Capital Projects
463
____________________________________________________________________________
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CAPITAL PROJECTS
____________________________________________________________________________
2020 Capital Budget
Mission/Policy ......................................................................................................... 465
Summary ................................................................................................................ 466
Projects Listing ....................................................................................................... 467
Highlights................................................................................................................ 469
Operating Impact & Capital Project Detail .............................................................. 471
2020-2024 Capital Projects Plan
Plan Summary Narrative ........................................................................................ 500
Plan Summary ........................................................................................................ 500
Plan Summary by Functional Area ......................................................................... 501
2020-2024 Project Summary Listing ...................................................................... 503
____________________________________________________________________________
464
Capital Projects 2020 Capital Projects Summary
Mission
To provide comprehensive planning and analysis of the long-range capital needs of Waukesha County. This process
contributes to the fiscal review and prioritization of such capital projects as facility development (new construction and
improvements), infrastructure maintenance, technology, major equipment, and systems installations.
Policy
A capital project is defined as an active or proposed non-recurrent expenditure in one or more specified plan years of an
amount usually in excess of $100,000 for a permanent fixed asset (building, land improvement, or equipment or technology
installation), which has a useful life or extends the useful life of an existing fixed asset, usually in excess of seven years.
This budget maintains the emphasis on planning and funding for infrastructure and capital improvements projects, as they
are needed rather than reacting to unplanned situations. Most new projects are to be requested in the last year of the five-
year plan, unless circumstances require a more immediate time frame. County Code Section 7-16 (c) requires design and
implementation for larger projects to be, at a minimum, in separate calendar years. Justification of projects includes costs
versus benefits, return on investment analysis, and project need.
A long-range goal to managing overall debt service is to use annual cash balances from tax levy, fund balance, and ongoing
revenues to fund capital projects at a minimum of 20 percent of net capital expenditures. This "down payment," reduces the
need to borrow additional funds and manages debt service growth in relationship to the operating budget to accommodate
the policy for debt service of less than 10% of operating budget.
In this section, under "Operating Impacts by Functional Area," is a summary of operational impacts resulting from
implementation of the capital improvement program. Also, in this section are individual capital project sheets, which detail
operational impacts. Impacts associated with new facility operations are included in planning for future funding needs for
county operations (see individual project pages), but are only included in operating department budgets in the year they will
be incurred; however, the county’s five-year operating budget projection considers these impacts in the appropriate years.
Financial Summary
2018 2019 2020
Budget
Budget
Budget
Expenditures
$18,786,300 $25,005,200 $27,794,700 $2,789,500
Revenues-Project Specific
$659,000 $2,148,000 $2,279,800 $131,800
Enterprise Fund Balance (a)
$190,000 $0 $247,000 $247,000
Internal Service Fund Balance
$0 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
Restricted Special Rev Fund Bal
$308,000 $0 $0 $0
Net Expenditures
$17,629,300 $22,682,200 $25,267,900 $2,585,700
Other Financing Sources:
Investment Earnings
$280,000 $325,000 $340,000 $15,000
Debt Issue Proceeds
$12,500,000 $17,500,000 $18,000,000 $500,000
Cash Balances from
Governmental Fund Balance (b)
$955,200 $1,707,200 $3,707,900 $2,000,700
Other Fund Balance
$1,242,000 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
Revenues-General (c)
$905,100 $1,919,073 $1,864,073 ($55,000)
Tax Levy
$1,747,000 $1,055,927 $1,355,927 $300,000
Total Cash Balances
$4,849,300 $4,857,200 $6,927,900 $2,070,700
Est. Use of Cash Balances
as % Of Net Expenditures
28% 21% 27%
Change from
2019
(a) 2020 budgeted use of enterprise fund balance consists of $247,000 of Material Recycling Facility (MRF) Fund balance for the Joint MRF
Fire Suppression System project (#202008).
(b) 2020 budgeted use of governmental fund balance of $3,707,900 includes $496,000 of General Fund balance from prior-year jail
assessment fee revenue reserves for the Jail Security System Recording/Display Equipment replacement project (#201615).
Governmental fund balance use also includes $250,000 of Tarmann Parkland Acquisition Fund balance budgeted for the Menomonee
Park Dog Exercise Area project (#202002), $350,000 of General Fund balance, and $2,611,900 of Capital Project fund balance.
(c) General revenues include $250,000 of state Shared Revenues, $600,000 of state aid for the personal property tax exemption of
computers, $270,000 of state General Transportation Aids, and $744,073 of state personal property aid for the tax exemption of
machinery, tools, and patterns not used for manufacturing (beginning in the 2019 budget).
465
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects 2020 Capital Projects Summary
2018 Budget 2019 Budget 2020 Budget
19-20 Budget
Change
EXPENDITURES
Justice and Public Safety $6,575,000 $16,205,000 $14,196,000 ($2,009,000)
Health and Human Services $0 $0 $330,000 $330,000
Parks, Env, Edu & Land Use $2,422,000 $2,510,000 $3,023,800 $513,800
Public Works $7,922,300 $5,740,200 $10,039,900 $4,299,700
County Wide Technology Projects $1,692,000 $350,000 $0 ($350,000)
Est. Financing Costs $175,000 $200,000 $205,000 $5,000
Total Gross Capital Expenditures $18,786,300 $25,005,200 $27,794,700 $2,789,500
REVENUES-Project Specific
Local Municipal Share $0 $0 $695,000 $695,000
Donations/Contributions $0 $0 $699,800 $699,800
County Highway Improvement Program (CHIP) $330,000 $330,000 $330,000 $0
CHIP-Discretionary $229,000 $291,000 $260,000 ($31,000)
Federal, State, & Municipal Funding for PLU Projects $0 $1,127,000 $24,000 ($1,103,000)
Community Development Block Grant Funding $0 $200,000 $71,000 ($129,000)
Landfill Siting Revenues $100,000 $200,000 $200,000 $0
Subtotal: Revenues-Project Specific $659,000 $2,148,000 $2,279,800 $131,800
REVENUES-General
State Shared Revenue/Utility Payment $305,100 $250,000 $250,000 $0
State Aid for Computer Equipment Property Tax Exemption $600,000 $600,000 $600,000 $0
State General Transportation Aids $325,000 $270,000 ($55,000)
State Aid for Tax Exempt Machinery, Tools, & Patterns (Non-Mfg) $744,073 $744,073 $0
Subtotal: Revenues-General $905,100 $1,919,073 $1,864,073 ($55,000)
FUND BALANCE APPROPRIATIONS:
Airport Fund $190,000 $0 $0 $0
Material Recycling Facility Fund Balance $0 $247,000 $247,000
Subtotal: Enterprise Fund Balance $190,000 $0 $247,000 $247,000
End User Technology Fund Balance $0 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
Subtotal: Internal Service Funds $0 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
Restricted Tarmann Parkland Acquisition Fund Balance $308,000 $0 $0 $0
Subtotal: Restricted Special Revenue Fund Balance $308,000 $0 $0 $0
Collections Fund Balance $390,000 $0 $0 $0
End User Technology Fund Balance $452,000 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
Central Fleet Fund Balance $400,000 $0 $0 $0
Subtotal: Other Fund Balances Used for Countywide Projects $1,242,000 $175,000 $0 ($175,000)
General Fund Balance $813,200 $350,000 $350,000
Gen Fund - Assigned: Jail Assessment Revenue Reserves $92,000 $1,505,000 $496,000 ($1,009,000)
Capital Project Funds Assigned $152,200 $2,611,900 $2,459,700
Tarmann Parkland Acquisition Fund Balance $50,000 $50,000 $250,000 $200,000
Subtotal: Cash Balances from Governmental Fund Balance $955,200 $1,707,200 $3,707,900 $2,000,700
Total Fund Balance Uses For Capital Projects $2,695,200 $2,057,200 $3,954,900 $1,897,700
Investment Earnings $280,000 $325,000 $340,000 $15,000
Debt Proceeds $12,500,000 $17,500,000 $18,000,000 $500,000
Tax Levy $1,747,000 $1,055,927 $1,355,927 $300,000
466
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects 2020 Capital Projects Project Listing
Pg #
PROJECT TITLE
Project
Number
2020
Project
Budget
Fund Balance
& Revenue
Applied
Net $'s
Needed After
Revenues
Applied
PUBLIC WORKS - CENTRAL FLEET
472
FUEL TANK REPLACEMENT AND INFRASTRUCTURE 201415 $200,000 $200,000
PUBLIC WORKS - BUILDINGS
473
COURTHOUSE PROJ-SECURE COURTROOM CONSTRUCTION 201418 $13,700,000 $13,700,000
PUBLIC WORKS - HIGHWAYS
475
CTH M, CALHOUN RD TO EAST COUNTY LINE 201008 $4,351,000 $445,000 (a) $3,906,000
476
CTH ES, FOX RIVER BRIDGE 201004 $150,000 $150,000
477
CTH XX, PEBBLE BROOK CREEK BRIDGE 201402 $11,000 $11,000
478
CTH O, I-94 TO USH 18 201502 $153,600 $153,600
479
CTH I, FOX RIVER BRIDGE 201601 $89,000 $89,000
480
CTH O & I INTERSECTION RECONSTRUCTION 201603 $1,504,000 $125,500 (b) $1,378,500
481
CTH O, CTH I TO CTH ES 201610 $211,000 $211,000
482
CTH C, HASSLINGER DRIVE INTERSECTION 201611 $82,900 $82,900
483
CTH D, MORAINE HILLS DRIVE INTERSECTION 201613 $372,400 $372,400
484
CTH B, MORGAN ROAD INTERSECTION 202009 $5,000 $5,000
485
CTH X, WEST HIGH DRIVE INTERSECTION 202012 $10,000 $10,000
486
BRIDGE AID PROGRAM 2018 - 2022 201701 $100,000 $100,000
487
CULVERT REPLACEMENT PROGRAM 2018-2022 201618 $100,000 $100,000
488
REPAVING PROGRAM 2018-2022 201416 $2,700,000 $860,000 (c) $1,840,000
(a) Municipal local share
(b) Developer contribution
(c) Includes state County Highway Improvement Program (CHIP) funding of $330,000, CHIP-
Discretionary funding of $260,000, and state General Transportation Aid revenue of $270,000.
467
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects 2020 Capital Projects Project Listing
Pg #
PROJECT TITLE
Project
Number
2020
Project
Budget
Fund Balance
& Revenue
Applied
Net $'s
Needed After
Revenues
Applied
PARKS AND LAND USE
489
UWW INFRASTRUCTURE SITE IMPROVEMENTS 201703 $491,000 $0 $491,000
490
MENOMONEE PARK DOG EXERCISE AREA 202002 $500,000 $500,000 (d) $0
491
RETZER ADVENTURE TRAIL RENOVATION 202003 $209,000 $185,000 (e) $24,000
492
MINOOKA PARK MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAILHEAD IMPROVEMENTS 202005 $484,300 $484,300 (f) $0
493
EXPO ARENA FURNACE/MECHANICAL SYSTEMS 202006 $92,500 $0 $92,500
494
JOINT MRF FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEM 202008 $247,000 $247,000 (g) $0
495
PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT PLAN 2018 - 2022 201406 $1,000,000 $200,000 (h) $800,000
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - SHERIFF
496
SECURITY SYSTEM RECORDING & DISPLAY EQUIPMENT RPLCMNT 201615 $496,000 $496,000 (i) $0
COUNTYWIDE TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS
498
HHS ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORD MODULE IMPROVEMENTS 202014 $330,000 $330,000
EST. FINANCING OF BORROWING ISSUE (Includes Discount) 999999 $205,000 $0 $205,000
$27,794,700 $3,542,800 $24,251,900
ADDITIONAL REVENUES & FUND BALANCE-GENERALLY APPLIED
STATE COMPUTER EQUIPMENT EXEMPTION $600,000
STATE SHARED REVENUE/UTILITY PAYMENT $250,000
STATE PERSONAL PROPERTY AID FOR EXEMPT MACHINE, TOOLS, & PATTERNS (NON-MFG) $744,073
GENERAL FUND BALANCE $350,000
CAPITAL PROJECT FUND BALANCE $2,611,900
DEBT ISSUE PROCEEDS $18,000,000
INVESTMENT INCOME EARNED ON DEBT ISSUE $340,000
TOTAL FROM OTHER FUNDING SOURCES $22,895,973
TAX LEVY $1,355,927
TOTAL EXPENDITURES/Fund Balance & Revenues Applied/Net $ Needed
(d) Includes $250,000 of Tarmann Fund balance for the county’s share and $250,000 in local
municipal contributions.
(e) Includes $75,000 in donations, $71,000 in federal Community Development Block Grant funding,
and $24,000 in state Department of Natural Resource funding.
(f) Private contributions
(g) Material Recycling Facility Fund balance
(h) Landfill siting revenues
(i) Prior-year jail assessment fee revenues
468
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Capital Projects Highlights
GENERAL SUMMARY
Capital project expenditures in 2020 increase about $2.8 million from the 2019 Adopted Budget to $27.8
million. Changes are identified by functional areas below.
Justice and Public Safety
Projects in this functional area total about $14.2 million, which is a decrease of $2 million from the prior-year
budget. The 2020 budget includes $13.7 million to continue the first phase of a two-phase project to modernize
and expand the courthouse, with major construction beginning in 2019. The first phase entails the construction
of eight new secure courtrooms to be located adjacent to jail facilities and will feature improved security,
prisoner transport, and public access. Construction is expected to continue into 2021. The 2020 budget also
includes funding of $496,000 to complete a jail-related project for the replacement of security recording and
display equipment.
Health and Human Services
The budget includes $330,000 in 2020 to fund improvements to the Health and Human Services Department’s
electronic medical records system. The project will streamline billing processes between the Clinical Services
Division and third-party service providers, saving staff time and improving the ability of the department to claim
federal funding. The project also includes funding to begin the concept/design phase for replacing the Public
Health Division’s electronic medical record module, which is being de-supported.
Parks, Environment, Education and Land Use
Projects in this functional area total about $3.0 million, an increase of $513,800 from the 2019 budget.
Maintenance of existing facilities includes $1.0 million for the parks pavement management plan. The budget
includes $500,000 to create a dog exercise area at Menomonee Park in 2020, with contributions from the
villages of Menomonee Falls and Sussex covering half of project costs. The last phase of a multi-year project to
repair and replace existing sidewalks, exterior stairways, and parking lots at the University of Wisconsin-
Milwaukee at Waukesha campus is planned for 2020 with a budget of $491,000. The budget also includes
$484,300 to address capacity issues at the popular Minooka Park mountain bike trail by constructing a new
parking lot. Additional infrastructure improvements are planned for 2021, including expanded trails and new trail
features. This project is funded entirely with private contributions. The budget includes $209,000 for
improvements to the Retzer Nature Center’s Adventure Trail to reconstruct the existing trail, providing an
extension of the educational programming offered at Retzer, and improving ADA accessibility for all county
residents and visitors. This project is funded mostly with donations and grants. An upgrade of the fire
suppression system at the joint Material Recycling Facility (MRF) in 2020 is included in the plan, with the
county contributing half of the costs ($247,000), per an intergovernmental agreement, and the city of
Milwaukee contributing the other half. The budget includes $92,500 for the design phase of a project to replace
the aging furnace and mechanical systems at the Expo Center’s Arena building, with installation anticipated in
2021.
