quality
of our casework continued to improve despite the pressures. We introduced a revised Quality Assurance and
Impact Framework (QAIF) for case auditing which in my view is second to none in social work. Our backroom
systems were constantly improving in terms of speed and responsiveness to internal and external customers.
We say to our business services staff that every number on a spreadsheet is a child and this reminds all of us in
Cafcass that we are frontline facing: that is our job and that is how we will be judged.
I want to acknowledge the hard work and extra goodwill shown by our staff which enabled us to remain high
performing during 2016-17. I also want to thank the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) for their support, illustrated by
our budget increase for the next nancial year which will enable us to stay on top of further increases in
demand without paying too high a price in terms of the pressure on frontline staff becoming excessive. The
extra funding will enable us to expand our workforce in those parts of the country where we are under the
most pressure. We have streamlined our recruitment process to support this.
As the Accounting Ofcer for Cafcass, I am proud of the way each member of staff takes their responsibility for
ensuring value for money so seriously. Something we strongly believe and practice is that the best innovation
comes from staff who re-imagine their day job on a regular basis, nding better ways of operating and putting
those improvements into practice with the minimum of fuss. I believe that making a great number of small
marginal gains at each level of our service adds up to a signicant quantum of innovation and improvement.
This approach also helps to make our services more sustainable under pressure.
While next year will be mostly about business as usual again, we will continue to play a full part in future
reform of the family justice system, working with our partners inside and outside of Government. System-wide
reform is in my view essential if the family justice system is to continue to be able to meet the needs of some
of the most vulnerable children in the UK over the next 10-15 years.
I look forward to being able to say in a year’s time that despite further pressures, we continued to maintain
performance productivity and quality, so that each child referred to us by a family court received a good
service. We will also be piloting some exciting new services in 2017-18, such as producing a child impact
analysis in private law cases rather than traditional section 7 reports, so that the focus is more specic to
the child’s needs.
 Signed:AnthonyDouglasCBE,ChiefExecutiveofCafcass.
Introducon from the Chief Execuve
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
9
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Who we are and what we are aiming to achieve
Cafcass stands for Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service. We are a non-departmental public
body accountable to the Secretary of State at the MoJ.
We represent children in family court cases. We aim to make sure that children’s voices are heard and decisions
are taken in their best interests.
We may be asked by the court to work with families in two main areas:
We operate within the law set by Parliament (Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000) and under the rules
and directions of the family courts. Our role is to:
We work within the strategic objectives agreed by our sponsor department, MoJ (including MoJ strategy
launched in 2017), and contribute to wider government objectives relating to children.
We also have our own strategic and business plans which set out what we are aiming to achieve. We are
committed to strengthening the voice of the child in the family court process and we aim to deliver our services
as effectively and efciently as possible within the resources that are available.
Our strategic priorities to help courts choose the best outcomes for children are:
1. Quality: continue to make improvements to the quality of our work.
2. Familyjusticeinnovation: implement our part of the family justice reform and bring innovation to our
services.
3. Diversity: always see the uniqueness of each child we have responsibilities towards and build our
understanding of diversity in casework.
4. Efciencyandeffectiveness:nd the best way to make our money go further while still providing the
best outcomes for children.
5. Inuence: use our inuence positively as the voice of the child, and the eyes and ears of family courts.
· safeguard and promote the welfare of children
· give advice to the family courts
· make provision for children to be represented
· provide information, advice and support to children and their families.
Privatelaw, including child arrangements
for children after parents have divorced or
separated.
In these cases, a Cafcass social worker will be
appointed by the court to act as a Family Court
Adviser (FCA). Their job is to provide
information to the court that is needed for a
safe decision to be made about arrangements
for who the child lives with or spends time with.
Publiclaw, including care and adoption
cases where the local authority has serious
concerns about the safety or welfare of a child.
In these cases, a Cafcass social worker will be
appointed by the court to act as a Children’s
Guardian. Their job is to check the local
authority’s (LAs) plan and make sure that it is
the best possible for the child. It is also to let
the court know what they think should happen.
09
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
10
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Numbers of children in new cases received per service area, including areas and Assistant Directors (AD).
A1: Tyneside and Northumbria.
Carole Goodman (AD)
1,352 &
2,138
A2: Durham, Teesside, North
Yorkshire, York, Cumbria and
Lancashire. Marie Gittins (AD)
2,887 &
4,186
1,915 & 3,448
A3: Greater Manchester.
Sandie Hayes (AD)
1,475 & 3,057
A5: West Yorkshire.
Hilary Barrett (AD)
A9: Cheshire, Staffordshire and
Merseyside. Sandie Hayes (AD)
2,466 &
4,471
A4: South Yorkshire and
Humberside. Hilary Barrett (AD)
1,622 &
2,665
1,161 &
4,040
A11: Nottinghamshire and
Derbyshire. Neville Hall (AD)
A12: Birmingham, the Black
Country, Shropshire,
Herefordshire and
Worcestershire. Neville Hall (AD)
2,095 &
4,633
A7: Avon, Gloucestershire
and Wiltshire. Kevin Gibbs (AD)
1,037 & 2,602
1,755 &
4,024
A8: Cornwall, Devon and
Somerset.
Kevin Gibbs (AD)
A6: Hampshire and the
Isle of Wight and Dorset.
Steve Hunt (AD)
1,181 & 2,878
A13: National Business Centre,
Coventry, Northamptonshire and
Buckinghamshire. Neville Hall (AD)
907 & 2,115
A16: Surrey
and Sussex.
Richard Morris (AD)
1,048 &
2,127
A15: Greater London. Richard
Morris (AD) (public law) and Sarah
Parsons (AD) (private law)
4,055 & 7,161
A10: Leicestershire,
Lincolnshire and
Cambridgeshire.
Hilary Barrett (AD)
1,345 & 1,099
A14: Essex,
Suffolk, Norfolk,
Hertfordshire and
Bedfordshire.
Sarah Parsons (AD)
2,837 & 6,014
A17: Kent. Steve Hunt (AD)
746 & 2,235
1,646 children are included in the national totals that were on cases held in the Cafcass Intake Team. These
cases were yet to be transferred to the service areas at the time of data collection.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
11
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
125,230
This year we worked with
children and young people
34,807 (28%) children were in exisng cases
[2]
90,423 (72%) children were in new cases
[2] Cases referred to us prior to the reporting period and on whose cases we continued to work during part, or occasionally all, of the year,
and those cases which were closed during the year.
[3] A12:Birmingham, Black Country, Shropshire, Herefordshire and Worcestershire.
[4] A13.
How we have managed rising demand pressures
Demand has risen signicantly in both our private and public law work. In some service areas this increase is
even more pronounced, such as in the West Midlands
[3]
which experienced a 28% increase in care applications,
and Coventry, Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshire
[4]
which saw a 19% rise in private law applications.
The drivers behind such regional variation and the impact on performance are being explored by Cafcass and
MoJ both at a national level, and by Cafcass ADs at a local level with their local authorities and Designated
Family Judges (DFJs).
Such increased demand has placed, and continues to place, many of our teams under serious pressure. Our
focus has been on how to introduce supportive measures, so that we can continue to provide high quality and
timely services to the children and families we work with.
11,159
14,554
14-15 15-16 16-17
34,119
37,415
40,824
14-15 15-16 16-17
12,792
30.4%
19.7%
13.8%
Care applicaons Private law applicaons
9.1%
To manage the uctuations and increases in demand we have been innovative in
supporting our staff’sresilienceto higher workload pressure, increasing our use of a
cost-effective and experienced exibleworkforce, and introducing time-saving
technologyand more efcientprocesses.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
12
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Staffresilience
A motivated and resilient workforce has been crucial to maintain quality under the increased demand levels.
Our Health and Wellbeing Ofcers developed training on stress and mindfulness which is available for all staff,
and provided one-to-one support to over 100 staff members last year. Our National Service Managers’
workshop in November, delivered by an outside facilitator, focused on developing strategies to meet high
pressure environments and build resilience. Further resources are being shared with staff through team
development days and online materials.
However, we recognise that there is a limit to the impact of this approach if individual workloads continue to
increase. We have been working to ensure that our staff have manageable caseloads in order to perform well
and maintain a healthy work-life balance.
Aexibleworkforce
A exible workforce has been essential to meet uctuating levels of demand. One way we have achieved this is
through our use of contracted social workers (Self-Employed Contractors or SECs) in every service area. Unlike
agency staff, they are engaged for each case they take on, so can be deployed exibly where required to meet
resource gaps in different service areas. Our accreditation scheme ensures we engage only those with the most
experience and highest quality work. We have over 100 SECs available to allocate across the country, and they
are currently working on over 1,000 open cases. This has provided a sustainable and cost-effective way of
managing demand pressures.
We have encouraged our retiring practitioners to consider offering their expertise as bank workers, so that we
can continue to use experienced practitioners while increasing temporary capacity within teams. This has
proven to be a popular choice and our number of bank workers has increased by 25% compared with last year.
We also continue to use high calibre agency practitioners where the need arises, engaging just over 100 at the
end of the year.
131
147
1,806
1,754
1,682
14-15 15-16 16-17
103
85
employed staff
agency staff
Self-Employed Contractors
£90.65m
Number of:
121
93
£89.04m
£89.56m
Please note that the above 2016-17 chart is exclusive of net AME spend of £0.23m.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
13
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
ECMS Mobile
· A smartphone view of our
electronic case management
system (ECMS) has been
developed to promote
productivity. Work can be
completed exibly when at
court, with service users or
during travel.
· It saves practitioners time, with
immediate access to case
information and on-the-go case
recording and dictation options.
Virtual meetings
· Skype for Business has been
enabled on all Cafcass laptops
and tablets. This allows
practitioners to conduct
interviews by video or audio
with service users where
appropriate.
· It also connects staff across
locations to save time travelling
and support better
communication.
Analytics
· Accessible, up-to-date case and
workforce analytics play a
pivotal role in supporting the
management of increased
demand.
· A range of innovative
electronic tools for staff and
managers include role-
specic online dashboards,
workload information and
detailed reporting across our
services.
Technology
Our Innovation Project Development Board (IPDB) has a clear focus on increasing the time spent for our
frontline staff to focus on direct work through opportunities around technology and practice innovation. We
have provided training to staff, using a number of channels (face to face, webinars, videos) to demonstrate
how the technology available to our staff can support and enhance the direct work we carry out with children
and young people.
Efciency
We have worked to identify key areas within our processes and individual ways of working which may deliver
greater efciency to help manage demand. Within private law, we analysed our report work in a section 7
social work activity analysis study. A range of factors from higher-performing teams, including processes,
training and IT-prociency support were trialled in some areas. An evaluation identied areas inuencing
working patterns and quality, and highlighted key efciency opportunities around technical competence to be
taken forward next year.
Following feedback from practitioners, we auto-populated case information from ECMS in our case plan
templates for both private and public law. Case plans support the quality of our work through robust issue
exploration and planning of case activities at the start of a case. Auto-population of information held elsewhere
in the case le, such as child and adult details or linked previous cases, will signicantly reduce the time taken
in this critical activity.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
14
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
A child’s journey through our service
Privatelaw
Here we show a journey one of these children
and their family will have taken in the family
courts and with Cafcass over the last year.
Cassie’s story
[5]
Cassie’s mum and dad had her 10 years ago. After a difcult
few years Cassie’s dad left the family home when she was
four. She always receives a birthday card from her dad but
she hasn’t spoken to him since 2013.
Cassie loves riding her bike and wants to be in the Olympics
one day. She has a cat called Bob and hangs out with her
nan after school while her mum is at work.
Cassie’s dad has got a new job and a new partner, and is
expecting a child. He feels like he’s in a good place now: he
has moved back to the area and wants Cassie to know her
new half-sister. He tried to speak to Cassie’s mum but she
got really upset, saying this wouldn’t be good for Cassie. He’s
made a Child Arrangement Order (CAO) application, asking
the court to help him see her every week.
A Cafcass practitioner, known as a Family Court Adviser (FCA),
in the local Early Intervention Team, Mo, has been allocated
Cassie’s case.
After listening to some concerns Cassie’s mum has raised;
talking to her dad; and looking at the information provided
by the police and local authority (LA), Mo decides to advise
the court that Cafcass does some further work with Cassie
and her family.
Steve, a FCA from the team which writes section 7 reports,
has been asked to access the concerns and nd out Cassie’s
wishes and feelings. He meets with her and she uses an app
on his phone to help her describe how she was feeling –
excited but a bit anxious about seeing her dad. Steve also
talked to her dad and her mum to explore whether how
Cassie’s dad had behaved in the past might still be an issue
today.
Steve recommended to the court that Cassie start seeing her
dad in a space she felt comfortable. He also recommended
that her dad go on a course to help him and Cassie’s mum
communicate in the future, especially as things change with
his new family. The court makes the nal decision taking all
of the information into account.
Six months on, Cassie is now seeing her dad once a month
– usually at McDonald’s! She’s also getting to know her new
half-sister and can’t wait to teach her how to ride a bike when
she’s old enough.
Cassie’s mum and dad have a good system in place for
dealing with any unexpected changes on the days Cassie sees
her dad.
51%
male
49%
female
76%
were under 10 years old
60,537
We worked with
children and young people
[5] These stories reect the experiences of many of the children we work with but are not actual cases.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
15
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Our process
Most of the cases we are asked to take on are about
arrangements for children, usually after their parents
have separated. These are known as private law cases.
Cafcass and others working in the family justice sector
recognise that the family courts are often not the best
places to resolve disputes. We have been running a
Supporting Separated Parents in Dispute (SSPID) pilot
helpline which allows parents to contact Cafcass
pre-court to nd out about other support options
available out of court.
We also have a Parenting Plan that we promote, which
helps parents plan for the realities of parenting after
separation.
After receiving an application the court will ask Cafcass to
nd out more about the child, and write a safeguarding
letter.
Part of our checks involve asking Cafcass’ Police National
Computer (PNC) Unit what information the police have
about parties (level 1), and also requesting checks from
the local authority and talking to both parties.
A duty ofcer will work with families at the rst hearing
to try to help parents reach a safe agreement without
further involvement of the court.
The court may ask Cafcass to carry out further work and
provide a section 7 welfare report. Cafcass has a suite of
evidence informed practice tools to deal with issues such
as domestic abuse, alienating behaviours, disability and
mental health.
Practitioners also have apps and resources to help
children and young people express their views – for
example, using a Cafcass smartphone to take a picture
of a child’s drawing and inserting this in a court report.
These tools may help the practitioner identify that a child
or parents would benet from a contact activity – this
could be a parenting course (e.g SPIP) or domestic
abuse programme (e.g DVPP).
There are clear processes in place for making sure the
work and report is high quality and child centred, and
that everyone understands the reason behind the
recommendation.
We ensure that throughout the life of a case we are
focused on child outcomes. We provide children with
feedback forms and are working on incorporating
children’s feedback into the Area Quality Reviews (AQRs)
process.
Performance for the year
We received 40,824 private law applications.
3,023 people contacted our SPPID helpline in
the pilot areas and 828 adults were eligible to
be transferred to a FCA.
We wrote 35,850 safeguarding letters.
We completed 91,584 level 1 police checks.
68%of cases closed after the rst hearing.
32% of our cases progressed to work after rst
hearing (WAFH) with a section 7 welfare report
being ordered, of which 27% had more than
one report ordered.
1,624 child contact interventions (CCIs) were
ordered.
We introducedsix new evidence based tools
for our practitioners to use in private law cases,
including the Domestic Abuse Practice Pathway.
Our cases are quality assured against the four
child outcome domains in the Quality Assurance
and Impact Framework (QAIF). These are
ensuring the child is safe, heard, better
represented and enabled/advised.
74%of cases audited identied child centred
practice as a particular strength. The
uniqueness of the child being well represented
in court reports was identied as a particular
strength in work in 61% of cases.
Complimentfromboyagedeight:
“Thank you for everything you have done, if it
wasn’t for you I’d be in hell, so thank you very
much.
Complimentfromgirlaged14:
“Since my case ended I have felt better that I
now don’t have to think about what Dad would do
at the weekend. I feel more in control of my own
life now.
S
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Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
16
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Publiclaw
Ko’s story
Ko is three years old. His mother Mary is 24: her rst
child was taken into care when she was 17 and her
second and third also went into care. Mary has periods
of severe depression and does not stay on top of her
medication. She also misused alcohol while her children
were in her care.
Ko’s health worker is concerned that Mary is drinking
heavily again and is not meeting his needs – he is
underweight and missing several key milestones. Ko’s
grandmother is a stable gure in her life but has a
severe physical disability and is unable to take care of
him.
Ko’s dad is in prison. He comes from a large family but
doesn’t talk to his parents and they are unaware of Ko.
The LA has made an application for Ko to be looked
after by foster carers and placed for adoption.
Ko’s Children’s Guardian Sue has reviewed the work
the LA has done so far, and why it thinks Ko needs
to go into care. She carries out an initial case analysis,
agreeing that care looks like the right option, but wants
to see whether any of Ko’s father’s family may be able
to care for him.
Sue meets with Ko and his mum. Sue has some
questions about how she will work on this case that she
puts to Cafcass’ in-house psychologist.
She tries to make contact with Ko’s paternal family but
it becomes clear that they cannot care for him.
Sue carries out her case analysis and makes her
recommendation to the court for Ko’s future care,
which she believes is in Ko’s best interests. Sue’s
recommendation supports the local authority care plan
for Ko to be looked after by foster carers and placed
for adoption. The court makes the nal decision taking
all of the information into account.
Throughout her work with Ko Sue keeps a clear record
of what she has done and her assessment. This may be
important for Ko later on his life, to understand why
the court made its decision.
70%
were under 10 years old
29,886
We worked with
children and young people
Our process and performance
Cafcass has been working with several LAs to pilot
pre-proceedingswork(Cafcass Plus), to see if early
support can be put in place to avoid the need for a child
to go into care. In other cases, the emphasis will be
on ensuring that as soon as a child is born, they can
be placed in a safe environment and be on the road to
permanent care.
This year Cafcass recorded 80 Cafcass Plus cases
across the four pilot service areas.
Once proceedings are brought, the court will appoint a
Children’s Guardian, who will appoint a solicitor for the
child. They will carry out an initial analysis of the child’s
needs ahead of the Case Management Hearing.
We introduced 10 new evidence based tools for our
practitioners to use in public law cases. We also have an
in-house psychology service available to support the work
of our practitioners.
Our National Improvement Service (NIS) collaborated
with the NSPCC to develop a new tool for our public law
practitioners to help them assess cases featuring neglect.
“It provides a structure to analyse paperwork in public
law proceedings to keep the focus centered on children
and the risk posed to them, supporting guardians to
identify where the gaps are and keep the child’s lived
experience, which is so key in bringing neglect cases, to
the fore.” NIS manager.
The psychology service has been used in 163 cases.
Evaluation of the pilot showed that the service improved
case analysis and the management of risk in 97% of
audited cases.
The guardian will usually meet with the child and
carry out a nal case analysis having reviewed the LAs
work. They will make their recommendation to the court
on what they believe is in the child’s best interest.
Next year we will be running case recording workshops,
including messages from young people affected by poor
recording on childhood social work les.
51%
male
49%
female
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
17
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Commissioned services
Our National Commissioning Team (NCT) delivers programmes for the family courts that help parents resolve
private law cases. These are delivered through third sector and private service providers.
Courtorderedinterventions
Supervised and
supported child
contact intervention
(CCI) programmes
£1.55m on CCIs
£0.45m in grants to
192 centres for
supported contact
These interventions enable safe contact to take place, often after a long
break. We have given a stronger focus to dispute resolution during these
interventions, working with parents to help them develop sustainable
long-term arrangements.
“By this service just existing you have helped me and possibly countless
other mothers and fathers reconnect with our children, something that
seemed like such an impossibility at the time.” Non-resident parent.
DNA testing service
£0.02m
This offers a Cafcass-funded low-cost testing service which delivers
certainty for those making decisions in private law. We have extended the
contract for this service this year.
Courtorderedactivities
Separated Parents
Information
Programme (SPIP)
£3.12m
This programme particularly helps parents to focus on the needs and
wishes of their children. It also emphasises practical steps to handle
emotions and improve communication as separated parents.
“[It] made me realise I need to think about what I say before I say it as it
has more of an effect than I thought.” SPIP participant.
“Very informative and does open your eyes towards the feelings of others,
children especially.” SPIP participant.
Domestic Violence
Perpetrator and
safe contact
programmes
(DVPP)
£0.75m
We continue to support change in families affected by domestic abuse.
These programmes challenge harmful behaviours and support change.
They also offer a support service for victims of abuse.
“I was happy that the WSS [Women’s Support Service] did not give up
contacting me, even though I felt low at times and did not want to talk to
anyone.” Supported mother
Outofcourtoptions
Parenting Plan:
getting it right
for children
£0.01m
This tool offers a good way
into dispute resolution for
parents away from court,
helping them listen to their
children’s views and make
child-focused arrangements.
Its use is encouraged within
CCI work as well as within
out-of-court pilot work such
as Parenting Plan meetings.
We provide free hard copies
and online downloads.
20,433
parents aended a Separated
Parents Informaon Programme
566
families involved with DVPP
and support services
65,235
Parenng Plans ordered
and 8,342 downloaded
231
DNA tests
commissioned
1,624
contact services
delivered
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
18
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Quality of our pracce
We have continued to show improvement in the quality of our work by implementing a robust process of
quality assurance and thematic audits. We will continue with this internal audit and quality assurance
programme throughout 2017-18 to help improve the quality of the service we provide.
Howourworkisqualityassured
Cafcass’ National Improvement Service (NIS) focuses on supporting quality improvement in frontline work to
help Cafcass provide the best service possible to children and young people. NIS assures the quality of our
work by carrying out thematic audits, area quality reviews and local area benchmarking sessions with the aim
to achieve consistency in the grading and application of Cafcass’ Quality Assurance and Impact Framework
(QAIF). The below table provides a summary of the work carried out by NIS and teams this year to help assure
the quality of our practice.
Activity Whatdidwedeliver?
Embedded the Quality
Assurance and Impact
Framework (QAIF) tool
· This came into full use in April and is used by Service Managers and Practice Supervisors
across the organisation to quality assure cases.
· It is underpinned by a methodology that considers both the impact of our work upon
children and compliance with the organisation’s policy expectations.
· We test the thresholds within the framework by holding local area benchmarking sessions
with our NIS, Heads of Practice, Service Managers and Practice Supervisors.
· Monthly updates are provided to the Operational Management Team (OMT) on compliance
with QAIF expectations, key strengths and learning areas.
Area Quality Reviews
(AQRs)
· We have continued our programme of Area Quality Reviews. This year six service areas
were subject to an AQR, adding to the three completed in 2015-16.
· This methodology involves a peer review of service areas. Good overall ndings have been
combined with strong learning points to enable measurable improvement to children.
· The AQR model received positive feedback by Cafcass’ internal audit service
[6]
assurance
audit undertaken in October 2016.
· In line with the audit recommendations, the methodology was strengthened to allow for
follow up three months after the process, to assess whether learning points are being
addressed.
· Learning from AQRs is shared nationally through the OMT meeting and recorded within the
national learning log.
· An example of local learning identied includes improving practitioners’ compliance with
case recording, in times of high demand.
Thematic audits
· These audits have focused on thematic areas of practice including domestic abuse in private
law, liaison with independent reviewing ofcers in public law, the quality of our
safeguarding practice in the early stages of private law proceedings and the impact of the
voice of the child in all our casework.
· These audits have identied the organisation’s resilience in maintaining practice quality in
the context of increased demand. We will continue a programme of thematic auditing
throughout 2017-2018.
The quality of our work
· 69% of cases audited were assessed as ‘outstanding’ or ‘good’, 23% as ‘met’ and 8% as
‘requires improvement
[7]
’.
· We redesigned the case planning process in partnership with practitioners, informed by
learning.
[6] Cafcass’ internal audit service is provided by the Government Internal Audit Agency, see page 46.
[7] We are not able to compare these gures to 2015-16 gures, as we have used a different grading framework this year.
Exampleofhowweareapplyinglearningfromthematicaudits
The voice of the child thematic audit found evidence of improved practice in relation to the quality of
capturing the voice of the child in practice, in particular relating to the use of child engagement tools.
Following a recommendation from the audit, Cafcass’ learning and development plan for 2017-18 was
updated to include ‘master classes’ with practitioners on direct work with children, including using
contemporary techniques to help further improve practice in this area.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
19
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
[8] The FJYPB noted that the term ‘sibling’ often isn’t recognised by children and prefers to use ‘brothers and sisters’.
Ourcommitmenttodrivingupquality
Other activities that demonstrate how we have continued to improve the quality of our work this year are set
out below.
Child outcomes
· The child outcomes pilot project was carried out in three service areas in October,
asking children, parents, judges and practitioners in a small number of private law
cases about the quality of our service and its impact on the outcome for the child.
· All six children said that their FCA helped them, and ve said that issues in their family
had improved following the ending of the court case.
· We are now exploring incorporating survey questions for parents and children into the
AQR process so that outcomes data and service user feedback can be gathered in each
service area.
· Survey responses will be aggregated into an annual service user feedback overview
and will contribute to our knowledge of the effectiveness of private law proceedings
and help improve the service we provide.
Family Justice Young People’s Board (FJYPB)
The FJYPB has worked with Cafcass on a range of different projects and events to improve the quality of
our work, including:
· participating in service area development days
· contributing to AQRs
· sitting on recruitment panels
· reviewing documents and proposals to strengthen children’s feedback
· working with NIS on training and resources, including involvement in the design of electronic tools
· working with Cafcass’ major stakeholders, including ongoing liaison with MoJ, contributing to their
policy development.
The FJYPB has developed ‘top tips’ leaets and videos for FCAs and other professionals working with
children and young people in the family courts. Examples of the top tips include:
Sasha’s,forFCAsworkingwithchildrenandyoungpeople:
“The child or young person should feel that their needs, wishes and feelings have been listened to, valued
and respected.
Matthew’s,forworkingwithchildrenandyoungpeoplewithautism:
“Give me simple questions so I don’t get confused.
Aleesha’s,forworkingwithchildrenandyoungpeoplewithadisability:
“Respect me and my disability.
The FJYPB ‘top tips’ have been shared in full on Cafcass’ website and intranet, promoting best practice.
Seminar on importance of brother and sister (sibling) relationships
Cafcass practitioners and FJYPB members hosted a seminar for Cafcass Board members, considering the
importance of brother and sister relationships
[8]
for children and young people in public and private law cases,
resulting in:
· commissioning the FJYPB to develop ‘top tips’ for professionals working with brothers and sisters
· further exploration of the recognition of the importance of sibling relationships in the 2017-18 audit programme.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
20
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
A NCT Service Manager describes how the domestic abuse pathway helps our practitioners in their work:
“The pathway assists with the systematic analysis of domestic abuse cases – it helps practitioners identify
key risk factors and stimulates critical thinking. Working on the idea of a ‘golden thread’, it supports
practitioners to establish a clear connection between their initial lines of enquiry and the nal order. It also
helps draw out the impact of domestic abuse on children so practitioners can evidence this condently.
Social Worker of the Year Awards
We celebrated the following staff achievements at the Social Worker of the Year Awards:
· Daniel Hope, Family Court Adviser, won Gold for Practice Educator of the Year award. The
judges recognised his personal commitment to improving the breadth and depth of his
students’ social work placements.
· Michelle Evans, Head of Practice, won Silver for Children’s Team Leader of the Year. She
has worked hard to maintain high standards of practice in Greater Manchester, Cheshire and
Merseyside, and has developed the Practice Supervisor role across the region.
Writer in residence
· Our Royal Literary Fund ‘writer in residence’, Yvonne Coppard, has continued to deliver a
programme of workshops and 1:1 sessions which complements existing initiatives to
improve the writing of our staff.
· This year Yvonne ran 65 team workshop presentations and 30 one-to-one sessions.
Feedback from all sessions was excellent.
· Going forward, the ‘Write More Good’ workshop will be part of the FCAs induction.
Evidence based tools
We have continued to expand the range of evidence based tools available to our practitioners - new tools
launched this year include:
· a pathway to help structure the analysis cases featuring domestic abuse to ensure a systematic review
of the risk to the child
· a tool to assess coercive control, highlighting features that are indicative of such behaviour and
supports practitioners to assess this dynamic risk more fully
· tools to assess levels of risk related to neglect, parents’ capacity to change and risk of re-abuse in
public law (care) cases
· tools for direct work with children with disabilities or additional needs
· a tool to assess a child’s level of risk of child sexual exploitation
· We also introduced a resource section of the tools matrix, bringing together a number of evidence-in-
formed practice resources.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
21
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Supporng our sta to deliver quality
LearningandDevelopment
We offer continuous learning and development opportunities for our staff. In 2016-17 we provided:
eLearning:
· This includes eLearning on protecting information and child sexual exploitation.
· There have been new courses added to the catalogue, these include courses on: learning from serious Case
Reviews, high Conict child arrangement disputes and assessing impact of mental health on children and
parents.
Equalityanddiversity
· We updated our training to staff on equality and diversity issues such as, launching the Communicating with
Deaf Parents module on MySkills
[9]
.
· Our diversity champions ensured learning is shared nationally. For example, a talk was delivered by one of
our practitioners in London, on working with people with dyslexia.
· Work is underway on updating our Equality and Diversity Strategy for 2017-20.
IT
· The webinars help save our practitioners time and money (on travel costs).
· We implemented two further major updates to ECMS which had a considerable focus on further process
automation to increase efciency.
· We introduced ECMS mobile so that practitioners can access case records on the move.
Operaonal Business Manager said: “Delivering high quality, competency focused IT training in a way that reduces the
amount of me our praconers spend away from their core tasks with children and families, has been top of the agenda
for the IT Team.
[9] Learning conducted electronically within Cafcass’ online learning site, MySkills.
316
We delivered new IT training via webinars.
Learninganddevelopment
We offer continuous learning and development opportunities for our staff. In 2016-17 we have provided:
eLearning:
· This includes eLearning on protecting information and child sexual exploitation.
· There have been new courses added to the catalogue, including: learning from serious Case Reviews,
high-conict child arrangement disputes and assessing impact of mental health on children and parents.
Over 5,000
pieces of pracce learning have been completed.
We delivered diversity events in local areas led by
our diversity champions.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
22
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Resources:
New child engagement tools have been developed to support better communication and effective assessment
of children’s wishes and feelings.
Face to face:
Learning via face-to-face workshops delivered either internally by NIS and/or HR or by external experts.
A HR Projects Ofcer (Organisational Development) describes the impact this has: “The continuous learning
and development opportunities we offer to all staff across the organisation increases the overall level of
engagement and equips them with the necessary knowledge and information they need to provide the highest
level of service to children.
Legal Team
Cafcass’ Legal Team supports staff by providing advice, training and legal updates:
· The team continues to provide a duty advice line for practitioners on all aspects of family law.
· This year’s legal training included sessions on radicalisation and forced marriage.
1,805
sta aended 191 face-to-face workshops.
1,699
The duty advice line for praconers received calls.
74
o-the-shelf resource packages have been
requested for delivery to teams.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
23
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Libraryservice
Our library service strengthens our advice to court using evidence informed practice. This year the library
service:
Practitioners use the library to build knowledge on rapidly developing subjects including radicalisation, child
sexual exploitation, Special Guardianship Orders, domestic abuse/coercive control, and female genital
mutilation.
A FCA in Manchester describes how the library service helps her: “The court, judges, barristers and children’s
solicitors have given me very good feedback on a number of court reports led. This is largely due to the
brilliant response from the library, equipping me with the ability to provide an evidence-based, analytical and
well-researched approach to advancing a child’s best interests”.
4,540
completed requests for items, subject searches and reference enquiries,
9,980
sent out items (journal arcles and books),
886
responded to requests for subject and literature searches.
96%
Of the requests completed, were received from operaonal sta.
[10] Workload weighting refers to the calculation and ‘score’ Cafcass assigns to different types of case involvement, giving an overall rating
for each practitioner to help their manager and Cafcass monitor workload.
[11] MyWork is an online performance dashboard, setting out performance against a number of measures at an individual, team and
service area level.
CafcassAnalyticsTeam
Cafcass Analytics Team has created a wide range of tools, reports and dashboards which are now available in
one place on the intranet to provide all staff with easy access to detailed information to help support and
manage their work. This includes electronic case management reports, operational data, HR and workforce
data, workload weighting
[10]
and MyWork
[11]
.
An Assistant Director describes how the Analytics team helps her: “The richness of data and business
intelligence now available to me as a senior manager ensures that I am evidence-led in my decision making
and forward planning. The range of on-demand interactive tools and dashboards provide business critical
support to me and all our managers and staff.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
24
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Our innovaon and inuence in the family
jusce sector
InnovationWe are committed to trialling and evaluating new ways of working to help
improve outcomes for the children and families we work with and drive greater
efciency within the sector.
Privatelawreform
Supporting Separating Parents in Dispute Helpline
· This helpline, piloted in ve service areas, signposts separated parents to appropriate resolution
pathways.
· Evaluation at the start of the year evidenced the need for this service as well as its effectiveness.
On average over 200 calls were received each month in the ve service areas; 84% of surveyed
users would recommend the service; and 74% found their case worker helpful or very helpful.
· Findings and ongoing provision of the service have helped inform discussions on options for new
private law interventions.
Parenting Plan Meetings and discussions
· This service, piloted in three service areas, offered pre-court meetings supporting parents to discuss
issues and agree a twelve month plan for child arrangements. Meetings explore creating a child-
centred plan, consider methods to improve parental communication, and highlight options for
further support.
· In a nine month period, almost 250 enquiries were received. 34 face-to-face meetings and ve
telephone discussions (to trial increased service accessibility) took place. Users were positive about
the service with 80% of feedback stating that they would recommend the service to someone in a
similar position.
‘Out-of-court’ alternatives
· We are working with MoJ to increase the information and support available for separating parents
before court.
· We are also providing support to explore how alternative out-of-court options can most effectively
assist families to make safe and sustainable child arrangements. We focus particularly on how to
ensure safeguarding and the voice of the child are kept central to the process.
Publiclawreform
Settlement conferences
· We are participating in the judiciary’s pilot of ‘settlement conferences’. This is where the judge talks
directly to parties to discuss the likely outcome of their case, and the judge and Children’s Guardian
carry out a ‘mutual evaluation’ of a local authoritys case at pre-proceedings stage.
· This year 146 conferences took place, and 70% achieved a consent order out of court which means
an agreement on the next steps was made. Where this happened, a court hearing was avoided,
saving 178 days of court time.
· Such agreements are also hoped to reduce delay for children and stress for parents that can come
with a nal hearing. MoJ are monitoring and evaluating the impact of the scheme. Following initial
trials in Cheshire, Merseyside and Devon, the pilot is being extended to additional areas.
Cafcass Plus
· This model pilots our pre-court involvement in public law cases, with the aim of diverting cases
from court or narrowing issues and improving assessments. The Children’s Guardian acts as an
independent voice and works with local authorities and parents to assess the viability of child
protection plans. If cases progress to court, the Cafcass Plus work informs our initial case analysis
to reduce delay.
· This will be extended from three current areas (Lincolnshire, Derbyshire County and
Nottinghamshire) to two new areas (Bedfordshire and Birmingham); further evaluation is planned
to build on positive ndings from previous reports.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
25
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
ResearchOur data is a valued source of information across the family justice system. We
aim to use our unique position and insight to generate high impact and timely
research to inform our own practice and inuence policy across the family justice
system. We conduct our own research projects to inform practice, and support
high prole research by external researchers.
Internalresearch
· We published a study into cases featuring radicalisation concerns exploring the implications for social work
practice.
· We are collaborating with Women’s Aid, to better understand what is happening in child arrangements cases
where domestic abuse is alleged.
· We carried out a le review of cases featuring concerns about child trafcking, nding examples of children
and adults trafcked within the UK and into the UK.
· We explored best practice within high conict (rule 16.4) cases, to explore the quality and impact of Cafcass
involvement.
· Senior managers reviewed over 200 private law applications (C100s) received on two working days to
provide evidence on the proportion of cases containing risk factors and the type of risks, as well as those
which appear suitable to safely resolve out of court. This contributes to the evidence-base for our work with
MoJ piloting new private law services.
Externalresearch-publicationsofexternalresearchinvolvingCafcassthisyearincluded:
· evaluation of the impact of Family Drug and Alcohol Courts (FDAC)
· impact of the Public Law Outline (care proceedings reform) on child outcomes in the Tri-borough area
[12]
(nal report) and nationally (interim report)
· conicts of EU courts on child abduction
· unlocking children’s rights: strengthening the capacity of professionals in the EU to full the rights of
vulnerable children.
[12] Shared Children’s Services of Westminster City Council, Hammersmith and Fulham London Borough Council and Kensington and
Chelsea London Borough Council.
Collaborativeworking
This year we have built stronger links with research partners and are a key supporter of the proposed
‘Family Justice Observatory’ which has the potential to build a valuable evidence base to inform our practice.
This is being established by the Nufeld Foundation to improve both the research which is conducted into
family justice, and how it is used within the sector. We contributed to the call for evidence and our
participation will inuence the scope of future research programmes to help us better understand emerging
trends and needs of the children and families we work with.
We also began work with MoJ to analyse linked family court and education data to better understand the
demographic characteristics of children involved in the family justice system, which is a research priority for the
Family Justice Board. We supported MoJ research, with a Cafcass representative on the advisory group for the
study of settlement conference pilots, and participation of Cafcass staff in discussion groups for the study on
the effectiveness of the tandem model in public law proceedings.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
26
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
Inuence We aim to share our expertise and ideas on how best to meet the needs of
children and families involved in family proceedings, drawing on knowledge
from our frontline staff and the FJYPB, to better support those we work with.
We build and maintain positive working relationships with partner organisations
and interest groups so that we can share tools and knowledge to contribute to
wider sector improvement.
The following timeline highlights some of the key areas of work where we have
demonstrated our inuence.
We were involved in a case, Re Z,
at the High Court which will lead to
a change in legislationtoallow
singleindividualstobecomea
parentthroughsurrogacy. We
are also working with the
Department of Health and surrogacy
groups to produce clear guidance
on how surrogacy works in the UK,
including our safeguarding role.