Public Works
Project expenditures in the public works functional area total $10.0 million, a decrease of $4.3 million from the
2019 budget. County dollars leverage an additional $13.5 million of state/federal funds for highway projects.
Projects include buildings, highways and the airport as follows:
Buildings/Land Improvements
The major focus for building improvements in the five-year capital plan is the two-phase project to upgrade and
modernize the county courthouse (discussed previously under the Justice and Public Safety functional area).
The 2020 budget includes $200,000 as part of a multiple-year project to replace county fuel tanks when
needed.
Highways
The 2020 capital budget for roadways continues priorities established in four categories and includes projects
in all categories to provide a balanced plan. Projects and funding priorities are identified below.
Repaving
A funding level of $2.7 million is budgeted for the annual County Trunk Highway (CTH) Repaving Program. In
addition the budget includes $153,600 for the design/land acquisition phase of a project to rehabilitate CTH O
(Moorland Road), from I-94 to USH 18 (Blue Mound Road) in the city of Brookfield (construction in 2022). The
design phase for a project to rehabilitate Moorland Road from CTH I (Beloit Road) to CTH ES (National
Avenue) in the city of New Berlin is funded at $211,000 (construction in 2023).
469
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Capital Projects Highlights
Bridges/Culverts
The existing Culvert Replacement Program continues with an appropriation of $100,000. The budget funds
$150,000 for the remainder of construction for the rehabilitation of the Fox River Bridge on CTH ES in the
village of Mukwonago and the towns of Mukwonago and Vernon. The budget provides $89,000 for the design
phase for the rehabilitation of Fox River Bridge on CTH I in the town of Waukesha (construction in 2021).
Funding of $11,000 is provided for the land acquisition phase for rehabilitation of the Pebble Brook Creek
Bridge on CTH XX in the town of Waukesha (construction in 2021).
Signal & Safety Improvements
Decisions to initiate signal and safety spot improvements are based on safety, traffic congestion, and roadway
safety audits to identify the use of lower-cost remediation strategies. Reconstruction of the Moorland Road and
Beloit Road intersection in the city of New Berlin is budgeted at $1,504,000. The land acquisition phase is
funded for the CTH D, Moraine Hills Road intersection ($372,400) in the town of Ottawa (construction in 2021)
and for the CTH X, West High Drive intersection ($10,000) in the city of Waukesha (construction in 2021). The
land acquisition and design phases are funded with $82,900 for the CTH C, Hasslinger Drive intersection in the
town of Merton and village of Chenequa (construction in 2021). The design phase is funded with $5,000 for the
CTH B, Morgan Road intersection in the village of Summit and city of Oconomowoc (construction in 2022)
Priority Corridors
The budget includes about $4.4 million to begin construction for widening of about three miles of CTH M (North
Avenue) from Calhoun Road to the East County Line (124
th
Street) in the city of Brookfield and village of Elm
Grove. Construction is planned to continue into 2021 with $2.3 million of additional funding.
County Wide Technology Investments
The budget includes funding for information technology projects to replace security recording and display
equipment at the Jail and to improve/replace electronic medical records modules for the Department of Health
and Human Services, which were mentioned previously in those functional area sections.
Project Revenue Funding
Revenues and various fund balance appropriations for project funding increase by about $2.0 million to $8.5
million for the 2020 Budget.
Project specific revenues increase by $131,800 to $2.3 million. This increase is mostly due to additional private
donations/contributions to capital projects totaling $699,800, including $484,300 for the Minooka Park Mountain
Bike Infrastructure Improvement project, $45,000 from the Friends of Retzer Nature Center and $45,000 from
the Waukesha Rotary for the Retzer Nature Center Adventure Trail Renovation project, and $125,500 for the
developer share of the project to reconstruct CTH O (Moorland Road) and CTH I (Beloit Road) in the city of
New Berlin. The budget also includes $695,000 in local municipal revenues, including $445,000 from the city
of Brookfield for their share of amenities (e.g., sidewalks) as part of the project to widen CTH M (North Avenue)
from Calhoun Road to the east county line (124
th
Street) and $250,000 from the villages of Menomonee Falls
and Sussex for half of the project costs to build a dog exercise area in Menomonee Park. This is partially offset
by not repeating one-time revenues budgeted for park trail projects in 2019, including $887,000 for the project
to construct an underpass for the Lake Country Trail underneath State Highway 67 in the city of Oconomowoc
and $240,000 for the design/engineering phase of the project to build a 3.5 mile trail between the cities of
Brookfield and Pewaukee.
The budget also includes state County Highway Improvement Program (CHIP) funding of $330,000 and CHIP-
Discretionary funding of $260,000 to help fund the County Highway Repaving Program. The Parks and Land
Use Repaving Program includes $200,000 of landfill siting revenue to fund the repavement of park roads and
pavement around county facilities. The Retzer Nature Center Adventure Trail Renvoation project (mentioned
previously) includes $71,000 in federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding and $24,000 in
state Department of Natural Resources Stewardship Grant funding.
Current Funding Sources
The budget includes $600,000 in state aid for tax-exempt computer property and $250,000 of state Shared
Revenues. The budget also includes $270,000 of state General Transportation Aid revenues, which are used
to fund the County Highway Repaving Program.
470
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Capital Projects Operating Impact
Use of fund balances in 2020 totals $3,954,900, which is an increase of $1,897,700 from the 2019 budget.
This includes $846,000 of General Fund balance, which includes prior-year jail assessment fee revenue
reserves of $496,000 to fund the replacement of the Jail’s security system recording and display equipment
project. Tarmann Parkland Acquisition Fund balance is budgeted at $250,000 to partially fund the creation
of a dog exercise area at Menomonee Park. Material Recycling Facility (MRF) Fund balance of $247,000 is
budgeted to fund the county’s share of an upgrade of the joint MRF facility’s fire suppression system, in
accordance with an intergovernmental agreement, with the city of Milwaukee funding the other half. Capital
Project Fund Balance of $2,611,900 is budgeted in 2020.
Borrowed funds are budgeted at $18.0 million, which is $500,000 higher than in 2019. Investment income is
budgeted at $340,000, an increase of $15,000 from the 2019 budget. Property tax levy funding increases
$300,000 to $1,355,927. Tax levy, the use of governmental fund balance, and other revenues generates the
county’s “down payment” at 27% of net capital expenditures, above the policy target of 20%.
OPERATING IMPACTS BY FUNCTIONAL AREA
Justice and Public Safety/Public Works
Regarding the Courthouse Project: Based on information gathered through the design review process, there
will be operating impacts related to staffing and facility maintenance. Consolidating office space and moving
operations within departments closer together, is expected to result in greater operational efficiencies for most
affected departments. With the exception of the Sheriff’s Department, none of the affected departments have
indicated a need for additional staff. The Sheriff’s Department is requesting an additional six correctional officer
positions during construction for Step 1 (January 2019 through March 2021), with three of the positions
remaining permanently after construction. These additional positions are estimated to cost $1 million during
the interim construction period and $240,000 annually for the three permanent positions beginning in 2021.
Step 1 of this project will demolish approximately 52,000 square feet of space for the previous intake court and
old jail space, which provided holding cells connected to existing courtrooms in the current courthouse. A new
62,000 square-foot court tower will increase county building space and is expected to result in higher utility,
housekeeping, and repair/maintenance costs. Utilities are expected to increase by a net of $5,000. For Step 2,
the renovation of the existing courthouse will involve replacing existing systems (e.g., HVAC) with energy
efficient technology, which is expected to lower utility costs.
The court tower addition in Step 1 is expected to increase contracted housekeeping costs by $80,000. These
additional expenses will likely be partially offset by savings as the Facilities Maintenance Division plans to
continue transitioning from in-house cleaning staff to contracted cleaning staff.
Estimated third-party maintenance/repair services are estimated to increase $15,000. Additional in-house
maintenance/repair work is expected to be absorbed within the division’s existing staffing levels.
Health and Human Services
The project to upgrade/replace the electronic medical records modules for the Department of Health and
Human Services is expected to streamline the billing process between the Clinical Services Division and third-
party care providers, saving staff time and improving the department’s ability to claim federal revenues.
Public Works - Highways
Annual operating costs for additional lane miles are estimated at approximately $5,400 per lane mile. The
county’s goal is to maintain or improve the current overall pavement condition index (1-100 scale) for county
highways, which was estimated at 62 in 2018. Regarding bridges, the county follows Wisconsin Department of
Transportation guidelines for bridge replacement. Structure rehabilitation is warranted when the sufficiency
number drops below 80, and a structure replacement is warranted when the sufficiency number drops below
50. The Highway Engineering Division continues to work to maintain an average sufficiency index rating of 80
or higher for all county bridges. The overall bridge sufficiency index for 2018 was 85.3.
471
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Fuel Tank Replacement and Infrastructure Project
Project #:
201415
Department:
Public Works - Central Fleet
Project Type:
Equipment Replacement
Phase:
Construction
Sponsor:
Public Works
Budget Action:
As Planned Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GE T S U MMAR Y
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Total
Project Phase
Implementation
Constr Constr Constr Constr Constr Constr Project
Expenditure Budget $400,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,500,000
Revenue Budget $400,000
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $400,000
Net County Cost After Revenues Applied $0 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $100,000 $1,100,000
COST D OCU MEN T AT ION R E VEN U E
Ite m
Qua ntity Price T otal Cost
Underground Tank Testing 5 $4,000 $20,000 Central Fleet
Underground Tanks* 5 $150,000 $750,000 Fund Balance $400,000
Above Ground Tanks* 25 $13,800 $345,000
Monitors 5 $20,000 $100,000
Card Readers 16 $15,000 $240,000
Fuel Software Systems 1 $40,000 $40,000 Total Revenue $400,000
Signage/Fencing All Sites $5,000
EXPEN D IT U RE BU D GET
$1,500,000 REVENUE BUDGET $400,000
*Higher cost of underground tanks is partially due to larger capacity needed for highway operations at substations, including
four 10,000 gallon tanks and one 6,000 gallon tank, and also due to necessary monitoring systems and electronic devices. By
contrast smaller above ground tanks are needed at other locations and hold either 550 or 1,000 gallons. Previously, those
underground tanks that could be replaced by above ground tanks were replaced, based on the implementation of a replacement
plan in the early 1990s. Those underground tanks remaining were due to inadequate space (that would have required the
purchase of additional land) and safety issues.
Project Scope & Description: There are 16 vehicle fuel sites utilized by Waukesha County departments with a total of 30
tanks (five underground, and 25 above ground). All tanks were installed in the early 1990’s. The infrastructure is aging and
will begin to exceed tank warranties and useful lives of technology and equipment associated with site operations. The 25
above ground and five underground tanks will be replaced with similar tank styles, design, and capabilities. Note: all
underground tanks are monitored with sensors designed to shut-off system operations immediately at time of detection, thus
eliminating the loss of fuel into the ground.
Funding for this project is spread out into later years, which allows for more initial research into replacement strategies and
costs before committing too much funding. The concept for capital budgeting for tank replacement follows: $400,000 will be
set aside beginning in 2018 and then $200,000 each year and $100,000 in the last year for a total $1.5 million funding level,
replacing tanks as needed. The focus for 2018-2019 is the replacement of the aging software system and card readers. Tank
inspections will be implemented when monitoring systems indicate they are warranted and replacement is likely in the near
future.
The budget strategy for the project is to fully fund the project and to utilize funds only as needed to complete improvements
when necessitated by aging infrastructure. This strategy is similar to the method used in the Highway Paving program where
funds are allocated to paving but not specifically to a location.
Location:
All 16 fuel sites that are utilized by Waukesha County Departments will require some form of replacements, upgrades and/or
modifications. Sites include Highway Operations Center, Nashotah Substation, North Prairie Substation, Sussex Substation,
New Berlin Substation, Nagawaukee Golf Course, Wanaki Golf Course, Moor Downs Golf Course, Nagawaukee Park,
Nashotah Park, Menomonee Park, Fox Brook Park, Minooka Park, Fox River Park, Muskego Park, and Mukwonago Park.
Alternatives:
Three alternative options exist at this time: close the site(s), fuel off-site in the local area, or consolidate fuel sites with other
governmental agencies. None is an effective option given the nature of daily departmental operating procedures and
emergency operation requirements.
Ongoing Operating Costs: Waukesha County currently spends $40K annually to maintain all 16 of the vehicle fuel sites.
The funding is contained within the Central Fleet Division’s fuel budget. An additional $2,500 in annual software licensing fees
is estimated for the new fuel system.
Previous Action: Regulatory requirements associated with the State of Wisconsin “Comm 10” statutes necessitated a fuel
capital project in 2012-14 totaling $232K (project # 201211). The project focused on upgrading fuel dispenser spill containment
and monitoring systems. The work contained in the 2012-14 project will not be duplicated in this project. Approved as a new
project in the 2014-2018 capital plan. Delayed in 2015-2019 capital plan. Approved as planned: 2016-2020, 2017-2021 capital
plans. Approved with a revenue update in 2018-2022 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
472
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Courthouse Project – Secure Courtroom Construction
Project #:
201418
Department:
Public Works - Buildings
Project Type:
New Building
Phase:
Construction
Sponsor:
Public Works
Budget Action:
As Planned
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAP IT AL BU D GET S UMMAR Y
Year
2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase
Budget & Concept Design/ Constr
Construction Construction Construction Project
Expenditure Budget
$700,000 $6,500,000 $15,000,000 $13,700,000 $2,600,000 $38,500,000
Revenue Budget
$0 $0 $300,000 $500,000 $0 $800,000
Net County Cost After Revenues Applied
$700,000 $6,500,000 $14,700,000 $13,200,000 $2,600,000 $37,700,000
COST D OCUME N T AT ION R EVEN U E
Design
$2,275,000
Jail Assessment Fund Balance Reserves $300,000
Construction Management
$2,275,000
Construction
$32,550,000
Capital Project Fund Balance $500,000
Contingency
$1,400,000
Total Project Cost
$38,500,000
Total Revenue $800,000
EXPEN D IT UR E BU D GET
$38,500,000
R EVEN U E BUD GET
$800,000
Project Scope & Description
The existing courthouse, located at 515 W. Moreland Blvd., was constructed in 1959 and remains structurally
sound. The courthouse currently houses the Judiciary, Clerk of Courts, Family Court Counseling, District Attorney’s
offices (including Victim/Witness), the County Board Room, Information Technology, and other miscellaneous
functions. Throughout the life of the courthouse, extensive remodeling has taken place to add additional courtrooms
and reconfigure interior space to meet the expanding needs of the services located in the courthouse. Operational
and business inefficiencies, particularly for the courts systems, have been created due to both space and building
limitations. The courthouse building infrastructure is approaching the end of its useful life. In addition, existing
courtrooms do not meet current design standards.
This courthouse projects (steps 1 and 2, mentioned below) will enhance security at the courthouse by establishing
“three-way separation” among inmates, court staff, and court visitors, which is a judicial standard that limits unnecessary
interaction and prevents potential confrontations. Other security enhancements will include improved video surveillance;
upgraded fire protection; better courtroom design, with clear line-of-sight for judges and bailiffs to monitor people; ability
for judges to automatically lock-down courtrooms in emergency situations; installation of staff and public announcement
systems to provide notifications during emergencies; and redesign of the security entrance to improve the flow of
courthouse visitors.
The county retained Zimmerman Architectural Studios to develop a “Courthouse Study,” (capital project #200914), to
provide a comprehensive analysis of courthouse space requirements and design needs. This study was completed in
2013, and Zimmerman recommended a two-step design approach (below). This project addresses step 1. A separate
capital project will address step 2. While approving this project in the plan does not obligate future County Boards for
step 2 (renovation of the existing courthouse facility as outlined in the aforementioned study, project #201705), it does
reflect the county’s future guidance for the overall courthouse project.
Step 1: Construction of a new four-story, eight-courtroom facility and relocation of eight existing courtrooms to
the new facility. This work also includes the demolition of the existing 1959 jail.
Step 2: Courthouse Project Step 2 will renovate the existing courthouse facility in a multi-phase vertical
segmented approach to provide newly renovated facilities for all divisions, except the secure
courtrooms addressed in Step 1. Courthouse renovation will also include the installation of new state
of the art mechanical, electrical, fire protection, window systems and new wall, floor, and ceiling
finishes in all renovated areas. This approach will not require temporary offsite relocation of
courthouse personnel.
473
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Courthouse Project – Secure Courtroom Construction
Project #:
201418
Department:
Public Works - Buildings
Project Type:
New Building
Phase:
Construction
Sponsor:
Public Works
Budget Action:
As Planned
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
Project funding includes $500,000 of capital project fund balance and $300,000 of prior-year jail assessment fee revenue
reserves, applied to partially cover the costs of the new courts building jail-holding area.
Step 2 is currently estimated to be $58.6 million. Going forward, many factors may impact eventual project costs,
including, but not limited to, incorporating additional operations to the courthouse space, future economic conditions,
and the maturing of the design process for the remaining phases of work that are part of step 2.
Location
Waukesha County Courthouse, 515 West Moreland Blvd., Waukesha, WI 53188.
Analysis of Need
The existing courthouse building, constructed in 1959, remains structurally sound. Over the years, extensive
remodeling has taken place to add additional courtrooms and reconfigure interior space. Public access to the building
is now limited to the main entrance (door #2) where security screening takes place. Customer circulation has been
identified for improvement, particularly the courts area. Due to the remodeling, some courtrooms are considered
inadequate since the space and/or security does not measure up to current courtroom design standards.
Based on the needs identified by the county and analyzed by the consultant, the consultant has recommended the
construction of a new four-story courts building adjacent and contiguous to the existing Courthouse and the relocation
of eight existing courtrooms to this building. This will address courtroom security needs, prisoner transport needs, and
customer circulations needs. Due to the design of this new building, it will not be necessary to temporarily relocate any
courtrooms or staff off-site during construction.
The existing courthouse is in need of complete replacement of its mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection and
window systems. The need for these replacements will coincide with the completion of the courts building and the
vacating of eight courtrooms in the existing courthouse. The space left vacant by the courtrooms will be used in
consideration with the consultant’s recommendation for Step 2, as described previously in the project scope and
description.
Alternatives
Continue to operate all county functions and services at their present location utilizing existing facilities, risking HVAC
failure, and without gaining future HVAC, utility, and staffing efficiencies.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Based on information gathered through the design review process, there will be operating impacts related to staffing
and facility maintenance. Consolidating office space and moving operations within departments closer together, is
expected to result in greater operational efficiencies for most affected departments. With the exception of the Sheriff’s
Department, none of the affected departments have indicated a need for additional staff. The Sheriff’s Department is
requesting an additional six correctional officer positions during construction for Step 1 (January 2019 through March
2021), with three of the positions remaining permanently after construction. These additional positions are estimated
to cost $1 million during the interim construction period and $240,000 annually for the three permanent positions
beginning in 2021.
Step 1 of this project will demolish approximately 52,000 square feet of old jail space, which provided holding cells
connected to existing courtrooms in the current courthouse. A new 62,000 square-foot court tower will increase County
building space and is expected to result in higher utility, housekeeping, and repair/maintenance costs. Utilities are
expected to increase by a net of $5,000. For Step 2, the renovation of the existing courthouse will involve replacing
existing systems (e.g., HVAC) with energy efficient technology, which is expected to lower utility costs.
The court tower addition in Step 1 is expected to increase contracted housekeeping costs by $80,000. These additional
expenses will likely be partially offset by savings as the Facilities Maintenance Division plans to continue transitioning
from in-house cleaning staff to contracted cleaning staff.
Estimated third-party maintenance/repair services are estimated to increase $15,000. Additional in-house
maintenance/repair work is expected to be absorbed within the Division’s existing staffing levels.
Previous Action: The Courthouse Study was completed in August, 2013. Approved as a new capital project in the
2014-2018 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2015-2019, 2016-2020, and 2017-2021 capital plans. Approved
with a cost and revenue update in the 2018-2022 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan. All
phases included committee review meetings open to the public.
474
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH M, Calhoun Road to East County Line
Project #:
201008
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Priority Corridor
Phase:
Construction
Road Name:
North Avenue
Budget Action:
As Planned
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
Year 2015 2016 2017 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase Design Design/Land Land Const Const Project
Expenditure Budget $1,098,000 $1,524,000 $2,132,000 $4,351,000 $2,300,000 $11,405,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $445,000 $0 $445,000
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $1,098,000 $1,524,000 $2,132,000 $3,906,000 $2,300,000 $10,960,000
COS T D OCU ME N T AT ION RE VE N U E
Design $1,769,000 Federal Surface Transportation $16,110,000
WisDOT Design Review $362,000 Program - ST P Funding
Land Acquisition $3,200,000 (Per State Municipal Agreements)
Construction $19,290,000
Construction Management $1,929,000 Local Municipality $445,000
Contingency $965,000
Total Project Cost $27,515,000 Total Revenue $16,555,000
EXPEN D IT U R E BU D GE T
$11,405,000
RE VE N U E BU D GE T
$445,000
Project Scope & Description
This project involves the reconstruction and widening of about 3.0 miles of CTH M (North Avenue) from Calhoun Road to 124
th
Street to four lanes and the replacement of bridges and culverts over Underwood Creek. A raised median will be provided
along the project for left turn movements. The median area, along with 3 ponds, will provide additional capacity for storm water
management. The roadway alignment will stay at its present location. Land will be acquired to a distance of 60 feet from the
roadway centerline and additional grading easements and vision corners as may be required.
The increased costs in the 2019-2023 capital plan were based on a more developed plan, including storm water management
ponds and further refined items and quantities as well as the rising construction costs. Due to some anticipated high
construction costs at or near Pilgrim Road, in the 2017-2021 capital plan, this project was combined with project 201202 (CTH
M, Calhoun Road to CTH YY) to form a single project to construct CTH M from Calhoun Road to 124
th
Street. To keep approved
federal funding, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation needed to move all construction funding to 2020-21.
Location
City of Brookfield, Village of Elm Grove
Analysis of Need
CTH M, or North Avenue, has been identified as a priority corridor for widening to four lanes by the Department of Public
Works. This portion of CTH M is shown as a four-lane roadway in the 2035 SEWRPC Jurisdictional Highway Plans for
Waukesha County. Traffic volumes recorded in 2011 along this portion of CTH M range from approximately 14,400 vehicles
per day (VPD) at Calhoun Road to 20,400 VPD at 124
th
Street. These volumes indicate that the existing two-lane roadway is
beyond its operating capacity, and is in need of widening.
Alternatives
Rehabilitate CTH M: This alternate will address pavement issues but will not provide the required level of service or
capacity warranted by traffic volumes, or improve ingress to the highway.
Reconstruct CTH M to provide necessary additional capacity.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Operating costs are expected to increase by approximately $42,500 per annum for the additional lane miles after the
construction phase is completed.
Previous Action
2010 -2014 capital plan: approved as a new project. 2011-2015, 2012-2016, 2013-2017, 2014-2018, 2016-2020, 2019-2023
capital plans: approved with a cost update. 2014-2018, 2015-2019, 2018-2022 capital plans: approved as planned. Combined
with project 201202 and approved in 2017-2021 capital plan with a delay and updates to cost and revenues.
475
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH ES, Fox River Bridge
Project #:
201004
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Bridge
Phase:
Construction
Road Name:
National Avenue
Budget Action:
Delay
C - $ Update
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2012 2013 2014 2018 2019 2020 Total
Project Phase Budget/Concept Design Construction Construction Construction Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $6,000 $150,000 $176,000 $197,000 $35,000 $150,000 $714,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $6,000 $150,000 $176,000 $197,000 $35,000 $150,000 $714,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Budget/Concept $4,000 Federal Bridge Aid $0
Design $124,000
Land Acquisition $0
Construction $510,000
Construction Management $56,000
Contingency $20,000
Total Project Cost $714,000 Total Revenue $0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$714,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
A bridge rehabilitation report was completed for this project and recommended deck repairs and a deck
overlay. However to meet federal funding eligibility requirements regarding shoulder widths, the project
scope was expanded to become a substructure widening and concrete deck replacement. During the early
stages of project design, it became apparent that the proximity of both underground utilities and the
remaining foundations of the old CTH ES Bridge would pose a significant risk to construction cost overruns.
In addition, closing CTH ES for long-term construction posed a significant concern for local emergency
service providers. Therefore, the project was re-scoped back to the original intent to repair and overlay the
existing bridge deck using 100% county funding. The project was bid in 2019 and was over budget.
Methods of traffic control will be reviewed, and the project will be rebid in early 2020.
Location: Village of Mukwonago, Town of Mukwonago, and Town of Vernon
Analysis of Need
The existing bridge (B-67-147) is a two-span, pre-stressed concrete girder structure that was constructed
in 1971. A concrete overlay was placed on the deck in 1995. The abutments and girders are generally in
good condition. The bridge is considered structurally deficient” due to the condition of the deck, which
includes deterioration and spalling on the underside of the deck along both edges. The roadway over the
structure is narrow with minimal shoulders, causing the bridge to be classified as “functionally obsolete.”
The structure sufficiency number is 63.1, which indicates that structure rehabilitation is warranted according
to WisDOT guidelines. The 2018 traffic volume at the site is 9,100 vehicles per day.
Alternatives
Don’t do project, which does not address the identified deficiencies.
Rehabilitate the existing bridge to address structural deficiencies.
Rehabilitate with structure widening and federal bridge aid funding, but could result in higher overall
county share of costs.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Initial maintenance costs may be reduced following construction.
Previous Action
2010-2014 capital plan: approved as a new project.
2011-2015 capital plan: approved with cost update.
2012-2016 capital plan: approved with cost update/delay.
2013-2017 and 2014-2018 capital plans: approved as planned.
Approved with scope change, cost and revenue update in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
Approved with cost update and delay in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
476
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH XX, Pebble Brook Creek Bridge
Project #:
201402
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Bridge
Phase:
Land Acquisition
Road Name:
Oakdale Drive
Budget Action:
C - $ Update C - Rev Update
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2014 2015-18 2019 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase Concept Design Right of Way Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $5,000 $0 $87,000 $11,000 $53,000 $156,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $5,000 $0 $87,000 $11,000 $53,000 $156,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Budget/Concept $5,000 Federal Bridge Aid $197,000
Design $65,000
State Review For Design $20,000
Land Acquisition $11,000
Construction $211,000
Construction Management $28,000
Contingency $13,000
Total Project Cost $353,000 Total Revenue $197,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$156,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
This project is an overlay of the CTH XX bridge over Pebble Brook Creek. A concrete overlay is anticipated, but several
overlay types will be considered during design. Concrete repairs will be made to the spalled areas of the deck edges.
Existing bridge railing may be salvaged/remounted or completely replaced with this project. Approach guardrail will be
replaced to meet current standards. The asphalt bridge approaches will be repaved, and concrete approach slabs will be
added at the structure. Right of way was purchased to the ultimate width of 100 feet at this bridge in the 1970’s. No
additional fee acquisition is anticipated. Some easements may be necessary due to the proximity to railroad right of way.
This project was delayed in the 2017-2021 capital plan because the project was not approved for federal funding following
the 2015 application. Waukesha County again applied for federal funding in 2017, and in May 2018 WisDOT approved
federal bridge funding for the project. An agreement with WisDOT was executed in February 2019 authorizing $197,000 in
federal funds toward the project. The approved funding was $17,000 less than originally planned, but is offset with $17,000
lower cost estimates, resulting in no net change in the county’s share of costs.
Location: Town of Waukesha
Analysis of Need
The existing bridge (B-67-195) is a two-span concrete box culvert that was constructed in 1980. The roof of the box culvert
serves as the roadway driving surface. Most of the box culvert is in good condition. However, approximately 8% of the top
deck surface is delaminated, and some concrete is beginning to spall. The delamination is due to corrosion of the top mat
of bar steel. This bar steel is not epoxy coated. There is also spalling of concrete along both edges of the deck (roof) at
the drip edge. The approach guardrail is in poor condition and does not meet current standards. The roadway is functionally
classified as a ‘principal arterial.’ The bridge is considered ‘structurally deficientdue to its current condition rating. The
structure sufficiency number is 51.1. This indicates that structure rehabilitation is warranted according to WisDOT
guidelines, which makes the bridge eligible for federal bridge rehabilitation funding when the sufficiency index is below 80.
An independent engineering study report was prepared for this project prior to application for federal bridge funding. The
report verifies that the proposed project scope is a cost-effective rehabilitation strategy. The 2018 traffic volume on this
roadway segment was 5,200 vehicles per day.
Alternatives: Reconstruct the existing bridge and roadway approaches to current WisDOT standards. This alternative,
while addressing the deficiencies, is not warranted.
Ongoing Operating Costs: Maintenance costs will be reduced in the early years after construction beyond 2018.
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2014-2018 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2015-2019 capital plan.
Approved with delay/cost update in the 2016-2020 capital plan.
Delayed in the 2017-2021 capital plan.
Approved with cost update in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
477
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH O, I-94 to USH 18
Project #:
201502
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Rehabilitation
Phase:
Design/Land Acquisition
Road Name:
Moorland Road
Budget Action:
Delay C - $ Update C - Rev Update
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GE T S U MMAR Y
Year 2019 2020 2021 2022 Total
Project Phase Design Design/Land Construction Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $100,000 $153,600 $0 $1,389,400 $1,643,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied
$100,000 $153,600 $0 $1,389,400 $1,643,000
COS T D OCU ME NT AT ION RE VE N UE
Design $698,000 Surface Transportation Program - STP $6,372,000
WisDOT Plan Review $15,000
Land Acquisition $555,000
Construction $5,860,000
Construction Management $581,000
Contingency $306,000
Total Project Cost $8,015,000 Total Revenue $6,372,000
EXPE N D IT U RE BU D GE T
$1,643,000
RE VE N U E BUD GET
$0
Project Scope & Description
This 0.8-mile long project involves the rehabilitation/reconstruction of CTH O to bring it up to current standards.