May
TheArchersstorylineon Radio
4 drew attention to the issue of
coercive control: a blog from our
Principal Social Worker Sarah
Parsons promoted the child as
central to proceedings and set
out our structured framework for
responding to risk within such
cases. This includes the use of
evidence-based tools to assess the
impact of domestic abuse and
analyse whether contact is safe and
in the best interests of the child.
June
Ofstedreportedourpractice
leadershipas an example of good
practice for the sector, creating a
context for excellent practice by
designing strong systems to
support improvement. Of particular
note was our use of technology
to build culture and relationships
across geographic locations.
August
We attended Departmentfor
Education’s(DfEs)assessment
andaccreditationworkshopsto
help design the new system for social
workers and identify issues that will
affect Cafcass as the largest
national employer of social workers.
We responded to a consultation in
March, noting that any new
accreditation should help to build a
sustainable workforce and fully engage
with existing expertise in social work
across local authorities, Cafcass and
other agencies.
We heldworkshopswithMoJto
shareourexpertiseon
safeguardingand the voice of the
child from our private law work with
families in court and pre-court pilots.
This is part of joint work to develop
a clear out-of-court pathway, where
this is safe and appropriate. Progress
of this work was shared with family
justice partners.
October
TheFamilyJusticeYoung
People’sBoardcontinue to be
inuential within the family justice
sector to ensure that children are
at the heart of policy and practice.
Members organised and led their
annual Voice of the Child conference
for an audience of 200 professionals
from the sector. This year its focus
was on communication with children
and young people during
proceedings.
September
We provided our views on the new
framework in response to the Ofsted
consultationonthefutureof
socialcareinspection. We
emphasised that inspections should
be proportionate and used to drive
improvement.
We have continuedtowork
closelywithHMCTSto evaluate
and improve our joint processes,
including agreeing a standard
e-ling format for reports. This
ongoing partnership is essential to
future system-wide improvement.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
27
Section 1 | The performance report | Overview
November
We responded to the HomeOfce
andDfEconsultationon
mandatoryreportingandaduty
toact. We outlined concerns about
the impact of introducing mandatory
reporting to a system that is already
experiencing unprecedented demand
and highlighted the work already
underway to make the child
protection system safer.
We issued a jointstatementwith
ADCSontheprocessfor
settlementconferencesand
suitable cases where they can be
used.
January
We became a ‘partnerinpractice’
withNIGALA, the equivalent
agency to Cafcass for public law
cases in Northern Ireland.
Our Director of Resources, Julie Brown,
continues to work with tech industry leaders
to accessnewandemerging
thinkingfromoutsidethesectorto
provide ideas for innovative services and
effective forecasting capabilities. Cafcass
facilitated a session at the Digital Catapult
Centre to talk with industry experts on
sustainability and digital developments.
February
We jointlyhosteda‘CareCrisisSeminar’
withtheNufeldFoundationabout the
increasing volumes in care applications which
shared research, analysis and practice insights.
Trends and variations across local areas were
discussed, as well as ongoing research into
drivers of care applications and implications for
how they might be tackled, including recurrent
families (Karen Broadhurst), impact of poverty
(Paul Bywaters) and safeguarding pressures
(ADCS). Cafcass Chair Baroness Tyler called for
a whole-sector approach to tackle the issues
and pool skills, knowledge and inuence.
March
We launched our ‘myCourtroom
app’, an interactive simulation, to
demystify court proceedings for both
service users and social workers.
The service user version will help
litigants in person and children
understand what to expect at court.
The social work version links to court
skills training to support improved
evidence-giving in court by
practitioners within and outside
Cafcass.
We responded to the FamilyRights
Group’sknowledgeinquiryonthe
useofsection20voluntary
arrangements. Our response was based
on the joint guidance document issued
by Cafcass, ADCS and ADSS Cymru in
April 2016, which conrms that section 20
remains a viable option for many children.
We gave examples of the positive use of
section 20 and stressed the importance of
a robust review process to ensure section
20 status remains the appropriate legal
option for the child.
Secon 1.1
The performance report
Performance analysis
Financial commentary
In 2016-17, Cafcass was awarded grant funding of £113.5m from Central Government, plus £0.406m for
depreciation.
We also drew down from the sponsor separate additional funding of £1.546m for contact services.
A summary of how we spent our budget is shown below and further details are provided within our 2016-17
Accounts in Section 3.
The Cafcass Statement of Financial Position as at 31st March 2017 shows net liabilities of £193.340m, including
the pension liability of £191.853m. This reects the inclusion of liabilities falling due in future years which, to
the extent that they are not to be met from Cafcass’ other sources of income, may only be met by future grants
or grants-in-aid from Cafcass’ sponsorship department. This is because, under the normal conventions applying
to Parliamentary control over income and expenditure, such grants may not be issued in advance of need.
The pension decit at 31st March 2017 has increased compared with 31st March 2016 due principally to the
nancial assumptions that underpin this and so drive the estimation of the future liability. These assumptions
are proposed by scheme actuaries and scrutinised through the Audit and Risk Assurance Committee. They are
considered to be reasonable and reect a range of broader economic factors.
79,633
69.4%
2,507
2.2%
7,420
6.5%
Sta costs
£000
SECs
£000
Agency sta
£000
22,624
19.7%
Other
operang
charges
£000
406
0.4%
Depreciaon
and asset
write downs
£000
2,105
1.8%
Partnership
costs
£000
Total = £114,695
Please note that this 2016-17 chart
is exclusive of net AME spend of
£5,552.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
29
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
[13] Our current KPIs have been unchanged since 2012-13; see appendix for how these are calculated.
[14] In some private law cases which continue past the rst hearing, Cafcass is instructed by the court to complete a section 7 report.
Section 7 reports provide the court with relevant information about the child’s welfare and the practitioner’s assessment of what is in the
child’s best interests, and are based on interviews with adult parties, meetings with the child and any other relevant enquiries.
The aggregate amount owed to trade creditors at 31st March 2017 compared with the aggregate amount
invoiced by suppliers during the year, expressed as a number of days in the same proportion to the total
number of days in the nancial year, is equal to 1.02 days (0.65 days in 2015-16).
Interest of £nil has been paid or claimed by creditors under the Late Payment of Commercial Debts Act (£nil in
2015-16).
Parliament has voted Grant-in-Aid to Cafcass for the 12 months following the Statement of Financial Position
date. Therefore, despite the Statement of Financial Position of net liabilities, Cafcass operates as a going
concern.
Key Performance Indicators: how we have
performed
Howwemeasureperformance
Cafcass has four Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) which are agreed with our sponsor department
[13]
. These
cover our work in both public (care and adoption) and private law (arrangements for children, usually after
divorce and separation) cases.
· For both public and private law, we measure the percentage of ‘open’ (ongoing) cases which have an
allocated Cafcass practitioner – a Children’s Guardian in public law care cases (KPI 1) and a Family Court
Adviser in private law cases (KPI 3). We measure this because work can only be started on a case once an
individual practitioner is allocated to it. We aim for at least 97% of cases to be allocated.
· For public law, we measure how quickly a Cafcass practitioner is allocated to a case (KPI 2). We measure this
because we recognise that unnecessary delay negatively impacts children in public law proceedings, who need
safe and stable outcomes as quickly as possible. We aim for allocation within three days.
· For private law, we measure how many section 7 court reports
[14]
are completed by the date the court
has ordered them for (KPI 4). We measure this because we recognise the importance for families
of receiving our reports on the agreed date so that proceedings can progress and children have safe and
stable arrangements as quickly as possible. We aim for at least 97% of reports to be led on time.
Howwehaveperformedinpubliclaw
Careapplicationsreceived
1,400
1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
Total: 14,554
Total: 12,792
Total: 11,159
Total: 10,620
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
30
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
[15] These applications can be public or private.
Rise in demand Newcases ‘Opencases’ Caseduration
We received on
average over
1,200new care
applications per
month
The overall number of
open public law care
cases rose from 9,071 in
March 2016 to 10,171 in
March 2017, a 12.1%
increase. The overall rise
in demand contributed to
this increase.
The average duration
of care cases has
reduced from 30 weeks
in 2015-16 to 29
weeksin 2016-17.
Received 14,554 care applications
higher than 2015-16
&
higher than 2014-15
13.8%
(1,762)
30.4%
(3,395)
Otherpubliclawcasetypes
Our public law work also involves ‘non-care’ cases, which are set out below. The snapshot number of open
‘non-care’ cases was 2,055 at the end of March 2017, compared with 1,900 at the end of March 2016, an
increase of 8.2%.
Numberofapplicationsreceived
Publiclawapplicationtype 2015-16 2016-17 Trend
Placement Order applications 2,341 2,528
Adoption applications involving Cafcass 1,112 1,079
Special Guardianship
[15]
applications 900 894
Standalone Supervision Order applications 394 487
Cafcass witnessing consent in respect of
relinquished babies and children
81 60
8%
3.1%
23.6%
25.9%
0.7%
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
31
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
PubliclawKPIs
We continue to meet our allocation targets in public law (KPI 1 and KPI 2). This is a signicant achievement
given the rise in the number of cases received without increasing our workforce.
KPI1:theproportionofopenpubliclawcareworkloadallocatedtoanappointedChildren’sGuardian
97% - 100%
90% - 96%
0% - 89%
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
99.7% 99.7% 99.4%
Performance against this indicator has
decreased slightly compared with
previous years but remains well within
the 97% - 100% ‘green’ target.
All service areas met the target over
the year as a whole; there were three
instances of a service area at ‘amber’;
there were no instances of ‘red’ ratings.
KPI2:thetimelinessofallocationtoanappointedChildren’sGuardianforallcareapplicationsreceived
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
0.5
days
0.7
days
1.2
days
Performance against this indicator has
decreased slightly compared with
previous years but remains well within
the three working day ‘green’ target.
Nationally we met the target each
month. Four service areas were at
‘amber’ for one month; one service
area was at ‘amber’ for two months;
and two service areas were at a ‘red’
rating for one month.
Howwehaveperformedinprivatelaw
Privatelawapplicationsreceived
6,000
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
1,000
0
Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
Total: 40,824
Total: 46,636
Total: 37,415
Total: 34,119
2013-14
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
0 - 2.9 days
3 - 4.9 days
5+ days
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
32
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Rise in demand Newcases ‘Opencases’ Caseduration
We received on
averageover3,400
newprivatelaw
applicationsper
month.
The overall number of open
private law cases rose from
15,033 in March 2016 to
17,021 in March 2017, a
13.2%increase.
The average duration
of our private law
cases has reduced from
22 weeks in 2015-16 to
19weeks in 2016-17.
Privatelawcasetypes
· ChildArrangementsOrders(CAOs) make up the majority of our private law work (87%). Of our 32,473
completed CAO cases, 68% were completed at the rst hearing, and 32% involved further work after the
rst hearing (a section 7 report). Of those cases involving a section 7 report, 27% had at least one more
report ordered during the case. A total of 35,850 safeguarding letters and 16,594 section 7 reports were
led.
For CAO cases which completed at the rst hearing, the average duration was eight weeks; for those which
involved work after the rst hearing the average duration was 41 weeks.
· Rule16.4appointmentsmay be made in some private law cases which means the child is separately
represented in court by a Children’s Guardian and a solicitor
[16]
. The number of new rule 16.4 appointments
has increased by 5.6% (from 1,778 in 2015-16
[17]
to 1,878 in 2016-17).
· ParentalOrderapplications, where parents have had a child through surrogacy, increased by 6.8%
(from 295 in 2015-16 to 315 in 2016-17).
· FamilyAssistanceOrders, where the Cafcass practitioner is required to advise and assist on the
implementation of the ordered child arrangements, decreased by 9.6% (from 488 in 2015-16 to 441 in
2016-17).
PrivatelawKPIs
We continued to meet our targets for ensuring cases have an allocated practitioner in private law (KPI 3) and
for completing section 7 reports within court-ordered timescales (KPI 4).
The slight performance decrease for KPI 4 may be explained by the increase in overall demand (see KPI 4 on
page 33). On average, where the target was not met, the report was led 2.4 calendar days late. It is worth
noting that where a section 7 report has an input to a hearing, they are led on average seven days before the
listed hearing in which they were due to be reviewed. The average ling time has also shortened compared
with previous years, from 11.9 days (2014-15) to 10.4 days (2016-17).
Received 40,824 private law cases
higher than 2015-16
&
higher than 2014-15
9.1%
(3,409)
19.7%
(6,705)
[16] These are typically made in complex and often long-running cases where the court believes that such representation is necessary to
safeguard the child’s interests. We have maintained effective liaison with local judges to ensure that such appointments are only reserved
for the exceptional cases where there are circumstances of signicant difculty and only made after consultation by the court with the local
Cafcass manager.
[17] This gure is based on an updated reporting method for rule 16.4 cases.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
33
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
KPI3:theproportionofopenprivatelawworkloadallocatedtoaFamilyCourtAdviser
97% - 100%
90% - 96%
0% - 89%
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
99.4% 98.7% 98.7%
Performance against this indicator is
similar to the previous year and remains
well within the 97% - 100% ‘green’
target.
All of the 17 service areas met the
target in each individual month.
2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
97.8% 98.8% 97.1%
Performance against this indicator has
decreased compared with previous
years, but met the 97% - 100%
‘green’ target.
Eight service areas met the ‘green’
target; the remaining nine service
areas performed at ‘amber’ level
ranging from 93.7% to 96.9%.
KPI4:theproportionofsection7reportsthatmeettheiragreedlingtimes
97% - 100%
90% - 96%
0% - 89%
Averagelingtimesofsection7reports(inweeks)
12.0
10.0
8.0
6.0
4.0
2.0
0.0
Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar
14.0
16.0
Average: 11.9
Average: 10.4
Average: 10.9
2014-15
2015-16
2016-17
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
34
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Compliments,complaintsandothercorrespondence
We aim to respond to concerns raised about our work in a way which prioritises the safeguarding and
promotion of children’s welfare.
Complaintsandcompliments
We take account of service users’ feedback and aim to put things right wherever possible. We also record
compliments to learn from and to share good practice.
This year we updated our Complaints and Compliments procedure to help service users navigate the process
more easily. We claried the process for abusive or threatening complaints, and such complainants are now
warned about their behaviour and given the chance to re-submit their complaint.
A quarterly analysis of complaints and compliments is carried out, with learning shared through the quarterly
learning log.
InvestigationsbytheParliamentaryHealthServiceOmbudsman(PHSO)
The PHSO proposed to investigate 32 complaints about Cafcass, with 25 of those being conrmed as
investigations during the year. This is a decrease from previous years, which we attribute to the PHSO closing
more cases at their assessment stage.
We received 28 nal reports in 2016-17 and we complied with all recommendations made. We have continued
to work effectively with the PHSO during their period of restructure.
PHSOdecisiononcomplaints(2016-17)
Upheld Partlyupheld Notupheld
4 13 11
Othercorrespondence
We received 988complaints.
This means we receive only three complaints for
every 1,000 open cases.
We completed 97% of responses to these within
our target of 15 working days.
We received
427
compliments
(one compliment
for every two
complaints).
We received
86
Subject Access Requests
(SARs).
We processed 100% of these
within the required timescale.
We received
143
Freedom of Information
Requests (FOIs).
We processed 100% of these
within the required timescale.
We responded to
159
enquiries made by MPs on
behalf of their constituents.
We responded within seven
working days on average.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
35
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
SustainabilitySteeringGroup
We have a Sustainability Steering Group (SSG), chaired by the Director of Resources, which monitors our
progress and promotes sustainable practice within Cafcass. Recent initiatives include:
· Reducing our use of paper through the provision of IT ‘paperless working’ training, smartphone access to
casework, secure digitised post, and a new PIN-based printing service.
· Providing tools to help staff make more informed travel choices including a ‘travel emissions calculator’. This
calculates how energy-efcient different modes of transport are for a trip.
· Introducing a ‘Food for Thought’ section in the health and wellbeing newsletter to encourage staff to think
food sustainability as well as nutrition, such as how far it has to travel, its amount of packaging, and its
impact on local communities.
2012-132013-142014-152015-162016-17
Reamsofpaper
£46,000 £8,000
Sustainability report
Cafcass is committed to sustainable practices which take into account our environmental, economic and social
impact.
Environmental Economic Social
Deliver plans in line with the Greening
Government Commitments (GGC).
Buy more sustainable and efcient
products and contract with small
businesses.
Uphold and share values of
corporate social responsibility.
17,865
14,535
9,233
5,739
3,529
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
36
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Targetarea1:reduceouremissions
We continue to achieve lower greenhouse gas emissions, already exceeding the 2020 target.
· Work to reduce travel-related emissions, and related costs, include our exible working policy, our video
conferencing enabled laptops, and our encouragement of staff to travel ‘sustainably smart’. This has been
complemented by our policy change in 2015-16 to limit travel to that which is business-critical and ensure it
is booked in advanced wherever possible.
· An increase in domestic ights in the last two years will be targeted by the SSG to ensure reduction by the
2020 target.
· We have also introduced ‘smart meters’ to ensure accurate billing for utilities and our expenditure on energy
has reduced.
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce
greenhouse gas
emissions by at
least 32%
Scope 1 and 2
emissions: site
based, leased
transport, and
supplied energy
(tonnes CO
2
e)
Scope 3
emissions:
business travel
using non-owned
transport
(tonnes CO
2
e)
Total emissions
(tonnes CO
2
e)
Target met
Target on track to be met
Target not yet met
*Data has been compared with 2014-15, as baseline 2009-10
data not held.
508
1,208
1,716
646
1,290
1,936
653
2,067
2,720
2,298
884
[20]
3,182
CO
2
Met
46%
PerformanceagainstourGreeningGovernmentCommitments
We have met, or are on track to meet, the ve GGC target areas. Each target area contains specic targets;
these targets, and our performance, are set out in tables below
[18]
. Our overall reductions can be partly
attributed to the reduction in our number of ofces
[19]
.
[18] GGC targets are for achievements by 2020 compared to 2009-10 baseline gures. Target and trend data is therefore set out in relation
to baseline gures. Where baseline gures are not held, target and trend data compares current data to 2013-14. Cafcass 2009-10 gures
were calculated according to measures at our previous sponsor department, DfE. A comparison of the last three years may provide more
accurate information on our progress.
[19] Number of ofces: 90 (2009-10, baseline); 43 (2014-15); 40 (2015-16); 37 (2016-17).
[20] Excludes domestic air travel (data not held).
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
37
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce energy
usage
Electricity
(MWh)
Gas
(MWh)
Total energy
(MWh)
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce number of
domestic ights by
at least 30%
Domestic air
travel (number
of ights)
Financialindicators 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Trend
Energy and travel
costs
Total energy
(£000s)
Ofcial business
travel
(£000s)
Domestic air
travel
(£000s)
Totaltravel
(£000s)
804
622
1,426
976
714
1,690
1,024
567
1,591
3,380
2,913
6,293
115
73
51
Not yet
met
225%*
£
155
622
21
166
664
7
137
660
6
338
719
643
671
666
719
54%
£183,000 saved
£76,000 saved
Met
77%
11%
Not
held
Not
held
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
38
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Targetarea2:improveourwastemanagement
We have substantially reduced our overall waste generated, and have achieved reductions in the proportion of
waste sent to landll although this has not yet met the 2020 target. Our waste management data is currently
based on some estimated gures due to diverse lease arrangements across our 37 ofces
[21]
. A new reporting
system will be implemented next year to improve accuracy by recording data for ofces for which we are
directly responsible.
· Recycling is encouraged in all ofces and all condential paper waste is recycled under a national scheme.
This year we surveyed existing recycling facilities to create a standard minimum provision.
· As part of our social impact practice, IT equipment that is no longer needed is disposed of ethically by
donating it to schools or charities where possible.
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce landll
proportion to
under 10% of
overall waste
Increase
proportion of
waste which is
recycled
Reduce overall
waste
Hazardous waste
(tonnes)
Non-hazardous
waste: landll
(tonnes)
Non-hazardous
waste: reused/
recycled
(tonnes)
ICT waste:
recycled
(tonnes)
ICT waste:
reused
(tonnes)
Total waste
(tonnes)
0
31
36
0
33
42
0
27
34
0
44
263
0.5
1.2
1
0.3
1
1
68
77
63
307
Total
waste
78%
[21] The majority of our ofces have third party landlord waste disposal arrangements so actual data cannot be reported on; only
condential waste recycling and IT waste is based on actual data. For this reason some gures are based on estimates and should be read
with caution. Financial data is based on actual spend.
32%
decrease
46%
of total
waste
Not yet met
Landll:
Not yet met
Recycled
proporon:
Met
Not
held
Not
held
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
39
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Financialindicators 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Trend
Waste
management costs
Non-hazardous
waste: landll
(£000s)
Non-hazardous
waste: reused/
recycled
(£000s)
Total disposal
(£000s)
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce paper
usage by at least
50%
Paper
consumption
(reams)
Financialindicators 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Trend
Paper costs
Paper
(£000s)
£
Not
held
7
22
Not
held
9
25
Not
held
12
19
5
17
92
3,529 5,739
9,233
Not
held
8
12
26
Not
held
£
59%
£10,000 saved
£70,000 saved
76%
62%
*
Met
69%
*
£18,000 saved*
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
40
Section 1 | The performance report | Performance analysis
Targetarea3:reduceourwateruse
Our use of water has almost met the GGC target, and has remained steady over the last three years. National
water arrangements will be explored next year following the deregulation of water companies, as this will
enable greater access to water monitoring and saving initiatives.
Targetby2020 Indicator 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Target
progress
Reduce water
usage to 3m
3
per
FTE
Total water
consumption
(m3)
Water
consumption per
FTE (m3)
Financialindicators 2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Baseline
(2009-10)
Trend
Water costs
Water supply
and sewage
(£000s)
Targetarea4:buying‘greener’productsandservices
We are committed to meeting the Government Buying Standards (GBS) best practice specications wherever
possible which help deliver sustainable procurement to meet GGC targets. All common goods and services are
procured by the Crown Commercial Service (CCS), which streamlines procurement processes, provides value
for money and also establishes ‘framework agreements’ to include a sustainable products that meet the GBS
mandatory levels.
Targetarea5:beingtransparentandopen
We report our sustainability data to MoJ quarterly, and an annual return is completed at the end of each
nancial year.
Biodiversity Action Planning is not relevant to the Cafcass estate
as we do not own any open spaces; we consider climate change
within the SSG.
Sustainable procurement: we are on track to meet the 2020
government target of 33% of procurement spending to reach small
and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). All our contracting
requirements over £25,000 are advertised on the Contract Finder
website and are open to the SME market.
855
1,401
1,377
Not
held
3.05
3.57
3.32
Not
held
8
13
9
31
On track
£
74%
£23,000 saved
Total procurement
spend
23%
current spend
with SMEs
On track
Secon 2
The accountability report
Corporate Governance report
Overview
Summary
This secon reviews and evaluates the governance, risk
and control arrangements in place in Cafcass. It also sets
out how we are organised and who is responsible for
managing and running Cafcass, including our Chief
Execuve, our Chair of the Board, members of the Board,
and our Corporate and Operaonal Management Teams.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
42
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
The Directors report
The Directors present their annual report, together with the nancial statements and auditor’s report
[22]
. The
Chair of the Cafcass Board is Baroness Claire Tyler. The Board is made up of non-executive members, listed
below, who have been appointed in accordance with the Membership, Committee and Procedure Regulations
2005
[23]
.
· Baroness Claire Tyler (Chair)
· Mary MacLeod (Deputy Chair; Quality Committee Chair)
· John Lakin (Performance Committee Chair)
· Francis Plowden (Audit and Risk Assurance Committee Chair)
· Fay Selvan
· Stuart Smith
· Nickie Aiken
· Caroline Corby
· Deep Sagar
· Paul Grant
· Sir Mark Hedley (co-opted member, appointed January 2016)
We also have two advisors to our Quality Committee:
· Joanna Nicolas (special advisor)
· Professor Simon Hackett (academic advisor)
Register of interests
Board members have a duty to declare any private interests relating to their public duties and to take steps to
resolve any conicts arising in a way that protects the public interest; a register of interests can be found on
our website.
Personaldatarelatedincidents
No personal data breaches fell within the criteria for reporting to the Information Commissioner’s Ofce
(ICO)
[24]
during 2016-17. Further detail on our information assurance processes is set out in the governance
statement.
[22] This report uses the convention of conrming whether information is audited or non-audited in footnotes.
[23] Regulation 6 sets out eligibility to be a Board member, including the requirement that Board members are non-executive; executive
staff attend Board meetings but are not Board members.
[24] The criteria for reporting to the ICO is set out within ICO guidance titled ‘The notication of data security breaches to the ICO’.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
43
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
The statement of Accounng Ocers
responsibilies
Under the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000, the Secretary of State has directed Cafcass to prepare
for each nancial year a Statement of Accounts in the form and on the basis set out in the Accounts Direction.
The accounts are prepared on an accruals basis and must give a true and fair view of the state of affairs of
Cafcass and of its net resource outturn, application of resources, changes in taxpayers’ equity and cash ows
for the nancial year.
In preparing the accounts, the Accounting Ofcer is required to comply with the requirements of the
Government Financial Reporng Manual and in particular to:
· observe the Accounts Direction issued by the Secretary of State, including the relevant accounting and
disclosure requirements, and apply suitable accounting policies on a consistent basis;
· make judgements and estimates on a reasonable basis;
· state whether applicable accounting standards as set out in the Government Financial Reporting Manual
have been followed, and disclose and explain any material departures in the nancial statements; and
· prepare the nancial statements on a going concern basis.
The Principal Accounting Ofcer of the Ministry of Justice has appointed the Chief Executive as Accounting
Ofcer of Cafcass. The responsibilities of an Accounting Ofcer, including responsibility for the propriety and
regularity of the public nances for which the Accounting Ofcer is answerable, for keeping proper records and
for safeguarding Cafcass’ assets, are set out in Managing Public Money published by the HM Treasury.
As far as the Accounting Ofcer is aware, there is no relevant audit information of which Cafcass’ auditors are
unaware. He has taken all the steps that he ought to have taken to make himself aware of any relevant audit
information and to establish that Cafcass’ auditors are aware of that information.
The Accounting Ofcer conrms that the annual report and accounts as a whole is fair, balanced and
understandable. He takes personal responsibility for the annual report and accounts and the judgments
required for determining that it is fair, balanced and understandable.
The governance statement
Cafcass is an executive non-departmental public body (NDPB) for which I, Anthony Douglas, am the Chief
Executive and the Accounting Ofcer. I am personally responsible and accountable to Parliament for the
organisation and quality of the work carried out by Cafcass, including its use of public money and the
stewardship of its assets.
There have been no material changes in our governance framework. Our governance arrangements satisfy the
requirements of the main principles of the Corporate governance in central government departments: Code of
Good Pracce that are relevant to Cafcass. I consider our Governance Framework to be effective.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
44
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
TheMinistryofJustice
As a NDPB, Cafcass is accountable to our sponsoring department, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ). We work within
the strategic objectives agreed with MoJ. We agree an annual National Business Plan with MoJ which reects
our statutory duties, our contribution to MoJ targets, and our plans to deliver efciency targets. In 2016-17,
regular meetings have been held between Cafcass and MoJ where performance against these requirements has
been scrutinised. We work closely with MoJ on policy development and we contribute in agreed, dened ways
to MoJ policy objectives for the family justice system.
TheCafcassBoard
The Board use their expertise and experience to establish the organisation’s strategic aims and objectives. Their
work is supported by three main committees:
· Audit and Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC): provides assurance to the Board and Accounting Ofcer on
audit, risk and control issues.
· Performance Committee: supports the Board in scrutinising performance against Key Performance Indicators
(KPIs) and monitoring our contribution to family justice key performance measures.
· Quality Committee: supports the Board in assessing the quality of safeguarding practice and casework.
The Board met formally four times in the year and the Committees met quarterly. There is also a Remuneration
Committee which is convened as and when needed; this met once during 2016-17. The following table lists our
Board members and their attendance at meetings of which they are members.
The Family Justice Young People’s Board (FJYPB) acts across the whole of the family justice system, and is
integral to the family justice reform process. Two representatives of the FJYPB attend each Board meeting and
provide an update about their work.
Meetingsattendedpermemberoutofthoseeligibletoattend
Boardmember Board ARAC Quality Performance
Baroness Claire Tyler (Chair) 4 of 4 - - 4 of 4
Mary Macleod (Deputy Chair) 4 of 4 4 of 5 4 of 4 -
John Lakin 4 of 4 4 of 5 - 4 of 4
Fay Selvan 4 of 4 - 3 of 4 -
Stuart Smith 4 of 4 - 2 of 4 3 of 4
Francis Plowden 4 of 4 5 of 5 - -
Nickie Aiken 3 of 4 - - 2 of 4
Caroline Corby 3 of 4 5 of 5 4 of 4 -
Deep Sagar 4 of 4 5 of 5 4 of 4 -
Paul Grant 4 of 4 - 3 of 4 3 of 4
Sir Mark Hedley (co-opted member) 2 of 4 - - -
AdvisortoQualityCommittee
Joanna Nicolas - - 4 of 4 -
Professor Simon Hackett - - 3 of 4 -
External
Internal
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
45
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
External
Internal
Internalmanagementstructure
I am currently supported by three Directors, who make up the Corporate Management Team (CMT): the
Director of Strategy, the Director of Resources and the National Service Director. CMT meets weekly and
collectively we lead and manage the organisation.
The Operational Management Team (OMT) is led by the National Service Director. Its membership is made
up of the Assistant Directors, operational Heads of Practice, and staff from teams which directly support
operational services including Finance, Human Resources and Business Analysis. OMT meets monthly to
manage performance across the country.
Service Area Meetings take place locally every month in each service area to translate the corporate and
operational agenda into local actions. Local team meetings complete this cascade structure and process, which
includes the learning both from mistakes and from best practice.
We have internal boards and groups which are managed by members of the CMT to ensure that we keep
abreast of regulations and requirements in line with good governance principles: an Innovation Project
Development Board, a Board Strategy Group, an Information Assurance Board, a Business Continuity Steering
Group, a Budget Approval Panel, and a Sustainability Steering Group.
Corporate
Management Team
(CMT)
Parliament
Remuneration
Committee
Audit and Risk
Assurance Committee
Secretary of State
(through nominated
Minister)
Chair of Cafcass
Chief Executive
(Accounting Officer)
Cafcass
Board
Performance
Committee
Quality
Committee
Innovation
Project
Development
Board
Budget
Approval Panel
Board-led
Strategy
Group
Operational
Management Team
(OMT)
Family Justice
Board
Family Justice Young
People’s Board
Service Area Management
Teams; Local Teams; Front
line staff
Permanent Secretary
Principal Accounting Officer
Business Assurance
Meetings (BAM)
Research
Governance
Committee
Customer
Services Team
Information
Assurance
Board
Business
Continuity
Steering Group
Sustainability
Steering Group
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
46
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
TheBoard’sperformance
The membership of the Board has been consistent during the year. During 2016-17 the Board has continued to
govern and perform well. As well as the Chair conducting regular catch-ups with members on performance, we
repeated the Board effectiveness review. This was conducted by an external provider, as an additional form of
assurance. The results show that the Board is adding value and providing strong leadership.
I am condent that the quality of the data used by the Board is robust. All reports prior to submission to
the Board are subject to stringent quality assurance processes by senior managers. The effectiveness of the
systems that generate the nancial and performance data contained within the reports is evidenced through
positive internal audit and inspection results. None of these results this year, or in the previous year, were of a
low or inadequate opinion
[25]
. We aim to keep reports clear, concise and focused on the purpose of the Board’s
reviewing. An example of this is our Performance Dashboard, which provides an overall high level position and
assessment of our performance against our strategic objectives and risks and is aligned with the corporate
work programme which drives the actions needed to meet our objectives.
Assurancearrangements
The Audit and Risk Assurance Committee (ARAC) has oversight of the organisation’s governance, risk and
internal control frameworks. It receives reports on matters of assurance and oversees the preparation and
publication of the nancial statements each year.
The ARAC oversees the internal audit programme work and delivery arrangements. The Head of Internal
Audit role and internal audit programme were provided through MoJ Internal Audit Shared Service until 30th
September 2016, at which point the service was transferred to the Government Internal Audit Agency, who
remain our Internal Auditors.
Internalaudit
The planned programme of audit work was met during the year which included ve nal audit reports, three
rated Moderate
[26]
and two rated Substantial
[27]
. Cafcass was given an overall assurance of Moderate.
Rating Audit
Substantial Health and Safety, August 2016
Moderate Area Quality Reviews, November 2016
Moderate Health and Wellbeing Benets Scheme, November 2016
Moderate Complaints and Compliments, March 2017
Substantial National Business Centre – Call Centre, April 2017
Strategicandbusinessplans
We maintain a strategic plan which sets out the priorities for the organisation. We have a dashboard for the
national business plan and strategic plan which tracks and reports on the performance of relevant activities.
This is updated quarterly and monitored by the CMT and the Cafcass Board. The strategic plan remains in force
for the next nancial year. CMT conducts a review of key work priorities for the coming year and these are
shared with the Board at their planning day in April each year.
[25] This means that none of the areas reviewed by the internal auditors was found to have a control framework of low or inadequate
design or operation.
[26] ‘Moderate’ rating denition: some improvements are required to enhance the adequacy and effectiveness of the framework of
governance, risk management and control.
[27] ‘Substantial’ rating denition: the framework of governance, risk management and control is adequate and effective.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
47
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
Businesscontinuityplanning
Business continuity planning creates resilience within our processes and tools (such as IT systems) so that we
can continue to deliver our service effectively during unexpected disruptive events. Each Cafcass site has a
continuity plan in place. Our Business Continuity Steering Group and Incident Management Team support this
work. A test of continuity planning was successfully carried out in the National Business Centre during 2016-17.
Riskmanagementandprole
Our risk management policy sets out our approach to risk management and clearly outlines our responsibilities
in the management of risk throughout the organisational structure, including how risk is escalated.
Our strategic risks are captured in a risk register which is reviewed at every meeting of the ARAC, the lead
Board Committee (Quality or Performance) and quarterly by the Board. Our register identies the risks to the
achievement of our strategic priorities and objectives, and the mitigations are categorised using a three-line
of defence model; operational controls, management monitoring, and independent assurance. In addition, this
year we have introduced a separate risk assessment of the wider environment in which we work, to provide
more transparency around our understanding and management of risks outside the organisation, which do or
could impact on our work.
During the year, we identied a number of noteworthy areas within our strategic risk prole:
· The in-year funding situation was again considered manageable and the reduction in spending during
the year was made without service detriment. Funding for subsequent years remains an area of risk
as the level of demand continues to place pressure on the service, driving a need for more resources if
quality and performance are not to be compromised.
· Our assessment of the risk to maintaining quality of casework was increased during the year, in
acknowledgment of the continual increase in demand and the consequent increase in individual workloads.
· The assessment of residual risk relating to demand was retained at Amber to acknowledge the rising
demand in both public and private law applications and the uncertainty of the duration of the continual
rise.
· We introduced a separate risk relating to workforce capacity where previously we had a broader strategic
risk around workforce generally, given that a talented and engaged workforce of sufcient size and stability
is absolutely critical to service delivery. While we believe the engagement of the workforce is still strong, the
overall capacity is signicantly stretched.
Informationassurance
Our position statement on Cafcass’ information assurance arrangements is as follows:
· The National Child Care Policy Manager remains the Senior Information Risk Owner (SIRO) for Cafcass
and is supported in this role by the Information Assurance Ofcer and IT Operations Manager.
· The quarterly Information Assurance Board (IAB) meetings have in attendance Cafcass’ business area
Information Asset Owners, who regularly assess any information management associated risks. The
IAB also discusses the log of data breaches and monitors any changes in the nature of breaches.
· An annual data breach report is presented to ARAC for further scrutiny and oversight.
· Information stored electronically, which involves all current case information, is considered to be
appropriately secure as we maintain compliance with recommended government security levels. This is
audited independently and all electronic devices are encrypted.
· We continue to use Egress Switch which allows personal data to be sent securely via email to service
users and external agencies.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
48
Section 2 | The accountability report | Corporate Governance report
[28] The criteria for reporting to the ICO is set out within ICO guidance titled ‘the notication of data security breaches to the ICO’.
[29] In 2016-17 Cafcass received 40,824 new private law cases which represents a 9.1% increase compared with the previous year; 14,554
new care cases which represents a 13.8% increase compared with the previous year.
[30] ‘Unauthorised disclosures’ are instances where personal data has been disclosed in error to the wrong person, but which has been
recovered or securely destroyed in order to limit the impact of the breach.
· We continue to promote awareness and good practice through regular news items and training.
Completion rates of our previous training package, the Cabinet Ofce’s ‘Responsible for Information’,
have been maintained at 90%. A new Cafcass-specic training package was launched in September
2016, based on our policies and processes.
· We report our position annually in relation to the Security Policy Framework and planned future work to
the Cabinet Ofce via MoJ. We continue to self-assess at a high level of assurance.
As set out above, no personal data breaches fell within the criteria for reporting to the Information
Commissioner’s Ofce (ICO)
[28]
. However, all incidents are taken seriously, recorded, and responded to. There
were 236 data breaches in 2016-17. This reects incidents in a very small proportion of cases: 0.4% of cases
received 2016-17 (and a far smaller percentage of total communications).
This is an increase in number compared with the previous year (156 in total), although this increase may in
part reect the fact that Cafcass processed thousands more cases this year compared with previous years
[29]
,
which necessarily involved an increase in Cafcass’ overall case correspondence.
The majority of data breaches (82%) involve paper correspondence being delivered to a wrong address.
We continue to take steps to automate and digitise correspondence where possible so that manual error is
reduced. Updates include:
· automated email verication processes to increase email contacts held
· automated ‘workow’ processes to send electronic correspondence directly from the case management
system
· a new printer service which enforces PIN use for printing, to reduce the risk of mixing paper
documents which relate to different cases.