Improvements will include: replacing the existing concrete pavement, reconfiguring intersections to improve safety,
replacing older traffic signals, minor grading, and adding sidewalks and storm water improvements. Access to Brookfield
Square Mall and other businesses adjacent to Moorland Road will need to be maintained during construction. Therefore,
traffic control will be a major challenge for this project. Federal funds will be used to offset the cost of design, real estate,
and construction for this project. The department was awarded $6,372,000 in federal STP funds in 2019, which is an
increase of $1,372,000 from what was originally planned (in part due to applying for offsetting funds for land acquisition
costs). The cost estimate for the project increases $1,265,000 to reflect more recent market conditions, but is more than
offset by the increase in STP funding, for a net reduction in the county’s share of costs by $107,000. The construction
phase of the project is delayed from 2021 to 2022 to correspond with available funding in the federal funding cycle.
Location: City of Brookfield
Analysis of Need
The concrete pavement along this portion of Moorland Road (CTH O) has deteriorated to the point where it now has a
pavement condition index (PCI) of 30 which is regarded as poor. A PCI of 20 would indicate that the pavement has failed.
The roadway was first built in 1978 and was rehabilitated in 2001, but that rehabilitation is now at the end of its useful life;
paving slabs have deteriorated; paving joints have faulted, and the concrete pavement is in need of replacement. Pavement
issues are further compounded by the fact that this portion of Moorland Road is one of the busiest on the county system
with over 30,000 vehicles per day using the corridor, which serves as a major access road to Brookfield Square Mall and
to the Bluemound Road corridor.
Alternatives
Attempt further rehabilitation. This alternate is not recommended because it is not considered cost-effective due
to the poor condition of the existing pavement and the high cost of traffic control needed to maintain traffic for this
roadway.
Reconstruct\rehabilitate CTH O as described above.
Ongoing Operating Costs: Operating costs are not expected to change.
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2015-2019 Capital Plan
Approved as planned in the 2016-2020, 2018-2022, 2019-2023 Capital Plans
Approved with a revenue update in the 2017-2021, Capital Plan
478
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH I, Fox River Bridge
Project #:
201601
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Bridge
Phase:
Preliminary Design
Road Name:
River Road
Budget Action:
C - $ Update
C - Rev Update
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GE T SU MM AR Y
Year 2016 2017-19 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase
Concept Budget Design Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $6,000 $0 $89,000 $103,000 $198,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $6,000 $0 $89,000 $103,000 $198,000
COS T D OCU MEN T AT ION R EVEN UE
Budget/concept $6,000 WisDOT Bridge Aid $426,000
Design $71,000
State review for Design $18,000
Land Acquisition $0
Construction $472,000
Construction Management $42,000
Contingency $15,000
Total Project Cost $624,000 Total Revenue $426,000
EXP EN D IT U R E BU D GE T
$198,000
R EV EN UE BU D GE T
$0
Project Scope & Description
This project is a deck replacement of the CTH I bridge over the Fox River. In addition, the scope is expected to include
railing replacement, approach paving, approach guardrail replacement, and repair of riprap slope paving. The roadway
will remain two lanes over the bridge. Right of way acquisition is not anticipated. The Waukesha County Bicycle Plan
shows a proposed trail along the Fox River at the site of this project. This project does not include bridge widening for
purpose of bicycle trail. Roadway shoulders over the bridge will accommodate bicycles. A bridge rehabilitation report
has been approved by WisDOT that recommends deck replacement. Waukesha County amended a 2017 application
for federal bridge aid to be consistent with the approved bridge rehabilitation report. This was a change in scope from
superstructure replacement, which was the recommended rehabilitation alternative in 2017. Waukesha County applied
for federal bridge aid, and in May 2018 WisDOT approved the county’s application. An agreement with WisDOT was
executed in February 2019 authorizing $426,000 in Bridge Aid funding toward the project, which was $12,000 more
than previously anticipated. This is offset by an increase in overall costs of $12,000 resulting in no change in net county
costs. In June 2019 the project was approved for participation in WisDOT’s new “Low Risk Pilot Program” using state
rather than federal funds in construction. The Low Risk Pilot Program allows for a streamlined and accelerated design
process. Success of this pilot program may lead to improvements in the Local Bridge Program that result in time savings
and cost savings.
Location: Town of Waukesha
Analysis of Need
The existing bridge (B-67-097) is a two-span, pre-stressed concrete girder structure that was constructed in 1965. A
concrete overlay was placed on the deck in 1996. The bridge is considered “structurally deficient” due to the condition
of the deck. The deck edges and soffit underside are spalling. A thermal infrared scan of the wearing surface in 2014
indicates the concrete overlay is 22% delaminated. The riprap slope paving beneath the bridge has missing stone, and
should be repaired. The structure sufficiency number is 76.2, which indicates that structure rehabilitation is warranted
according to WisDOT guidelines and makes the bridge eligible for federal bridge funding (rehabilitation) with a
sufficiency below 80. The 2017 traffic volume on this roadway segment was 2,300 vehicles per day.
Alternatives: Reconstruct the existing bridge, but will not be eligible for federal bridge aid.
Ongoing Operating Costs: Maintenance costs will be reduced in the early years after construction beyond 2021.
Previous Action
New project in the 2016-2020 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2017-2021 capital plan.
Approved with scope change and cost update in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
Approved with scope change and cost/revenue update in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
479
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH O & I Intersection Reconstruction
Project #:
201603
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Rehabilitation
Phase:
Construction
Road Name:
Moorland Road/Beloit Road
Budget Action:
C - $ Update C - Rev Update
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 19, 2019
CAP IT AL BU DGET SU MMAR Y
Year 2017 2018 2019 2020 Total
Program Project Design Land Aquis Design Const Project
Expenditure Budget $45,000 $50,000 $65,000 $1,504,000 $1,664,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $65,000 $125,500 $190,500
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $45,000 $50,000 $0 $1,378,500 $1,473,500
COST DOCUMENTATION REVENUE
Design $285,000 Surface Transportation Program (STP) for Construction $1,735,000
WisDOT Design Review $59,000 STP for Design $234,000
Land Acquisition $50,000
Construction $2,817,000 Developer Agreement 1 - Budgeted $63,000
Construction Mgmt $282,000 Developer Agreement 2 - Budgeted $62,500
Contingency $140,000
Capital Project Fund Balance $65,000
Total Project Cost $3,633,000 Total Revenue $2,159,500
EXPENDITURE BUDGET $1,664,000 REVENUE BUDGET $190,500
Project Scope & Description
This project involves improvements to the intersection at Moorland Road (CTH O) and Beloit Road (CTH I). Left turn
lanes on Moorland Road will be turned into double left turn lanes; right turn islands will be added; Beloit Road will be
restriped to provide two lanes in each direction; failing pavement on Moorland Road will be replaced; and traffic signals
will be upgraded.
Proposed developments in the area have indicated the need for a number of incremental improvements at this
intersection to meet their needs. Additionally, pavement conditions and future background growth have identified further
deficiencies at this location. However, due to the proximity of I-43, it has been determined that a single project funded
with developer, county, and federal funding would disrupt traffic patterns less and cause fewer potential safety problems
than a series of small incremental projects. The project cost estimate was updated as design is nearing completion.
Construction costs have increased by $1.2 million due to a higher level of poor soils and drainage needs than was
originally anticipated. Additionally, aggregate concrete and signal infrastructure prices have escalated in recent years.
This is partially offset by an increase in federal Surface Transportation Program funding by $73,000, for a net increase
in the county’s share of costs by $1.1 million
Location: City of New Berlin
Analysis of Need
This intersection controls traffic on two heavily used roadways, Moorland Road and Beloit Road, and is a major gateway
to New Berlin from I-43. Recent traffic impact studies conducted for developments in the area have shown that the
intersection operates at a low level of service and that relatively small increases in traffic are having a large impact on
the intersection operations. As more developments occur in the area, background traffic will grow. The existing
intersection capacity is insufficient to meet the current and future traffic volumes and turning movements. Also, while
the roadway was last rehabilitated in 2006, the latest Pavement Condition Index (PCI) for this segment is 45. The
concrete pavement on Moorland Road is in poor condition and should be replaced. Traffic volumes within this segment
of Moorland Road are currently 31,000 vehicles per day.
Alternatives
Reconstruct the intersection to provide necessary additional capacity.
Reconsider project in a future capital plan.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Minor operational cost increase due to increased size and number of turn lanes.
Previous Action
Project approved as new in 2016-2020 capital plan. Approved as planned in 2017-2021 capital plan. Approved as
planned in the 2018-2022 capital plan. Approved with delay in the 2019 2023 plan. Approved with for a cost update
through an ordinance (174-37) in 2019.
480
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH O, CTH I to CTH ES
Project #:
201610
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Rehabilitation
Phase:
Preliminary Design
Road Name:
Moorland Road
Budget Action:
Delay
C - $ Update
C - Rev Update
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2020 2021 2022 2023 Total
Project Phase Design Design/Land Const Project
Expenditure Budget $211,000 $190,000 $0 $2,300,000 $2,701,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0
Net Costs After Revenues Applied $211,000 $190,000 $0 $2,300,000 $2,701,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Design $1,038,000 Surface Transportation $9,200,000
WisDOT Design Review $15,000 Program - STP for Construction
Land Acquisition $950,000
Construction $10,000,000 STP for Design/ $1,602,000
Construction Management $1,000,000 Land Acquisition
Contingency $500,000
Total Project Cost $13,503,000 Total Revenue $10,802,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$2,701,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
This 1.4-mile long project involves the rehabilitation/reconstruction of CTH O to bring it up to current standards.
Improvements will include: replacing the existing concrete pavement, reconfiguring intersections to improve
safety, replacing older traffic signals, minor grading, adding sidewalks and storm water improvements. Access
to other businesses and residences adjacent to Moorland Road will need to be maintained during construction.
Therefore, traffic control will be a major challenge for this project. This project will use federal funds to partially
offset the cost of design, land acquisition, and construction. The Department applied for approximately $10.8
million in federal STP funds in 2017, and was awarded $1,602,000 in 2018 for the design and land acquisition
phases of the project. The County will reapply for STP funding in 2019 for the construction phase and anticipates
being awarded the funding. Due to the need to reapply for construction funding, construction will be delayed until
the next federal funding cycle (2023 or 2024). Project costs estimates increase $1,440,000 reflecting changes
in market conditions. Total project revenue is projected to increase $1,920,000 above what was previously
planned (partly due to applying for STP reimbursement of land acquisition costs), resulting in a net decrease in
the County share of costs by $480,000.
Locations: City of New Berlin
Analysis of Need
The concrete pavement along this portion of Moorland Road (CTH O) now has a pavement condition index (PCI)
of 50 which is regarded as fair. While the PCI isn’t in poor condition, the transverse and longitudinal joints show
signs of significant deterioration, and it is anticipated that the roadway will be ready for a pavement replacement
by 2023. The roadway was first built in 1978 and was rehabilitated in 2006 but that rehabilitation will be at the end
of its useful life by 2023, and the concrete pavement will need to be replaced. Pavement issues are further
compounded by the fact that this portion of Moorland Road is one of the busiest on the County system with over
30,000 vehicles per day using the corridor which serves as a major access road to Between I-43 and I-94.
Alternatives
Attempt further rehabilitation. This alternate is not recommended because it is not considered cost-effective due
to the poor condition of the existing pavement and the high cost of traffic control needed to maintain traffic for
this roadway.
Ongoing Operating Costs: Operating costs are not expected to change.
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2016-2020 capital plan.
Approved with a revenue update in the 2017-2021 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
481
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH C, Hasslinger Drive Intersection
Project #:
201611
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Spot Improvement
Phase:
Design/Land
Road Name:
Kettle Moraine Drive
Budget Action:
Delay
C - $ Update
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAP IT AL BU D GE T S U MM AR Y
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase Design Design/Land Design/Land Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $18,100 $165,000 $82,900 $308,000 $574,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $18,100 $165,000 $82,900 $308,000 $574,000
COST D OCU ME N T AT ION R EVEN U E
Design $160,000 Federal Highway Safety
WisDOT Review $20,000 Improvement Program (HSIP)
Land Acquisition $165,000 Funding $404,000
Construction $550,000
Construction Management $55,000
Contingency $28,000
Total Project Cost $978,000 Total Revenue $404,000
EXPEN DIT U R E BU D GE T
$574,000
R EVE N U E BU DGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
The purpose of this proposed project is to correct the safety problems along the curved segment of CTH C (Kettle Moraine
Drive) at Hasslinger Drive. Proposed improvements addressing the conditions described above and other existing potential
hazards include:
1. Realign approximately 2,200’ of CTH C with one gradual horizontal curve.
2. Realign and combine Hasslinger Drive, the private Oakland Road, and the driveway as one common intersection
approach aligned perpendicular to CTH C. Include a right turn-only lane and acceleration taper along CTH C at this
reconfigured T’-intersection. Combining the driveways will remove the visual effect for north bound traffic whereby
the road appears to be straight – not curved.
3. Widen the CTH C lane widths from 11’ to 12’, its paved shoulders from 1’ to 3’, and clear zones along this curve. Add
new pavement edges.
4. Add center line and shoulder rumble strip pavement markings to alert motorists approaching and driving through this
curved highway segment.
5. Add intersection area highway lighting.
Waukesha County has been awarded $404,000 in Federal Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) funding to help fund
this project. The scope of the project was reduced in the 2019-2023 capital plan to qualify for HSIP funding, but, based on the
30% design and estimate, the current budget is not sufficient to fully address the project needs. The reduced scope smooths
out the curve, but does not straighten the curve. Thus, it was determined in preliminary design that the hill along the curve
needs to be cut down to allow adequate sight distance for the side road/driveways that access CTH C along the curve. This
requires significant grading and excavation leading to additional cost. An additional $283,000 is needed in county funding to
achieve these objectives. The construction phase has been moved from 2020 to 2021 to accommodate the federal funding
allocation schedule.
Location: Town of Merton and Village of Chenequa
Analysis of Need
A sharp curve along CTH C (Kettle Moraine Drive) has an awkwardly configured intersection with a residential street
(Hasslinger Drive), a driveway and a private road (Oakland Road). Drivers must react suddenly to the changing curve radii of
its existing alignment. This rural highway intersection has among the highest collision rates along Waukesha’s County Trunk
Highways. There have been twenty-two (22) crashes reported from 2001 through 2017 at this intersection where average daily
traffic is approximately 3,800 vehicles/day for a crash rate of 1.174 per million vehicles. All of these crashes involved
northbound vehicles running off the right side of CTH C at the midpoint of its curve. All but one had occurred with wet/snow
pavement and/or dark conditions. One crash had a fatality and four others had severe injuries.
Alternatives
Changing this intersection to a full-way stop or a roundabout is not warranted and would not address the prevailing northbound
traffic flow problem along CTH C.