Summaryofotherprotectedpersonaldatarelatedincidentsin2016-17
Data breaches reported internally according to Cabinet Ofce guidance, none of which fall within the criteria for reporting
to the Information Commissioner’s Ofce
Category Natureofincident Total
I Loss of inadequately protected electronic equipment,
devices or paper documents from secured Government
premises
0
II Loss of inadequately protected electronic equipment,
devices or paper documents from outside secured Cafcass
premises
14
III Insecure disposal of inadequately protected electronic
equipment devices or paper documents
0
IV Unauthorised disclosure
[30]
219
V Other 3
Overallconclusions
I consider that our governance framework is operating effectively and is proportionate to the risks and
challenges facing us. Our focus is squarely on supporting the frontline service which continues to operate under
signicant demand pressure. So assuring the safety and quality of work for all cases referred to us through
the careful balancing of resource and demand management is paramount. This in turn places pressure on
supporting functions as key enablers of service delivery so we continue to prioritise work to make best use of
our contracts, technology and estates. There will never be the level of resources available to us that would
make the work we do risk free and I would question whether that would be a good use of resource. But I do
consider we have the right governance framework for us, and one which I will always keep under review.
Secon 2.1
The accountability report
Remuneraon and sta report
This secon sets out the pay and benets received by
Cafcass Directors and Board members, our pay and
pensions policies, details of sta numbers and costs,
and our policies supporng sta, including equality and
diversity commitments.
Overview
Summary
Remuneraon policy
The remuneration for Cafcass Directors is recommended by a Remuneration Committee made up of three
Cafcass Board members: the Chair, the Deputy Chair and the Chair of the Audit and Risk Assurance Committee
(ARAC). MoJ reviews the Remuneration Committee’s proposals and also approves annual pay reviews and
performance-related payments for the Chief Executive. Cafcass salaries are established by considering factors
such as relevant external comparator pay levels, internal relativities, affordability, recruitment and retention
risks, and political sensitivity. There is no planned change to this policy for the 2017-18 nancial year.
The remuneration for Cafcass Board members is determined by MoJ.
Service contracts
Cafcass’ appointments of Directors are made in accordance with the Cafcass Recruitment and Retention Policy.
This policy recognises that in order to provide a high-quality service to the children and families that we serve,
it is vital that we recruit and retain people through fair and open competition who share our aims and values,
and have the requisite skills and abilities to perform to a consistently high standard.
Unless otherwise stated, staff covered by this report hold appointments that are open-ended. Members
of Cafcass’ Corporate Management Team (CMT) are required to provide four or six months’ notice to
terminate their contract. Early termination by Cafcass, other than for gross misconduct, would result in the
individual receiving compensation by way of payment in lieu of notice, as set out in the individual contract of
employment. No such payments were made to senior executives during the year.
Cafcass Board members are appointed by MoJ according to the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support
Service (Membership, Committee and Procedure) Regulations 2005, which sets out all terms of appointment
except remuneration which is determined by the Secretary of State. Board members are statutory ofce holders
and, as such, do not hold a contract of employment. Cafcass Board members are appointed on one, two or
three-year terms.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
50
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Remuneraon of Cafcass Board members and
senior management
Remuneration includes gross salary, bonus payments (up to 10% performance-related pay applicable to some
CMT members), benets in kind, and pension benets (employer’s pension contributions). More detail on these
is set out below the remuneration tables.
SingletotalgureofremunerationforCafcassBoardmembers
Boardmembers Salary
(£000)
Bonus payments
(£000)
Benets in kind
(to nearest
£100)
Pension benets
(£000)
[31]
Total
(£000)
2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16
Baroness Claire Tyler of
Eneld (Chair)
35-40 35-40 - - - - - - 35-40 35-40
Mary MacLeod (Deputy
Chair) OBE
5-10 5-10 - - - 100 - - 5-10 5-10
Kamaljit Kaur-Singh (until
30th June 2015)
- 0-5 - - - - - - - 0-5
Honor Rhodes OBE (until
30th June 2015)
- 0-5 - - - - - - - 0-5
John Lakin
5-10 5-10 - - 1,900 500 - - 10-15 10-15
Francis Plowden
5-10 5-10 - - - - - - 5-10 5-10
Fay Selvan
5-10 5-10 - - 1,200 500 - - 10-15 10-15
Stuart Smith
5-10 5-10 - - 1,000 600 - 10-15 10-15
Geoffrey Bush CB DL (until
31st July 2015)
- 0-5 - - - 100 - - - 0-5
Nickie Aiken
5-10 5-10 - - - - - - 5-10 5-10
Caroline Corby
5-10 5-10 - - - - - - 5-10 5-10
Paul Grant
5-10 5-10 - - 1,300 500 - - 10-15 10-15
Deep Sagar
5-10 5-10 - - 500 300 - - 5-10 5-10
Sir Mark Hedley (from
January 2016)
0-5 - - - 100 - - - 0-5 -
[31] The value of pension benets accrued during the year is calculated as (the real increase in pension multiplied by 20) plus (the real
increase in any lump sum) less (the contributions made by the individual). The real increases exclude increases due to ination or any
increase or decreases due to a transfer of pension rights.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
51
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
SingletotalgureofremunerationforDirectors
[32]
Directors Salary
(£000)
Bonus payments
(£000)
Benets in kind
(to nearest
£100)
Pension benets
(£000)
[33]
Total
(£000)
2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16
Anthony Douglas CBE,
Chief Executive
160-165 160-165 - - - - - - 160-165 160-165
Julie Brown, Director of
Resources
125-130 125-130 10-15
[34]
10-15
[35]
- - 39 35 170-175 170-175
Christine Banim, National
Service Director
110-115 105-110 5-10
[34]
10-15
[35]
- - - - 115-120 120-125
Helen Watson, Director
of Strategy (joined on 1st
September 2015)
125-130 70-75 - - - - 37 22 160-165 90-95
PaymentstopastDirectors
[36]
Jabbar Sardar, Director of
HR & OD (left post 31st
December 2015)
- 105-110 - 10-15
[37]
- - - 30 - 150-155
Bruce Clark, Former
Director of Policy (left
Directorate post 31st May
2013)
- 15-20
[38]
- - - - - - - 15-20
Salary
‘Salary’ includes: basic salary, London Weighting, honorarium, overtime, market supplement (discretionary
payment for some posts to aid retention and recruitment), buy-back of untaken annual leave, and Pay in Lieu
of Notice (PILON).
Bonuspayments(performance-relatedpay)
Performance-related pay (PRP) is based on performance in the year. Targets are set annually and based on
overall performance towards the achievements of the Business Plan objectives (stated below). Threshold
performance would result in a PRP payment of no more than 10% of basic salary. Performance below threshold
would result in no payment being paid.
PRP awards for Cafcass staff are determined by the Chief Executive and must be endorsed by the
Remuneration Committee. PRP for the Chief Executive is determined by the Remuneration Committee and MoJ.
The strategic objectives that are relevant for PRP consideration are to:
· show continuous improvement in our performance and in the quality of our work;
· innovate and reform in public and private law, so as to use our resources to best effect;
· develop an evidence base that analyses the diversity related needs of service users and in turn briefs and
trains our staff to respond to these changes;
· continue delivering savings packages required by innovating throughout all front and back ofce functions
and across organisational boundaries;
· use our unique position and insight to generate high impact and timely research to inform our own practice
and inuence that across the family justice system.
[32] This information has been audited.
[33] The value of pension benets accrued during the year is calculated as (the real increase in pension multiplied by 20) plus (the real
increase in any lump sum) less (the contributions made by the individual). The real increases exclude increases due to ination or any
increase or decreases due to a transfer of pension rights.
[34] Related to performance in 2015-16 nancial year but paid in 2016-17 following sponsor department approval.
[35] Related to performance in 2014-15 nancial year but paid in 2015-16 following sponsor department approval.
[36] This information has been audited.
[37] Related to performance in 2014-15 but paid in 2015-16 following sponsor department approval.
[38] Payments in relation to commissioned work as hourly paid senior manager.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
52
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Benetsinkind
The monetary value of benets in kind covers any non-cash benets provided by Cafcass and treated by HM
Revenue and Customs as a taxable emolument. Board members’ travel costs to the Cafcass National Ofce are
reimbursed to them, which acts as a benet in kind.
Pensionbenets
This sets out the value of pension benets accrued during the year which were paid by Cafcass as employer’s
contributions. The contribution rate from April 2016 is 15.8%.
Pension entlements for Directors
Pension benets are provided by the West Yorkshire Pension Fund (WYPF), to which Cafcass makes employer’s
contributions. Further information on the Cafcass pension schemes can be found in notes 1(f) and 22 in the
Accounts and pages 52 and 59.
Theaccruedpensionatage60is the pension earned that the member is entitled to receive when they
reach pension age, or immediately on ceasing to be an active member of the scheme if they are already at or
over pension age.
Cashequivalenttransfervalue(CETV)is the actuarially assessed capitalised value of the pension scheme
benets accrued by a member at a particular point in time. A CETV is a payment made by a pension scheme or
arrangement to secure pension benets in another pension scheme (or arrangement) when the member leaves
a scheme and chooses to transfer the benets accrued in their former scheme. CETVs are calculated within the
guidelines and framework prescribed by the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries.
The pension gures shown relate to the benets that individuals have accrued as a consequence of their total
membership of the pension scheme, not just their service in a senior capacity to which disclosure applies. The
CETV gure includes the value of any pension benet in another scheme or arrangement which the individual
has transferred to the pension provider and for which the pension provider has received a transfer payment
commensurate to the additional pension liabilities being assumed. They also include any additional pension
benet accrued to the member as a result of their purchasing of additional years of pension service in the
scheme at their own cost.
TherealincreaseinCETVeffectively funded by the employer excludes increases due to ination and
contributions paid by the Director (including the value of any benets transferred from another pension scheme
or arrangement). It uses common market valuation factors for the start and the end of the period.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
53
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
1 2 3 4 5 6
Salary
2016-17
(performance
pay)
(£000)
Salary
2015-16
(performance
pay)
(£000)
Real increase
in pension
and related
lump sum at
age 60
(£000)
Total accrued
pension at
age 60 at 31st
March 2016
and related
lump sum
(£000)
CETV at 31st
March 2017
(£000)
[39]
CETV at 31st
March 2016
(£000)
[40]
Real increase
in CETV after
adjustment
for ination
and changes
in market
investment
factors
(nearest
£000)
[41]
Anthony Douglas
CBE,
Chief Executive
160-165
(0)
160-165
(0)
- - - - -
Julie Brown,
Director of
Resources
125-130
(10-15)
125-130
(10-15)
2.5-5 0-5 229 187 40
Christine Banim,
National Service
Director
140-145
(10-15)
[42]
135-140
(10-15)
[43]
- - - - -
Helen Watson,
Director of Strategy
(joined on 1st
September 2015)
125-130
(0)
125-130
[44]
(0)
45-47.5 90-95 863 17 846
Compensaon on early rerement or for loss of
oce
No senior managers received compensatory payments in 2016-17
[45]
.
Fair pay disclosure
This shows the relationship between the remuneration of the highest-paid Director in the organisation and
the median remuneration of the organisation’s workforce
[46]
. This is based on full-time equivalent salaries and
includes agency staff.
[39] This information has been audited.
[40] This information has been audited.
[41] This information has been audited.
[42] This is full-time equivalent salary. Actual salary is £110,000-115,000.
[43] This is full-time equivalent salary. Actual salary was £105,000-£110,000.
[44] This is full-time equivalent salary. Actual salary was £70,000-£75,000.
[45] This information has been audited.
[46] This information has been audited.
Toptomedianstaffpaymultipleratio
2016-17 2015-16
Highestearner’stotalbandedremuneration(£000) 160-165 160-165
Mediantotalremuneration £41,085 £40,719
Ratio 1:3.97 1:3.99
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
54
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
In 2016-17, nil (2015-16, nil) employees received remuneration in excess of the highest-paid director.
Remuneration ranged from £10,000 to £165,000 (2015-16, £10,000 to £165,000).
Total remuneration includes salary, non-consolidated performance-related pay and benets in kind. It does not
include severance payments, employer pension contributions or the CETV of pensions.
Sta report
NumberofSeniorCivilServiceequivalentstaff
Cafcass has 34 staff who are the equivalent of Senior Civil Servants (SCS): 23 members of the Operational
Management Team and 11 senior managers in corporate teams (this excludes Directors, whose remuneration
has been set out above).
Salaryband NumberofSCSequivalentwithinbandasat31stMarch2017
£60,000-£70,000 16
£70,000-£80,000 2
£80,000-£90,000 5
£90,000-£100,000 11
Total 34
Staffnumbersandcosts
Cafcass staff members are subject to levels of remuneration and terms and conditions of service (including
superannuation) within the general pay structure approved by MoJ.
An analysis of staff numbers and costs is set out below, distinguishing between staff with permanent contracts,
and staff who are exible, agency, and Self-Employed Contractors. All staff numbers are presented on an actual
basis
[47]
as at the reporting date (31st March 2017) and reect headcount; staff costs are presented on total
cost during the reporting period (April 2016 – March 2017)
[48]
.
[47] The gures show staff numbers based on headcount, not full-time equivalent (FTE).
[48] Staff costs information is audited. Spend based on full International Reporting Financial Standards (IRFS) stated cost, further
information on which is set out in Section 3 Accounts 2016-17.
Staffnumbers(31stMarch2017)
Socialworker Other Total
Cafcass Board member - 11 11
Corporate staff - 93 93
Operational staff 1,254 273 1,527
Flexible staff (bank/sessional) 62 - 62
Agency staff 107 40 147
Self-Employed Contractors 103 - 103
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
55
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
[49] This information has been audited. Spend based on full International Reporting Financial Standards (IRFS) stated cost, further
information on which is set out in Section 3 Accounts 2016-17.
[50] Self-Employed Contractors are ordinarily responsible for meeting travel, ofce and all other expenses related to their work, as well as
related tax and national insurance liabilities.
[51] These gures are as self-reported by employed staff only; gures are not held for all employed staff as they may choose not to
disclose the information.
[52] Black and Minority Ethnic.
[53] 23 members of the Operational Management Team and 11 senior managers in corporate teams.
Staffcosts(2016-17
[49]
)
CafcassBoard
members(£000)
Corporatestaff
(£000)
Operationalstaff
(£000)
Total
(£000)
Salaries and wages 128 5,113 55,224 60,465
Social security costs 7 550 5,929 6,486
Other pension cost 0 4,331 8,462 12,793
Past pension service
cost
0 12 112 124
Totalpayrollcost 135 10,006 69,727 79,868
Agency social worker
costs
0 0 6,297 6,297
Other agency staff
costs
0 51 1,072 1,123
Self-Employed
Contractors costs
[50]
0 0 2,507 2,507
Inward secondee costs 0 0 0 0
Totalstaffcosts 135 10,057 79,603 89,795
Staffcomposition
[51]
Staff Female Male BME
[52]
Disability
Directors 3 1 0 0
Senior Civil Service equivalent (excluding Directors)
[53]
19
(55.9%)
15
(44.1%)
3
(8.8%)
1
(2.9%)
Other Cafcass staff
1,347
(81.9%)
297
(18.1%)
210
(12.8%)
121
(7.4%)
Total staff
1,369
(81.4%)
313
(18.6%)
213
(12.7%)
122
(7.3%)
Cafcass Board members (0.57%)
Corporate staff (4.79%)
Operational staff (78.59%)
Flexible staff (bank/sessional) (3.19%)
Agency staff (7.56%)
Self-Employed Contractors (5.30%)
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
56
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Sicknessabsencedata
The overall average number of working days lost due to sickness (AWDL) per staff member is set out
below. There was an increase due to a number of long-term serious and complex absence cases. Signicant
improvements took place between January to March, with the average across that period more in line with
previous years.
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15 2013-14 2012-13
Social workers AWDL
(excluding leavers)
10.6
(9.0)
7.6
(6.7)
8.9
(7.6)
7.3
(6.1)
7.4
(5.8)
Non-social workers AWDL
(excluding leavers)
8.1
(7.1)
7.1
(6.2)
8.8
(6.4)
6.1
(5.7)
5.7
(4.8)
OverallAWDL
(excludingleavers)
10.0
(8.6)
7.5
(6.6)
8.8
(7.3)
7.0
(6.0)
7.0
(5.6)
EqualityandDiversity
Cafcass is an Equal Opportunities Employer and provides all job applicants and existing employees with
equal opportunity regardless of their ethnicity, background or situation. We monitor our recruitment and
selection processes in accordance with legislative requirements and best practice.
Our Equality and Diversity Strategy 2013-16 sets out our commitment to workforce diversity and to
supporting our staff where reasonable adjustments are required. Cafcass ensures that all training
programmes and materials are fully accessible.
A new Diversity and Inclusion Strategy for 2017-20 is being developed, which will further evidence our
commitment to strengthening and deepening the focus on issues of diversity, inclusion and equality,
particularly in respect of frontline service delivery and workforce learning and development, with a focus on
impact and better outcomes for children.
Cafcass continues to fully support staff in respect of both their physical and mental health and wellbeing,
through a range of resources and immediate intervention strategies designed to prevent sickness absence and
facilitate a return to work as quickly as possible when absence does occur. Central to our approach is timely
and proactive absence management, delivered by managers at the local team level working in close partnership
with HR, as well as bespoke and tailored interventions on a team and individual level based on the prevalent
causes of absence.
Staffpolicies
Cafcass has a range of policies and key strategies to ensure that we can effectively support managers and staff
on a range of issues from employee relations, change management, workforce planning, health, wellbeing, and
engagement.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
57
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Recruitmentandretention
We have a Recruitment and Retention Policy which sets out how we aim to achieve best practice and
ensure that Cafcass employs and retains a highly skilled, credible and motivated workforce.
In 2016-17:
· We won a Recruitment and Retention award (Excellence in People Management awards).
· We have undertaken signicant work to develop our approach to resourcing, enhancing our end-to-end
recruitment processes from advertising and candidate attraction through to assessment and selection, in
order to ensure that we are able to deliver the capacity to meet increased demand for our services.
· There has been a renewed focus on the detailed forward recruitment planning, between HR and
operational recruiting managers, to minimise delay in resourcing and ensure that there is minimal time
lag between leavers and new starters. This has also involved the implementation of online and
automated methods to speed up pre-employment checking requirements in order to minimise sources
of potentially signicant delay in the recruitment process.
· Work commenced on the development of high-end video content to support our resourcing and
workforce development strategies, promoting Cafcass as an employer of choice and what we can offer
high-performing social workers.
Workforcedevelopment
Our Workforce Strategy sets out our approach to improve capacity to maintain quality of work and meet
rising demand for services. All staff are provided with a range of comprehensive learning and development
resources, including use of IT equipment, that are designed to improve the performance of individuals and
teams, and promote a continued focus on more efcient ways of working. Our workforce development
programmes include distinct Leadership and Management Development Programmes and Talent
Management.
In 2016-17:
· We updated Performance and Learning Reviews (PLRs) for managers and Practice Supervisors through
the roll-out of 360
o
feedback. This allows colleagues to provide constructive feedback on an individual’s
role. The nal report is used within the learning and development discussion of an individual’s PLR.
· Staff are better informed on performance measures, as we have focused on providing more up-to-date
and accessible information. MyWork, our online individual performance dashboard which also shows local
and national averages, has been redeveloped resulting in a quicker and more user-friendly interface,
with daily updated information. This helps staff self-regulate, and is used by managers within PLRs.
Managers also have a new single click tool to check compliance against PLRs and use of Quality
Assurance and Impact (QAI) tools, and new allocation tools to better see staff availability and capacity.
· We delivered 28 Management Development workshops to 207 attendees. Feedback from the sessions
were positive. 98% felt the training was worth their time, and 77% rated it ‘very useful’ or ‘extremely
useful’.