Ongoing Operating Costs: None
Previous Action: Approved as a new project in the 2016-2020 Capital Plan. Approved with cost and revenue update in the
2017-2021 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2018 – 2022 plan. Approved with scope, cost, and revenue updates in
the 2019-2023 plan.
482
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH D, Moraine Hills Drive Intersection
Project #:
201613
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Spot Improvement
Phase:
Land Acquisition
Road Name:
CTH D
Budget Action:
C - $ Update
C - Rev Update
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GET SU MMAR Y
Year 2019 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase Design Land Acquis Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $6,200 $372,400 $73,400 $452,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $6,200 $372,400 $73,400 $452,000
COS T D OCU MEN T AT ION R EV EN U E
Design $139,000 Federal Highway Safety
Land Acquisition $365,000 Improvement Program
Construction $638,000 (HSIP) Funding $786,000
Construction Management $64,000
Contingency $32,000
Total Project Cost $1,238,000 Total Revenue $786,000
EXPE N D IT U R E BU D GET
$452,000
R EV EN U E BU D GET
$0
Project Scope & Description
The purpose of this proposed project is to correct the safety problems along the curved segment of CTH
D at Moraine Drive. Proposed improvements addressing the existing potential hazards include:
1. Realign approximately 1,200 feet of CTH D with one gradual horizontal curve.
2. Widen the CTH D lane widths from 11’ to 12’; add shoulders that are 8 feet wide, of which 3 feet
are paved, and the rest gravel; and clear zones along this curve. Add pavement safety edges.
3. Improve clear zones to proper standards.
4. Add center line and shoulder rumble strip pavement markings to alert motorists approaching and
driving through this curved highway segment.
The county was awarded $786,000 in federal Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP funding), which
is an increase of $115,500 from what was previously assumed. Project costs are estimated to increase
$128,000 for a net change in the county’s share of project costs of $12,500 to match the State/Municipal
Agreement terms.
Location: Town of Ottawa
Analysis of Need
A sharp horizontal curve at the intersection of CTH D and Moraine Hills Drive has been the site of a number
of run-off-the-road crashes. Not only is the curve at Moraine Hills Drive substandard, but the approach
alignments are such that in combination with the curve they form reverse curves as drivers approach the
location. This combined with a relatively steep grade has been the cause of crashes. The crash rate for this
location is 1.8 crashes per million vehicles entering, which includes one fatality. This rate is above the limit
of 1.5 crashes per million vehicles entering above which action is recommended.
Alternatives
Improved signing and marking may reduce the crash rate but are not as effective as improving the roadway
geometry per the recommended scope.
Ongoing Operating Costs: None
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2016 - 2020 capital plan. Approved as planned in 2017-2021 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2018-2022 capital plan. Approved with a revenue update in the 2019 2023
capital plan.
483
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH B, Morgan Rd Intersection
Project #:
202009
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Spot Improvement
Phase:
Preliminary Design
Road Name:
Valley Road
Budget Action:
New
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GET SU MMAR Y
Year 2020 2021 2022 Total
Project Phase Design Land Acq Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $5,000 $48,000 $47,000 $100,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0
Net Costs After Revenue Applied $5,000 $48,000 $47,000 $100,000
COST D OCU MEN T AT ION
Design $50,000 Federal Highway Safety $386,000
Land Acquisition $48,000 Improvement Program (HSIP)
Construction $346,000 Funding
Construction Management $22,000
Contingency $20,000
Total Project Cost $486,000 $386,000
$100,000 $0
RE VEN U E
Total Revenue
EXP EN D IT U RE BU D GET REVEN U E BU D GE T
Project Scope & Description
The purpose of this proposed project is to correct the safety problems along the westbound and eastbound directions
of this curved segment of CTH B (Valley Road). Proposed improvements include:
Realign the Morgan Road intersection approach for providing a perpendicular connection with CTH B near
the midpoint of its existing curve. Add a right turn lane and acceleration taper along westbound CTH B at this
reconfigured ‘T’-intersection.
Lower the CTH B profile along this highway curve by ~1' - 2' for improving driver sight distance.
Expand slightly the curve alignment of the westbound CTH B travel lane and adjust its superelevation as part
of inserting a new eastbound CTH B left turn lane for Morgan Road.
Widen the CTH B paved shoulders from 1’ to 3’ and clear zones along this curve.
Waukesha County was awarded Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) funding for these intersection
improvements.
Location
Village of Summit/City of Oconomowoc
Analysis of Need
A CTH B (Valley Road) sharp curve at a Y-intersection with Morgan Road has been the site of a number of run-off-the-
road crashes. Westbound CTH B drivers approaching too fast can be misled by the appearance of this intersection's
large paved area, so when entering this curve they must react suddenly and can lose vehicle control. Not all turning
and other oncoming vehicles at this Y-intersection are visible from along its CTH B curve and from the existing
orientation of the Morgan Road approach. This curve has a crash rate of 0.61 per million-vehicles, which is high for an
average daily traffic of only ~3,900 vehicles/day. Many of the crashes caused severe injuries.
Alternatives
Improved signing (sharp turn advance warning signs with 20 MPH advisory panels and directional arrow warning) was
implemented as a lower cost alternative three years ago. Crashes persist along this short curved segment of CTH B
as the signing was not as effective of an option as improving the geometry per the recommended scope.
Ongoing Operating Costs: None
Previous Action: None
484
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
CTH X, West High Drive Intersection
Project #:
202012
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Spot Improvement
Phase:
Land Acquisition
Road Name:
Saylesville Road
Budget Action:
New
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2020 2021 Total
Project Phase Land Construction Project
Expenditure Budget $10,000 $253,000 $263,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0
Net Costs After Revenues Applied $10,000 $253,000 $263,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Land Acquisition $10,000
Construction $220,000
Construction Management $22,000
Contingency $11,000
Total Project Cost $263,000 Total Revenue $0
$263,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
Project Scope & Description
The purpose of this proposed project is to install permanent signal poles and equipment at the CTH X
(Saylesville Road) / West High Drive signalized intersection. This existing signalized intersection had been
identified by WisDOT during 2012 as one of 5% of local road locations in Wisconsin warranting a local
intersection safety evaluation. Proposed improvements include:
Remove and replace all temporary wood poles, span wires, and signal heads with WisDOT-
standard permanent equipment mounted on monotube structures. Re-mount existing video
detectors and emergency vehicle pre-empt devices (EVP).
This intersection's existing controller would serve the new traffic signal. Minor signal operation
improvement details also will be implemented, including new clearance intervals, all-red times,
minimum gap times, and left and right turn detectors.
Location: City of Waukesha
Analysis of Need
The traffic signal at this ‘T’-intersection serving Waukesha West High School was installed with wood poles
and span wire during the fall of 2007 following several severe-injury angle collisions. The intersection was
installed on temporary poles due to anticipation of future development. This development of 35 homes is
anticipated to begin in 2019, but the primary access to the subdivision will be located on a local City of
Waukesha roadway, not at this intersection. What will be installed at the intersection will be a driveway for
a church located adjacent to the proposed subdivision. The church and developer are implementing several
infrastructure improvements, including a southbound CTH X right turn lane, a northbound CTH X left turn
lane, supplemental signal equipment mounted on the existing wood poles-span wires, and new sidewalks
with a CTH X crosswalk added between this new neighborhood and Waukesha West High School. With
the development moving forward with a driveway at this intersection, the final configuration of the
intersection will be established and permanent signal infrastructure should be implemented.
Alternatives
The alternative is to leave the existing wood poles and temporary signal configuration in place, but at some
point this temporary system will need a permanent solution implemented.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Maintaining proper alignment of the vehicle detection video cameras mounted on the wood poles after
strong winds and seasonal freeze-thaw conditions is an operational and maintenance challenge. Public
complaints about malfunctioning signal operation responses to traffic are frequently received by the
Waukesha County DPW. A new permanent signal will alleviate these operational calls and responses.
Previous Action: None
485
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Bridge Aid Program: 2018-2022
Project #:
201701
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Bridge
Phase:
Program Project
Road Name:
Budget Action:
As Planned
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, Director DPW
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Total
Project Phase Project
Expenditure Budget $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $500,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $500,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
2018 Appropriation $100,000
2019 Appropriation $100,000
2020 Appropriation $100,000
2021 Appropriation $100,000
2022 Appropriation $100,000
Total Project Cost $500,000 Total Revenue $0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$500,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
The program provides assistance to municipalities for the replacement of bridge or culvert structures. The
program normally provides 50% of the funding for engineering, design, and construction of town and village
initiated projects that do not receive federal or state aid.
Locations
Various
Analysis of Need
Wisconsin Statute 82.08 requires the County to fund half the cost of construction or repair of local bridge
and culvert projects initiated by townships. Such projects arise during the course of the budget year and
funds are distributed on the basis of requests received. Requests that exceed the remaining funding for
one year are carried over to the next year.
Alternatives
County participation in the program is required by a statutory mandate.
The county can opt out of participation with villages.
Ongoing Operating Costs
The projects do not require departmental budget operating expenditures. Projects are reviewed by County
engineering staff.
Previous Action
Capital Project 9131 – Bridge Aid Program through 2017.
Approved as a new project in the 2017-2021 Capital Plan.
Approved as planned in the 2018-2022 Capital Plan.
Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 Capital Plan.
486
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Culvert Replacement Program 2018 - 2022
Project #:
201618
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Bridge
Phase:
Program Project
Road Name:
Various
Budget Action:
As Planned
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Total
Project Phase Project
Expenditure Budget $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $500,000
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $500,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
2018 Appropriation $100,000
2019 Appropriation $100,000
2020 Appropriation $100,000
2021 Appropriation $100,000
2022 Appropriation $100,000
Total Project Cost $500,000 $0
$500,000
$0
REVENUE
Total Revenue
EXPENDITURE BUDGET REVENUE BUDGET
Project Scope & Description
Provide annual funding for a countywide culvert replacement program.
Location
Various
Analysis of Need
The Public Works Department replaces a number of culverts every year because of deterioration. This
program is designed to address larger culvert structures that require extensive design, more land
acquisition and higher construction costs. Generally the individual cost of culvert replacements is
approximately $50,000 and do not warrant capital projects. However, when grouped together, the annual
costs exceed $100,000. The County averages one to two culvert replacements per year under this program.
Individual culvert locations are not normally known until the year they are to be replaced.
Alternatives
Schedule individual projects as needed.
Ongoing Operating Costs
The projects do not require departmental budget operating expenditures. Projects are reviewed by County
engineering staff.
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2016-2020 capital plan.
Approved as planned 2017-2021, 2018-2022, and 2019-2023 capital plans.
487
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Repaving Program 2018-2022
Project #:
201416
Department:
Public Works - Highways
Project Type:
Repaving
Phase:
Program Project
Road Name:
Various
Budget Action:
C - Rev Update
Choose an item.
Manager:
Allison Bussler, DPW Director
Date:
November 20, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Total
Project Phase
Expenditure Budget $4,450,000 $3,870,000 $2,700,000 $4,200,000 $4,300,000 $19,520,000
Revenue Budget $559,000
$725,000 $860,000 $1,140,000 $790,000 $4,074,000
Net Costs After Revenues Applied $3,891,000 $3,145,000 $1,840,000 $3,060,000 $3,510,000 $15,446,000
COST DOCUMENTATION REVENUE
County Highway Improvement Program (CHIP)
and CHIP-D (Discretionary)
Hwy Paving General Transportation Aid (GTA)
Paver Study
& Shouldering Total CHIP CHIP-D GTA Donation Total
2018 $50,000 $4,400,000 $4,450,000 2018 $330,000 $229,000 $0 $0 $559,000
2019 $50,000 $3,820,000 $3,870,000 2019 $330,000 $0 $325,000 $70,000 $725,000
2020 $50,000 $2,650,000 $2,700,000 2020 $330,000 $260,000 $270,000 $0 $860,000
2021 $50,000 $4,150,000 $4,200,000 2021 $330,000 $260,000 $550,000
*
$0 $1,140,000
2022 $50,000
$4,250,000 $4,300,000 2022 $330,000 $260,000 $200,000 $0 $790,000
Total Project Cost $250,000 $19,270,000 $19,520,000 Total Revenue $1,650,000 $1,009,000 $1,345,000 $70,000 $4,074,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET $19,520,000 REVENUE BUDGET $4,074,000
*Includes $350,000 of GTA received above budget in 2018, appropriated as Capital Project Fund balance.
Project Scope & Description
The project involves resurfacing or rehabilitation of county trunk highways to remove distressed areas and provide improved
riding surfaces. It is the Department of Pubic Work’s goal to pave approximately 20 lane miles of roadway on an annual basis.
Crush, relay and surface or other alternative methods will be used as necessary in lieu of a simple patch and overlay. The
project includes the cost of the ongoing Pavement Inspection Program, which determines the sections of highways to be
repaved, along with the cost of shouldering, and parking lots at the department’s substation facilities. Project funding was
accelerated in the 2019-2023 capital plan, moving $1,000,000 from 2020 to 2019, to balance resources in the overall five-year
capital plan. Beginning in 2019, a portion of the state’s allocation of General Transportation Aid (GTA) revenue is budgeted
to cover repaving project expenditures. GTA revenues are budgeted to increase $20,000 in 2020 above what was previously
planned. Inflation and a reduced number of highway capital projects has caused a gradual reduction in the number of lane
miles paved and hence the average pavement condition rating has declined.
During 2019, the budget was amended through an ordinance (173-96), increasing expenditures $70,000 in order to pave a
five-foot portion of the shoulders along CTH DR (Golf Road) from the Delafield city limits to Maple Avenue in the town of
Delafield. This project is funded with $70,000 of donation revenue.
Location: Various locations throughout the county.
Analysis of Need
The Department of Public Works presently maintains about 400 centerline miles of roadways on the county trunk system. The
typical useful life of pavement is 15 years. The department reconstructed existing two-lane roadways to four-lane facilities.
These four-lane facilities are now coming to the end of their design life and need repaving. As asphalt pavements age, the
surface tends to rut and crack due to vehicle loads and weathering of the asphalt. The department has initiated a pavement
management program, using Cartegraph’s Pavementview software to rate pavement conditions and manage pavement
projects. The average Pavement Condition Index (PCI) of asphaltic pavements in 2018 was 62. It is the intention of this project
to continue to maintain and improve current pavement conditions. Resurfacing projects take into consideration the PCI of
existing pavements and classification of the road. The PCI ratings are updated on a rolling three-year schedule.
Alternatives
Spot repairs and patching. The result will be a slight delay in the deterioration of the system.
Resurface roadways based on pavement conditions determined by the PAVER pavement management system and
Department review.
Ongoing Operating Costs
The cost of maintaining a two-lane roadway in good condition is projected to cost about $7,000 per mile annually.
Previous Action: Approved as a new project in the 2014-18 capital plan. Approved as planned in 2015-2019 Capital Plan.
Approved as planned in the 2016-2020 Capital Plan. Approved with cost updates and accelerated in the 2017-2021 Capital
Plan. Approved with cost and revenue updates in the 2018-2022 capital plan. Accelerated with cost and revenue updates in
the 2019-2023 capital plan. Approved to accept a donation through ordinance (173-96) during 2019.
488
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
University of Wisconsin Waukesha Site
Infrastructure Improvements
Project #:
201703
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Concrete/Repaving
Phase:
Design/Construction
Sponsor:
Parks and Land Use
Budget Action:
As Planned
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2017 2018 2019 2020 Total
Project
Project Phase
Design/Constr
Design/Constr
Design/Constr
Design/Constr
Expenditure Budget $182,400 $558,000 $0 $491,000 $1,231,400
Revenue Budget $0
$0 $0 $0 $0
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $182,400 $558,000 $0 $491,000 $1,231,400
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Design/Engineering $171,000
Construction $902,000
Contingency $158,400
Total Project Cost $1,231,400 Total Revenue $0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$1,231,400
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
Waukesha County owns the land and buildings, which serve as the University of Wisconsin - Waukesha campus.
Waukesha County and the Regents of the University of Wisconsin entered into a Partnership Agreement on June 11,
1965 and later amended on July 1, 1970 and January 1, 2000 to detail county and University responsibilities related to
the property. The Partnership Agreement details County responsibilities for maintenance items such as infrastructure,
HVAC, plumbing, sidewalks, parking lots, and landscaping. The Partnership Agreement terminates on June 30, 2040.
This project will repair and replace existing deteriorating concrete walks, terraces, stairways, asphalt parking lots, and
update the conditions for ADA code compliance, safety, stormwater management, and improved ease of maintenance
and campus function. All concrete projects will include erosion and sediment control, site preparation, drainage
improvements, excavation, demolition, pavement installation, and vegetative restoration. The project also includes
consideration for reducing or eliminating concrete to save future operations and maintenance costs. Third year (2019)
project funding was brought forward into 2018 to help balance overall capital plan spending between those two years.
No appropriation is needed in 2019 because it is expected that funds from 2018 will be available for that two-year period.
Location: The UWW campus is located on University Drive, south of Northview Road, and north of Summit Avenue in
the City of Waukesha.
Analysis of Need
In 2015, an assessment of need and condition evaluation report was completed to review the existing conditions, identify
improvements, and prioritize concrete walk, terrace, and stairway segments for improvements. Priority segments are
identified as areas that have failed or are in poor condition.
Alternatives
1. Continue to repair failed or poor condition areas as a series of small projects.
2. Repair and replace site infrastructure over a shorter or longer period of time.
Ongoing Operating Costs
The proposed projects will help to reduce on-going operating costs for UWW involving maintenance, walk closures and
potential risk areas. Reduction of total concrete square footage on campus will help to reduce future concrete
replacement costs for the county.
Previous Action: Approved as a new project in the 2017-2021 capital plan. Accelerated in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan.
489
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Menomonee Park Dog Exercise Area
Project #:
202002
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Facility Expansion
Phase:
One-Year Project
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
New
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Total
Design/Engineering Project
Project Phase
& Const.
Expenditure Budget
$500,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$500,000
Revenue Budget
$500,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$500,000
Net Costs After Revenues Applied
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Design/Engineering
$15,000
Village of Sussex Contribution
$125,000
Construction
$435,000
Village of Menomonee Falls Contribution
$125,000
Contingency
$50,000
Tarmann Fund Balance
$250,000
Total Project Cost
$500,000
Total Revenue
$500,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$500,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$500,000
Project Scope & Description
Waukesha County is partnering with the Villages of Sussex and Menomonee Falls to develop a regional dog exercise area (DEA) in
Menomonee Park. Similar to other dog exercise areas in other Waukesha County parks, the municipalities proposed to make an up-front
contribution to construct the facility with Waukesha County collecting revenue and being responsible for maintenance. An existing open
space area of the park provides an opportunity to implement a sizable facility that serves the residents of the northeast section of the
County. The design incorporates some of the existing park infrastructure, including parking, restrooms and a water source, while
separating the facility from other popular use areas in the park. The scope of the project would include two separate areas, each with
multiple entrances to allow for seasonal closure of sections of the facility for turf maintenance and regeneration.
An existing covered picnic shelter with modern restrooms will be incorporated into the space to create the opportunity for rental for dog-
related special events, which is a request that has become popular with patrons at Waukesha County’s other DEA’s. The fencing layout
will be designed to accommodate the closure of small areas for rental events.
Due to the very shallow depth to bedrock in Menomonee Park, a unique buck and rail fencing system is proposed for the perimeter of the
facility. This is a popular ranching fence style that is commonly used on large properties in the western United States. The design rests
on grade and eliminates the need for costly drilling into bedrock for fence posts. Fence sections can also be moved around with heavy
equipment if adjustments or closures are needed. The fence design will be modified slightly with the addition of the woven wire fencing,
which is used as a standard fence element to contain the dogs at all of Waukesha County’s DEA’s. The addition of a new parking lot will
supplement the two existing parking lots that will now be used for the DEA users. Since this is a one-year project, funds for construction
will not be spent until a standing committee of the County Board approves the project bid process.
Locations
Menomonee Park, W220 N7884 Town Line Rd, Menomonee Falls, WI 53051
Analysis of Need
Residents of Sussex and Menomonee Falls have expressed considerable interest in the development of a dog exercise area in the
northeast corner of the county. Both Sussex and Menomonee Falls had been considering development of their own smaller facilities,
and the partnership will allow for the implementation of a larger facility that better meets the needs of residents. Small dog exercise areas
are often over used, making maintenance of adequate turf coverage difficult.
Alternatives
1. Do nothing.
2. Allow either the Village of Menomonee Falls or the Village of Sussex to create a dog exercise area.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Ongoing maintenance, including turf mowing, emptying trash receptacles, and snow plowing will be performed by existing Menomonee
Park staff. Costs will be offset by increased sales of park entrance stickers, which will be required for residents to use the facility.
Previous Action
None
490
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Retzer Adventure Trail Renovation
Project #:
202003
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Renovation/Upgrade
Phase:
One-Year Project
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
New Choose an item. Choose an item.
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Total
Design/ Engineering Project
Project Phase
& Const.
Expenditure Budget $209,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $209,000
Revenue Budget $185,000
$0 $0 $0 $0 $185,000
Net Costs After Revenues Applied $24,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $24,000
COST DOCUMENTATION REVENUE
Design/ Engineering $20,000 Donation - Waukesha Rotary $45,000
Construction $170,000 CDGB Grant $71,000
Contingency $19,000 Donation - Friends of Retzer $45,000
State DNR Grant $24,000
Total Project Cost $209,000 Total Revenue $185,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$209,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$185,000
Project Scope & Description
This project will improve an existing 810 foot accessible trail, which was originally constructed in 1993 within the 483-acre Retzer Nature
Center. The deteriorated existing trail will be reconstructed, ensuring full ADA accessibility and access to persons of all abilities. Features
and plantings along the trail will be designed to provide an extension of the educational programming that is offered at Retzer. Some of
the features will include an interactive sensory station, climbing logs, a rain garden, and a habitat play area. A new asphalt addition to
the ADA-accessible trail will also be constructed to connect the original trail footprint to a new ADA-accessible boardwalk. This will
increase ADA access by an additional approximately 400 feet, and it will connect to a 600-foot long boardwalk that is under construction
as a component of another ADA enhancement project.
The project goal is to provide barrier-free access to both nature and outdoor education elements/programs; therefore, the project will be
designed with input from local applicable experts and educators, to include teachers from area school districts who participate in
programming at Retzer, and occupational therapists. This will ensure inclusion and access for all adults, students, and children with
physical or mental impairments that substantially limit a major life activity. Project funding includes anticipated donation revenues from
the Waukesha Rotary ($45,000) and the Friends of Retzer Nature Center group ($45,000). The project is also funded with a Community
Development Block Grant intended to help improve ADA accessibility, and a State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Stewardship Grant. Since this is a one-year project, funds for construction will not be spent until a standing committee of the County
Board approves the project bid process.
Locations
Retzer Nature Center, S14 W28167 Madison St, Waukesha, WI 53188
Analysis of Need
There is a need for improved access to nature and outdoor educational programs at Retzer Nature Center for persons of all abilities.
Currently, approximately 20,000-plus residents visit Retzer annually, and it is anticipated that the number will grow in quantity and diversity
due to this project.
The accessible trail will be designed and constructed to provide access to nature and educational signage and interactive exhibits at
Retzer Nature Center. The 810-foot trail will be 8-feet wide, barrier-free asphalt with maximum 5% slopes to comply with ADA
requirements. The original trail, which was constructed in 1993, was a concept that was leading the way in providing universal access to
nature education. Since constructed, it has served park visitors of all abilities for nearly 30 years but is now in need of renovation. The
original portion of the trail is in need of complete reconstruction and drainage improvements to reduce water and ice issues. New to the
project is the proposed addition of a paved trail that will extend universal access to a new accessible boardwalk, furthering the opportunity
for those with disabilities to access nature, and extending access to educational programs at Retzer Nature Center.
Alternatives
1. Remove the trail and restore the area to natural vegetation.
2. Repair and repave the trail only.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Ongoing maintenance, including plant care, invasive species removal, and snow removal will be performed by existing Retzer staff as a
component of the care for the Retzer Nature Center grounds. Maintenance of the asphalt trail will be added to the pavement management
capital project schedule. Any additional prep work to maintain the new interactive nature education elements for programming will be
conducted by the existing staff at Retzer.
Previous Action: None
491
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Minooka Park Mountain Bike Infrastructure
Improvements
Project #:
202005
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Renovation/Upgrade
Phase:
Design/Construction
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
New Choose an item. Choose an item.
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Total
Design/Engineering & Const. Project
Project Phase
Const. Phase 1
Phase 2
Expenditure Budget
$484,300
$273,000
$0
$0
$0
$757,300
Revenue Budget
$484,300
$273,000
$0
$0
$0
$757,300
Net Costs After Revenues Applied
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
2020 Design/Engineering
$58,000
2020
Metro Mountain Bikers, Inc.
$484,300
2020 Construction Phase 1
$388,300
2021
Metro Mountain Bikers, Inc.
$273,000
2020 Contingency
$38,000
2021 Construction Phase 2
$248,000
2021 Contingency
$25,000
Total Project Cost
$757,300
Total Revenue
$757,300
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$757,300
REVENUE BUDGET
$757,300
Project Scope & Description
The Metro Mountain Bikers, Inc. (MMB) have partnered with Waukesha County to build and maintain the mountain bike trails in the
previously undeveloped south end of the Minooka Park. To date, four miles of trails have been developed. The bike trailhead is currently
located near an existing parking lot that is shared with adjacent picnic shelter #5. Due to the success of the mountain bike trails, a shortage
of parking can occur when there is heavy use of the trails and also a rental event at the picnic shelter. The parking area is also sometimes
used by users of the nearby hiking trails and equestrian trails, which escalates the shortage. Because of the quality of the mountain bike
trails, and the picturesque natural setting, Minooka Park has become a regional destination for mountain bike riders. Subsequently, MMB
has requested to expand the trails and add feature areas (segments of built structures for different skill level training and experiences) to
meet the growing demand for enhanced riding opportunities. To properly plan for new features and additions to the mountain bike trails,
the parking issue must be addressed. The department created a design that will add enough parking to accommodate all of the user
groups in the south end of the park, and MMB has pledged to raise the funds to construct the parking and the new features. Department
management will enter into a revised agreement with MMB that specifies that the project going forward is contingent upon receipt of MMB
contributions. Since the design and construction phases will both occur in the first year, funds for construction will not be spent until a
standing committee of the County Board approves the project bid process
Phase 1 would include: Construction of the new parking lot to eliminate user conflict by separating picnic area parking from trailhead
uses, connecting concrete sidewalks to existing restrooms and the new trailhead, fencing to separate bike trails from the parking lot, a
stormwater infiltration area, landscaping, bike racks, and other site amenities/signage.
Phase 2 will include: Expanded trails with bike skills features and additional signage/gates, which are anticipated to bring an increase in
use by skills riders.
Locations: Minooka Park 1927 E Sunset Dr, Waukesha, WI 53189
Analysis of Need
The current parking condition requires shared use of the existing undersized parking lot by mountain bikers and Picnic Area 5 renters,
along with hikers and equestrian trail users. The increasing popularity of the mountain bike trails continues to increase the need for more
parking. The MMB request for expansion of the trails and feature areas is not possible without first expanding the parking and reorganizing
the trailhead for the bikers, hikers, and equestrian trail users.
Alternatives
1. Continue to use the existing parking lot and limit the number of events that can happen at the same time.
2. Create a second entrance into Minooka Park or extend the existing road further into the park, to create a new mountain bike
trailhead and parking area, separate from other park uses and not leverage existing amenities.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Ongoing maintenance, including snow/ice clearing in the winter and assisting MMB with brush/tree removal on the trails, will be performed
by existing Minooka Park staff. Minor maintenance of the mountain bike trails, and the new trail features, will be performed by MMB
volunteers under the existing agreement that is in place with Waukesha County. Future maintenance of the parking lot asphalt will be
included in Waukesha County’s ongoing pavement management capital plan. It is anticipated that any increase in operating costs will
be more than offset by an increase in park entrance fees from new users of the facility.
Previous Action: None
492
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Expo Arena Furnace/Mechanical Systems
Project #:
202006
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Mechanicals/Bldg Systems
Phase:
Preliminary Design
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
New Choose an item. Choose an item.
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Total
Project Phase Design Construction
Project
Expenditure Budget
$92,500
$1,305,000
$0
$0
$0
$1,397,500
Revenue Budget
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
Net Costs After Revenues Applied
$92,500
$1,305,000
$0
$0
$0
$1,397,500
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Design/Engineering
$92,500
Construction
$1,135,000
Contingency
$170,000
Total Project Cost
$1,397,500
Total Revenue
$0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$1,397,500
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
The Waukesha County Exposition Center Arena Building, built in 1972, is a unique oval building with approximately 21,000 square feet
of year-round heated and air-conditioned meeting and exhibit space. It features a domed roof, a stage, three meeting rooms, a kitchen,
two balconies, staff offices, and a box office. The primary heating and cooling system is original to the building. Now at 47 years of
service life, replacement parts are no longer available and, when needed, are custom fabricated. This project will replace the existing
estimated 80% efficient heating and air conditioning equipment that serves the main Arena area with a new automated energy efficient
system. The new 95% efficient system will implement a hot water boiler plant and two (2) hot water/DX indoor air handling units for heating
of the main Arena space, and four (4) roof-mounted air-cooled condensing units mounted on the roof for air conditioning of the space.
Heating and cooling of each of the three (3) meeting rooms is currently accomplished with an individual gas-fired furnace in each room,
and an individual exterior air-cooled condensing unit. These furnaces would be eliminated, and hot water blower coils that are attached
to the main system will provide efficient heat for the meeting rooms, and more efficient air-cooled condensing units will be installed for air
conditioning. Ancillary spaces such as vestibules and bathrooms are currently heated by original electric wall heaters. These spaces
will also be heated by hot water cabinet heaters that are tied to the main system. To maximize efficiency and temperature control, the
hot water boiler plant will use a variable primary pumping system to allow for modulation of the boiler and pumps; each air handling unit
will be controlled as single zone variable air volume; and each condensing unit will contain multiple modulating scroll compressors.