· We continued to support the long-term development of high-performing staff through our Emerging
Talent Programme; 40 new participants are now on the programme, with 185 total participants.
Participants report experiencing a boost in condence and an increased awareness of their strengths and
how to enhance these, and they continue to outperform national averages on most MyWork measures.
There is an overall promotion rate of 34% among participants compared with the national gure of 8%.
An Emerging Talent participant: “The programme has been very effective. The management development
modules have really helped and being on the programme has given me the condence in progressing
through recognition of my achievements by Cafcass.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
58
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Health,safetyandwellbeing
We work with managers to ensure that working environments are safe, workloads are manageable and that
staff are equipped and supported to carry out their roles. Our Employee Wellbeing Strategy outlines our
vision and approach to health and wellbeing at Cafcass. We are committed to creating an environment that
enables staff to feel engaged, motivated, and able to provide the best service possible to the children and
families we work with.
In 2016-17:
· We are actively promoting learning around mental health and have signed both the ‘Time to Change
Pledge’ and ‘Mindful Employer Charter. We have identied a network of voluntary ‘Time to Change’
champions to support staff with mental health related issues, and have begun training for a number of
staff to become qualied Mental Health First Aiders.
· We delivered 47 health and wellbeing sessions to 615 staff members on a range of topics including
nutrition, posture and movement, stress management and mental health. 92% rated the activity as
excellent and half went on to access additional resources such as 1:1 appointments with our Health and
Wellbeing Ofcers or treatments via our Health and Wellbeing plan (provided by Medicash). We continue
to promote healthy lifestyles through our ‘cycle to work’ scheme, a monthly newsletter and health and
wellbeing ofce champions.
A Service Manager on a mental health session at a development day in A7 (Avon, Gloucestershire and
Wiltshire): “It was thought-provoking and powerful to hear the talk about mental health particularly the
relevant information and useful strategies that practitioners can apply in their demanding roles as Family
Court Advisers (FCAs) - we have had positive feedback from our FCAs who feel that the day has had a
signicant impact on them.
· We reviewed our Health and Safety policies and have consolidated policy and guidance relating to risk to
staff from violence, aggression and harassment into three key documents, with supporting eLearning
courses, to ensure up-to-date guidance for managers on how they can and should support staff following
threatening or abusive behaviour. These are (1) Health and Safety Policy Arrangement: managing
violence, aggression, harassment and promoting personal safety; (2) Managing Unacceptable Behaviour
guidance; (3) Risk assessment: threats to and intimidation of staff.
Staff engagement
An engaged workforce is critical to maintaining a high quality, timely service to children and families. A
range of policies and initiatives have contributed to staff engagement. These include strong management
and leadership training and development, clear corporate communications, enhancing feedback
mechanisms for staff to contribute their views and a focus on wellbeing nationally and locally, at a team
and individual level. The quarterly PLR continues to provide an effective way for staff and their manager
to discuss how it feels to work for Cafcass and look at ways to create the right conditions to maximise
individual potential.
We have a clear structure to share organisational updates to all staff through team meetings. We also have
a monthly newsletter ‘Channel C’ and news updates on the home page of the staff intranet.
In 2016-17:
· Our national fundraising effort for Children in Need, the ‘Caon’, saw 595 people (including staff and
their friends and family members) take part in 35 events across 17 different service areas. This was a
65% increase in participation compared with the previous year. We raised £3,371 (including Gift Aid).
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
59
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
Expenditureonconsultancy
Cafcass incurred no costs for consultancy across 2016-17.
Off-payrollengagements
Cafcass conducts an annual review of the tax arrangements of all its off-payroll appointments
[54]
. All contractors
within the scope of this exercise are required to provide evidence of tax compliance. There have been no
known instances of non-tax compliant off-payroll engagements (brought to the attention of the organisation) as
at 31st March 2017. Further details of off-payroll engagements can be found in MoJ consolidated accounts.
Exitpackages
A summary of exit packages for employed staff through compensation schemes is set out below. No early exits
occurred in 2016-17.
Numberof
compulsory
redundancies
Numberofother
departuresagreed
Totalnumberofexit
packagesbycost
band
Exitpackagecostband 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16 2016-17 2015-16
Less than £10,000 0 38 0 0 0 38
£10,000-£25,000 0 7 0 0 0 7
£25,000-£50,000 0 0 0 0 0 0
£50,000-£100,000 0 0 0 0 0 0
£100,000-£150,000 0 0 0 1 0 1
£150,000-£200,000 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totalnumberofexitpackagesbytype 45 0 1 0 46
Total resource cost (£000) 0 249 0 161 0 410
Pensioncosts
Cafcass participates in the West Yorkshire Pension Fund (WYPF) scheme and the Principal Civil Service Pension
Scheme (PCSPS). The WYPF scheme is a multi-employer dened benet scheme in which Cafcass’ share of the
underlying assets and liabilities are identied.
The current contribution rate was previously determined by the independent fund actuaries, Aon Hewitt
Limited, at the time of the 2013 revaluation. The contribution rate for 2016-17 is 15.8%. The contribution rate
is based on a combination of future service and the effects of past service decits and ill-health retirements.
Employer’s contributions to the scheme for the year to March 2017 amounted to £12.590m (costs relating to
the voluntary early retirement programme were nil) with 1,770 employees participating in the scheme (2015-
16: employer’s contributions: £12.864m, voluntary early retirement: £0.038m, participating employees 1,780).
[54] ‘Payroll’ includes employed staff, bank and sessional workers; ‘off-payroll’ includes agency staff and Self-Employed Contractors.
[55] As at March 2017 there were no early exits. However a cost of £0.070m was incurred during the 2016-17 nancial year which relates
to the 2015-16 early exits. The accrued 2015-16 early exit severances were calculated based on an average of 26 early exits at a cost of
£0.410m. Following deployment and actual exits, the nal number of early exits was 18, with actual payment of £0.480m.
0
[55]
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
60
Section 2 | The accountability report | Remuneration and staff report
The last independent actuarial valuation of the WYPF scheme was on 31st March 2016 and revealed that the
scheme was 87% funded in relation to past service. The valuation is based on assets and liabilities at 31st
March 2016. Following the actuarial valuation, the revised employer contribution rates for Cafcass have been
set as follows:
Contributionrate%
Additionalcash
contribution
Year2017-18 16.2% £3.1268m
Year2018-19 16.2% £3.2284m
Year2019-20 16.2% £3.3333m
The PCSPS is an unfunded multi-employer dened benet scheme for which Cafcass is unable to identify its
share of the underlying assets and liabilities. The scheme’s actuary reviews employer contributions every four
years following a full scheme valuation. A full actuarial valuation was carried out as at 31st March 2012 and
revised contribution rates applied from 1st April 2015. Full details can be found at www.civilservice.gov.uk/
pensions.
For 2016-17, employer’s contributions of £0.042m (2015-16: £0.052m) were payable to the PCSPS at 22.10%
of pensionable pay, based on salary bands.
The contribution rates reect benets as they are accrued, not when the costs are actually incurred and reect
past experience of the scheme.
Secon 2.2
The accountability report
Parliamentary Accountability and Audit
report
This secon shows how we have spent the money
provided to us by Parliament. It also shows that our
annual report and accounts have been audited.
Overview
Summary
Our accounts
The Statement of Accounts of Cafcass for the year ending 31st March 2017 has been prepared in a form
directed by the Secretary of State with the consent of the Treasury, in accordance with the Accounts Direction
dated 12th April 2002 given under Schedule 2, paragraph 13(2) of the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act
2000.
The Accounts are audited by the Comptroller and Auditor General, who is appointed by statute. The audit fee is
£52,500 for 2016-17 (£55,000 2015-16). There have been no non-audit services during 2016-17.
Financial commentary on how we spent our budget is set out in Section 1.1.
Treatment of pension liabilies
Employees of Cafcass are members of the West Yorkshire Pension Fund (WYPF), which is funded on a pay-
as-you-go basis. A small number of Cafcass staff retained membership of the Principal Civil Service Pension
Scheme (PCSPS) by virtue of their earlier employment with one of Cafcass’ predecessor organisations.
The amount charged to the staff costs for the PCSPS represents the contributions payable to the scheme in
respect of current employees in the accounting period. Contributions are charged on a year-by-year basis in
accordance with the requirements of the scheme administrators.
The assets of the WYPF, which is a dened benet scheme, are held separately from those of Cafcass.
The scheme assets are measured at realisable value. Scheme liabilities are measured using a projected unit
method and discounted at the current rate of return on a high-quality corporate bond of equivalent term and
currency to the liability.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
62
Section 2 | The accountability report | Parliamentary Accountability and Audit report
The pension scheme surplus (to the extent that it is considered recoverable) or decit is recognised in full on
the face of the Statement of Financial Position. The movement in the scheme surplus/decit is split between
operating charges (within staff costs) and reserves in the case of actuarial gains and losses.
Net interest receivable on pension scheme assets is shown in operating cash ows.
Long-term liabilies
There have been no signicant changes in the organisation’s long-term liabilities.
Remote conngent liabilies
[56]
There are no remote contingent liabilities.
Long-term expenditure trends
There have been no signicant changes in the organisation’s long-term expenditure trends.
Regularity of expenditure: losses and special
payments
[57]
2016-17 2015-16
£000 Number of cases £000 Number of cases
Losses statement
Administrative write-offs 5 3 2 3
Fruitless payments 71 28 46 47
Totalvalueoflosses 76 31 48 50
Specialpayments
Compensation payments 35 2 5 1
Totalspecialpayments 35 2 5 1
Totallossesandspecialpayments 111 33 53 51
There were £0.111m of losses and special payments charged to the Accounts as at 31st March 2017 (2015-16:
£0.053m). The actual cash amount paid in the period was £0.478m (2015-16: £0.058m). These payments were
made in accordance with HM Treasury guidance.
[56] This information has been audited.
[57] This information has been audited.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
63
Section 2 | The accountability report | Parliamentary Accountability and Audit report
The Cercate and Report of the Comptroller
and Auditor General to the Houses of Parliament
The Certicate and Report of the Comptroller and Auditor General to the Houses of Parliament is on page 64.
Signed: Anthony Douglas CBE
Cafcass Chief Executive and Accounting Ofcer
Date: 15th June 2017
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
64
Section 2 | The accountability report
The Cercate and Report of the Comptroller
and Auditor General to the Houses of Parliament
I certify that I have audited the nancial statements of the Children and Family Court Advisory Support
Service (Cafcass) for the year ended 31 March 2017 under the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act
2000. The nancial statements comprise: the Statements of Comprehensive Net Expenditure, Financial
Position, Cash Flows, Changes in Taxpayers’ Equity, and the related notes. These nancial statements
have been prepared under the accounting policies set out within them. I have also audited the information
in the Remuneration and Staff Report and the Parliamentary Accountability Disclosures that is described in
that report as having been audited.
RespectiveresponsibilitiesoftheBoard,AccountingOfcerandauditor
As explained more fully in the Statement of Accounting Ofcer’s responsibilities, the Board and the
Accounting Ofcer are responsible for the preparation of the nancial statements and for being satised
that they give a true and fair view. My responsibility is to audit, certify and report on the nancial
statements in accordance with the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000. I conducted my audit in
accordance with International Standards on Auditing (UK and Ireland). Those standards require me and
my staff to comply with the Auditing Practices Board’s Ethical Standards for Auditors.
Scopeoftheauditofthenancialstatements
An audit involves obtaining evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the nancial statements
sufcient to give reasonable assurance that the nancial statements are free from material misstatement,
whether caused by fraud or error. This includes an assessment of: whether the accounting policies are
appropriate to the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service’s circumstances and have been
consistently applied and adequately disclosed; the reasonableness of signicant accounting estimates
made by Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service; and the overall presentation of the nancial
statements. In addition I read all the nancial and non-nancial information in the Annual Report to
identify material inconsistencies with the audited nancial statements and to identify any information that
is apparently materially incorrect based on, or materially inconsistent with, the knowledge acquired by
me in the course of performing the audit. If I become aware of any apparent material misstatements or
inconsistencies I consider the implications for my certicate.
I am required to obtain evidence sufcient to give reasonable assurance that the expenditure and income
recorded in the nancial statements have been applied to the purposes intended by Parliament and the
nancial transactions recorded in the nancial statements conform to the authorities which govern them.
Opiniononregularity
In my opinion, in all material respects the expenditure and income recorded in the nancial statements
have been applied to the purposes intended by Parliament and the nancial transactions recorded in the
nancial statements conform to the authorities which govern them.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
65
Section 2 | The accountability report
Opiniononnancialstatements
In my opinion:
· the nancial statements give a true and fair view of the state of the Children and Family Court Advisory
Support Service’s affairs as at 31st March 2017 and of the net expenditure for the year then ended;
and
· the nancial statements have been properly prepared in accordance with the Criminal Justice and Court
Services Act 2000 and Secretary of State directions issued thereunder.
Opiniononothermatters
In my opinion:
· the parts of the Remuneration and Staff Report and the Parliamentary Accountability disclosures to
be audited has been properly prepared in accordance with Secretary of State directions made under
the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000; and
· the information given in Performance Report and Accountability Report for the nancial year for which
the nancial statements are prepared is consistent with the nancial statements.
MattersonwhichIreportbyexception
I have nothing to report in respect of the following matters which I report to you if, in my opinion:
· adequate accounting records have not been kept or returns adequate for my audit have not been
received from branches not visited by my staff; or
· the nancial statements and the parts of the Remuneration and Staff Report and the Parliamentary
Accountability disclosures to be audited are not in agreement with the accounting records and returns;
or
· I have not received all of the information and explanations I require for my audit; or
· the Governance Statement does not reect compliance with HM Treasury’s guidance.
Report
I have no observations to make on these nancial statements.
Sir Amyas C E Morse
Comptroller and Auditor General
13th July 2017
National Audit Ofce
157-197 Buckingham Palace Road
Victoria
London
SW1W 9SP
Secon 3
2016-17 Annual Accounts
Financial statements
2016-17 2015-16
Note £000 £000 £000 £000
Expenditure
Staff costs (80,867) (84,643)
Past pension service cost 4 (124) 0
Total staff costs 4 (80,991) (84,643)
Self-Employed Contractors and agency staff 20 (8,804) (6,462)
Depreciation and amortisation 7/8 (406) (407)
Partnerships 21 (2,105) (2,023)
Other expenditure 5 (22,650) (24,009)
(114,956) (117,544)
Income
Income from activities 3/6 141 159
141 159
Net expenditure (114,815) (117,385)
Net interest cost 22 (5,432) (5,390)
Net expenditure after interest 3 (120,247) (122,775)
Othercomprehensiveexpenditure
Net gain on revaluation of property, plant and equipment 7 59 46
Net gain on revaluation of intangible assets 8 123 29
Re-measurement of pension benets (20,057) 15,817
Totalcomprehensiveexpenditureforyearended
31stMarch2017
(140,122) (106,883)
The Notes on pages 69 to 84 form part of these Accounts.
StatementofComprehensiveNetExpenditureforyearended31stMarch
2017
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
67
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
StatementofFinancialPositionasat31stMarch2017
31stMarch2017 31stMarch2016
Note £000 £000 £000 £000
Non-currentassets
Property, plant and equipment 7 897 863
Intangible assets 8 1,057 1,315
Totalnon-currentassets 3 1,954 2,178
Currentassets
Trade and other receivables 11 3,284 3,541
Othercurrentassets
Cash and cash equivalents 12 1,362 726
Totalcurrentassets 4,646 4,267
Total assets 6,600 6,445
Currentliabilities
Trade and other payables 13 (6,085) (6,465)
Totalcurrentliabilities (6,085) (6,465)
Non-currentassetslessnetcurrentliabilities
515 (20)
Non-currentliabilities
Provisions 14 (2,002) (2,175)
Pension liabilities 22 (191,853) (166,069)
Totalnon-currentliabilities (193,855) (168,244)
Assetslessliabilities (193,340) (168,264)
Taxpayers’equity
General reserve (194,703) (169,484)
Revaluation reserve 1,363 1,220
(193,340) (168,264)
The Financial Statements on pages 66 to 84 were approved by the Board on 15th June 2017 and signed on its
behalf by:
Signed: Anthony Douglas CBE
Cafcass Chief Executive and Accounting Ofcer
Date: 15th June 2017
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
68
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
StatementofCashFlowsforyearended31stMarch2017
2016-17 2015-16
Note £000 £000
Cashowsfromoperatingactivities
Net expenditure after interest 3 (120,247) (122,775)
Depreciation and amortisation 7/8 406 407
Decrease/(increase) in trade and other receivables 11 257 (1,298)
Decrease in trade payables 13 (380) (1,888)
In year additional pension cost 5,727 7,059
Decrease in provisions 14 (173) (146)
Netcashoutowfromoperatingactivities (114,410) (118,641)
Cashowsfromnancingactivities
Grant-in-Aid from parent department for resource expenditure 113,500 116,300
Other grant funding received 1,546 1,369
Netcashinowfromnancingactivities 115,046 117,669
Netincrease/(decrease)incashandcashequivalentsintheperiod
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period 12 726 1,698
Cashandcashequivalentsattheendoftheperiod 12 1,362 726
StatementofChangesinTaxpayers’Equityasat31stMarch2017
General
reserve
Revaluation
reserve
Total
Note £000 £000 £000
Balanceat1stApril2016 (169,484) 1,220 (168,264)
Changesintaxpayers’equity
Net gain on revaluation of property, plant and equipment 7 0 59 59
Net gain on revaluation of intangible assets 8 0 123 123
Release of revaluation reserve to general reserve due to disposals 39 (39) 0
Net expenditure after interest 3 (120,247) 0 (120,247)
Pension fund actuarial losses (20,057) 0 (20,057)
Totalcomprehensiveexpenditure (140,265) 143 (140,122)
Grant-in-Aid from parent department for resource expenditure 113,500 0 113,500
Other grant funding received 1,546 0 1,546
Balanceat31stMarch2017 (194,703) 1,363 (193,340)
Balanceat1stApril2015 (180,202) 1,152 (179,050)
Changesintaxpayers’equity
Net gain on revaluation of property, plant and equipment 7 0 46 46
Net gain on revaluation of intangible assets 8 0 29 29
Release of revaluation reserve to general reserve due to disposals 7 (7) 0
Net expenditure after interest 3 (122,775) 0 (122,775)
Pension fund actuarial gains 15,817 0 15,817
Totalcomprehensiveexpenditure (106,951) 68 (106,883)
Grant-in-Aid from parent department for resource expenditure 116,300 0 116,300
Other grant funding received 1,369 0 1,369
Balanceat31stMarch2016 (169,484) 1,220 (168,264)
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
69
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
NotestotheAccountsfortheyearended31stMarch2017
1AAccountingpolicies
These Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with the 2016-17 Government Financial
Reporting Manual (FReM) issued by HM Treasury. The accounting policies contained in the FReM apply
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adapted or interpreted for the public sector context.
Where the FReM permits a choice of accounting policy, the accounting policy which is judged to be most
appropriate to the particular circumstances of Cafcass for the purpose of giving a true and fair view has been
selected.