Locations: Waukesha County Exposition Center, 1000 Northview Road, Waukesha, WI 53188
Analysis of Need: The Arena is served by two systems, and each consists of a Tjernlund (obsolete product, out-of-business
manufacturer) gas-fired heater section and an associated blower section with DX refrigerant cooling coil, with two (2) 30-ton remote
condensing units and a centrifugal type return fan. The existing duct systems are run in an inefficient manner, dropping down through the
mezzanine floor and then back up into the mezzanine in order to accommodate the undersized equipment rooms. There is currently
inadequate access space to remove the existing components in case of failure. The gas fired heater section, blower section, and return
fan are also from the original installation of 1972. The gas heater section was 80% efficient when new. The original condensing units
were replaced with new units built in 1986. As noted in the 2007 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning
Engineers (ASHRAE) Handbook of Applications, the median service life of the fan/air handling unit and air cooled condensing units is 20
years. Although not directly identified, the expected service life of the gas heating section is most likely 20-25 years. This indicates that
all of the units are well beyond their useful life span.
Alternatives
1. Install a gas-fired horizontal discharge packaged furnace unit mounted on grade. This approach will require ductwork external
to the building, and modifications to the existing parking lot to accommodate construction of an equipment enclosure on the west
side of the Arena Building. While a slightly cheaper system, cost savings are nullified by the needed structural modifications
and reduced energy efficiency and temperature control flexibility.
2. Continue to operate the existing Expo Arena furnace and mechanical systems. This alternative continues to use custom
fabricated replacement parts. In the event of a failure, a temporary heating/cooling system could be connected to the existing
ductwork in the building for an estimated cost of $10,000+ per day.
Ongoing Operating Costs: The proposed project will reduce annual energy costs to operate the Expo heating and cooling systems, by
an estimated 15-20% per year, an estimated $6,000 per year. Staff time to maintain the equipment will also be significantly reduced, as
will costs associated with sourcing and manufacturing custom parts that are required to repair the existing equipment.
Previous Action: None
493
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Joint MRF Fire Suppression System
Project #:
202008
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Mechanicals/Bldg Systems
Phase:
Construction
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
New
Choose an item. Choose an item.
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Total
Project
Project Phase
Plan/Design &
Construction
Expenditure Budget
$247,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$247,000
Revenue Budget
$247,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$247,000
Net Costs After Revenues Applied
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Plan, Design & Engineering
$17,300
County Share - MRF Fund Balance
$247,000
Construction
$440,000
City of Milwaukee Share
$247,000
Contingency
$36,700
Total Project Cost
$494,000
Total Revenue
$494,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$247,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$247,000
Project Scope & Description
The Joint Waukesha County/City of Milwaukee Materials Recovery Facility (Joint MRF) is a publically owned and privately operated
facility that processes 70,000 tons of household recyclables annually, or over 300 tons per day. There is a risk of fire while the material
is temporarily stored on the tip floor, and a more significant risk while the material is actively being processed, due to non-recyclable items
people place in their recycling carts (also known as residue). Major fire risks include propane tanks and lithium ion batteries that can
spontaneously start on fire, and cords that can wrap around equipment and cause a friction fire. While rigorous education plans have
been implemented to reduce these types of hazards since the Joint MRF began operation in 2015, significant fire risks remain.
The current fire suppression system was installed in accordance with state building codes when the Joint MRF was constructed in 2014.
Due to the ceiling height of the Joint MRF, the heat from small fires does not trigger the current sprinkler system. Even if the sprinkler
system was engaged, it is not likely to be effective for these types of fires due to its limited water flow rates. Fires can spread quickly at
a MRF due to the large volume of fuel material present at any given time. Since the Joint MRF began operation, there have been 15
documented fires, many requiring emergency response from the fire department, and none setting off the current fire suppression system.
Working in collaboration with the City of Milwaukee and firefighting professionals, a consultant engineering firm has prepared a preliminary
design for a system that would allow employee intervention beyond using hand held fire extinguishers. If necessary, employees would
have the ability to override the current fire suppression system and deluge a specific area of the facility with water from a safe distance.
The system will utilize existing City water service to the building to provide a continuous deluge at much higher flow rates than the current
fire suppression system. The spigots for water will also be interwoven in some more critical pieces of equipment to ensure a large amount
of water is quickly and safely delivered to the area of concern. Based on the approved intergovernmental agreement between the City
and the County, all facility improvement costs such as this are split 50/50. The $247,000 project budget represents the County’s share.
Locations: Joint Waukesha County/City of Milwaukee Materials Recovery Facility, 1401 W Mount Vernon Ave., Milwaukee WI 53233
Analysis of Need
Documented average of 100 propane tanks/day
15 documented fires and explosions since facility’s opening with 0 of the fires triggering the existing fire suppression system.
The MRF collects 300 tons of recyclables per day. If the facility cannot accept material for more than a day due to fire a costly
contingency plan is enacted to divert material to other processing facilities.
This system will allow Joint MRF staff to more effectively and safely respond to fire incidents by being able to respond from a
safer distance with a constant supply of water negating the need for emergency response or temper the growth of the fire while
emergency personnel are en route.
Due to current operations schedule, there are personnel on site to enact the system a majority of the time (20 hours/day for 5
days/week, 10 hours/day for 1 day/week).
Alternatives
1. Continue to monitor for fires and explosions with the current response protocol.
2. Install a proprietary remote controlled fire suppression system that requires over $230,000 capital cost in addition to $3,400 in
monthly monitoring fees and considerable ongoing operating costs, such as recharging the system after each use.
Ongoing Operating Costs: The ongoing preventative maintenance will be completed by the private contractor operating the Joint MRF,
as is done with the current fire suppression system. If significant repairs were required, the Equipment Repair and Replacement Fund
may be used to cover the costs, which is jointly funded by the County, the City, and the Operator by a fee of $10/ton processed.
Previous Action: None
494
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Pavement Management Plan 2018-2022
Project #:
201406
Department:
Parks & Land Use
Project Type:
Repaving
Phase:
Program Project
Sponsor:
Budget Action:
As Planned
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Dale Shaver, PLU Director
Date:
November 22, 2019
CAPIT AL BU D GET SU MMARY
Year 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 Total
Program Project Project
Expenditure Budget $950,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $800,000 $4,750,000
Revenue Budget $150,000
$450,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $1,200,000
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $800,000 $750,000 $800,000 $600,000 $600,000 $3,550,000
COST DOCUMENTATION REVENUE
Tarmann Landfill Comm. Develop.
Fund Balance
Siting Revenue Block Grant Total
2018 $950,000 2018 $50,000 $100,000 $0 $150,000
2019 $1,200,000 2019 $50,000 $200,000 $200,000 $450,000
2020 $1,000,000 2020 $0 $200,000 $0 $200,000
2021 $800,000 2021 $0 $200,000 $0 $200,000
2022 $800,000
2022 $0 $200,000 $0 $200,000
Total Project Cost $4,750,000 Total Revenue $100,000 $900,000 $200,000 $1,200,000
EXPENDITURE BUDGET $4,750,000 REVENUE BUDGET $1,200,000
Project Scope & Description
In cooperation with the Public Works Department, the Department of Parks and Land Use retains consultant services to update the
Pavement Management Plan. The plan establishes a uniform procedure for pavement maintenance by establishing a Pavement
Condition Index (PCI). The PCI is a rated scale of 1-100 based on the state of the asphalt. Pavement repairs are scheduled based
on rating. A PCI rating over 70 is satisfactory, and pavement ratings improve up to a scale maximum of 100. The goal is to maintain
an average pavement PCI rating of 70 (“satisfactory”) or better. The focus of the Pavement Management Plan for 2020 will be
prioritizing Park System and Government Center projects based on PCI rating, safety, and access issues. The focus in 2021-22
will return to the next phase of pavement improvements at the Expo Center, working toward completion of the work that was initiated
at the Expo Center in 2018 and 2019.
In 2020, the major projects include the Communications Center back parking lot, the Retzer Nature Center entry road, the Mental
Health Center north parking lot, and the Menomonee Park family campground road.
Location
The Waukesha County Department of Parks and Land Use is responsible for the pavement management of the Government Center
Complex, Expo, Parks, Ice Arenas, Golf Courses, Boat Launches, Trails and various other Waukesha County Facilities. The
Department maintains 21 miles of road, 40 miles of paved trails, and 421,000 square yards of parking area.
Analysis of Need: In 1995 the Waukesha County Department of Parks and Land Use (PLU) retained consulting services to provide
a Pavement Management Plan to assist in cost-effectively managing the pavement assets for the 6 largest parks. At that time there
were six park facilities with 243,000 square yards of paved surface. Currently PLU maintains over 875,000 square yards of paved
surface around the Government Center, remote County facilities and the major parks. This represents approximately 3.6 times as
much pavement to maintain. The department uses a PAVER rating system in an effort to coordinate pavement condition analysis
and project bidding with the Department of Public Works to save program cost. The PAVER rating process includes field surveys of
pavement conditions, development of deterioration models, and preparation of a multi-year pavement management plan.
Approximately 80% of the budget will be used for major rehabilitation on sections selected with a PCI below 40. The remaining
budget allocation is first utilized for preventative maintenance on sections with a PCI between 67 and 75, selected on best-first
basis; concrete replacement; and consulting. The goal of these practices is to maintain an average PCI of 70. Anticipated projects
may be adjusted due to project coordination efficiencies or accelerated deterioration.
Alternatives
Spot repair with asphalt base patching or sealing road surface has been performed to maintain some function of the roadway or
parking area. This could be continued on an annual basis, but will not achieve the desired surface performance or overall PCI rating
goal. Reconstruction will be required sooner and risk issues would be more likely to occur.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Maintenance of the existing road conditions requires frequent patching and seal applications in order to provide usable conditions
and extend pavement life. Operating costs within the next five years will be minimal with the proposed pavement improvements.
Previous Action: Pavement management prior to 2018 was covered in project 200824. Approved as a new project in 2014-2018
plan. Approved with cost update in the 2015-2019 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2016-2020 capital plan. Approved with
a cost update in the 2017-2021 capital plan. Approved with a cost and revenue update in the 2018-2022 and 2019-2023 capital
plans.
495
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Security System Recording & Display Equipment
Replacement
Project #:
201615
Department:
Sheriff's Department
Project Type:
Equipment Replacement
Phase:
Implementation
Sponsor:
Sheriff’s Department
Budget Action:
C - $ Update
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Donn Hoffmann/John Gorski, IT
Date:
November 22, 2019
Year 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020
Total
Project Phase Design/Analysis Design Implementation Project
Expenditure Budget $55,000 $0 $0 $755,000 $496,000 $1,306,000
Revenue Budget $55,000
$0 $0 $755,000 $496,000 $1,306,000
Net Cost After Revenues Applied $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
COS T D OCU MEN T AT ION RE VEN U E
Hardware & Installation $793,000
Licenses $119,000 Jail Assessment Fund Balance Reserves $1,306,000
Upgrade Jail Door Technology $80,000
2019 Specifications Consultant $75,000
2016 Consultant Studies $39,000
Contingency $200,000
Total Project Cost $1,306,000 Total Revenue $1,306,000
EXPEN D IT U R E BU D GET
$1,306,000
REV EN U E BU D GET
$1,306,000
CAPIT AL BU D GET SU MMAR Y
Project Scope & Description
The Waukesha County Jail has a security electronics system that includes:
Approximately 320 analog cameras which, send camera images through coaxial cable to master control and other
staff monitoring stations.
20 DVRs (digital video recorders) that record and store camera images for approximately 30 days so that staff can
access video following an event.
1 virtual matrix which connects all of these devices so that they can be utilized by staff to monitor the jail.
The security electronics system was installed in 2005 when the jail was constructed. Portions of the system have been
replaced as they have failed including:
the DVR equipment in 2013,
the analog matrix switcher was replaced in 2015 to convert the analog matrix to a virtual matrix, and
analog camera replacements which are funded through the jail equipment replacement plan.
The project scope was modified during 2019 through an ordinance (174-015) to allocate existing project funding for the
following items in 2019: $75,000 for additional consulting services to develop detailed system specifications to allow for a
competitive purchasing process, and $80,000 for an upgrade of the security electronics system that is used to control jail
doors, due to that system being de-supported at the end of 2019.
This project includes a cost update. The basis for the original project cost estimate was a 2016 assessment performed by
Aventura, a video surveillance solutions provider. After conducting multiple site visits at other county jails and researching
costs associated with similar, recent projects in Wisconsin, the Aventura assessment appears to have underestimated the
costs in three key areas: hardware, cable installation, and licensing. The revised estimate provides additional funding for
these key areas of concern and reflects the best cost information available to date. As the part of this project, an expert
video consultant will be hired during 2019 to provide, as a contract deliverable, a more detailed and accurate estimate along
with system specifications.
The system is utilized 24 hours a day and is a vital component of the jail’s safety and security monitoring ability. It is clear
the system has a defined life span, so the Sheriff’s Department is requesting that the system be replaced prior to failure.
The Sheriff’s Department is requesting to replace the current security electronics system with a digital security electronics
system. This is a change in scope from the originally proposed DVR recording replacement project due to the
recommendation from a study completed in 2016 from a security electronics consultant. The Sheriff’s Department hired a
consultant to review the existing security electronics system and recommend a process to replace the existing analog
system with a digital system. The goals of the study included but are not limited to: ability to safely and securely monitor
jail activities; ability to record up to 30 days of video; the installation of a system that would be supported for a minimum of
seven years; and the ability of nonprofessional IT staff to perform the day-to-day administrative functions on the system.
496
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
Security System Recording & Display Equipment
Replacement
Project #:
201615
Department:
Sheriff's Department
Project Type:
Equipment Replacement
Phase:
Implementation
Sponsor:
Sheriff’s Department
Budget Action:
C - $ Update
Choose an item.
Choose an item.
Manager:
Donn Hoffmann/John Gorski, IT
Date:
November 22, 2019
The consultant reviewed the replacement of the system in a “piecemeal” approach as well as a complete “rip and replace”
of the current analog system with a fully digital system. Based on the goals of the study and the need for a fully operational
security system 24-hours a day, the consultant recommended the complete replacement of the analog security electronics
system with digital system, which was the basis for the scope and cost update of this project in the 2018-2022 capital plan.
The cost estimate provided by the consultant included the re-cabling of the jail from coaxial cable to Cat5/Cat6 cable, the
replacement of the analog cameras with digital cameras, the replacement of the DVR equipment which record video with a
server based recording system, software licenses for management of the security system, backup power supply,
replacement work stations, and built in system redundancy for device failures.
While the upfront costs of the upgrade would be higher, the consultant noted that it would be less challenging to manage a
fully digital system than a hybrid system. The consultant further noted that the higher upfront costs would result in lower
long-term costs, easy system expandability with minimal cost, a system that supports future technology, superior camera
quality, and a more secure video system.
This project also included funding in 2016 to complete a study to review available alternatives for the replacement of the
current video visitation system. Following the study, video visitation replacement is funded in a separate capital project
(#201702).