The particular policies adopted by Cafcass for 2016-17 are described below. They have been applied
consistently in dealing with items that are considered material to the Accounts.
a)Accountingconvention
The Accounts are prepared under the historical cost convention, modied to include assets at their value to
the business by reference to current costs. Without limiting the information given, the Accounts meet the
accounting and disclosure requirements of the Companies Act 2006 and accounting standards issued or
adopted by the Accounting Standards Board insofar as those requirements are relevant. The Accounts are also
fully consistent with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).
b)Goingconcern
Parliament has voted Grant-in-Aid to Cafcass for the 12 months following the Statement of Financial Position
date. Therefore, despite the Statement of Financial Position of net liabilities, Cafcass operates as a going
concern.
c)Property,plantandequipment
Freehold land and buildings were revalued in 2016-17 by reference to current cost indices as specied by the
Valuation Ofce Agency (VOA).
Freehold land and buildings were last physically revalued by the Valuation Ofce Agency (VOA) as at 31st
March 2015 in accordance with the RICS Appraisal and Valuation Manual published by the Royal Institution of
Chartered Surveyors, insofar as this is consistent with current Treasury accounting guidance.
Freehold properties are subject to physical revaluation by the VOA at least every three years and by indexation
using current cost indices during intervening years. Leasehold land and buildings and associated improvements
are not subject to revaluation or indexation.
Other property, plant and equipment, except for leasehold property, have been stated at their value to the
business using appropriate indices published by the Ofce for National Statistics (ONS).
Revaluations above the depreciated historic cost of these assets are credited to a revaluation reserve.
Any downward revaluation of property, plant and equipment below the asset’s depreciated historic cost is
recognised when it occurs through the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure.
Property, plant and equipment include those assets costing £2,500 or more. Individual items valued at less than
the threshold are capitalised if they constitute integral parts of a composite asset that is in total valued at more
than the threshold. Furniture and ttings are not capitalised but fully expensed in the year of acquisition.
d)Intangiblexedassets
Intangible assets consist of software, software licenses and website and intranet costs. These have been stated
at their value to the business using appropriate indices published by the ONS.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
70
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Revaluations above the amortised historic cost of these assets are credited to a revaluation reserve. Any
downward revaluation of intangible assets below the asset’s amortised historic cost is recognised when it occurs
through the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure.
Intangible assets include those assets costing £2,500 or more. Individual items valued at less than the
threshold are capitalised if they constitute integral parts of a composite asset that is in total valued at more
than the threshold.
Intangible assets are periodically reviewed to ensure that they have been accurately stated at their value to the
business.
e)Depreciationandamortisation
Freehold land is not depreciated.
Depreciation is provided to write-off property, plant and equipment and amortisation to write-off intangible
assets by instalments, on a straight line basis, over their expected useful lives or for leased assets, over the life
of the lease.
Due to the Flex contract initiating laptop replacements, additional depreciation has been applied in the
Accounts consistent with the reduction in life of existing Flexed laptops from ve years to the estimated
replacement date. Non-Flexed laptops continue to be depreciated over ve years.
Expected useful lives are as follows:
Freehold buildings Up to 60 years
Leasehold land and buildings Up to 50 years, or over the term of the lease
Leasehold improvements Over the term of the lease
Ofce equipment Seven years
Information technology Five years
Laptops under Flex Estimated replacement date
Laptops (non-Flex) Five years
f)Pensions
Employees of Cafcass are members of the West Yorkshire Pension Fund (WYPF), which is funded on a pay-
as-you-go basis. A small number of Cafcass staff retained membership of the Principal Civil Service Pension
Scheme (PCSPS) by virtue of their earlier employment with one of Cafcass’ predecessor organisations.
The amount charged to the staff costs for the PCSPS represents the contributions payable to the scheme in
respect of current employees in the accounting period. Contributions are charged on a year-by-year basis in
accordance with the requirements of the scheme administrators.
The assets of the WYPF, which is a dened benet scheme, are held separately from those of Cafcass.
The scheme assets are measured at realisable value. Scheme liabilities are measured using a projected unit
method and discounted at the current rate of return on a high-quality corporate bond of equivalent term and
currency to the liability. All estimates are performed by actuaries and in accordance with IAS 19.
The pension scheme surplus (to the extent that it is considered recoverable) or decit is recognised in full on
the face of the Statement of Financial Position. The movement in the scheme surplus / decit is split between
operating charges (within staff costs) and reserves in the case of actuarial gains and losses.
Net interest receivable on pension scheme assets is shown in operating cash ows.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
71
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
g)Grant-in-Aid
Grant-in-Aid, used to nance activities and expenditure that supports the statutory and other objectives of
Cafcass, is treated as nancing and credited to the general reserve, because it is regarded as contributions
from a controlling party.
Other grant funding (Contact Services funding) is used to provide grants to Child Contact Centres and is also
treated as nancing and credited to the general reserve.
h)Incomefromactivities
Income from activities is generated from training, student placements and one-off receipts in the year. Income
is recognised on the issuing of an invoice. All income is stated net of VAT.
i)Insurance
With the exception of comprehensive insurance on contract lease and hire vehicles, Cafcass does not insure but
carries its own risks for re, accidental damage and similar accidents and claims at common law.
j)Operatingleases
Rentals under operating leases are charged to the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure on a straight-
line basis over the lease term.
k)AccountingforValueAddedTax
Cafcass is registered for VAT. It is unable to recover most of the VAT incurred on expenditure, although a
small amount of VAT can be recovered where it is related to the costs recovered in court cases. Expenditure is
therefore stated inclusive of any irrecoverable VAT.
l)Financialinstruments
Cafcass does not hold any complex nancial instruments. The only nancial instruments included in the
Accounts are receivables and payables (notes 11 and 13).
Financial assets comprise trade receivable and other receivables. Receivables are recognised at carrying value,
reduced by appropriate allowances for estimated irrecoverable amounts.
Trade creditors are short term and are stated at carrying value in recognition that these liabilities fall due within
one year.
m)Provisions
A provision is recognised in the Statement of Financial Position when Cafcass has a present legal or constructive
obligation arising from past events, and it is probable that an outow of economic benets will be required to
settle the obligation.
2Changeofaccountingpolicy
There have been no signicant changes to the accounting policies, as described in Cafcass’ 2015-16 Annual
Report and Accounts.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
72
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
3Analysisofnetexpenditurebysegment
Operational
serviceareas
Other Total
£000 £000 £000
2016-17
Gross expenditure 77,494 42,894 120,388
Income (2) (139) (141)
Netexpenditure 77,492 42,755 120,247
Non-currentassets 887 1,067 1,954
2015-16
Gross expenditure 79,960 42,974 122,934
Income (158) (1) (159)
Netexpenditure 79,802 42,973 122,775
Non-currentassets 845 1,333 2,178
‘Operational service areas’ and ‘Other’ reect the structure of the standard monthly management information
provided to Cafcass’ chief operating decision makers.
There was no capital expenditure in 2016-17 (2015-16: £nil).
4Staffcosts
CafcassBoard
members
Corporate
National
Ofcestaff
Regional
staff
Total
Note £000 £000 £000 £000
2016-17
Salaries and wages 128 5,113 55,224 60,465
Social security costs 7 550 5,929 6,486
Current service cost 22 0 4,399 8,462 12,861
Other pension costs 0 (68) 0 (68)
Past pension service cost 22 0 12 112 124
Totalpayrollcosts 135 10,006 69,727 79,868
Temporary staff costs 0 51 1,072 1,123
Inward secondee costs 0 0 0 0
Totalstaffcosts 135 10,057 70,799 80,991
2015-16
Salaries and wages 138 5,707 57,780 63,625
Social security costs 7 461 4,793 5,261
Current service cost 22 0 4,424 10,118 14,542
Other pension costs 0 41 0 41
Past pension service cost 22 0 0 0 0
Totalpayrollcosts 145 10,633 72,691 83,469
Temporary staff costs 0 26 1,144 1,170
Inward secondee costs 0 4 0 4
Totalstaffcosts 145 10,663 73,835 84,643
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
73
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
5Otherexpenditure
2016-17 2015-16
Note £000 £000
Outsourced nance and ITC services 9,115 9,272
Accommodation costs 6,126 6,571
Travel and subsistence 2,744 2,983
Telecommunications and postage 1,135 1,444
Ofce supplies, printing and stationary 729 890
Legal costs 577 457
Staff related costs 373 389
Interpreters and translators 371 402
Training costs 248 341
Fuel and utilities 204 265
Vehicle costs 164 162
Internal audit costs 151 144
Recruitment costs 94 103
External audit costs 53 55
Other provisions no longer required 14 (246) (341)
Other 812 872
22,650 24,009
6Income
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Training 133 158
Award of court costs (1) 0
Other income 9 1
141 159
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
74
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
7Property,plantandequipment
Land and
buildings
excluding
dwellings
Leasehold
land,
buildingsand
improvements
Information
technology
andtelecoms
Ofce
equipment
Total
£000 £000 £000 £000 £000
2016-17
Costorvaluation
As at 01/04/16 970 521 3,007 22 4,520
Disposals 0 0 0 0 0
Revaluations 55 0 4 0 59
As at 31/03/17 1,025 521 3,011 22 4,579
Depreciation
As at 01/04/16 126 520 2,989 22 3,657
Charged in year 12 0 13 0 25
Disposals 0 0 0 0 0
As at 31/03/17 138 520 3,002 22 3,682
NBVasat31/03/17 887 1 9 0 897
NBVasat31/03/16 844 1 18 0 863
Assetnancing
Owned 887 1 9 0 897
NBV as at 31/03/17 887 1 9 0 897
2015-16
Costorvaluation
As at 01/04/15 925 521 3,030 22 4,498
Disposals 0 0 (24) 0 (24)
Revaluations 45 0 1 0 46
As at 31/03/16 970 521 3,007 22 4,520
Depreciation
As at 01/04/15 115 520 2,998 22 3,655
Charged in year 11 0 15 0 26
Disposals 0 0 (24) 0 (24)
As at 31/03/16 126 520 2,989 22 3,657
NBVasat31/03/16 844 1 18 0 863
NBVasat31/03/15 810 1 32 0 843
Assetnancing
Owned 844 1 18 0 863
NBV as at 31/03/16 844 1 18 0 863
Freehold land as at 31st March 2017 was valued at £0.330m (2015-16: £0.315m).
The property values have been provided on the basis of Existing Use Value (EUV), apportioned between the
land and the buildings with an assessment of the remaining life of the latter (Practice Statement 4.3).
Property valuations do not include any notional directly attributable acquisition costs and have not been
reduced for any expected selling costs, as they are not considered material to the valuations.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
75
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
8Intangibleassets
Information
technology
Software
licences
Websites
thatdeliver
services
Total
£000 £000 £000 £000
2016-17
Costorvaluation
As at 01/04/16 2,360 205 89 2,654
Disposals (147) (26) 0 (173)
Revaluations 120 3 0 123
As at 31/03/17 2,333 182 89 2,604
Amortisation
As at 01/04/16 1,071 179 89 1,339
Charged in year 371 10 0 381
Disposals (147) (26) 0 (173)
As at 31/03/17 1,295 163 89 1,547
NBVasat31/03/17 1,038 19 0 1,057
NBVasat31/03/16 1,289 26 0 1,315
2015-16
Costorvaluation
As at 01/04/15 2,331 205 89 2,625
Disposals 0 0 0 0
Revaluations 29 0 0 29
As at 31/03/16 2,360 205 89 2,654
Amortisation
As at 01/04/15 700 169 89 958
Charged in year 371 10 0 381
Disposals 0 0 0 0
As at 31/03/16 1,071 179 89 1,339
NBVasat31/03/16 1,289 26 0 1,315
NBVasat31/03/15 1,631 36 0 1,667
9Financialinstruments
As the cash requirements of Cafcass are met through the Estimates process, nancial instruments play a more
limited role in creating and managing risk than would apply to a non-public sector body.
The majority of nancial instruments relate to contracts to buy non-nancial items in line with the non-
departmental public bodies’ (NDPBs) expected purchase and usage requirements and the NDPB is therefore
exposed to minimal credit, liquidity or market risk.
10Impairments
There were no impairments in 2016-17 (2015-16: £nil).
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
76
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
2015-16
Balance at 1st April 2015 7 1,691 1,698
Net change in cash and cash equivalent balance (1) (971) (972)
Balance at 31st March 2016 6 720 726
Thefollowingbalancesat31stMarch2016wereheldat:
Government Banking Service and cash in hand 6 720 726
Balance at 31st March 2016 6 720 726
11Tradereceivablesandothercurrentassets
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Amountsfallingduewithinoneyear
Other receivables 1,569 1,907
Provision for bad debts (2) (2)
Prepayments 1,715 1,634
Travel advances 2 2
3,284 3,541
12Cashandcashequivalents
Cash Bank Total
£000 £000 £000
2016-17
Balance at 1st April 2016 6 720 726
Net change in cash and cash equivalent balance (1) 637 636
Balance at 31st March 2017 5 1,357 1,362
Thefollowingbalancesat31stMarch2017wereheldat:
Government Banking Service and cash in hand 5 1,357 1,362
Balance at 31st March 2017 5 1,357 1,362
13Tradepayablesandothercurrentliabilities
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Amountsfallingduewithinoneyear
Taxation and social security 0 5
Trade payables 1,794 1,056
Other payables
92 138
Accruals and deferred income 3,906 4,897
Annual leave accrual 293 369
6,085 6,465
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
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Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
2015-16
Balance at 1st April 2015 181 2,140 2,321
Provided in the year 0 292 292
Provisions not required written back (109) (232) (341)
Provision utilised in the year (46) (51) (97)
Balance at 31st March 2016 26 2,149 2,175
Analysisofexpectedtimingofdiscountedows
Not later than one year 26 1,750 1,776
Later than one year and not later than ve years 0 365 365
Later than ve years 0 34 34
26 2,149 2,175
IAS 37 requires the recognition of a provision (a liability that is of uncertain timing or amount) when it exists at
the Statement of Financial Position date. It must therefore full the criteria of being a present obligation arising
from a previous event, where it is probable there will be a transfer of economic benets to settle the obligation
and where a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Cafcass makes provisions for legal
or constructive obligations (liabilities), which are of uncertain timing or amount at the Statement of Financial
Position date, on the basis of the best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the obligation.
Employmentclaims
Employment claims relate to employment tribunal cases that are likely to be brought against Cafcass, which
may or may not result in court attendance.
Dilapidations
Cafcass operates from a number of leasehold properties which include provision for the payment of
dilapidations on exit from the premises.
Cafcass considers it appropriate to recognise these liabilities through the creation of a provision whilst premises
are in active use, and to accrue for these liabilities once settlement has been agreed.
Provisions have been maintained for these using actual information and industry information on the most likely
costs for dilapidations per square metre.
14Provisionsforliabilitiesandcharges
Employment
claims
Dilapidations Total
£000 £000 £000
2016-17
Balance at 1st April 2016 26 2,149 2,175
Provided in the year 146 77 223
Provisions not required written back (26) (220) (246)
Provision utilised in the year 0 (150) (150)
Balance at 31st March 2017 146 1,856 2,002
Analysisofexpectedtimingofdiscountedows
Not later than one year 146 1,548 1,694
Later than one year and not later than ve years 0 264 264
Later than ve years 0 44 44
146 1,856 2,002
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
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Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Other
Not later than one year 111 152
Later than one year and not later than ve years
47 104
Later than ve years 0 0
158 256
Financeleases
There were no nance leases as at 31st March 2017 (2015-16:£nil).
17Othernancialcommitments
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Not later than one year 5,826 7,520
Later than one year and not later than ve years
1,456 9,400
Later than ve years 0 0
7,282 16,920
Cafcass signed a seven-year contract with Fujitsu ending December 2016 to provide an integrated information
and communication technology service across the organisation. This contract has now been extended for a
further 18 months until June 2018.
18Relatedpartytransactions
Cafcass is an executive non-departmental public body that is sponsored by the Department. The Department
as such is regarded as a related party. During 2016-17, Cafcass had various material transactions with the
Department, including the receipt of £115.046m grant funding from the Department (2015-16: £117.669m).
Transactions with the Department not related to Grant-in-Aid or other funding totalled £0.106m (2015-16:
£0.087m), which relates to internal audit service charges as at 31st March 2017.
15Capitalcommitments
There were no material contracted capital commitments as at 31st March 2017 (2015-16: £nil).
16Commitmentsunderleases
Operatingleasescommitments
Total future minimum lease payments under operating leases are given in the table below for each of the
following periods.
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Obligationsunderoperatingleasescomprise:
Buildings
Not later than one year 3,185 3,365
Later than one year and not later than ve years
2,912 3,846
Later than ve years 383 949
6,480 8,160
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
79
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Cafcass does have occasional small transactions with other Central Government bodies and Local Authorities
that are considered not to be material.
All payments made to senior managerial staff are disclosed in the Remuneration Report.
A register of interest is held for all Board Members and there were no material related party transactions
with Board Members or the Corporate Management Team during the year other than those associated with
remuneration for normal duties.
19EventsafterStatementofFinancialPositiondate
The Financial Statements were authorised for issue on the 14th July 2017 by Anthony Douglas CBE (Chief
Executive and Accounting Ofcer).
20Self-EmployedContractors
In 2016-17 we contracted the services of 103 Self-Employed Contractors (2015-16: 85), of which amounts paid
amounted to £2.507m in the year (2015-16: £2.096m).
As Self-Employed Contractors, they are ordinarily responsible for meeting travel, ofce and all other expenses
related to their work, as well as related tax and national insurance liabilities.
In addition to this, agency staff costs amounted to £6.297m in the year (2015-16: £4.366m).
21Partnershipcosts
Partnership costs of £2.105m (2015-16: £2.023m) represent the cost of services provided by Cafcass through
third party organisations such as contact centres and mediation centres.
Expenditure on partnerships’ Court ordered contact activities are shown net of expenditure claimed back and
received from the Department.
In addition to Cafcass’ baseline partnership budget, in 2016-17 Cafcass received additional funding of £1.546m
from the Department (2015-16: £1.369m).
22Pensionliabilities
WYPF’s actuary, Aon Hewitt Limited, carried out an IAS 19 valuation for Cafcass as at 31st March 2017.
The assets of the scheme are held separately from those of Cafcass and are invested in managed funds.
Cafcass accounts for scheme liabilities in accordance with IAS 19 – Employee benets. The in-year current
service cost has been reected in the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure.
In addition to the disclosure contained in the Financial Statements, the following disclosures are in accordance
with that standard.
Introduction
The disclosures below relate to the funded liabilities within the West Yorkshire Pension Fund (the Fund) which
is part of the Local Government Pension Scheme (the LGPS).
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80
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
The LGPS is a funded dened benet plan with benets earned up to 31st March 2014 being linked to nal
salary. Benets after 31st March 2014 are based on a Career Average Revalued Earnings scheme. Details of
the benets earned over the period covered by this disclosure are set out in ‘The Local Government Pension
Scheme Regulations 2013’ and ‘The Local Government Pension Scheme (Transitional Provisions, Savings and
Amendment) Regulations 2014’.
Funding/governancearrangementsoftheLGPS
The funded nature of the LGPS requires participating employers and its employees to pay contributions into the
Fund, calculated at a level intended to balance the pension liabilities with investment assets. Information on the
framework for calculating contributions to be paid is set out in LGPS Regulations 2013 and the Fund’s Funding
Strategy Statement. The last actuarial valuation was at 31st March 2016 and the contributions to be paid until
31st March 2020 resulting from that valuation are set out in the Fund’s Rates and Adjustment Certicate. An
actuarial valuation of the Fund was carried out at 31st March 2016 and as part of that valuation a new Rates
and Adjustment Certicate was produced for the three year period from 1st April 2017.