Location
Waukesha County Jail
Analysis of Need
The security electronics system is vital to the daily operations of the jail. Without the security electronics system, additional
staff would be required to monitor movement into, out of, and throughout the jail in order to ensure that only authorized
individuals are in the facility. This would result in significant additional personnel costs to provide necessary levels of
operational and facility security.
Alternatives
The security electronics system is critical to the operation of the jail. As previously noted there are over 320 cameras in
the jail to monitor doors, elevators, halls, pods, medical services, kitchen, laundry, program areas, etc.
Maintain the Existing Analog Cameras and Use Hybrid DVRs. This option was analyzed by the security electronics
consultant as an option but was not their recommendation. This option involves the replacement of the recording equipment
and associated management hardware while leaving the existing cameras in place and only replacing those cameras when
necessary. The upfront cost of this option is less expensive at $344,500. However, the option involves utilizing the legacy
cabling and infrastructure which the consultant noted would become more difficult to manage and maintain as the system
continues to age. The legacy system also has limited expansion ability and relies on technology that is outdated and may
become unsupported. This option also lacks in security, scalability, and overall system management.
Utilize overtime to monitor the building. The camera system is so vital to the daily operation of the jail that when portions
of the system are down, additional staff are brought in on overtime to provide the monitoring ability that the cameras provide
until the system is operational. Monitoring using personnel is extremely cost prohibitive. A correctional officer currently
costs about $50 per hour of overtime on average (including WRS and Social Security) so the money budgeted for this
project would purchase about 26,000 hours of overtime.
Ongoing Operating Costs
The on-going costs of the security electronics system will be dependent on the system selected and the maintenance
support required by the vendor. The current estimate for ongoing cost is approximately $75,000 per year.
Previous Action
Approved as a new project in the 2016-2020 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2017-2021 capital plan. Approved
with a scope and cost update in the 2018-2022 capital plan. Approved as planned in the 2019-2023 capital plan. Approved
with a change in scope through an ordinance (174-015) in 2019.
497
Return to Table of Contents
Project Title:
HHS Electronic Medical Record Module Improvements
Project #:
202014
Department:
DOA - Information Technology
Project Type:
Information Technology
Phase:
Implementation
Sponsor:
Health & Human Services
Budget Action:
New Choose an item. Choose an item.
Manager:
Donn Hoffmann, IT
Date:
November 22, 2019
Dept Mgr
Randy Setzer, HHS
CAPITAL BUDGET SUMMARY
Year
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Total
Project Phase
Design/
Project
Implementation
Expenditure Budget
$330,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$330,000
Revenue Budget
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
Net Costs After Revenues Applied
$330,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
$330,000
COST DOCUMENTATION
REVENUE
Clinical Services
Public Health
Module
Module
Total
Concept/Design
$50,000
$50,000
Vendor Implementation
$103,000
$103,000
Software
$70,000
$70,000
Interfaces/Customization
$50,000
$50,000
Equipment
$10,000
$10,000
Contingency
$47,000
$47,000
$0
Total Project Cost
$280,000
$50,000
$330,000
Total Revenue
$0
EXPENDITURE BUDGET
$330,000
REVENUE BUDGET
$0
Project Scope & Description
The Health and Human Services Department uses an electronic health record system, that includes several modules among HHS
Divisions. This capital project is intended to: (1) Implement a new software solution in the Clinical Services division to improve the
tracking, management, and documentation of health claims across third-party care providers, and (2) Replace the current Public Health
module (Insight) which is being de-supported (discussed below).
HHS management has been reviewing options for the Clinical Services module in 2019, and the 2020 project budget includes funding to
implement the new Clinical Services module. Replacement of the Public Health module will require more research from HHS and the
Department of Administration – IT Division to investigate system costs and help ensure functionality needs are met, and the 2020 budget
includes funds to study the replacement. Additional funds will likely be requested in 2021 for the implementation phase of the new Public
Health module.
Locations
Department of Health and Human Services
Analysis of Need
The Clinical Services Division relies on multiple contracted third-party entities to provide care to clients. Currently, the billing process is
very manual and time consuming, requiring HHS staff to document and correct billing submissions from the third-party entities.
Department management indicates that it is frequently six months behind in reviews and billing. An electronic solution would allow HHS
to enhance and streamline the process. System functionality may include the ability to aggregate clinical data to provide a broad picture
of the population levels, facilitate care coordination across providers, track clinical quality control measures and outcomes, and manage
authorizations and claims across providers.
The current Public Health module was built upon a Microsoft SQL 2007 server, which is being de-supported. There is a three-year
extended support period that ends by June 2022. After that, there will be no additional security updates, which would put the system at
risk.
Alternatives
HHS will explore multiple software solutions to find a cost-effective solution that meet the Clinical Services and Public Health divisions’
functionality needs.
Ongoing Operating Costs
Department management currently estimate that the ongoing cost for the Clinical Services Division module at about $70,000. However,
streamlining the billing process is expected to save staff time that is currently devoted to documenting and correcting supporting data.
The ongoing costs for the Public Health module are less certain, and will be determined as HHS investigates software solutions in 2020.
Previous Action
The current electronic health records systems were implemented as part of the HHS Automated System capital project (#200109).
498
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects
Plan
499
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Plan Summary
Narrative
Each year, the County Executive submits a capital budget and an updated five-year Capital Plan to the County
Board. After review and modification, the County Board adopts the plan by resolution. The plan represents the
prioritization of long-range capital infrastructure needs linked to the county’s strategic plan.
Justice and Public Safety projects total $50.7 million or 49% of the plan. This includes $16.3 million to continue the
first phase of a two-phase project to upgrade the courthouse to meet the county’s future needs. This phase will
include the construction of a new secure courtroom facility. The second phase of this project begins in the 2nd year
of the plan with $34 million in 2021-2024 for design and to begin renovation of the existing courthouse. Construction
for the second phase is expected to continue into 2026 and is estimated to cost $58.6 million in total.
The Health and Human Services functional area includes $330,000 to make improve/replace components of its
electronic medical record system.
Public Works–Highway projects are about 39% of the plan at $40.0 million. However, many of the projects are
managed by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, who account for a majority of project costs using federal
funds (typically paying 80% to 90% of most costs), and billing the county for its remaining share. As a result, the
capital plan reflects only the county’s net share on much larger transportation investments. Factoring in total
transportation costs, including approximately $45 million of federal funds, highway projects make up about
57% (almost $85 million in total) of the five-year capital plan.
The Parks and Land Use functional area includes $10.0 million or about 10% of the plan, of which $7.4 million is for
trails and parks pavement improvements. Trail project costs are mostly partially funded with federal, state,
municipal, and private donation revenues.
Public Works–Facilities/Other projects total $900,000 or about 1% of the plan. The major building project in the five-
year capital plan is the two-phase project to upgrade the county courthouse (discussed above under the Justice and
Public Safety functional area). The plan includes $900,000 as part of a $1.5 million project to upgrade fuel tank
systems and replace tanks as needed (project began in 2018, and continues until 2024).
General Administration totals $1,015,000 for financing costs (cost to issue and potential bond discounts) over the
five years.
JUSTICE &
PUBLIC SAFETY
49.3%
HEALTH &
HUMAN
SERVICES - IT
0.3%
PUBLIC WORKS
- HIGHWAY*
38.8%
PARKS & LAND
USE
9.7%
PUBLIC WORKS
- FACILITIES /
OTHER
0.9%
FINANCING
COSTS 1%
FUNCTIONAL AREA FOR TOTAL PLAN 2020-2024
TOTAL % OF
FUNCTIONAL AREA
2020-2024 TOTAL
JUSTICE & PUBLIC SAFETY $50,746,000 49.3%
HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES - IT $330,000 0.3%
PUBLIC WORKS - HIGHWAY* $39,960,700 38.8% *
PARKS & LAND USE $10,041,800 9.7%
PUBLIC WORKS - FACILITIES / OTHER $900,000 0.9%
FINANCING COSTS
$1,015,000 1.0%
TOTAL PLAN EXPENDITURES $102,993,500 100.0%
*Factoring in total transportation costs, including approximately $45 million of
federal funds, highway projects make about 57% of the five-year capital plan.
500
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Plan Summary
Narrative
WAUKESHA COUNTY 2020-2024 CAPITAL PROJECT PLAN SUMMARY
FUNCTIONAL AREA:
2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 TOTAL FIVE-
BUDGET PLAN PLAN PLAN PLAN YEAR PLAN
JUSTICE & PUBLIC SAFETY
Facility Projects
$13,700,000 $3,800,000 $8,000,000 $12,400,000 $12,350,000 $50,250,000
System Projects
$496,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $496,000
Subtotal
$14,196,000 $3,800,000 $8,000,000 $12,400,000 $12,350,000 $50,746,000
HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICE
Facility Projects
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
System Projects
$330,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $330,000
Subtotal
$330,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $330,000
PARKS, ENVIRONMENT, EDUCATION & LAND USE
Parks, Facilities, Pavement, System Projects (a)
$3,023,800 $4,618,000 $800,000 $800,000 $800,000 $10,041,800
PUBLIC WORKS
Priority Coridor Expansion
$4,351,000 $2,300,000 $0 $0 $0 $6,651,000
Intersections and Bridges
$2,424,300 $1,507,400 $1,469,000 $599,000 $1,392,000 $7,391,700
Pavement and Rehabilitation
$3,064,600 $4,969,000 $6,008,400 $7,370,000 $4,506,000 $25,918,000
Subtotal Highways
$9,839,900 $8,776,400 $7,477,400 $7,969,000 $5,898,000 $39,960,700
Facilities
$200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $100,000 $900,000
Airport
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Subtotal Public Works
$10,039,900 $8,976,400 $7,677,400 $8,169,000 $5,998,000 $40,860,700
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION COUNTY WIDE
TECHNOLOGY PROJECTS
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
FINANCING
$205,000 $160,000 $180,000 $220,000 $250,000 $1,015,000
Subtotal
$205,000 $160,000 $180,000 $220,000 $250,000 $1,015,000
TOTAL GROSS EXPENDITURES
$27,794,700 $17,554,400 $16,657,400 $21,589,000 $19,398,000 $102,993,500
Less Proj. Specific Rev./Proprietary Fund Bal.
($2,526,800) ($3,109,000) ($790,000) ($790,000) $0 ($7,215,800)
NET EXPENDITURES
$25,267,900 $14,445,400 $15,867,400 $20,799,000 $19,398,000 $95,777,700
Cash Balances Excluding Property Tax Levy
($4,827,900) ($2,170,000) ($1,900,000) ($2,050,000) ($1,520,000) ($12,467,900)
NET EXPENDITURES BEFORE TAX LEVY, DEBT
BORROWING AND INTEREST APPLIED (b)
$20,440,000 $12,275,400 $13,967,400 $18,749,000 $17,878,000 $83,309,800
(a) Category includes concrete sidewalk, stairway, and parking lot improvements for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee at
Waukesha campus.
(b) Net expenditures will also be funded with personal property aid revenue from the state, which is meant to offset the loss of
property tax levy from the tax exemption of machinery, tools, and patterns (not used in manufacturing). The personal property
aid payment is budgeted at about $744,000 in 2020.
The 2020-2024 Capital Plan identifies 42 projects at an estimated total cost of $103.0 million over the five-year
period. Projects in the first year of the plan represent the 2020 Budget. Major projects for future years are briefly
explained in the following narrative. A project listing all projects in the plan is shown on the following pages.
JUSTICE AND PUBLIC SAFETY
Justice and public safety projects total $50.7 million. This includes the remaining $16.3 million for the first phase of a
two-phase project to modernize and expand the courthouse (constructed in 1959) to meet current and future needs.
The first phase is to construct a new secure courtroom facility to be located adjacent to jail facilities and will feature
improved security, prisoner transport, and public access. Design for this phase began in 2017, with construction
planned for 2019 through 2021. In addition, $34 million is included in 2021-2024 for design and earlier stages of
construction for the second phase, which is expected to continue through 2026 at an estimated total cost of $58.6
million. The second phase will renovate the existing courthouse in order to replace aging mechanical systems,
enhance business operations through a more efficient office layout, and improve public access. The capital plan
modifies the project schedule by extending construction one additional year (into 2026) in order to spread project
costs over more years, helping reduce projected annual borrowing levels and provide greater flexibility in meeting
other future capital improvement needs.
Jail-related projects include $496,000 to complete the replacement of security recording and display equipment.
501
Return to Table of Contents
Capital Projects Plan Summary
Narrative
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
The plan includes $330,000 in 2020 to fund improvements to the Health and Human Services Department’s
electronic medical records system. The project will streamline billing processes between the Clinical Services
Division and third-party service providers, saving staff time and improving the ability of the department to claim
federal funding. The project also includes funding to begin the concept/design phase for replacing the Public Health
Division’s electronic medical record module, which is being de-supported.
PARKS AND LAND USE
Projects in this functional area total $10 million, and includes $4.2 million for maintenance improvements on park
roadways and paved surfaces around county facilities. The plan also includes $2.2 million to build a 3.5-mile trail from
a proposed trail access located on North Avenue, south of Watertown Road in the city of Pewaukee, to a proposed
trailhead near the intersection of River Road and Brookfield Road in the city of Brookfield. This project is the first
phase of a plan to create a north-south connector trail, eventual connecting with Frame Park in the city of Waukesha,
as envisioned in the County Board-adopted Waukesha County Bike/Pedestrian Plan. The county was awarded
federal funding to cover 80% of the costs and share remaining costs with the city of Brookfield. Construction is
planned for 2021. The plan includes $1.4 million to replace the aging furnace and mechanical systems at the Expo
Center’s Arena building, with installation anticipated in 2021.
Other Parks and Land Use projects in the plan include $500,000 to create a dog exercise area at Menomonee Park in
2020, with contributions from the villages of Menomonee Falls and Sussex covering half of project costs. The plan
includes $757,300 to make infrastructure improvements at the Minooka Park mountain bike trail in 2020 and 2021,
including the construction of a new parking lot, expanded trails, and installation of additional trail features. This project
will be funded entirely with private contributions. The last phase of a multi-year project to repair and replace existing
sidewalks, exterior stairways, and parking lots at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee at Waukesha campus is
planned for 2020 with a budget of $491,000. The plan also includes $209,000 in 2020 to make improvements to the
Retzer Nature Center Adventure Trail, which will include reconstructing the existing trail, providing an extension of the
educational programming offered at Retzer, and improving ADA accessibility for all county residents and visitors. This
project is funded mostly with donations and grants. An upgrade of the fire suppression system at the joint Material
Recycling Facility (MRF) in 2020 is included in the plan with the county contributing half of the costs ($247,000), per
an intergovernmental agreement, and the city of Milwaukee will contribute the other half.
PUBLIC WORKS
Public Works projects for highways and facility/other projects are estimated to total $40.9 million. This includes road
projects totaling $40.0 million. New and expanded road capacity construction is identified in priority corridors and
includes about $6.7 million for Waukesha County’s share of project costs to widen about three miles of CTH M (North
Avenue), from Calhoun Road to East County Line (124
th
Street). Project costs are estimated to total $27.5 million,
with federal aid covering $16.1 million,