The Fund Administering Authority, City of Bradford Metropolitan District Council is responsible for the
governance of the Fund.
Assets
The assets allocated to the Employer in the Fund are notional and are assumed to be invested in line with the
investments of the Fund for the purposes of calculating the return to be applied to those notional assets over
the accounting period. The Fund is large and holds a signicant proportion of its assets in liquid investments.
As a consequence there will be no signicant restriction on realising assets if a large payment is required to
be paid from the Fund in relation to an employers liabilities. The assets are invested in a diversied spread
of investments and the approximate split of assets for the Fund as a whole (based on data supplied by the
Administering Authority) is shown in the disclosures split by quoted and unquoted investments.
The Administering Authority may invest a small proportion of the Fund’s investments in the assets of some of
the employers participating in the Fund if it forms part of their balanced investment strategy.
RisksassociatedwiththeFundinrelationtoaccounting
Assetvolatility
The liabilities used for accounting purposes are calculated using a discount rate set with reference to corporate
bond yields. If assets underperform a decit will be created from this yield in the Accounts. The Fund holds a
signicant proportion of growth assets which while expected to outperform corporate bonds in the long term
creates volatility and risk in the short term in relation to the accounting gures.
Changesinbondyield
A decrease in corporate bond yields will increase the value placed on the liabilities for accounting purposes
although this will be marginally offset by the increase in the assets as a result.
Inationrisk
The majority of the pension liabilities are linked to either pay or price ination. Higher ination expectations will
lead to a higher liability value. The assets are either unaffected or loosely correlated with ination meaning that
an increase in ination will increase the decit.
Lifeexpectancy
The majority of the Fund’s obligations are to provide benets for the life of the member following retirement, so
increases in life expectancy will result in an increase in the liabilities.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
81
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Exitingemployers
Employers who leave the Fund (or their guarantor) may have to make an exit payment to meet any shortfall in
assets against their pension liabilities. If the employer (or guarantor) is not able to meet this exit payment the
liability may in certain circumstances fall on other employers in the Fund. Further the assets at exit in respect
of ‘orphan liabilities’ may, in retrospect, not be sufcient to meet the liabilities. This risk may fall on other
employers. ‘Orphan liabilities’ are currently a small proportion of the overall liabilities in the Fund.
The amounts recognised in the Statement of Financial Position are as follows:
2017 2016
£000 £000
Present value of funded obligations (680,690) (570,663)
Fair value of plan assets
488,837 404,594
Net liability (191,853) (166,069)
The amounts recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure are as follows:
2017 2016
£000 £000
Current service cost 12,861 14,542
Past service cost
124 0
Service cost 12,985 14,542
Interest on obligation 19,199 18,222
Interest income on plan assets (13,767) (12,832)
Net interest cost 5,432 5,390
Expense recognised in the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure 18,417 19,932
Changes in the present value of the dened benet obligation are as follows:
2017 2016
£000 £000
Opening dened benet obligation 570,663 575,382
Current service cost
12,861 14,542
Interest on obligation
19,199 18,222
Member contributions 4,346 4,154
Past service cost 124 0
Actuarial loss/(gain) due to changes in nancial assumptions 126,512 (20,448)
Actuarial gain due to changes in demographic assumptions (10,937) 0
Actuarial gain due to liability experience (25,482) (4,886)
Benets/transfers paid (16,596) (16,303)
Closing dened benet obligation 680,690 570,663
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82
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Changes in the fair value of plan assets are as follows:
2017 2016
£000 £000
Opening fair value of plan assets 404,594 400,555
Interest income on plan assets
13,767 12,832
Re-measurement gain/(loss) on assets 70,036 (9,517)
Contributions by employer 12,690 12,873
Member contributions 4,346 4,154
Benets/transfers paid (16,596) (16,303)
488,837 404,594
Asset allocation:
Quotedvalue
at31March
2017
Unquotedvalue
at31March
2017
Total at 31
March2017
Total at 31
March2016
Equities 70.3% 6.9% 77.2% 75.6%
Property
4.3% 0.0% 4.3% 4.9%
Government bonds 10.1% 0.0% 10.1% 10.3%
Corporate bonds 3.9% 0.0% 3.9% 4.6%
Cash 1.2% 0.0% 1.2% 1.3%
Other 1.4% 1.9% 3.3% 3.3%
91.2% 8.8% 100.0% 100.0%
Actual return on assets:
2016-17 2015-16
£000 £000
Interest income on plan assets 13,767 12,832
Re-measurement gain/(loss) on assets 70,036 (9,517)
83,803 3,315
The major nancial assumptions used in the valuation were:
2016-17 2015-16
Pension accounts revaluation rate 2.00% 1.80%
Rate of increase in salaries 3.10% 2.90%
Rate of increase in pensions 2.00% 1.80%
Nominal discount rate 2.50% 3.40%
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
83
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Estimatedpensionexpenseinfutureperiods
Analysis of amount charged to the Statement of Comprehensive Net Expenditure on the provision of services next year:
Yearending31
March2018
Yearending31
March2017
£000 £000
Current service cost 16,926 14,210
Interest on net dened benet liability
4,639 5,424
Totalestimatedpensionexpense 21,565 19,634
Allowance for administration expense included in current service cost 176 182
Estimated pensionable payroll over the period ending 31 March 2018 58,626 60,628
Sensitivityanalysis
The approximate impact of changing the key assumptions on the present value of the funded dened benet
obligation as at 31st March 2017 and the projected service cost for the year ending 31st March 2018 is set out
below.
Discount rate assumption:
Adjustment to discount rate +0.1%p.a. Basegure -0.1%p.a
£000 £000 £000
Present value of total obligation 669,289 680,690 692,286
% change in present value of total obligation
(1.7%) 1.7%
Projected service cost 16,458 16,926 17,404
Approximate % change in projected service cost (2.8%) 2.8%
Rate of general increase in salaries:
Adjustment to salary increase rate +0.1%p.a. Basegure -0.1%p.a
£000 £000 £000
Present value of total obligation 682,912 680,690 678,486
% change in present value of total obligation
0.3% (0.3%)
Projected service cost 16,926 16,926 16,926
Approximate % change in projected service cost 0.0% 0.0%
Rate of increase to pensions in payment and deferred pensions assumption, and rate of revaluation of pension accounts
assumption:
Adjustment to pension increase rate +0.1%p.a. Basegure -0.1%p.a
£000 £000 £000
Present value of total obligation 690,043 680,690 671,473
% change in present value of total obligation
1.4% (1.4%)
Projected service cost 17,404 16,926 16,458
Approximate % change in projected service cost 2.8% (2.8%)
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
84
Section 3 | 2016-17 Annual Accounts
Post retirement mortality assumption:
*Adjustment to mortality age rating assumption -1year Basegure +1 year
£000 £000 £000
Adjustment to pension increase rate 701,352 680,690 660,169
% change in present value of total obligation
3.0% (3.0%)
Projected service cost 17,579 16,926 16,278
Approximate % change in projected service cost 3.9% (3.9%)
*A rating of +1 year means that members are assumed to follow the mortality pattern of the base table for an
individual that is 1 year older than them.
23Contingentliabilities
GuaranteedMinimumPension(GMP)Equalisation
As at 31st March 2017 no allowance has been made in the Accounts for the potential increase in the
Guaranteed Minimum Pension (GMP) benets following the equalisation of the pension benets between male
and female scheme members. A consultation paper was issued on 28th November 2016 entitled “consultation
on indexation and equalisation of GMP in public service pension schemes” proposing three methods to address
the equalisation and as such until it is known how the GMP equalisation will be carried out an allowance cannot
be made (2015-16: £nil).
24Contingentassets
There were no qualifying contingent assets as at 31st March 2017 (2015-16: £nil).
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
85
Appendix and glossary
Appendix
HowourKeyPerformanceIndicators(KPIs)arecalculated
Source:All data is taken from the Electronic Case Management System (ECMS) which is a live national
database.
KPI1.Calculation method: Snapshot of total allocated public law care cases divided by snapshot of total open
public law care workload (open and ongoing cases not concluded). For monthly reporting the snapshot is taken
once a month at month end. Annual gures are an average of the 12 months. Assumptions: Allocated includes
cases allocated on substantive basis to a named practitioner.
KPI2.Calculation method: Counts all care cases allocated in the year and the total working days taken from
date the case was received to the date of the rst substantive allocation is recorded (date case received
counted as day 0). The total working days taken is then divided by the total number of cases to give an
average working days gure. Assumptions: Allocated only includes cases allocated on substantive basis to a
named practitioner.
KPI3.Calculation method: Snapshot of total allocated private law cases divided by snapshot of total open
private law workload (open and ongoing cases not concluded). For monthly reporting the snapshot is taken
once a month at month end. Annual gures are an average of the 12 months. Assumptions: Allocated includes
cases allocated on a duty or substantive basis to a named practitioner.
KPI4.Calculation method: The number of section 7 reports led by the agreed date, divided by the total
number of section 7 reports led.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
86
Appendix and glossary
Glossary
The Family Justice Young People’s Board (FJYPB) has created a glossary of the more commonly used terms and
words in family proceedings. We thank the FJYPB for allowing us to use this glossary to help readers
understand some of the terminology used in our Annual Report.
Adjournment– A decision made by the family court to hold the court hearing at another time because things
are not ready or people need more time to do something.
Adoptionorder – A type of order made by the family court which transfers parental responsibility to new,
adoptive parents and means that a child or young person is no longer legally the child of their birth parents. It
allows them to start a new family.
Agencystaff/workers – Social workers who do not normally work for Cafcass but will sometimes do work for
Cafcass during busy periods.
AreaQualityReview(AQR) – A way of measuring how well an area is working. People involved include the
Assistant Director/Heads of Service in that area. We hope that in the next three years there will be a AQR in
each Cafcass service area. The AQR ndings help form the action and development plans for that area.
Application – This is how a person asks the family court to help them.
Barrister – A legally trained person who advises people going through the family court and speaks for them in
court hearings.
Bankworkers – Social workers who do not normally work for Cafcass but will sometimes do work for Cafcass
during busy periods. These workers do not come through an agency.
ChildrenandFamilyCourtAdvisoryandSupportService(Cafcass)– This is an organisation which
works with children and young people and their families and then advises the family court on what it considers
to be in the best interests of each and every child.
Cafcassworker– Depending on what the family court have ordered Cafcass to do, the Cafcass worker
(sometimes known as a practitioner or ofcer) can be named one of two things: a Family Court Adviser or a
Children’s Guardian (for more detail look for their descriptions).
Careorder – An order made by the family court when the local authority can prove that a child or young
person living in their area is not being looked after properly.
CaseManagementConference– This is a hearing where the major issues for a child or young person are
talked about and the judge sets out how the family court case is going to proceed.
Childarrangementsorder– When people can’t agree on where a child might live or who they should see,
the family court might be asked to decide. The judge will look at what is best for the child or young person and
make a decision setting out what people must do. This replaces what used to be called contact and residence
or custody which you may have heard about.
Children’sGuardian – Sometimes when the problems within a family are really difcult then the family court
will ask for a Children’s Guardian to help them. The Children’s Guardian is an independent person who is there
to keep the court focused on what is best for the child or young person. They will also appoint a solicitor to act
for the young person in court.
Childcontactcentre – This is a safe place where children and young people can see a parent who they do
not live with. Usually, this allows for direct contact, supervised contact or supported contact.
Consentorder – an order made by the court where all parties in the case have agreed to what it says.
Cafcass Annual Report and Accounts 2016-17
87
Appendix and glossary
Contactorder – These orders allow a child or young person to visit, stay or have contact with the person who
has applied to court. (Instead of making this order, the family court will now make a child arrangements order).
Directcontact – When a child or young person can spend time with someone that they do not live with.
DomesticViolencePerpetratorsProgramme(DVPP) A course that helps adults who have been violent
towards another person learn how to control their anger.
EarlyInterventionTeams(EIT)– Early Intervention Teams operate in service areas, with Cafcass workers
carrying out safeguarding checks to inform the safeguarding letter we provide at the First Hearing.
ECMS– Electronic Case Management System, which stores Cafcass’ case-related information including
feedback and complaints.
Familyassistanceorder – An order which the family court can make to provide short term (usually six
months) support to a family who agree to it. This can be from a Cafcass worker or a social worker from the
local authority.
Familycourt– This is where important decisions are made about children, young people and their families.
It is different to criminal courts where people go when they might have done something wrong. Decisions in
the Family Court are made by judges or magistrates when people can’t agree about what is best for a child or
young person.
FamilyCourtAdviser(FCA)– Sometimes the family court may ask a family court adviser to meet with a
child or young people to talk about their wishes and feelings and to make sure the family court hears what they
have to say. The FCA also gives their view to the court about what is best for the child. FCAs do not need to
meet all children and young people because sometimes families can agree themselves on what is best.
FamilyGroupConference– All of the important people in a child’s life get together to check that they are
safe. It means that everyone knows what is happening and keeps them safe.
Final order – This is the last order made by the family court. The court expects all the people named in the
order to keep to it and do as it says and can punish adults if they don’t.
Fostercarer – People who give a home to children and young people who need a safe place to live. They
may have children of their own, or other foster children living with them, in which case you would all live in the
same house together.
Guardian’sreport– The family court will ask the Children’s Guardian to write a report to help it make
decisions about a child or young person. The report will include information on their wishes and feelings and a
recommendation from the Children’s Guardian on what they think is best for the child. The report will also
include information from the other people involved such as the parents and any other individuals such as
experts.
IndependentReviewingOfcer(IRO) – IROs help to make sure the best decisions are made for children
looked after by the local authority. Their main focus is to make sure that the care planning process for each
child or young person is meeting their needs and to ensure that his/her current wishes and feelings are given
full consideration.
Indirectcontact – A child or young person can use forms of contact such as letters, cards or gifts and is
often used to re-introduce a child to someone that they have not seen for some time.
Interimcareorder– This means that the local authority make decisions about a child rather than their own
parents for the short term, before the family court makes a nal order. The child will get a social worker to
make the decisions day to day.
IssuesResolutionHearing(IRH)– This is a special hearing where the family court decides which issues
need to be sorted out and hears arguments about which is a true version of events.
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Appendix and glossary
Judge– Sometimes families have problems which they might nd too hard to sort out by themselves. A judge
works in a family court, listens to everybody and then decides what is best for the child or young person
involved in the case. They have the nal say and will make the decision about that child or young person’s life.
LegalAdviser– A legally qualied person who helps magistrates in the family court apply the law. They do
not play any part in the decision making process but are there to advice.
Litigants-in-person– a party in a case who is self-representing i.e. they don’t have a solicitor.
Localauthority(alsoknownaschildren’ssocialcareorsocialservices) – This organisation is
responsible for making sure all children and young people in their local area are kept safe by the people who
care for them.
Magistrate – This person is a member of the community who volunteers to make decisions that affect
families, children and young people. They are similar to a judge but are not legally qualied. They are advised
on the law by their legal adviser.
Mediation – When people can’t agree, they go to another person to help them sort it out (a mediator). The
mediator talks to all and tries to help them nd an outcome that they are all happy with. This means that they
don’t have to go to the family court.
Non-molestationorder – This is a type of order the family court uses to keep adults, children and young
people safe from someone who has been violent toward them.
Parental order – an order which transfers legal parenthood from a surrogate to the intended parents.
Parentalresponsibility– Parental responsibility means all the rights, duties, and responsibilities that a parent
has to a child or young person. A person or the people with parental responsibility can make decisions about a
child such as who they will live with and what school they will attend.
Placementorder– An order which allows the local authority to place a child with suitable adopters following
care proceedings (even if the parents do not agree).
Pre-proceedings – work that is carried out by the local authority (sometimes involving Cafcass) before a
decision on making a care application is made.
Privatelaw – These cases are brought to the family court by private individuals, generally in connection with
divorce or parents’ separation. The family court may make a child arrangements order, prohibited steps order or
a specic issues order or no order at all.
Prohibitedstepsorder – A parent can be prevented by the family court from doing something the other
parent does not want them to do. The most common type is where one parent is stopped from moving abroad
with the child or young person.
Publiclaw– Public law cases are brought to the family court by local authorities where they are worried that
a child or young person is not being looked after safely. The family court may make a care order, a supervision
order, or no order at all.
Relinquishedbabiesandchildren– term used to describe where parents feel that adoption may be the
best option for providing a permanent, safe future for their child (the child is ‘relinquished).
Residenceorder – This order decides who the child is to live with, can give parental responsibility to any
adult who does not have it and will last until the young person is 16. (Instead of making this order, the family
court will now make a child arrangements order).
Rule16.4cases – These are particularly difcult or complicated family court cases where the Judge decides
to make the child a party to the case under rule 16.4 of the Family Procedure Rules 2010. A Cafcass Guardian
will be appointed to represent the child in the case.
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89
Appendix and glossary
Safeguardingletter – This is a letter that a Cafcass worker will write and send to the family court. They will
speak to the parties (usually the parents) and ask about the child or young person’s safety and any worries that
they might have.
Section37report – The family court orders Cafcass to produce this report because they are worried about a
child or young person and want to make sure that they are safe. It will involve a Cafcass worker usually visiting
the child and ensuring everything is okay at home.
Section7report– This report is ordered by the family court and makes either Cafcass or the local authority
investigate all the circumstances of the family, often including the wishes and feelings of a child or young
person, and send a report to the court.
Section16ARiskAssessment– a duty held by Cafcass ofcers to undertake a risk assessment whenever
they have cause to suspect that the child concerned is at risk of harm.
Self-EmployedContractor – social work staff who are offered work on a case by case basis to assist in
providing additional capacity and have a contract for services for each individual case.
Sessionalworkers– former Cafcass staff who stay to complete case work which occurs after their departure
from the organisation, for example by attending a nal hearing and or closing an existing case rather than
having to reallocate that case to a new worker.
Socialworker – These specially trained people help to make sure children and young people are safe and
properly looked after. They will work with families to help make it possible for children to stay safely with them.
If the family court decides that it is not possible, they will help to make sure there is somewhere else that is
safe where a child can live.
Solicitor– A legally trained person who provides advice to people going through the family courts and can
speak for them in court.
Specialguardianshiporder– This family court order allows another person to become a child’s ‘special
guardian’. It is for children who cannot live with their birth parents and gives parental responsibility to the
special guardian so that they can make decisions alone about the child’s life.
Specicissueorder– This order is made by the family court, when there is an important issue to be resolved
but parents can’t agree on it. For example, which school a child should go to.
Supervisedcontact – This is a type of direct contact which requires a supervisor to make sure that the child
is safe with the other person. This may be done in a contact centre.
Supervisionorder– A supervision order makes the local authority take responsibility for advising, assisting
and befriending a young person, and ensuring that the child or young person is kept safe in the care of their
parents.
Supportedcontact– This is direct contact which gives some support from a child contact centre worker to
the adults so that they can meet the needs of their child(ren).
General contact details
Cafcass
21BloomsburyStreet
London
WC1B
3HF
0300 456 4000
webenquiries@cafcass.gsi.gov.uk
Further
informationisavailableonourwebsite:www.cafcass.gov.uk
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